Week of November 16

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We extend our warmest thanks for the numerous parents and guardians who attended last week’s parent conferences. I was a pleasure to chat about your child’s progress.

Picture re-take day is Monday, November 17.

The government vocabulary quiz will be given on Friday, November 21. Students were given the vocabulary cards last Friday. Students should study these cards to help them understand concepts and skills covered in class.

There will not be classes on Wednesday, November 26 through Sunday, November 30 in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 11 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students offer rhyming words. Can say “Give me 5” to remind students of 5 word limit.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads the nonsense word groups. Student say the onset sound found in each series. Ex. T: zab, zib, zub, S: /z/
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over enunciate the medial sound. Ex. T: rib, S: rIb
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
- Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
- Guided reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
- Writing conferences
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
- Centers:
- Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3-4 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level two-five sight words
b. Students read informational texts about experiments and investigations
c. A.R. on mini-iPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
- Greetings in Vietnamese: “When you say hello, I say Xin chao”
- Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: “The Fox Went Out on a Chilly Night” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Day 1:
Morning meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Monday, November 17, 2014. We will explore different ways to initiate rotational motion.
Inquiry Question: How can spin objects be kept in motion?
Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part One: Nonfiction Readers Read to Become Smarter about Our World and the Things in It
“Today I want to teach you that nonfiction readers train our mind to pick out topic sentences. Nonfiction readers know that text paragraphs have one special sentence within them that tells us the topic of what that entire paragraph is about.”
- Provide and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud
Force And Motion by John Graham

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 3: New Wanderings, New Experiments
Share—Interpreting Scientific Results and Developing Conclusions
Select a partner whose results didn’t match those of the earlier experiment, creating a situation that begs for explanation. Then set that partnership up to share the experiment with the class. Explain to the class that when writing the conclusion page, it is important to ask “why?’ and to speculate about the answers. Channel the whole class to do this work to make sense of the experiment the duo just shared. Tell students that scientists often consult outside sources—other scientists’ experiments, other articles and resources—to help them interpret their own results and write their conclusions. Close class by reminding students that their conclusion pages need to reflect that they have been asking why and developing hypotheses to explain what happen.
Students continue to write about their experiments. They work with an assigned partner to coach each other about their writing.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Tuesday, November 18, 2014. Using the analogue and digital clock, we will practice telling time to the nearest half hour.
Inquiry Question: How are analogue and digital clocks alike? How are they different? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Close Reading: “Breathing Underwater” From Toolkit Texts selected by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis
- Teachers will display the article on the Smart Board
- Teachers will review close reading strategies necessary to answer the following text dependent questions about key ideas:
1. How are humans similar to the animals in the article?
2. How are the animals different? (“I do”, whole class)
Further small group discussion:
What does the author want us to learn as we read the article? Why do you think that? (“We do”, whole class)
- Students will orally read the passage. (“We do”, whole class)
- Teachers will provide individual copies of the passage to the students.
- The students will reread the text dependent questions orally.
- Students will reread with a pencil using the following annotations; question marks, circling important information/ evidence of the answer to the essential question. (“You do”, independent)
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 4: Author Share Scientific Ideas/Conclusions
Minilesson
Connection: Remind students that the previous shared session left them asking why, and channel them to continue speculating explanations for that phenomenon. Coach partners to challenge each other to speak with more clarity. Encourage listeners to try to follow the speakers’ ideas. Accentuate the fact that scientists go through life asking, “Why?” Tell students that this kind of thinking goes into the conclusion of a lab report. Name the question that will guide the inquiry.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Introduce a mentor lab report, and coach writers to research the piece as they read through it, learning how their own writing could go. Scaffold students’ inquiry, collecting their observations on a class anchor chart.
Link: Send students off to revise their lab reports, using all they have learned from the mentor lab report.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, November 19, 2014. We will examine and discuss how an object spins in the air?
Inquiry Question: How can air start an object spinning? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part One: Nonfiction Readers Read to Become Smarter about Our World and the Things in It
“Today I want to remind you of some of the ways that readers can retell our nonfiction texts to our partners. We can retell our texts across our fingers, teaching what we have learned. We can also retell by using special transition words like or, and, however, and but.”
- Provide and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud
Force And Motion “Floating and Sinking” by John Graham

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 4: Author Share Scientific Ideas/Conclusions
Conferring and Small-Group Work—Using Revision Materials and Writing Partnerships to Bring Revision Work to Life
Provide students with an opportunity to talk out their ideas with a partner so that they can practice and grow ideas together. Some students may need additional coaching to talk and get down their ideas. Provide them with prompts such as “Why do you think your hypothesis was correct? One reason is… Another reason is… I think this happens because…”
Students continue to write about their experiments. They work with an assigned partner to coach each other about their writing.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, November 20, 2014. We will discuss how Americans choose their leaders.
Inquiry Question: What are some important characteristics of a good leader? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part One: Nonfiction Readers Read to Become Smarter about Our World and the Things in It
“Today I want to remind you that partners don’t just retell our nonfiction books to each other. We can also ask each other questions to make sure we understand. First, readers teach our partner about what we have learned and then we ask questions like, ‘What does that really mean?’ and ‘Can you give an example of that information?’ ”
- Provide and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud
Force And Motion “Balancing Act” by John Graham

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 5: Scientists Learn from Other Sources as Well as from Experiments
Minilesson
Connection: Channel students to share what they know about what scientists do, then suggest today you will add one more item to their list. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Elevate the idea of learning from a lecture by suggesting this occurs at colleges all the time. Explain that you will give your lecture twice and set students up to take notes.
Active Engagement: Ask students to turn and teach each other what they just learned. Return to your lecture, and this time channel students to listen and take notes in ways that prepare them to talk about their experiments in forces and motion. Then get them talking.
Link: Set students up to read more sources and to take notes about new information to then add into their writing.
Students continue to write about their experiments.

Day 5:
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Friday, November 21, 2014. We will focus on using new vocabulary in our writing to make it sound like an expert scientific report.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to have our writing sound like an expert scientific report? Share what you think with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

Students read independently.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
well, large, must, big, even, grew, stew, drew, chew, few, brew, standard, unit, metric, color, shape
The above words will be tested on December 5.
Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 5: Scientists Learn from Other Sources as Well as from Experiments
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Writer’s Learning Trajectories
“Scientists, you should be using the information you learn from almost every page of your lab report. How many of you have added some of the information you learned into your diagram?—thumbs up. This will make a huge different in your conclusions. You’ll probably end up needing to write big flaps of new information or whole new pages!
“Scientists, whenever you try to learn about a new topic, you should pay attention to the special words that go with that topic. Like if a new kid came to our class and was trying to learn about writing workshop, the kid might pay attention to a word like minilesson or revision. Make sure that you are using some of the new vocabulary in your writing. Think of the important words you learned to make your writing sound like an expert scientific report.”
Students continue to write about their experiments.

Math
Open Response Assessment
Solving the Open Response Problem
This Open Response requires students to apply skills and concepts from Unit 3 to interpret and apply the subtraction strategy of going through 10.
After a brief introduction, (We do”, whole class) students make sense of another child’s subtraction strategy and apply it to a new problem. (“You do”, independent)
Discussing the Problem
After completing the problem, students discuss their strategies. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)
Teachers ask volunteers to describe Grace’s strategy in their own words. Ask: Why do you think Grace subtracted to get to 10?
Teachers ask volunteers to show Grace’s strategy to solve 14 – 8.
Teachers encourage each volunteer to use the number line. Finally, ask for a review a few other strategies students could use to solve 14 – 8.
Looking Ahead
Math Boxes 3 – 12
Students preview skills and concepts for Unit 4 in journal 1, p. 66. (“We do”, partners, “You do”, independent)

Lesson 4 – 1 Clocks and Telling Time
Students tell time to the nearest hour and half hour.
Goals:
- Work with time and money.
- Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
- Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.

Vocabulary: estimate, analog clock, minute

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Students count chorally using a class number line. Students may use their individual number lines as support.

Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Count by 5s from 5 to 100.
Level 2: Do start-and-stop counting by 5s. Start one group at 5 and count by 5s to 60. Stop. Start another group where the first group left off, counting by 5s to 125.
Level 3: Do start-and-stop counting by 5s, with the first group starting at 350 and ending at 400. Stop. Have another group start where the first group left off, counting by 5s to 450. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
- Teachers display two clock faces as shown on p. 336 in the TG.
Teachers ask: Which clock shows 4:30? Explain to a partner how you know. Use the words minute hand and hour hand. (“We do”, whole class; partners)

Estimating Time with the Hour and Minute Hands
Have volunteers share their responses and explanations.
- Teachers display the demonstration clock set at 4:00. Have the students observe the movement of the hour hand as the minute hand is slowly moved toward 12 to show 5 o’clock. At several points, teachers stop and ask: What do you notice about the hour hand as you move the minute hand?
-Teachers rephrase the time using the following phrases:
- about ____ o’clock
- just before _____ o’clock
- between _____ and _____ o’clock
- almost _____ o’clock
- Teachers point out that telling time is always an estimate – by the time you say the time, it’s already a little later.
- Teachers demonstrate that the minute hand will always point to the 6 for times that are half-past the hour such as 2:30, 3:30, and 7:30.
Ask questions such as the following:
- If you don’t need to know the exact time, which hand is more important?
- Could you tell the time if your clock had only the minute hand?
- What if your clock had only an hour hand? Could you estimate the time?
Explain.
- Which hand helps you tell the time to the nearest minute?

- Teachers read about the clock’s hour hand on p. 106 of My Reference Book.

Reviewing Units of Time
- Students use toolkit clocks to review the clock’s functions and units of time to answer the following questions:
- How many hours does it take for the hour hand to move from the 1 to the 2? From 2 to the 3?
- How long does it take the hour hand to move completely around the clock face?
- How many minutes does it take for the minute hand to move from the 1 to the 2? From the 2 to the 3?
- Students count the minute marks by fives all the way around the clock.
- How many minutes are there in 1 hour?
- Teachers have students watch the hour hand while moving the minute hand from one hour to the next. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)

Reviewing Time to the Hour and the Half Hour
- Students complete journal p. 67. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)
3. Practice
Practicing with Fact Triangles
- Students use both sets of Fact Triangles to practice addition and subtraction facts. (“We do”, partners; small groups)
Math Boxes 4 – 1
- Students complete mixed practice on p. 68 of journal one. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs)

Lesson 4 – 2 Telling Time to the Nearest 5 Minutes
Students will tell time to the nearest 5 minutes.
Goals:
- Understand place value.
- Work with time and money.
- Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
- Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
- Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Vocabulary: hour hand, minute hand, analog clock, digital clock

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
- Teachers will point to the class number line while students count chorally. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Count by 5s from 0 to 30.
Level 2: Count by fives from 45 to 90.
Level 3: Count by 5s from 110 to 160.

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
Students use a copy of the 5-Minute Clock to make individual clocks. (“We do”, pairs; individuals)

Math Talk
Telling Time to the Nearest 5 Minutes
- Students use their clocks to show the time school starts. (“We do”, whole class)
- Students share their determined placement of the hour and minute hands.
- Teachers remind students that they reviewed telling time to the nearest hour and half hour in Lesson 4 – 1. In this lesson, students will be telling time to the nearest five minutes.
- Review students understanding of the minute hand by reading My Reference Book, page 107.
- Teachers use the demonstration clock to start a discussion about the movement of the minute hand. Remind students that as the minute hand travels around the clock, the distance between to adjacent numbers represents 5 minutes. Display 9:00 moving the minute hand slowly forward to 9:20, pausing on each number 1 thru 4 chorally reading the time at each 5 – minute interval. Show additional times counting and pausing at each number with the minute hand. Remind students to watch the hour hand moving slowly to the next number over a period of 60 minutes. (“We do”, whole class; partners)

Reviewing Digital Clocks and Notation
- Teachers display 4:30 on the demonstration clock. What time does the analog clock show? Remind students how time is shown on a digital clock as follows:
Numbers are separated by a colon.
The number on the left of the colon tells the hour.
The number to the right of the colon tells the number of minutes after the hour. (“We do”, whole class)

Telling and Writing Time
- Students work in pairs taking turns setting the hands on their clocks and saying and recording the time on paper or erasable boards. (“We do”, pairs)
- Students complete Math Journal 1, p. 69. (“You do”, individuals)

Assessment Opportunity
- Teachers observe and note students’ ability to complete the problems on p. 69 accurately.

Summarize
- Students share some of their examples from Problem 7 on p. 69. (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
- Students play Evens and Odds (“We do”, partners)
Math Boxes 4 – 2
- Students complete journal 1, p. 70. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs)

Lesson 4 – 3 A.M. and P.M.
Students tell time using A.M. and P.M.
Goals:
- Understand place value.
- Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
- Make sense of the representations you and other use.
- Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.

Vocabulary: A.M., P.M., 24-hour interval

1. Warm Up
- Students use the Class Number Grid of Class Number Line to find the distance from one number to another. (“We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: 17 to 37; 15 to 45
Level 2: 83 to 108; 110 to 76
Level 3: 125 to 158; 156 to 183

Daily Routines
- Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Math Message
Taylor starts school at 9:00 and goes to bed at 9:00. How can this statement be true?

Introducing A.M. and P.M.
- Teachers discuss that there are 24 hours in a day. The first 12 hours of the day (from midnight to noon) are A.M. hours, and the second 12 hours (from noon to midnight) are P.M. hours.
- Teachers use the demonstration clock moving the hands and saying the A.M. hours (12:00 midnight, 1:00 A.M., 2:00 A.M., and so on) and then the P.M. hours (12:00 noon, 1:00 P.M., 2:00 P.M., and so on).

Exploring a 24-Hour Timeline
- Teachers display a horizontal line with arrows on both ends. Explain that a timeline is like a number line on which the intervals indicate time periods. Tell the students that this timeline will show all the hours in one day and is called a 24 – hour timeline. Set the demonstration clock to 12:00 midnight, the start of a new day. Make tick marks at the beginning of the timeline and label them 12, 1, 2, and so on, to 12. Add a bracket above the timeline labeling each 12 hours as A.M. and then the final 12 hours as P.M. (“We do”, whole class)
- Students volunteer to share events that occur during the day, such as getting up for school, beginning the school day, and eating dinner. Each volunteer says a time, including A.M. or P.M. (“We do”, whole class)

Practicing with A.M. and P.M.
- Students draw pictures of events on journal p. 71 that occur at the given times. (“You do, individuals; “We do”, small group)
- Teachers encourage students to refer to the 24-hour time line to help them distinguish between A.M. and P.M.

Assessment Opportunity
- Teachers observe and note students’ drawings on p. 71.

3. Practice
Introducing and Playing Addition Top-It
- Students and teachers read My Reference Book on p. 170 – 172.
- Teachers model a few rounds with a student and show students how to record their number models on the Addition Top – It record Sheet. (“We do”, whole class)
- Students play the game recording the number models to complete the record sheet. (“We do”, pairs, small groups)

Assessment Opportunity
- Teachers observe
What strategies are the students using to determine the sum?
Which students are using the correct comparison symbols on the Addition Top – It Record Sheet?

- Discussion
How did you figure out the sums?
How did you know which comparison symbol to write on the record sheet? (“We do”, whole class)
Math Boxes 4 – 3
- Students complete the mixed practice on journal, p. 72. (“You do”, independent)

Catch –Up and Game Day Friday
Playing Addition Top-It
Students and teachers read My Reference Book on p. 170 – 172.
Teachers model a few rounds with a student and show students how to record their number models on the Addition Top – It record Sheet. (“We do”, whole class)
Students play the game recording the number models to complete the record sheet. (“We do”, pairs, small groups)

Playing Salute!
Students play Salute! to practice addition by solving for a missing addend, which is an important strategy for developing fluency with addition and subtraction facts.
Teachers review the directions for “Salute!” on pp. 162 and 163 of My Reference Book. (“I do”, whole class)
Students play in groups of three, taking turns being the dealer using four cards each of 0 – 10. (“We do”, small groups)
Teachers circulate among groups encouraging students to reflect on and discuss strategies for a more efficient round looking for the following strategies:
Counting back by 1s
Counting back in pieces (by numbers larger than 1)
Counting up by 1s
Counting up in pieces
Think addition, especially with a known or easier fact
Making 10
Near doubles

Telling Time
Students work with an assigned partner to take turns practice telling time using plastic analogue clocks.

Science
Spinners–Zoomers
Zoomers are traditional toys made from a button and a piece of string. The string is passed through one button hole and back through the other and tied to make a loop. With the button in the middle, the string loop around a person’s thumbs. After the button has been twirled around to put some twist in the string, the string is pulled tight. The string unwinds, causing the button to spin. The momentum of the rotating button winds the string the other way. Pulling the string tight again spins the button in the opposite direction. Once the rhythm is established, the spinning can go on indefinitely.
Inquiry Question: How can spinning objects be kept in motion?
Investigation Summary
Students use disks and a length of string to make zoomers.
Science Content
- There are different ways to initiate rotational motion.
- The motion of an object can be changed by pushing or pulling.
- Tops and zoomers both spin, but in different ways.
Teacher Observation
- Check for understanding.
Guiding the Investigation
- Review spinning.
- Introduce zoomers.
- Students construct zoomers.
- Get the zoomers going.
- Students use round disks and squares in the kit to make additional zoomers.
- Visit students as they work.
Interactive Read Loud: Balance and Motion “Move It, But Don’t Touch It” by Delta Education
Adding to the content chart entries:
- How are tops and zoomers the same?
- How do you start the motion of tops and zoomers?
- How can you change the spinning motion of a zoomer?

Lab Observation:
- Students write to explain the following question:
How can spinning objects be kept in motion?

Spinners–Twirlers
Twirlers spin as they fall through the air. You may have seen seeds falling from maple trees in late summer. Maple seeds are fitted with little wings that interact with air to rotate rapidly, producing a wonderful visual effect. Spinning slows the fall of the seed, so that a breeze can carry the seed to a location some distance from the parent tree where it will have a better chance to produce a new tree. The effectiveness of a twirler, whether it is a seed or a toy, is influenced by a number of variables – the length of the wings, the amount of twist in the wings, the stiffness of the wings, the weight and length of the body, and so forth. When the twirler is perfectly balanced, it spins smoothly, descends slowly, and lands softly.
Inquiry Question: How can air start an object spinning?
Investigation Summary
Students make twirlers (flying spinners) that rotate by air resistance, first modifying soda straws with wings, and then making twirly birds from paper and paper clips.
Science Content
- Variations in design can influence the rotational motion of spinning objects.
- Air resistance can act as the force that initiates rotational motion.
Teacher Observation
- Check to see how well students compare spinners and whether they know that a force is needed to start the motion.
Guiding the Investigation
- Review spinning.
- Set the challenge.
- Distribute straws
- Split one end of the straw.
- Suggest wings.
- Assemble the twirlers.
- Test the twirlers.
- Teacher visits students as they work.

Social Studies
Government
Lesson 3: Choosing Leaders
Interactive Read Aloud: Read and discuss the chapter “Choosing Leaders”.
Main Idea: Americans choose their leaders.
Objectives:
- Recognize the importance of leaders throughout history.
- Discuss what makes a good leader.
- Identify ways that public officials are selected, including election and appointment to office.
Vocabulary: election, vote, appoint
Link History with Civic and Government: Ask students to name leaders from long ago whom they have learned about through stories, books, or movies. Encourage students to discuss with partners their impressions of the leaders and their ideas about what it means to be a leader. Point out that just as each person is different, each leader has a different way of leading. Some leaders of long ago were wise; others were careless or cruel. Many years ago, some leaders had the power of life and death over their people. These leaders were looked upon as gods. Whatever they decided became law.

Skill: Making a Choice by Voting
Vocabulary: majority rule
- Remind students that to vote means to make a choice. Explain that in most elections people are choosing the best person to do a specific job. There are several ways to decide who will do the best job. First, a voter should consider the qualities a person would need to do the job. Next, the voter should learn about the person’s qualifications for the job. Reading newspapers, listening to speeches, and watching television news programs are a few ways to learn more about how well each candidate is prepared for the job.
- Remind students about our election for student council. We read the candidates’ campaign posters and listened to their speeches, but we could vote for only two students.
- Ask students to pretend that our classroom is a community that needs a new mayor. Have each table grouping nominate a candidate and prepare that person to give a speech. We make ballots with the candidates’ names on them, cast our ballots for a candidate and count the ballots to determine the winner.

Vocabulary quiz
- government: a group of citizens who run a community
- law: a rule that people of a community must follow
- tax: money paid to the government that is used to pay for services
- vote: a choice that gets counted
- patriotism: a feeling of pride that people have for their country
- consequence: something that happens because of what a person does
- brotherhood: friendship or cooperation
- mayor: a leader of our city
- governor: a leader of our state

Lesson 4: Our State Government
Objectives:
- Compare the roles of mayor and governor.
- Describe state government.
- Identify some responsibilities of state government.
Vocabulary: governor, legislature, property
Civics and Government:
Explain to students that the governor of the state is elected by the voters of that state, usually for a four-year term. Voters in most states elect other state leaders such as lieutenant governor (governor’s assistant), treasurer (in charge of the state’s money), and attorney general (in charge of state’s laws). Point out that, as with a mayor, a governor has the power to appoint other state officials. Students complete a graphic organizer (word web) to organize information about state government as we read the chapter.
- Explain to students that a state legislature can impose taxes and decide how the state government will spend its money. Members of a state legislature are elected by that state’s voters.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of November 9

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We are looking forward to seeing you on Report-card Pickup day, which is Wednesday, November 12.

In order to be considerate to all, please keep your appointment time. Each conference is allotted for ten minutes. However, should you feel the need to discuss your child’s progress further, you can always request another appointment and we will be happy to accommodate.

School will be closed Tuesday, November 11, in honor of Veterans’ Day. Report-card Pickup Day, Wednesday, November 12, is also a non-attendance day for students.

Student picture retake will be held on Monday, November 17th.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! By Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 10 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Students repeat only the one none-rhyming word. Tuesday and Thursday: Eyes open when word pair rhymes; eyes closed when word pair doesn’t rhyme.
Onset Fluency: Teacher identifies the category for the day. Teacher says the nonsense word. Student say “Not (nonsense word), (real rhyming word)! Ex. T: sallow, S: Not sallow, yellow!
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-a-d/, S; pad
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over enunciate the final sound. Ex. T: even, S: eveN
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: lot, S: lot; l-o-t
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word or word part. Students repeat it. Teacher says add/*/ at the beginning/end and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

- Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
- Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
- Writing conferences
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
- Centers:
1. Listening Center:  Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study:  Building Fry Sight Words (3-4 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center: 
a. Students practice reading level two-five sight words 
b. Students read informational texts about experiments and investigations
c.  A.R. on mini-iPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
- Greetings in Chinese: “When you say hello, I say Ni hao”
- Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: “Five Currant Buns” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Monday, November 10, 2014. We will identify some governmental services in the community, such as libraries, schools, and parks, and explain their value to the community.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important for the government to provide these services to our communities? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part One: Nonfiction Readers Read to Become Smarter about Our World and the Things in It
“Today I want to teach you that when nonfiction readers begin reading our books we make a quick study of the lay of the land. That is, we glance at the table of contents, the chapter heading, and the subheadings to get an idea of how the text will go.”
“Today I want to teach you that just as we read fiction in a story voice, we read nonfiction with an explaining voice. This voice often explains or teaches new things.”
- Provide and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by John Graham

Session 2: Studying a Mentor Text—Procedural Writing
Share: Self-Assessment
Introduce students to the Information Writing Checklist for Grade 2 and 3.
Students check their writing against the checklist to see if it fits the criteria.

Day2:
Veterans’ Day

Day 3:
Report Card Pick-Up/Parent-Teacher Conferences

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, November 13, 2014. We will construct toys that demonstrate spinning.
Inquiry Question: What causes an object to spin? Share your answer with a classmate!

Shared Reading
A Taste of a Taco
By Rebecca Kai Dotlich

We feast on crackly
shells of corn;
tomatoes diced,
lettuce torn,
and onions in
a snow-white – row
crumble
to the plate below.

Spicy meat
cheesy slivers,
fiery red sauce
spills
a river;
a dribble of taco bit –
before we spoon
the rest of it.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part One: Nonfiction Readers Read to Become Smarter about Our World and the Things in It
“Today I want to teach you that non-fiction readers don’t roar through texts at the speed of lightning. We pause often to collect our thoughts about what we’re learning, and we put all we learned about a topic into different mental containers.”
Tip: “We can use the section headings to help us do this or even create our own section headings for our books when they don’t have any!”
- Provide and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by John Graham
Session 3: New Wanderings, New Experiments
Mini Lesson
Connection: Tell students that just as they revised their lab reports, scientists also revise their experiments. Rally students to design and conduct their own variations on the class’s first experiment. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Lay out some materials that students can use when they devise their own innovations from the initial experiment. Demonstrate your step-by step process: reread your lab report, think about how things could have gone differently, imagine a way to test things out, plan a new experiment, then record it. Recall what you did that you hope students do when conducting their very different experiments.
Active Engagement: Extract from students a recount of what they should do first, next, and then channel them to do those things. Coach into what they do.
Link: Channel writers to review the writing they will be doing during the various stages of the experiment. Get them started writing the first parts of their new lab reports while still in the meeting area.
Students continue to conduct and write about their experiments.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa Wildcats,
Today is Friday, November 14, 2014. We will investigate the stability of spinning tops during science.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Is the top you’re spinning more stable when it’s going fast or when it slows down? Why? Share with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

- Students read independently.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
also, around, form, three, small, mean, clean, peak, dream, beach, team, length, weight, height, temperature, distance
The above words will be tested on November 21.
Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by John Graham
Session 3: New Wanderings, New Experiments
Conferring and Small-Group Work—Coaching Partners to Help Each Other
Explain and demonstrate to students that their job is to envision their partner’s writing and to signal if the writing is confusing or unclear so that the partner knows when he/she needs to go back and revise. “Can you picture each step of that? Wait, I’m confused! What comes next? Can you say more about that?”
Students continue to conduct and write about their experiments. They work with an assigned partner to coach each other about their writing.

Math
Lesson 3 – 11 Exploring Rectangles, Fact Wheels, and Coins (2 Days)
Goals:
- Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
- Work with time and money.
- Reason with shapes and their attributes.
- Compare the strategies you and others use.
- Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.
- Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Students cover rectangles with squares, practice addition and subtraction facts on a fact wheel, and make coin stamp booklets.
Vocabulary: square, rectangle fact wheel
1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Students solve number stories.
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Brennan and Gregory are diving for rings and the bottom of the pool. Brennan collected 8 rings. Gregory collected 3 rings. How many rings did they collect together?
Level 2: Mr. Hoang and Kyra are playing checkers. Mr. Hoang won 7 games. Kyra won 12 games. How many more games did Kyra win than Mr. Hoang?
Level 3: Cha Nia has some rolls of yarn that are different colors. She wants to make a sweater with 16 different colors on it. How many colors of yarn does Cha Nia have right now? (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message
Students use stick on notes to cover the front side of their calculators.

Students share their answers and show how they used stick on notes to cover the calculator.
Teachers display two calculators: one covered with 2 stick on notes and one covered with 4 to 6 stick on notes. Have students compare the two ways of covering a calculator.
Teachers ask: On the calculator covered with 2 stick on notes, is there room for 4 more notes? (NO.) 2 more notes? (No.) Why not? (Some parts of the calculator are covered twice or four times) Does overlapping give us a good estimate of how notes it takes to cover the calculator? (No.) Why not?
Teachers explain that if we are estimating how many squares it takes to cover something, it is ok for some space to be left over on the edges.

Exploration A: Covering a Rectangle with Different – Size Squares
Activity Card 43
Students cover the rectangle (Math Masters, p. 86) with 1 – inch, then 2 – inch squares to explore how measurement relates to the size of the unit. (“You do:, individuals; “We do”, partners, whole class)
(In this case, when students use larger squares to cover the rectangle, fewer squares are needed. When smaller squares are used, more squares are needed.)

Teachers gather students to the carpet to discuss their thinking using the following questions:
What did you notice when you covered the rectangle/
How does covering the rectangle with small squares differ from covering it with large squares?
Why did we need more small squares than large squares?
Would it take more large triangles or more small triangles to cover the rectangle?
(“We do”, whole class)

Exploration B: Practicing Addition on a Fact Wheel
Activity Card 44
Students work to solve addition facts shown on a fact wheel. They write the subtraction facts related to the addition facts. (“We do”, partners; small group)

Exploration C: Making Coin Stamp Booklets
Activity Card 45
Students work to make booklets showing various groups of coins. They find the total value of each group of coins.

After completing Explorations on day two, teachers gather students to the carpet to revisit each Exploration and have students share the mathematics they used.

Introducing “What’s My Rule?”
Math Message Follow Up
Students share their strategies they used to solve the Math Message.
Summarize by writing the number model 7 + 3 = 10.

Teachers display a table labeled Tayla and Samantha, and place a unit box and an empty rule box near the table. Explain that this is one way to show the information from the problem. The unit box shows that we are talking about years, and the table shows that Samantha is 7 and Tayla is 10.
Teachers pose additional questions to use to complete the table (eg. If Samantha is 8, how old is Tayla?), and so on. (“We do”, whole class)

Using Function Machines
Teacher display function machines on chart paper. The machines are set to follow certain rules. Introduce the terms input and output.
Teachers model using the first of four function machines.
Teachers read the We know portion at the bottom of each function machine (eg. We know inputs rule Find: outputs)
Have students demonstrate using the function machine explaining their thinking as they complete “What’s My Rule?” tables.

Solving “What’s My Rule?” Problems
Students solve problems in journal 1, p. 56. (“We do”, partners, small groups; “You do”, individuals)

Summarize
Students share with a partner how they used the rule to find the missin input number in Problem 3 on journal p. 56. (“We do”, partners)

3. Practice
Students cut out the Fact Triangles in journal 1, Activity Sheets 4 – 5. (“You do”, individuals)

Math Boxes
Students complete the Mixed Practice in journal 1, p. 57. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Lesson 3 – 12 Progress Check Unit 3
(Day 1)
Unit Assessment
Students complete the Self-Assessment
Assessment items reflect mastery expectations to this point.
Students complete the Unit 3 Assessment to demonstrate their progress on the Common Core State Standards covered in this unit. (“You do”, independent)
Common Goals For MathematicalContent (GMC)
Core State Standards for Mathematics
- 2.OA.2
- 2.NBT.5
- 2.NBT.7
- 2.NBT.9

- Add within 20 fluently.
- Subtract within 20 fluently.
- Add within 100 fluently
- Subtract within 100 fluently.
- Add multidigit numbers using models or strategies.
- Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work.

Science
Interactive Read Loud: Balance and Motion by Delta Education

Spinners
Purpose
In Spinners, students will
- Construct toys that demonstrate spinning.
- Discover different ways to produce rotational motion.
- Explore variables that influence the spinning of tops, zoomers, and twisters.
Science Concepts
- Objects and systems that turn on a central axis exhibit rotational motion.
- The amount and position of mass affect how an object rotates.
- A push or pull (a force) is needed to initiate rotational motion in objects and systems.
Tops
Inquiry Question: How can spinning tops be changed?
Investigation Summary
- Students make tops from plastic disks and shafts, and spin them. After finding the arrangement of parts that produces the best top, they make tops from other materials.
Science Content
- Objects and systems that turn on a central axis exhibit rotational motion.
- You need a force to start a top spinning.
- The amount and position of mass affect how an object rotates.
Teacher Observation
- Check for understanding that speed and mass can affect how an object spins.
Guiding the Investigation
- Introduce motion.
- Propose Tops.
- Describe the top material.
- Distribute the top materials.
- Visit students as they work.
- Discuss top progress.
- Add colorful design to tops.
- Distribute spinning design sheets.
- Observe the path of a spinning top.
- Assess progress: Teacher observation
- Collect materials.
- Discuss top results
- Make word bank entries.
- Make content chart entries.

Lab Observation: Is the top you’re spinning more stable when it’s going fast or when it slows down? Why?

Social Studies
Government
Lesson 2: Community Governments
Objectives:
- Describe a community government.
- Explain a role of a judge in a court.
- Identify some governmental services in the community, such as libraries, schools, and parks, and explain their value to the community.
Vocabulary: mayor, council, court, judge, government, services, tax
Read and discuss civics and government. Remind students that a government is a group of citizens who run a community and that these people are usually elected to office by other citizens. Point out that even a small community needs a government to make decisions and provide services to citizens. Give an example of a school board and explain the kinds of decisions the members of the board make. Ask:
“If community leaders visited our classroom, what would you want to talk to them about?”
“What are some ways a town meeting could be a better way to make decisions than to have a few people in a community make decisions? What are some problems with this way of getting things done?
Civic and Government
Explain that sometimes in a courtroom, the judge makes a decision alone, and sometimes, a judge and a jury, or group of citizens, work together to make a decision. In addition to deciding whether a person has broken a law, courts also settle disagreements between two people or between a person and a business. For example, two people may go to court because they cannot agree on the boundary between their houses. Or a person might think a business did or did not do what it said it would do. Ask students to brainstorm with a partner why local governments need courts and judges. Have students share and chart their answers.
Read and discuss services provide by the governments.


Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of November 2

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

In order for us to enter grades into IMPACT in a timely manner, the FOSS Air and Weather Unit Test will take place on Wednesday, November 5 instead of Thursday, November 6 as previously mentioned. We will review concepts learned in class from lab investigations, and students will complete a study guide in class to prepare for the test.

A copy of the conference schedule will be sent home with students on Wednesday, November 5 to remind you of your conference time. We are looking forward to seeing you on Report-card Pickup day, which is Wednesday, November 12.

In order to be considerate to all, please keep your appointment time. Each conference is allotted for ten minutes. However, should you feel the need to discuss your child’s progress further, you can always request another appointment and we will be happy to accommodate.

Friday, November 7 is a non-attendance day for students. (It’s a Professional Development Day for staff.)

School will be closed Tuesday, November 11, in honor of Veterans’ Day. Report-card Pickup and Parent Conferences will be held Wednesday, November 12, and is also a non-attendance day for students.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed!by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 9 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Students repeat only the one none-rhyming word. Tuesday and Thursday: Eyes open when word pair rhymes; eyes closed when word pair doesn’t rhyme.
Onset Fluency: Teacher identifies the category for the day. Teacher says the nonsense word. Student say “Not (nonsense word), (real rhyming word)! Ex. T: sallow, S: Not sallow, yellow!
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-a-d/, S; pad
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over enunciate the final sound. Ex. T: even, S: eveN
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: lot, S: lot; l-o-t
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word or word part. Students repeat it. Teacher says add/*/ at the beginning/end and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
- Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
- Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
- Writing conferences
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
- Centers:
- Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3-4 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level two-five sight words
b. Students read informational texts about experiments and investigations
c. A.R. on mini-iPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
- Greetings in Japanese: “When you say hello, I say Konnichiwa”
- Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: “Five Waiting Pumpkins” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Monday, November 3, 2014. In the writing workshop, we will learn how to write lab reports and science books.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why do scientists write? Explain to a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit Three
Characters Face Bigger Challenges — and So Do Readers
Part One: Getting to Know Our Characters’ Wants and Troubles
“Today I want to teach you that we can get to know the characters in a book well by paying attention to their wants and problems. We do this even as we get ready to read by looking at the title and the blurb on the back of the book and asking, ‘What kind of problem will this character face?’ or ‘What does this character want?’ We can then use our answers to these questions to help guide our observations and jottings as we read right from the very first page of the book.”
- Provide and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book

Interactive Read Aloud:
Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson

Session 1: Learning to Write about Science
Mini Lesson
Connection: Ask students to visualize the kinds of writing work scientists do, and then describe that work. Confirm that scientists do write to plan, to record what happened, adding that they also write to teach. Explain that in this unit, students will first write like scientists do when the goal is to learn. Establish the format of today’s lesson: students will be guided through the process of conducting an experiment and writing within each step of that experiment. Name the teaching point.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Teach through guided practice: Take students through the process of doing an experiment and writing a lab report. Coach them as they form and record a hypothesis, then conduct and record the experiment. Channel students to plan and record a procedure for testing their hypothesis. Ask the volunteers to share their planned procedures, naming the precise steps they will follow and to then conduct one leg of the experiment in front of the class. Channel students to record results, including the unit of measurement. Channel the class to conduct multiple trials. Debrief—reiterate for the class what the volunteers did that you are hoping all writers have learned to do.
Link: Set students up to conduct and record the second leg of the experiment with more independence, while still in the meeting area, contrasting the results from this trial with those from the earlier trail.
- Students write their lab reports.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Hola Wildcats.
Today is Tuesday, November 4, 2014. We will learn how to use the going – back – through – 10 strategy for subtraction.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why does stopping at 10 make it easier to subtract from a teen number? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit Three
Characters Face Bigger Challenges — and So Do Readers
Part One: Getting to Know Our Characters’ Wants and Troubles
“Today I want to teach you that as we go forward in our reading of a book, we carry and build an understanding of who the characters are. In the beginning of our books we hold in our heads the information we learned from reading the blurb. As we read, we begin to add new information about the setting and characters’ lives. We read on, expecting that soon, a problem will show up.”
- Provide and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book

Interactive Read Aloud:
Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson

Session 1: Learning to Write about Science
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Engagement
Share: Writing Like Scientists
Ask writers to show partners where they did each of the kinds of writing you have explained and listed as the components of a lab report. Chart:
To Write Like a Scientist…
1. Ask a question about how the world works.
2. Record a hypothesis, a guess.
3. How will you test it? Record your procedure.
4. Conduct multiple trials, and record your results.
5. Analyze your results, and write a conclusion.
- Students write and revise their lab reports.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, November 5, 2014. We will practice the going – up – through – 10 strategy for subtraction.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why is it helpful to go up ten? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit Three
Characters Face Bigger Challenges — and So Do Readers
Part One: Getting to Know Our Characters’ Wants and Troubles
“Today I want to teach you that while reading we make predictions about what will happen to a character. We often think about the problems that a character faces and ask, ‘What would I do if I had this problem? How would I try to work it out or get what I want?’ ”
Tip: “Readers make predictions about their characters by paying close attention to the patterns in a character’s behavior. They think, ‘Does this character act a certain way over and over again? What does that make me think about how she will work out her problem?”

- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book

Interactive Read Aloud:
Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson

Session 2: Studying a Mentor Text—Procedural Writing
Connection: Help students understand the purpose of writing up their experiments with exact, precise information. Then name the question that will guide the inquiry: What does a scientist do when writing the procedure section of his or her lab report? How do procedures go? Name the question that will guide the inquiry.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Set students up for a mini-inquiry, preparing them to study a mentor text for something they could try in their own writing. Introduce the mentor text, encouraging students to study it. Chart students’ observations about the mentor procedural text.
Link: Explain that writers will all begin anew, writing a whole new procedural page, and set them up to imagine how it will be much better. Reiterate the importance of precise procedures, and channel all students to disassemble their books, removing their old procedure pages and replacing them with blank pages.
- Students write and revise their lab reports.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Ni hao Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, November 6, 2014. In social studies, we will discuss how laws and rules are alike and why laws are important for our community.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What would happen if our class had no rules? Explain to a classmate.

Students take the spelling test.

Reading Workshop
Unit Three
Characters Face Bigger Challenges — and So Do Readers
Part One: Getting to Know Our Characters’ Wants and Troubles
“Today I want to teach you that readers don’t only make predictions at the beginning of our books, we also confirm or revise predictions as we go along. If what happens in the story matches what we predicted would happen, we notice that and carry our prediction with us as we read on. If what happens in the story does not match what we predicted, then we need to revise our thinking.”
Tip: “Readers read on and create new predictions about what will happen, and then we read on with this revised prediction in mind.”
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
set, put, end, does, another, head, bread, dead, sweat, deaf, spread, rock, mineral, break, weather, soil
The above words will be tested on November 14.
Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book

Interactive Read Aloud:
Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson

Session 2: Studying a Mentor Text—Procedural Writing
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Channeling Students to Use Mentors from Start to Finish
Mid-Workshop Teaching
Noticing More in the Mentor Text
Teach students to reread the mentor text or other books containing experiments, noticing yet more that they could try. This support scaffolds the students in naming strategies they admired when they studied the mentor text.
- Students write and revise their lab reports.

Day 5:
Professional Development Day for Staff, Non-Attendance Day for Students

Math
Lesson 3 – 8 Using Double to Subtract
Students use double to solve subtract facts.
Goals:
- Subtract within 20 fluently.
- Use subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
- Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
- Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Vocabulary: think – addition strategy, related facts

1.Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Students solve subtraction number stories and share their strategies with the whole class. (“You do”, individuals; “We do”, partners; “We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Isaiah gathered 8 leaves for a science project. Hew only needed 4. How many extra leaves did he gather?
Level 2: Johanna had 15 oranges. She shared 6 with her friends. How many does she have left?
Level 3: Jalene had 38 pages left to read in her book. She read 9 pages before bed. How many pages does she have left?

Daily Routines: Students complete daily routines (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
Students solve the following subtraction number story.
Mia had 16 stickers and then gave 8 to her sister. How many stickers does Mia still have? (“You do”, individuals; “We do”, partners)

Using Think – Addition with Doubles
Students share how they figured out the number of stickers Mia stills has. (“We do”, whole class)
Some students may have used the think – addition strategy, using the double 8 + 8 = 16 to help them solve the number story.
If the think – addition strategy is not mentioned, the teachers will ask the following:
“What do I need to 8 to get 16?” Then write 8 + __ = 16. “What addition fact could help us figure this out? What do you notice about this fact? Yes, it’s a double” (“We do”, whole class.
Teachers remind students that doubles facts are one type of helper fact we can use to figure out unknown facts. Related facts are groups of addition and subtraction facts that use the same numbers, such as 2 + 3 = 5, 3 + 2 = 5, and 5 – 2 = 3.
Students work to create another subtraction number story they can solve with the help of a doubles fact.
Differentiate
Teachers list a few doubles facts and their related subtraction facts and discuss how they can use doubles to solve the subtraction facts. As students needing additional support solve and share their stories, help them identify helper double facts in each used. (“We do”, small group, individuals)
For example:
Ian has 14 new colored pencils in his desk. He sharpened 7 of them. How many pencils does Ian have left to sharpen?

There are 18 baseball players warming up on the baseball field. There are 9 players from the home team. The rest of the players are from the visiting team. How many players are from the visiting team?

Note: Giving students opportunities to find their own names for fact strategies can help foster a sense of ownership of the strategies.

Using Double to Subtract
Teachers guide students to think more broadly about using addition doubles to solve to help them subtract. Teachers ask: “How did we use addition doubles to solve other addition facts?”
Teachers display the following:
6 + 7 = ____
5 + 6 = ____
9 + 8 = ____
Students work together to record a double that is close to these facts on slips of paper.
Groups of students share their thinking. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)
Differentiate
Teachers pose one or two more subtraction facts asking the following:
“What is a related addition fact?”
“What did you notice about the related addition fact?”
“Is it close to a doubles fact?”

Students complete journal 1, p. 58.

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers circulate, check, and note whether students are correctly identifying opportunities to apply the new subtraction strategy. (“You do”, individuals)

3. Practice
Practicing with Fact Triangles
Students practice addition and subtraction facts using the fact triangles they cut out in lessons 3 – 3 and 3 – 7. (“We do”, partners)

Lesson 3 – 9 Going – Back – Through – 10 Strategy for Subtraction
Students will use the going – back – through – 10 strategy for subtraction.
Goals:
- Subtract within 20 fluently.
- Use subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
- Represent sums and differences on a number-line diagram.
- Make connections between representations.
- Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
- Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.

Vocabulary: friendly number, going back through 10

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Students solve simple addition and subtraction problems. Students may use their number as support.

Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: How many spaces are there from 23 to 33? From 16 to 26?
Level 2: How many spaces are there from 38 to 43? From 45 to 74?
Level 3: How many spaces are there from 63 to 51? From 136 to 147?

Students share solution strategies. (“You do”, individual; “We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math message
Students write a number model for this story.
Karla is riding the elevator of her apartment building. She gets on the elevator at floor 16. Karla rides down 7 floors to her aunt’s apartment. On what floor is her aunt’s apartment? (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Sharing Strategies
Have students share their number models.
Teachers display 16 – 7 = ? and ask: “What part of the story does the question mark represent?”
Teachers explain that you are going to repeat the same number story, but with additional information.
Karla is riding the elevator of her apartment building. She gets on the elevator at floor 16. She rides down 7 floors to her aunt’s apartment. She stops at floor 10 along the way. On what floor is her aunt’s apartment?

Assessment Opportunity
Students draw a picture to represent the number story.
Teachers circulate and observe, looking for pictures that clearly show how Karla’s elevator ride is split into two parts: one from floor 16 to floor 10, and the other from floor 10 to floor 9. (Note: If no students clearly show this thinking, use the sample student picture on p. 301 in the TG.)

Teachers explain that Karla’s elevator ride can be shown on a number line.
Teachers draw an arc on the number line beginning at 16 back to 10 and display the number model 16 – 10 = 6. Then teachers circle 6. Ask:” Why does stopping at 10 make it easier to subtract from a teen number?” Explain that 10 is a friendly number because teen numbers can be broken into a 10 and one or more 1s., and because students are familiar with groups of tens.
Teachers say: “Taking away the two parts, 1 and 6, which is 7 from 16, gives us the final answer: 9”.

Teachers pose additional problems as needed. Tell the students that this strategy for solving subtraction problems is called going back through 10. In today’s lesson you will continue thinking about ways to break apart numbers and use the friendly number 10.

Academic Language Development
Teachers provide charted sentences frames to help students think sequentially about the steps they take in going – back – through – 10 strategy. For example: To solve 17 – 8 = ?, I know that 17 – 7 = 10. So I know that 17 – 8 = 9 because I took away 7, but I need to take 8 away in all. So I have to take away 1 more. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)

3. Practice
Going Back Through 10
Students complete journal 1 pp. 60 -61. (“You do”, individuals; “We do”, partners)

Teachers gather students on the carpet to discuss their thinking. (“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes
Students complete the Mixed Practice in journal 1, p. 62. (“We do”, pairs; “You do”, individuals)

Lesson 3-10 Going – Up – Through – 10 Subtraction Strategy
Students will use the going – up – through – 10 strategy for subtraction.
Goals:
- Subtract within 20 fluently.
- Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
- Represent sums and differences on a number-line diagram.
- Compare the strategies you and others use.
- Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
- Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary: going up through 10

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers flash the following sequence of Quick Look Cards: 101, 112, and 120.
(“We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Quick Look Card 101 Double Ten Frame with 6 dots on the left frame, and 6 dots on the right frame.
Level 2: Quick Look Card 112 Double Ten Frames with 8 dots on the left frame and 6 dots on the right frame.
Level 3: Quick Look Card 120 Double Ten Frame with 9 dots on the left frame and 8 dots on the right frame. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
Students solve problem 1 on journal 1, p. 63. (“You do”. Individuals; “We do”, partners)

Going up Through 10
Teachers circulate, observe and note students who broke the total distance (the length, or number of spaces, between two numbers on the number line) into two parts from 8 to 10 and from 10 to 17, and then added 2 plus 7 to find the total of 9 miles.

Sharing Strategies
Teachers ask students to share how they used the going up to 10 strategy to solve the story. If no students use the strategy, teachers will display and discuss how to solve problem 1 using the going up to 10 strategy. (“We do”, whole class)

Practicing Going Through 10
Students solve problem 2 on journal p. 63 by going through 10. They show on the number line how to solve the problem by either going up to 10 or back through 10.

Going Up Through10
First find the distance from 7 to 10 (3) and then find the distance from 10 to 15 (5). Finally, add the distances together for a total of 8. So 15 – 7 = 8.

Going Back Through 10
Start from 15. Take away 5 (to land on 10) and then take away 2 more (to land on 8). So 15 – 7 = 8.

Summarizing Subtraction Strategies
Students discuss the following question: If you want to solve a subtraction fact that you don’t know, what strategies could you use?
Teachers pose a few subtraction facts to provide a context, such as 12 – 6, 15 – 8, and 16 – 7.
Encourage students to refer to their My Subtraction Fact Strategies table on journal page 48.

Teachers record their strategies on Class Data Pad as the discussion continues about each of the following strategies:
think addition, counting up, going back through 10, counting back, going up through 10, using double to subtract

Assessment Opportunity

Teachers circulate, observe and note students’ review of strategies on journal p. 48.

3. Practice
Playing The Exchange Game
Students play The Exchange Game to practice exchanges between $1, $10, and $100 bills.
My Reference Book pp. 146 – 148
Math Masters, p. G14 (“We do”, partners; small groups)

Math Boxes
Students complete the practice in journal 1, p. 64. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Game/Catch up Day
Goals:
- Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
- Check whether your answer makes sense.
- Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

- Playing Salute!
Students play Salute! to practice addition by solving for a missing addend, which is an important strategy for developing fluency with addition and subtraction facts.
Teachers review the directions for “Salute!” on pp. 162 and 163 of My Reference Book. (“I do”, whole class)
Students play in groups of three, taking turns being the dealer using four cards each of 0 – 10. (“We do”, small groups)
Teachers circulate among groups encouraging students to reflect on and discuss strategies for a more efficient round looking for the following strategies:
Counting back by 1s
Counting back in pieces (by numbers larger than 1)
Counting up by 1s
Counting up in pieces
Think addition, especially with a known or easier fact
Making 10
Near doubles
Subtraction/Addition Top It

- Playing Name That Number
The teacher reviews the rules for the game using
My Reference Book pp. 154 – 155; Math Masters p. G16
The teacher plays a sample or two rounds to demonstrate how to play. (“I do”)
Students use one or more operations to name a target number. (“We do”, small groups)
- Assessment Opportunity
The teacher observes which students are making appropriate names for the target umber, and which students need additional support. (“I do”)
The teacher poses the following questions:
- How did you and your group work together?
- How is the target number like the tag (number at the top of the name – collection box) in a name collection – box? (“We do”)

- The Fact Triangles Routine
The teacher demonstrates the procedures for Fact Triangle Routine.
1. Partner A covers one corner of a Fact Triangle with a finger or thumb concealing part of an addition or subtraction fact.
2. Partner B says the complete fact.
3. Partners trade roles and repeat
Practice
Partners use their fact triangles to practice addition and subtraction facts. (“We do”, partners)

Science
Review for the unit test.
- Air is matter and takes up space.
- Air is all around objects.
- Air resistance affects how things move (i.e. parachute).
- Air can be compressed.
- The pressure from compressed air can move things.
- Weather describes conditions in the air outside.
- Meteorologists are scientists who study the weather.
- Scientific journals record what is observable.
- Temperature describes how hot or cold the air is.
- Temperature is measured with a thermometer.
- The unit used to measure temperature is degrees Celsius (C) or degrees Fahrenheit (F).
- There are three main types of clouds: cirrus (high and feathery), cumulus (puffy like cotton candy), and stratus (low and stretched out like a blanket).
- Clouds are made of water drops.
- Wind moves clouds in the sky.
- Meteorologists use rain gauges to measure how much rain or snow has fallen.
- Natural sources of water include streams, rivers, lakes (fresh water), and the ocean (salt water).
- Bubbles are filled with air.
- Wind is moving air.
- Bubbles can show the changing direction and speed of the wind.
- Meteorologists use a wind scale to describe the strength of the wind.
- Meteorologists use an anemometer to measure the speed of wind.
- A pinwheel provides evidence about how fast the wind is blowing.
- Meteorologist use wind vanes to observe the direction of the wind.
- A wind vane points in the direction the wind is coming from.
FOSS Air and Weather Unit Test

Social Studies
Our Government
Introduce the Unit
Objectives:
- Use a visual to predict content.
- Interpret a quotation.
- Use a K-W-L chart to prepare for the unit.
Tell students that in this unit, they will learn about the government and laws of cities, states, and our nation.
Present the quote “The government is us: we are the government; you and I.” by Theodore Roosevelt and explain that he was the 26th President of the United States. Ask students to tell what they think the quote is saying. Ask why they agree with the quote or why not.

Use the K-W-L chart to list and discuss what students know and want to learn about government and citizenship.

Preview the Vocabulary: government, law, tax, patriotism, vote
Objective:
- Use visuals to determine word meanings.
- Use words and visuals to predict the content of the unit.
Interactive Read Aloud: Community Rules – Making and Changing Rules and Laws in Communities by Jake Miller
Have students look at the pictures from the book when explaining the vocabulary. Begin a shape summary with the word government at the top. Add the rest of the vocabulary words as branches. Ask students to work with a partner to describe how they think each word is related to government. Have students share answers with the class.
- Students work independently to write sentences using each of the vocabulary words.
Lesson 1: Getting Along in a Community
Objectives:
- Identify functions of government.
- Describe how governments establish order, provide security, and manage conflict.
- Recognize laws in the community and the consequence of breaking them.
Vocabulary: government, law, consequence, order
Read lesson 1. Ask students to share knee-to-knee some ways to get along with others in a community. Chart students’ responses. Explain that the word brotherhood doesn’t refer only to boys and men; it refers to all people. Alternative words could be friendship or cooperation.
Discuss with students the need for order or safety in a school or community. Ask what school would be like if no one were in charge.
Read and discuss civics and government. Have students break out in groups to give examples of laws in their community. Ask how laws and rules are alike and why laws are important to our community. Point out that laws help people in a community live together safely and peacefully, and that some laws protect citizens’ health and safety, and others preserve order or protect property.
Students work in groups to take turns naming laws in their community. The other group members should think of a suitable consequence for breaking the law.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Picture Day

Picture day is Wednesday, October 29 instead of Thursday, October 30. Sorry for the mistake.

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Week of October 26

Dear Parents and Caretakers,

The World Language Field trip permission slip and fee were due last Friday, 10/24. We need both on Monday. Legally, students cannot attend a field trip without a signed permission slip.

Picture day is Wednesday, 10/29. A notification was sent home last Wednesday.

The social studies Community Unit Test will take place Friday, 10/31. The study guide will be sent home on Monday, 10/27. Please refer to it to assist your child to prepare.

The FOSS Air and Weather Unit Test will be administered Thursday, 11/6. We will review concepts learned in class from lab investigations. Additionally, students will complete a study guide in class to prepare for the test.

Report card pick-up/conference day is only about two weeks away on Wednesday, November 12. Please stop by our school to sign up if you haven’t done so. The sign-up sheets are posted on the wall next to our classrooms’ doors. If you do not sign up by November 4, we will assign you one of the available slots so that a copy of the conference schedule can be sent home with students on November 5.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! By Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 8 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Students repeat only the one none-rhyming word. Tuesday and Thursday: Students repeat only the two rhyming words.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads word pairs. Students do “Thumbs Up” if the words begin with the same sound. “Thumbs Down” if they do not.
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: g-o, S; go
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers reads word pairs. “Thumbs Up” if the words end with the same sound. “Thumbs Down” if not.
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: go, S: go; g-o
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add/*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
Language Awareness: Teacher says the sentence. Students repeat the sentence, and then say the sentence while counting the words by raising fingers. Students then say how many words were in the sentence.
- Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
- Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
- Writing conferences
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
- Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level one sight words
b. Students read informational texts about the weather (A Child’s book about Weather, Storms, A Man Who Named the Clouds)
c. A.R. on mini- iPads
4. Accelerated Reading in library (Monday 103; Tuesday 106; Wednesday 103 and 106)

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
- Greetings in Spanish: The class sings “Buenos días” Spanish Greeting Song
- Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: “Frog Went A-courting” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa Wildcats,
Today is Monday, October 27, 2014. In social studies, we compare and contrast between needs and wants.
Today’s Inquiry Question: When might a want become a need? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit Two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Today I want to teach you that readers can smooth out our reading and make it sound more like talking by going back to reread the phrase or sentence with the new word in it. Readers know that to really learn a new word they must try to say the word in context. Saying the word soon after figuring it out will help us remember the word for a long time.”
- Chart and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Punctuation Takes A Vacation by Robin Pulver
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
- Each student begins recopying his/her edited “Small Moment” story. Students will illustrate their stories with watercolor paints and watercolor paper to create a story book.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Good Morning Wildcats,
Today is Tuesday, October 28, 2014. We will review what we learned about the FOSS Weather Unit.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How do we protect our water resource? Share your thinking with a partner.

Reading Workshop
Unit Two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Today I want to remind you that while retelling a story, we can try to make sure to use the new words we’ve learned.”
Tip: “Using new words often helps make sure that the new word is remembered.”
- Provide and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

World Language Field Trip 9:10a.m.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, October 29, 2014. We will discuss and practice using the counting- up and counting-back strategies to solve subtraction problems.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Look at the following problems:
54 – 51 =
84 – 7 =
Which problem is best to count up? Which is best to count back? Share what you think with a classmate.

Interactive Read Aloud: Flash, Crash, Rumble and Roll by Franklyn M. Branley

- Students read independently until picture time.

Picture Day

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
- Each student begins recopying his/her edited “Small Moment” story. Students will illustrate their stories with watercolor paints and watercolor paper to create a story book.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, October 30, 2014. We will read and discuss about thunderstorms in science.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why are thunderstorms important? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading
“How Big is the Atlas Moth?”
By Deborah Ruddell

If she settles in the middle
of the pillow on your bed,
you’ll barely have a corner left
to rest your tired head.

Of course, you’ll be uncomfortable,
But still – for what it’s worth –
You’ll get to share your pillow with
THE BIGGEST MOTH ON EARTH!

Reading Workshop
Unit Two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Sometimes, while working to figure out an unknown word, readers can lose track of what is happening in the story. Today I want to remind you that we can then get our reading back on track by touching each page to retell the big parts of the story.”
Example: “We can say things like, ‘Okay, so this is the part when ____________ and this is the part where ____________.’ ”
- Chart and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
- Each student begins recopying his/her edited “Small Moment” story. Students will illustrate their stories with watercolor paints and watercolor paper to create a story book.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Ni hao Wildcats,
Today is Friday, October 31, 2014. We explore strategies for finding missing numbers and missing rules in “What’s My Rule?” problems.
Today’s Inquiry Question: If my input number is 2 and my output number is 4, what are the possible rules for this problem? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
boy, follow, came, want, show, nurse, curve, turn, burn, curl, purse, growth, affect, gravity, stress, fruit
The above words will be tested on November 7.
Teacher display the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication
Writing Workshop
- Reading Aloud for Visitors –An Author’s Celebration:
In this publishing party, students will read their personal narratives aloud to their buddies (103 and 106) and visitors.

Math
Lesson 3 – 4 Playing Salute!
Students play Salute! to find missing addends.
Goals:
- Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
- Record comparisons using >, =, or, , <, =)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1:
10 ___ 8
19 ___ 21
Level 2:
113 ___ 131
767 ___ 676
Level 3:
2, 909 ___ 2, 990
8, 418 ___ 8,148

Daily Routines: Students complete daily routines (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
Teachers display a name collection box for the number 16.
Students write as many different names for the number 16 as they can. (“We do”, pairs)
Sharing Equivalent Names
Students share their equivalent names for the number 16.
Teachers encourage students who have not included subtraction names for 16 to write one or two subtraction names. (“We do”, whole class)

Introducing and Playing Salute!
Students play Salute! to practice addition by solving for a missing addend, which is an important strategy for developing fluency with addition and subtraction facts.
Teachers review the directions for “Salute!” on pp. 162 and 163 of My Reference Book. (“I do”, whole class)
Students play in groups of three, taking turns being the dealer using four cards each of 0 – 10. (“We do”, small groups)
Teachers circulate among groups encouraging students to reflect on and discuss strategies for a more efficient round looking for the following strategies:
Counting back by 1s
Counting back in pieces (by numbers larger than 1)
Counting up by 1s
Counting up in pieces
Think addition, especially with a known or easier fact
Making 10
Near doubles

Assessment Opportunity
Observe
Which addition facts do children seem to be fluent with, and which facts do they seem to struggle with the most?
Which children use efficient strategies – such as think addition, making 10, or near doubles – to solve addition facts? Which students still use counting-based strategies? (“I do”, small groups)

Discuss
What strategies did you use to figure out the addends?
What did you find challenging about the game? What did you find easy?
Did you find an easier way a fact could be solved? (“We do”, whole class)

Practicing Subtraction Using Fact Triangles
Students practice subtraction facts using Fact Triangles. Partner A covers one of the numbers with his or her thumb, and Partner B finds the covered number. Partners trade roles. Allow for several minutes of practice. (“We do”, pairs)

Summarize
Teachers remind students that in today’s lesson they practiced solving facts two ways: by playing Salute! and by using Fact Triangles.
Teachers ask: How is playing Salute! similar to practicing subtraction facts using Fact Triangles?

3. Practicing with Name – Collection Boxes
Students solve problems involving name – collection boxes in journal 1, p. 52. For Problems 1 and 4, encourage students to include both addition and subtraction expressions (as well as drawings and words). (“You do”, individual)

Math Boxes
Students complete mixed practice, journal 1, p. 53. (“You do”, individual)

Lesson 3 – 5 Subtraction Strategies: Counting Up and Counting Back
Students discuss and use the counting – up and counting- back strategies for subtraction.
Goals:
- Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
- Compare the strategies you and others use.
- Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.
- Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
- Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Vocabulary: counting back, counting up
1. Warm Up Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Students solve subtraction fact number stories. Students share solution strategies. (“You do”, individual; “We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Morgan made 12 friendship bracelets. She gave 6 to her friends. How many bracelets does Morgan have now?
Level 2: Amir had 13 crayons. He gave 6 to Christian. How many crayons does Amir have now?
Level 3: Joshua had 15 marbles. During a game, he lost some to his friend. Joshua now has 7 marbles. How many marbles did Joshua lose?

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math message
You are playing Salute! with two friends. The dealer says the sum is 11, and the other player has an 8. What card do you have? (“We do”, whole class)
Sharing Strategies
Have students share how they solved the Math Message problem. Make sure the following two strategies are discussed:
Counting Back: Start at 11. Count back 8: 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3. I end at 3, so my card is 3.
Counting Up: Start at 8. Count up to 11. That’s three counts, so my card is 3.

Exploring Counting Strategies for Subtraction
Teachers display 12 – 9 = ___________ and ask students to trying solving using both counting up and counting back. Encourage students to us the number line to demonstrate each strategy on the Class Number Line and record the following:
Counting back 9 numbers from 12: 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3. The answer is 3.
Count up from 9 to 12: 10, 11, 12. That is 3 counts, so the answer is 3.
Students complete the strategy grid in journal 1, p. 48 using a number line. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Differentiate
Have students use different colored pencils to make jumps on the number line copies (“We do”, small groups)

Assessment Opportunity
Observe and discuss the strategies students use to solve each given subtraction example. (“You do”, individual)

3. Practice
Students play Salute! (“We do”, small groups)
Math Boxes
Students complete the Mixed Practice in journal 1, p. 54. (“We do”, pairs; “You do”, individuals)

Lesson 3- 6 - 0 and – 1 Fact Strategies and Subtraction Top – It
Students explore the – 0 and – 1 fact strategies and play Subtract Top – It
Goals:
- Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
- Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
- Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
- Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Vocabulary: – 0 facts, – 1 facts, difference

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students use , and = to compare pairs of numbers. (“We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: 21 ___ 12
78 ___ 81
Level 2: 504 ___ 405
808 ___ 880
Level 3: 1,113 ___ 1, 131
4,554 ___ 5,445
Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)
2. Focus
Math Message
Students use either counting up or counting back to solve 11 – 3 = ____and 14 – 12 = ____.

Sharing Strategies
Teachers ask students to share how they decided which strategy to use? (“We do”, whole class)
Teachers explain to students that they will be exploring two additional strategies: the – 0 (minus 0) and the – 1 (minus 1) strategies.
Discussing the – 0 and the – 1 Strategies
Teachers display the following – 0 and – 1 facts vertically and horizontally:
5 – 0 = _____
___ = 8 – 0
7 – 0 = _____
___ = 9 – 1
3 – 1 = ____
9 – 0 = ____
4 – 0 = ____

Students solve these facts on slips of paper or erasable boards.
Teachers prompt students to look at the patterns to determine rules for solving these types of facts.

Students record the – 0 and – 1 strategies on p. 48 in journal 1. (“We do”, pairs; small groups)

Demonstrating and Playing Subtraction Top – It
Teachers model a round or two of Subtraction Top- It using My Reference Book, pp. 170 -172. (“We do”, partners)
Teachers encourage students to use the various subtraction strategies they have learned to solve the facts: think addition, counting up and counting back, and – 0 and – 1.

Assessment Opportunity

Teachers observe
What strategies are students using to find the difference? Are they finding them accurately?
Do students recognize when it is easier to count up and when it is easier to count back?

Discuss
Teachers ask: How did you figure out the differences?
When did you decide to use a strategy?

3. Practice
Playing Name That Number
Students use one or more operations to name a target number.
My Reference Book pp. 154 – 155
Math Masters, p. G16 (“We do”, partners; small groups)
Math Boxes
Students complete the practice in journal 1, p. 55. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Lesson 3 – 7 “What My Rule?”
Students find missing numbers and missing rules in “What’s My Rule?” problems.
Goals:
- Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
- Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
- Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
- Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.
- Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Vocabulary: “What’s My Rule?”, function machine, input, output
1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers flash Quick Look cards 111, 100, and 106 and allow a second look to students.
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Double Ten Frame with 9 dots on the left and 5 dots on the right frame.
Level 2: Double Ten Frame with 5 dots on the left and 6 dots on the right frame.
Level 3: Double Ten Frame with 8 dots on the left and 5 dots on the right frame. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message
Tayla is 3 years older than Samantha. If Samantha is 7 years old, how old is Tayla?
Introducing “What’s My Rule?”
Math Message Follow Up
Students share their strategies they used to solve the Math Message.
Summarize by writing the number model 7 + 3 = 10.
Teachers display a table labeled Tayla and Samantha, and place a unit box and an empty rule box near the table. Explain that this is one way to show the information from the problem. The unit box shows that we are talking about years, and the table shows that Samantha is 7 and Tayla is 10.

Teachers pose additional questions to use to complete the table (eg. If Samantha is 8, how old is Tayla?), and so on. (“We do”, whole class)

Using Function Machines
Teacher displays function machines on chart paper. The machines are set to follow certain rules. Introduce the terms input and output.

Teachers model using the first of four function machines.
Teachers read the We know portion at the bottom of each function machine (eg. We know inputs rule Find: outputs)
Have students demonstrate using the function machine explaining their thinking as they complete “What’s My Rule?” tables.

Solving “What’s My Rule?” Problems
Students solve problems in journal 1, p. 56. (“We do”, partners, small groups; “You do”, individuals)

Summarize
Students share with a partner how they used the rule to find the missin input number in Problem 3 on journal p. 56. (“We do”, partners)

3. Practice
Students cut out the Fact Triangles in journal 1, Activity Sheets 4 – 5. (“You do”, individuals)

Math Boxes
Students complete the Mixed Practice in journal 1, p. 57. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Science
Review FOSS Unit 1
- Air is matter and takes up space.
- Air is all around objects.
- Air resistance affects how things move (i.e. parachute).
- Air can be compressed.
- The pressure from compressed air can move things.
- Weather describes conditions in the air outside.
- Meteorologists are scientists who study the weather.
- Scientific journals record what is observable.
- Temperature describes how hot or cold the air is.
- Temperature is measured with a thermometer.
- The unit used to measure temperature is degrees Celsius (C) or degrees Fahrenheit (F).
- There are three main types of clouds: cirrus (high and feathery), cumulus (puffy like cotton candy), and stratus (low and stretched out like a blanket).
- Clouds are made of water drops.
- Wind moves clouds in the sky.
- Meteorologists use rain gauges to measure how much rain or snow has fallen.
- Natural sources of water include streams, rivers, lakes (fresh water), and the ocean (salt water).
- Bubbles are filled with air.
- Wind is moving air.
- Bubbles can show the changing direction and speed of the wind.
- Meteorologists use a wind scale to describe the strength of the wind.
- Meteorologists use an anemometer to measure the speed of wind.
- A pinwheel provides evidence about how fast the wind is blowing.
- Meteorologist use wind vanes to observe the direction of the wind.
- A wind vane points in the direction the wind is coming from.
Demonstration: Cloud in a Bottle
Materials:
2-liter clear plastic pop bottle, matches, warm water
Process:
Fill the clear plastic 2-liter bottle one-third full of warm water and place the cap on. As warm water evaporates, it adds water vapor to the air inside the bottle. This is the first ingredient to make a cloud.
Squeeze and release the bottle and observe what happens. You’ll notice that nothing happens. Why? The squeeze represents the warming that occurs in the atmosphere. The release represents the cooling that occurs in the atmosphere. If the inside of the bottle becomes covered with condensation or water droplets, just shake the bottle to get rid of them.
Take the cap off the bottle. Carefully light a match and hold the match near the opening of the bottle.
Then drop the match in the bottle and quickly put on the cap, trapping the smoke inside. Dust, smoke or other particles in the air is the second ingredient to make a cloud.
Once again, slowly squeeze the bottle hard and release. What happens? A cloud appears when you release and disappears when you squeeze. The third ingredient in clouds is a drop in air pressure.
Explanation:
Water vapor, water in its invisible gaseous state, can be made to condense into the form of small cloud droplets. By adding particles such as the smoke enhances the process of water condensation and by squeezing the bottle causes the air pressure to drop. This creates a cloud!
Courtesy of http://www.weatherwizkids.com/

Interactive Read Aloud: Flash, Crash, Rumble and Roll by Franklyn M. Branley

MAKE LIGHTNING IN YOUR MOUTH
MATERIALS:
Wint-O-Green or Pep-O-Mint Lifesavers, dark room, mirror
PROCESS:
Go to a really dark room and stand in front of the mirror. Wait a few minutes until your eyes get accustomed to the darkness.
Put a Wint-O-Green or a Pep-O-Mint lifesaver in your mouth.
While keeping your mouth open, break the lifesaver up with your teeth and look for sparks. If you do it right, you should see bluish flashes of light.

- Students discuss in groups what they think caused the sparks when they broke the lifesavers.
- A student from each group shares an explanation with the class.

EXPLANATION:
Why does this happen? When you break the lifesaver apart, you’re breaking apart sugars inside the candy. The sugars release little electrical charges in the air. These charges attract the oppositely charged nitrogen in the air. When the two meet, they react in a tiny spark that you can see.
- Students work in pairs to complete the Air and Weather Study Guide

Social Studies
Community
Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 6 – Needs and Wants
Main Idea: Everyone has needs and wants.
Vocabulary: need, want
Culture and Society: Explain that people all over the world have the same basic needs but they meet those needs in different ways. Point out that we all need food but that we eat different types of food, we all wear clothing but it sometimes looks different, and we live in different types of homes.
Role Play: Divide the class into groups. Have each group act out a scenario that demonstrates needs and wants. Give students examples and prompts to assist them with the activity.

Students continue to design a map of their neighborhood and write to describe important places in their neighborhood.

Community Building
Group Charades
- Teachers provide broad categories to small table groupings of students.
- Groups choose a leader to pull an animal name out of a bag.
- Groups collaborate to decide what movements to portray to the class.
- The rest of the class guesses what the animal is.

Review for Community Unit Test

Community Unit Assessment
- Students take a written assessment about the Community Unit.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of October 19

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Murray Language Academy is participating in Literacy Week during the Scholastic Book Fair. The activities schedule is posted on this website. Literacy Night is Wednesday from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. The second grade teachers will present Guiding Readers With Non-Fiction Texts in room 106 at 6 p.m. promptly. We look forward to seeing you.

The field trip has been approved by CPS. On Tuesday, October 28, students will participate in World Language Field Trip to view the Brazilian film “Worms” at the Logan Theater for the Arts at the University of Chicago, where they will have an opportunity to speak with the film’s director. Permission slips will be sent home on Monday, October 20. Tickets were offered to the school at no cost to students. However, the bus fee for each student will be $3. Please submit the permission slip and fee by Friday, October 24.

The Harcourt Science Chapter 7 Test on Weather will be administered on Thursday, October 23. Please have your child review the Harcourt textbook, graded homework and the Weather quiz to prepare for the test.

Math fact fluency such as addition and subtraction facts through 20, including doubles and near doubles facts and combinations of addends to make 10 should be mastered at this stage of second grade. Please continue to support your child practice these skills using counters, pennies, pictures and number models. Weekly three-minute timed quizzes will be given to ensure the mastery of these vital math skills.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 6 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Wednesday and Friday: Thumbs up when word pair rhymes; thumbs down when word pair doesn’t rhyme. Tuesday and Thursday: Students repeat only the two rhyming words.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads each sentence. Students give the repeated onset. Ex. T: Phil felt foolish. S: /f/
Blending: Teacher says the onset and the rime. Students say the whole word. Ex. T: /d-esk/ S: desk
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says both words. Students listen, and then isolate and say final sound. Ex. T: six, fox S: /ks/*
* Use sounds
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and segment the onset and rime. Ex. T: mat, S: mat; m-at
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add/*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
Language Awareness: Teacher says the sentence. Students repeat the sentence, and then say the sentence and clap each word. T: The cat is black. S: The cat is black. The – cat – is – black.
- Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
- Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
- Writing conferences
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
- Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level one sight words
b. Students read informational texts about the weather (A Child’s book about Weather, Storms, A Man Who Named the Clouds)
c. A.R. on mini- iPads
4. Accelerated Reading in library (Monday 103; Tuesday 106; Wednesday 103 and 106)

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
- Greetings in French: The class sings “When You Say…”

When you say hello
I say bonjour
When I say bonjour
You say hello
When you say hello
I say bonjour
Repeat after me bonjour.

When you say thank you
I say merci
When I say merci
You say thank you
When you say thank you
I say merci
Repeat after me merci.

When you say goodbye
I say au revoir
When I say au revoir
You say goodbye
When you say goodbye
I say au revoir
Repeat after me au revoir.

- Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: “Five Little Owls” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Good Morning Wildcats,
Today is Monday, October 20, 2014. In social studies, we will compare cities, suburbs, and rural or farming areas.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why do some people choose to live in cities and others choose to live in rural areas? Share what you think with a classmate.

Literacy Week
Students present the project: My Favorite Story in small groups

Reading Workshop
Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Readers, you must know that readers are curious about words. We try our best always to understand what words and phrases mean. One of the fun jobs for readers is to collect words. Today I want to teach you that you can keep track of new and interesting words that you read by putting them on Post-its and sharing them with your partner. When you’re not sure what they mean, you can talk about them with your partner to try to figure them out.”
- Chart and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication

Mini Lesson
- Connection: Remind students of all they have learned about editing both this year and last. Name the teaching point.
- Teaching: Model how to edit for spelling by breaking a word down to syllables and thinking about the vowel sounds in each one.
- Active Engagement: Set students up to work on the spelling of a second misspelled word, thinking about each syllable and the vowel sounds in each part.
Link: Send students off to edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
- Explain and model to the students how to use multiple sources such as our Word Wall, My On-the-Go Words, and the Scholastic First Dictionary to fix up spelling.

- Students edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Good Morning Wildcats,
Today is Tuesday, October 21, 2014. We will use fact strategies to solve addition problems.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How do you solve 12 + 14? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Literacy Week
Teachers present Top Ten Favorite Books to students
Students discuss their favorite books in small groups.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: The Crayon Box by Shane DeRolf

Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Once we have noticed and collected new words, we need to go back to the page where we found that word and try to figure out what the new word means in that part of the text. Today I want to remind you that we can think about how the words might go on the page or what the words will say before we read. We ask ourselves, ‘What’s happening in the story? What will the words say?’ before we read the words. The pictures can help too. We can look at the pictures carefully thinking about who is in the story and what is happening, to get us ready to read the words. When we do this, we can guess what a word will mean even when it looks tricky to read. We can substitute a word or group of words that makes sense in that place. Then we can use those words to help us figure out the meaning of the new word.”
- Chart and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
- Review with students how to use multiple sources such as our Word Wall, My On-the-Go Words, and the Scholastic First Dictionary to fix up spelling.

- Students continue to edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, October 22, 2014. As we are working to figure out tricky words, we want to be sure to continue to build stamina and push ourselves to read more and more.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What strategies do you use to read “tricky” words? Turn and tell a classmate.

Literacy Week
Teachers and students wear black for Black Out Day

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig

Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Today I want to remind you that we need to use every bit of information that a book gives us to help us figure out what new words mean. You can read back in your book and then read ahead, using the context to figure out the word or phrase in question. Then you can replace unfamiliar vocabulary with words you think might mean the same to help you hold on to meaning.”
Example: “So, if you got stuck on the word prized in an excerpt that reads Lily finally admitted to her mother that she was playing catch with the neighbor’s dog when he ran through and ruined her prized rose bush, you could think about what would make sense and substitute a word. Then you might say, ‘Hmm, it sounds like it must have been a special rose bush, so maybe it means something like special.’”
Tip: “When readers use their own, different word for an unknown new word to keep meaning going, they then need to go back and collect the new word. So in the above example they might meet with their partner, show the place where they did the substituting and say, ‘So prized probably means special.’ They can then ask their partner, ‘Does that make sense to you?’”
- Chart and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
- Students use multiple sources such as our Word Wall, My On-the-Go Words, and the Scholastic First Dictionary to fix up spelling.

- Students continue to edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Ni hao Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, October 23, 2014. We will write subtraction number stories and generate related addition and subtraction facts.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How are 8 + 4 related to 12 – 4? Discuss what you think with a classmate.

Literacy Week
Students and teachers dress as their favorite book characters

Reading Workshop
Shared Reading
“All Worn Out”
By Kristy Dempsey

Tippy – toe, Kitty Cat
is sneaking through the house,
pushing on a puff of yarn,
wishing for a mouse.
Kitty like to play all day,
jumping, pouncing, leaping.
Where is Kitty hiding now?
Shh! Kitty’s sleeping.

Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Today I want to teach you that even as we are working to figure out tricky words, we want to be sure to continue to build stamina and push ourselves to read more and more. We can look at our reading logs and set new goals for themselves.”
Tip: “Readers can think, ‘How much do I usually read during reading workshop or at home each day? Can I try to read even more today?’ Then we set a goal for the amount of pages we’ll read during reading time.”
- Chart and explain examples to students.
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
- Students use multiple sources such as our Word Wall, My On-the-Go Words, and the Scholastic First Dictionary to fix up spelling.

- Students continue to edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konichiwa,
Today is Friday, October 24, 2014. We are going to identify ways people and places change over time.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why do people and places change over time? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Literacy Week
Read Out Loud: The power of the spoken word
Parent Read Aloud

Independent Reading
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
means, old, any, same, tell, blue, true, clue, glue, due, argue, hero, action, cause, influence, kind
The above words will be tested on October 31.
Teacher display the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Students take the phonemic awareness quiz.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
- Students use multiple sources such as our Word Wall, My On-the-Go Words, and the Scholastic First Dictionary to fix up spelling.

- Students continue to edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Math
Lesson 2 – 13 Cumulative Assessment
Students complete the cumulative assessment.
Goals for Mathematical Practice
2.OA.2 Add within 20 fluently. Know all sums of two 1 – digit numbers.
2.NBT.2 Count by 1s, 5s, 10s.
2.MD.8 Solve problems involving coins and bills. Read and write monetary amounts.
Math Boxes
Students practice and maintain skills in Journal 1, p. 44. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 3 – 1 Open Response and Engagement (Day 1)
Students will solve an open response problem using their own fact strategies.
Goals:
- Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
- Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
- Make sense of your own problem.
- Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
- Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: making ten, double ten frame, near doubles

1. Warm Up Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
The teacher flashes a Quick Look Card for three to five seconds before removing it and prompting students to remember what they saw. The teachers give a second look at the card. Then students will share both what they saw and how they saw it. (“We do”, whole class)

Leveled for Differentiation (“You do”, individuals)

Level 1: Quick Look Card 81 Double ten frame with 5 dots in one frame and 4 dots in the second frame.
Level 2: Quick Look Card 96: Double ten frame with 5 dots in one frame and 6 dots in the second frame.
Level 3: Quick Look Card 110: Double ten frame with 7 dots in each frame

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines (“We do”, whole class)

2a. Focus
Math Message
Making 10 on a Double Ten Frame

The teacher shows Quick Look Card 86 (Double ten frame with 6 dots on the left frame and 4 dots on the right frame). Students work in pairs to complete problems 1 and 2 in math journal 1, p. 45 (“We do”, pairs)

The teacher poses these questions: “How did you see it as 10? Did you count them one by one? Does this card show a doubles fact? How do you know? Does the double ten frame show a combination of 10? How can you use the double ten frame to explain that the total number of dots is 10?”
Students share their strategies with the whole class (“We do”, whole class)

Solving the Open Response Problem
The teacher distributes Math Master p. 61, reading the problem with the students. Flash Quick Look Card 117 for 3 to 5 seconds (Double ten frame with 8 dots on the left and 6 dots on the right frame). Flash the card again. Tell the students to record the total number of dots they saw and to write an explanation of how they figured it out. Remind the students that the explanation can include words and drawings to help explain their thinking. Students’ drawings should show how they moved the dots not just the dots they viewed in the ten frame. (“You do”, individual)

Differentiation
Students who could not produce a drawing of the ten frame after seeing the card twice, give them a third look at the card. If additional support is need, provide a copy of the 8 + 7 double ten frame so they can try to determine the total number of dots without counting one by one. (“You do”, individual)

Summarize
Using My Math Reference Book, p. 18, discuss how to improve students’ explanations by adding details and units to the explanation. (“We do”, whole class)

After collecting the students’ work make notes to chart strategies used. (“I do”, teacher)

Lesson 3 – 1 Open Response and Engagement (Day 2)
Goals:
- Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
- Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
- Make sense of your own problem.
- Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
- Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Getting Ready for Day 2
The teacher prepares one of the following for discussion:

1. Display a response that includes a drawing showing how the student determined the number of dots in the double ten frame, but does not include a written explanation that supports what is shown in the drawing.
The teacher poses the following questions: “What does this drawing tell you about how the child saw the double ten frame? Do the words help you understand how the child saw the double ten frame? Why or why not? Can the drawing or written explanation be improved? How?” (“We do”, whole class)

2. Display responses that show and explain a making ten strategy. The examples may or may not include a number model and may differ in how they show dots moving from one frame to another.
The teacher poses these questions: “How do you think the child saw the double ten frame? How the number model connect to the double ten frame? (“We do, whole class)

3. Display a response that explains a strategy other than making 10, such as near doubles.
The teacher poses these questions: “What strategy did this child use to determine the number of dots in the double ten frame? How do you know? Is there another way to use doubles with this double ten frame? How?” (“We do”, whole class)

Making – 10 Strategy
(Have extra copies of Math Masters, p. 61 for revisions.)
2b. Focus

Setting Expectations
The teacher reviews the open response problem and discusses how to use double ten frames, drawings and words to explain their thinking. Review how to respectfully discuss their own and other students’ work. (“I do”, whole class)

Reengaging in the Problem
Students discuss others’ explanations and drawings for determining the number of dots on a double ten frame. (“We do” whole class; “We do”, partners)

Revising Work
Students use a colored pencil to improve their clarity and completeness of their drawings and explanations. (“You do”, individual)

3. Practice Math Boxes 3 – 1
Students practice and maintain skills in journal 1, p. 46.

Lesson 3 – 2 Subtraction from Addition: Think Addition
Students write subtraction number stories and generate related addition and subtraction facts.
Goals:
- Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
- Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
- Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
- Add and subtract multidigit numbers using models or strategies.
- Model real-world situations using symbols.
- Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: subtraction number story, subtraction facts, addition facts, related facts, think – addition strategy

1. Warm Up Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
The teacher poses simple addition – fact number stories. Students share their strategies. (“We do”, whole class)

Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Marion’s family is at the library. Marion checks out 7 books. His sister checks out 3 books. How many books do they check out all together?
Level 2: Adama’s family is at the library. Adama place some books in her bag. Her sister places 2 books in her bag. Together they have 10 books. How many books does Adama have in her bag?
Level 3: Ean has some library books to return. Heaven has 4 books to return. Together they need to return 10 books. How many books does Ean have to return?
Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines (“We do”, whole class)

2a. Focus
Math Message
Students make up a subtraction story for the number sentence 10 – 3 = 7. (“You do”, individual)
The teacher displays 10 – 3 = 7 along side an empty unit box on chart paper. As students share their subtraction stories, ask them to supply labels for the unit box and write them in. (“We do”, whole class) Students will use one of the two strategies:
1. Change – to – Less
Start with a number of objects. Decrease the number of items. Find out the number of items left.
Comparison
Two separate quantities are known. Compare them to find the difference between them. Tell how many more or less.

Generating Related Addition and Subtraction Facts
The teacher displays a domino with 5 dots on one side and 4 dots on the other. Help students discover the addition facts and subtraction facts it shows. “Which addition facts describe this domino? Use the turn around rule. Which subtraction facts describe this domino? Repeat with additional dominoes as needed. (“We do”, whole class)
Students complete math journal 1, p. 47 (“You do”, individual)

Assessment Opportunity
Circle the class and note students’ work on p. 47.

Summarize

In journal 1, p. 48, children record the think – addition strategy along with one or two examples showing each strategy. (“We do”, partners)

Doubles and Combinations of Ten Timed Quiz (3 minutes) 0n Friday, 10/24
Lesson 3 – 3 Fact Families
Students generate fact families using related numbers on Fact Triangles.
Goals:
- Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
- Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
- Add and subtract multidigit numbers using models or strategies.
- Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
- Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Vocabulary: facts table, row, column, diagonal, related facts, fact family, Fact Triangle

1. Warm Up Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
The teacher flashes Quick Look Cards for 2 – 3 seconds before removing it and prompting students to remember what they saw. Allow a second look. Students share both what they saw and how they saw it. The teacher asks questions to encourage students to share a variety of strategies. (“We do”, whole class)

Leveled for Differentiation

Level 1: Quick Look card 87 (Double ten frame with 8 dots on the left frame and 2 dots on the right frame)
Level 2: Quick Look Card 98 (Double ten frame with 9 dots on the left frame and 2 dots on the right frame)
Level 3: Quick Look Card 118 (Double ten frame with 7 dots on the left frame and 8 dots on the right frame)

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines (“We do”, whole class)

2a. Focus
Math Message
The teacher has the students look at the Facts Table on journal 1, p. 50. “How does it show an answer to and addition fact? Talk about you ideas with a partner (“We do”, whole class; “We do”, partners)

Exploring Patterns on the Addition/Subtraction Facts Table
The teacher displays the table from Math Masters, p. TA15. As the teacher discusses the meanings of row, column, and diagonal, students follow along on journal p. 50.
Use the table to find the sums for several addition facts. (Students use a black sheet of paper with an arrow in the lower right – hand corner to highlight the row and column of interest.
The teacher scribes noted patterns on chart paper:
Each number is 1 less than the number to its right and 1 more than the number on the left.
Each number is 1 less than the number below it. After the first row, each number is 1 more than the number above it.
If you start at the top left and move the diagonal toward the bottom right, each number increases by 2. If you start at the top right and move down the diagonal toward the bottom left, all numbers along the diagonal are the same. (“I do”, teacher; “We do”, whole class/small groups)

Discussing Fact Families
The teacher explains that, “Today we will use their knowledge of related addition and subtraction facts to create fact families”.
The teacher displays a unit box and a large fact triangle with a dot at the top (which show the number that is the sum of the other 2 numbers). Students label unit boxes and write number sentences to show ways that the 3 numbers on the fact triangle are related.
The teacher poses these questions: “Do you think all facts will have 4 facts in their fact family? Why or why not? How many different facts are there for the fact family like 5, 5, 10 that include doubles? (“We do”, whole class)

Introducing The Fact Triangles Routine
The teacher demonstrates the procedures for Fact Triangle Routine.
1. Partner A covers one corner of a Fact Triangle with a finger or thumb concealing part of an addition or subtraction fact.
2. Partner B says the complete fact.
3. Partners trade roles and repeat
Practice
Partners use their fact triangles to practice addition and subtraction facts. (“We do”, partners)
Students complete Math Boxes 3 – 3 in journal 1, p. 51 (“We do”, individual/partners)

Assessment Opportunity
The teacher uses the Addition Fact Inventory from journal 1, pp. 94 -95 to record students’ progress.

Science
Weather Eyewitness DVD
- Students will view and discuss the mythical and scientific beginnings of the study of weather.
Science Response to Weather DVD
- Students work in pairs to discuss the key points about the technological advances of the study of weather. Then we chart the learning points on paper for reviewing purposes and to support the students’ writing.
Review for Chapter Test (Tues. and Wed.)
Harcourt Chapter Test

Social Studies
Community
Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 4 – A Citizen of Many Communities
Objectives:
- Use your address to identify where you live.
- Locate communities, states, the United States, and selected countries on maps and globes.
- Compare cities, suburbs, and rural or farming areas.
Link Geography and History
Explain that Patty’s neighborhood is located in a city called Pittsburgh, which is in the state of Pennsylvania. Show students Pittsburgh on a map. Point out that Pittsburgh is located where two rivers, the Allegheny and the Monongahela, meet to form a third river, the Ohio. Explain that one reason Pittsburgh was able to grow into a large, important city was because the waterways made it easy for businesses to transport goods.
Have students look at the picture of Pittsburgh. Explain that areas like cities, with a lot of people, buildings, and businesses that are close together, are often called urban. Areas with more open land are called farms. And areas with fewer buildings and streets are called rural.
Display a map of the United States. Have volunteers take turns locating our state and various states in the United States.
Main Idea: You are a citizen of your city, state, and country.
Vocabulary: city, suburb, state, country

Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 5 – About Change
Main Idea: People and places change over time.
Vocabulary: change
Objectives:
- Identify ways people and places change.
- Compare photographs of a place taken at different times.
Link History and Economics: Ask students if they think their city always looked the way it looks today. Show an old picture of Chicago next to a current one. Ask students to explain why they think the city has changed.
Explain that places change to serve the needs of the people who live and work there. Point out that some places, especially small towns, can become smaller over time. Tell students that this might happen when people move from small towns to find work in big cities because there are more jobs.

Students continue to design a map of their neighborhood and write to describe important places in their neighborhood.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of October 12

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The Mid-term Progress Reports were sent home with the students on Friday, October 10. Please discuss the report with your child and complete the bottom portion to return to us. If we have requested a conference with you, kindly email us to schedule an appointment.

Monday, October 13 is a non-attendance day for students and staff in observance of Columbus Day.

The Chapter 7, Harcourt textbook science quiz about weather will be given to the students on Thursday, October 16. Please assist your child by reviewing the chapter in the textbook with a focus on the yellow highlighted vocabulary words.

The Social Studies Community Vocabulary Quiz will be given Friday, October 17. Please refer to the graded study guide and vocabulary sheets to support your child.

The Unit 2 Math Progress Check, as well as the cumulative assessment, will be administered Friday, October 17 and Monday, October 20 respectively. Please review graded homework and the unit 1 test to support your child’s success.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 6 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Wednesday and Friday: Thumbs up when word pair rhymes; thumbs down when word pair doesn’t rhyme. Tuesday and Thursday: Students repeat only the two rhyming words.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads each sentence. Students give the repeated onset. Ex. T: Phil felt foolish. S: /f/
Blending: Teacher says the onset and the rime. Students say the whole word. Ex. T: /d-esk/ S: desk
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says both words. Students listen, and then isolate and say final sound. Ex. T: six, fox S: /ks/*
* Use sounds
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and segment the onset and rime. Ex. T: mat, S: mat; m-at
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add/*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
Language Awareness: Teacher says the sentence. Students repeat the sentence, and then say the sentence and clap each word. T: The cat is black. S: The cat is black. The – cat – is – black.
- Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
- Writing conferences
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
- Teachers administer the TRC (Text Reading and Comprehension)
Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
- Greetings in other Languages: Teach children the proper pronunciations and then challenge them to greet at least 5 friends in other languages (they move around the room to do this.)
Konichiwa (koh-Nee-chee-wah) is hello in Japanese.
Jambo (JAHM-bo) is hello in Swahili.
Hola (OH-la) is hello in Spanish.
Ni hao (nee-Ha-OW) is hello in Chinese.
Bonjour (bohn-Zhoor) is hello in French.
Buon giorno (bwohn-JOR-noh) is hello in Italian.
Annyong ha shimnikka (An-YOH HASHim-ni-kah) is hello in Korean.
Al Salaam a’ alaykum (ahl sah-LAHM-ah-ah-LAY-Koom)) is hello in Arabic.
- Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: Verses One and Two of “Fooba Wooba, John” from Fountas and Pinnell Sing a Song of Poetry p. 101

Day 1:
Columbus Day

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Buenos Dias, Wildcats
Today is Tuesday, October 14, 2014. During independent reading we will check our words by asking three questions. ‘Does this go with what is happening in the story? Does this sound like it would sound in a book? Do the letters I see match the sounds in the word I’m saying?”
Today’s Inquiry Question: What types of questions do you ask yourself when you are reading? Share your thoughts with a partner.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Day Walt (Day 1)

Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Three: Readers Fix Our Reading When We Make a Mistake
“Today I want to remind you that we can’t wait for someone else to check our words. As second-grade readers, we need to watch ourselves as we read. We have to be the kind of readers who always check on our own reading to know if it’s right. We can do this in three ways, with three questions. When we check our words we can ask ourselves, ‘Does this go with what is happening in the story? Does this sound like it would sound in a book? Do the letters I see match the sounds in the word I’m saying?’ ”
- Chart and explain examples to students.

Independent Reading
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 15 Learning Craft Moves from Any Mentor Text

Mini Lesson
- Connection: Use the example of learning to cross the street as a metaphor for learning to use mentor texts independently. Just as over time children need less and less support in crossing the street, so, too, they will need less and less support learning form a mentor author. Name the teaching point.
- Teaching: Tell writers that whenever they want help improving their writing, they can call on the services of a mentor author. Review the chart listing steps for doing so. Demonstrate how you call on the help of a mentor author so that students will self-initiate this work in ways that improve their writing.
- Active Engagement: Recruit students’ help thinking how the author made a part powerful, and name the craft moves she used that they can try, too.
- Link: Give students an opportunity to reread their writing and plan with their partners. Then remind them that they can use the chart to help then learn from a mentor text of their choice.
Share: Sharing Favorite Parts of Writing
Ask students to choose a part of their writing that they would love to share.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, October 15, 2014. We will use tally marks, arrays, and numerical expressions involving addition and subtraction to give equivalent names for whole numbers.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How many ways can you express number 12? Share your answer with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Day Walt (Day 2)

Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Three: Readers Fix Our Reading When We Make a Mistake
“Today I want to remind you that readers can reread to make sure what we are reading is right. We can reread thinking about how the words we just read sound and ask ourselves, ‘Can I say it that way?’ For example, when I’m reading Tom want into the store I have to stop and ask myself, ‘Can I say it that way?’ No way! So I try something else: Tom went into the store. Can I say it that way? Yes I can! When readers notice something is not right we don’t just keep reading. We stop, we check it, and we try something else. One thing we can try is changing a word so that it sounds like how we, or people we hear in real life, would talk.”
- Chart and explain examples to students.

Independent Reading
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 16 Being Bold—Trying New Craft Moves
Mini Lesson
- Connection: Ask students to revisit the writing they did in the prior session, reflecting on the craft moves they learned from their new mentor authors. Set the stage for children to take risks as they write. Name the teaching point.
- Teaching: Demonstrate trying something new you learned from a mentor author in your own story. Model first how daunting this can be. Model how to be bold, trying out a craft move in several ways until the writing feels just right.
- Active Engagement: Ask students to find a craft move from their own mentor texts, and then help you incorporate it into your story. Debrief, highlighting some of the work that partners did to revise your story.
Link: Send students off to try out what they‘ve learned from their mentor author in their own writing.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Ni hao Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, October 16, 2014. We will skip count, add, and subtract to solve Frames – and – Arrows problems.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What do you need to identify when you solve a Frames –
and – Arrows problems? Why is this important? Share your answer with a classmate.

Shared Reading
“My Pet”
By David L. Harrison

See those bats?
In the maple tree?
The one on the left
Belongs to me.

Haven’t told him yet
He’s my pet.

He hangs all day
Napping with friends,
Then at dusk
When the day ends
He spends the dark night
In silent flight.

A hungry shadow
Sweeping the skies
Wolfing down
Mosquitoes and flies.

Haven’t told him yet
I love my pet.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Amos and Boris
Unit two

Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Three: Readers Fix Our Reading When We Make a Mistake
“Readers, we have been working to get through the hard parts and make sure that our reading makes sense. Today I want to remind you that especially when everything looks right and makes sense, we still need to reread to make our reading sound smooth. So we read, fix, and read again–putting it all back together!”
- Chart and explain examples to students.

Independent Reading
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 16 Being Bold—Trying New Craft Moves
- Share: Learning from Mentor Authors
Ask a student to share the work he/she has done under the mentorship of a new author. Ask the student questions to probe for more information. Ask the class to notice ways in which the student’s writing was similar to the published writing.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa, Wildcats,
Today is Friday, October 17, 2014. We are going to create a map to describe our neighborhood.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why are maps important? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Independent Reading
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words for next week:
much, before, line, right, too, loud, sound, found, shout, count, mouth, urban, suburban, rural, magnet, touch
Teacher display the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check. The spelling test will take place every Friday.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 17 Writers Can Help Each Other
- Remind students that they have consulted professional writers such as Jane Yolen to look for craft ideas, for revision technique and for inspiration. “Today you’re going to apprentice yourself to other master writers. You’re going to apprentice yourself to–each other!”
- Model to students how to elicit the help of a classmate.
- Students meet in partnerships to offer each other feedback on their writing.

Math
Lesson 2 – 10 Name – Collection Boxes
Objectives:
- Use tally marks, arrays, and numerical expressions involving addition and
subtraction to give equivalent names for whole numbers.

Students generate equivalent names for numbers and write them in name – collection boxes.
Vocabulary: name – collection box, equivalent
1. Warm Up Math Talk
– Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
The teacher flashes Quick Look Cards for 3 – to – 5 seconds before removing it and prompting students to describe what they saw. The teacher allows an additional time to view the cards and follow up by asking students to share both what they saw and how they saw it. (“We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Quick card 86
Level 2: Quick card 103
Level 3: Quick Card 99
- Daily Routines
2. Focus
- Math Message
Students write as many different names for the number 8 on Name – Collection Box copies.
Several students share the strategies used. (“We do”)
- Discussing Name – Collection Boxes
The teacher displays a name – collection box on chart paper. Volunteers share the different names they generated for the number 8.
The teacher guides the students to use their “My Reference Book” page 53.
- Practicing with Name – Collection Boxes
The students work in pairs and independently to complete problems 1 – 4 on Journal 1, p. 38 (“We do”, pairs; “You do” independently)
After completion of page 38, the teacher poses the following questions:
- How are equivalent names for numbers the same?
- How are equivalent names for numbers different?
3. Practice
Students practice identifying odd and even numbers and decomposing numbers into double facts. Players write number models to express even numbers as the sums of two equal addends. They express odd numbers as the sums of two equal addends and 1 more or 1 less. (“We do”, pairs)
Assessment Opportunity
The teacher observes which children are correctly identifying odd and even numbers, and which children are able to identify the even numbers closest to an odd number. (“I do”)
The teacher poses questions: “How did you know whether the numbers were odd or even? How did you figure out which numbers to use in your number models?” (“We do”, pairs and teacher)
- Math Boxes 2 – 10: Journal 1, p. 39
Students practice and maintain skills. (Independent “You do”)

Doubles Facts and Combinations of Ten Quiz
Lesson 2 – 11 Playing Name That Number
Objectives:
- Use tally marks, arrays, and numerical expressions involving addition and subtraction to give equivalent names for whole numbers.

Students many ways to name numbers.
Vocabulary: name – collection box, equivalent
1. Warm Up Math Talk
- Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
The teacher has students count chorally by 25s.
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Count from 0
Level 2: Count from 50
Level 3: Count from 125
- Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.
2. Focus
- Math Message
The teacher displays a name – collection box for the number 20.
Students write as many names for 20 as they can on sticky notes.
The teacher has the students to share their names for 20 and add their sticky notes to the Name – Collection Box displayed on chart paper. (“We do”)
- Demonstrating Name That Number
The teacher reviews the rules for the game using
My Reference Book pp. 154 – 155; Math Masters p. G16
The teacher plays a sample or two rounds to demonstrate how to play. (“I do”)
Students use one or more operations to name a target number. (“We do”, small groups)
- Assessment Opportunity
The teacher observes which students are making appropriate names for the target umber, and which students need additional support. (“I do”)
The teacher poses the following questions:
- How did you and your group work together?
- How is the target number like the tag (number at the top of the name – collection box) in a name collection – box? (“We do”)
Solving Number Stories on a Number Line
Students use number lines to solve number stories in Journal 1, p. 40. (“You do”, independent)
Math Boxes
Students practice and maintain skills in Journal 1, p. 41. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 2 – 12 Frames and Arrows
Objectives:
- Use manipulatives, number grids, tally marks, mental arithmetic, paper & pencil, and calculators to solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of multidigit whole numbers; describe the strategies used.

Students will skip count, add, and subtract to solve Frames – Arrows problems.
Vocabulary: Frames – and – Arrows diagram, frame, arrow, arrow rule
1. Warm Up Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
The teacher poses addition-fact number stories. Students share solution strategies. The teacher posts children problem solving strategies.
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Nicholas has 8 baseball cards. Kendall gives him 3 more. How many baseball cards does Nicholas have now?
Level 2: Hunter has 9 tennis balls. Heaven gives him 7 more. How many tennis balls does Hunter have now?
Level 3: Gabrielle has 8 baseballs. Her bag can hold 13 baseballs. How many more baseballs does she need to fill the bag?
Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.
2. Focus
Math Message
The teacher poses series of numbers. Students identify what number comes next.
50, 55, 60, 65, 70, ____
160, 150, 140, 130, ____
The teacher asks, “How did you find next number?”
“What rule could you use to find the next number in each sequence?”
“Today we will be solving more problems involving rules.”
Solving Frames – and – Arrows Problems
The teacher displays the Frames – and – Arrows diagram explaining the arrow, boxes, and rule box.
The teacher solves the example for the + 2 rule. (“I do”)
The teacher provides additional Frames – and – Arrows problems from Math Masters p. 54. The teacher selects a scribe to complete the whole class for exercises 2 and 3. (“We do”)
Students work in pairs to solve exercises 4 and 5.
(“We do”, pairs)
Differentiation: The teacher provides counters and number lines to students to have a visual support.
Then the teacher provides Frames – and – Arrows with a few of the frames filled in and the rule missing. (“I do”)
Students solve and explain their thinking about how they solved the missing frames and rules. (“We do”)
Frames – and – Arrows Diagrams
Students complete Journal 1, p. 42. (“We do”, pairs; “You do”, independent)
Differentiate the Activity (“We do”, small group)
The teacher encourages the students to think
Frames – and – Arrows as a two-step process.
1. Decide which operation is being used. Are the numbers getting bigger or smaller?
2. Find the number that is being added or subtracted. Count up or count back using counters on a number grid or number line.
Assessment Opportunity
The teacher observes students as they work and evaluates the work completed on p.42. (“I do”)
Playing Name That Number
Students work with partners to play Name That Number, Math Masters p. G16 and Math Reference Book p. 155. (“We do”, pairs)
Math Boxes
Students practice and maintain skills in Journal 1, p. 43. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 2 – 13 Unit 2 Progress Check (Day 1)
Students complete the Unit 2 assessment and self-assessment.
Differentiate:
The teacher provides counters and ten frames for items 1, 2, 3, 6; and dominoes for item 4
Goals for Mathematical Content
2.OA.2
Add within 20 fluently.
Subtract within 20 fluently.
Know all sums of two 1 – digit numbers automatically.
2.OA.3
Determine whether the number of objects in a group is odd or even.
Express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
2.NBT.7
Add multi-digit numbers using models and strategies.
2.NBT.9
Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work.
Goals for Mathematical Practice
SMP2
Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs, and concrete objects. (GMP2.1)
Make sense of the representations you and others use. (GMP2.2)
SMP3
Make sense of other’s mathematical thinking. (GMP3.2)

Science
FOSS Investigation 3 part 3
Wind Speed
Review last week’s lesson about wind speed. Allow students to go outside and observe their pinwheels and discuss their observation with a partner.
Lab Observation:
Students write to explain the inquiry question.
Inquiry Question:
How do people describe the strength of the wind?

FOSS Investigation 3 part 4
Wind vanes Inquiry Question:
How can we use a wind vane to observe the direction of the wind?
- Students learn about wind vanes, a tool to determine wind direction. They compare the movement of the wind vane to those of bubbles and clouds.
Science Content:
- Meteorologist use wind vanes to observe the direction of the wind.
- A wind vane points in the direction the wind is coming from.
- Students observe and record wind direction and types of clouds for the next 3 days.

What Makes Rain?
Have students:
- Fill a tin can with water and ice.
- Set the can over a bowl of warm water.
- Soon water vapor in the air will form drops on the cold can. The drops will run down the side of the can.

Social Studies
Vocabulary Quiz
Community
- Students work independently to write a paragraph describing their neighborhoods.
Make a Map:
- Provide students with aerial photos of various cities. Discuss what the photos show. Have each student draw a map of his/her neighborhood using the photo as a guideline. Invite them to create their own details on the map, such as street names, businesses and other items.
Skill: Read a Map Key
- Explain to students that in order to use a map, they must be able to recognize map symbols and to find their meaning by using the map key. We look at a map and practice using the map key to interpret the map symbols.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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