Week of December 14

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Please be reminded that the Social Studies Government Quiz 2 will be given on Tuesday, 12/16. The students completed their review in class and the study guide last week. Please refer to it to support your child.

We look forward to seeing on Friday, 12/19 at the Winter Assembly at 9 a.m. in the gym. As a reminder, the Winter Luncheon fees and parental slips are due Tuesday, 12/16.

The winter vacation begins after school on December 19. School will resume on Monday, 1/5/15.

Have a safe and restful winter break!

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 15 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and open their eyes if the words rhyme, or close their eyes if the words do not.
Onset Fluency: Thumbs up if the words begin with the same blend; thumbs down if the words do not begin with the same blend.
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher says the word. Students say the final sound found in the series. Ex. T: get, got, bet, S: /t/
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

- Guided writing: Teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Centers:
– Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3-4 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level two-five sight words
b. Students read informational texts about experiments and investigations
c. A.R. on mini-iPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Greetings in Arabic: “When you say hello, I say (es-sa-LEM-mu ah-LAY-koom)”.
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Eletelephony” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 91

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Monday, December 15, 2014. We will begin writing our All About Books.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How does the table of contents help us organize our writing? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Paired Reading
Students browse and read mentor texts to prepare for the writing of the “All About Books”.

Writing Workshop
Read-Aloud: Inclined Planes by Valerie Bodden

Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books

Session 12 Drawing on All We know to Rehearse and Plan Informational Books
Minilesson
Connection: Drumroll the start of a new bend, and channel students to quickly locate a topic they can teach an information book about forces and motion. Ask some students to share their topics, in this way raising possibilities for students who still haven’t selected one. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Name and explain your topic choice. Demonstrate planning how your teaching (and writing) will go. Name what you have done in a way that is transferable to another day and another topic.
Active Engagement: Channel students to think of a topic they could teach others, and then ask partners to have a go at describing each section of their booklet to other.
Link: Restate the teaching point, making it applicable to not only today but every day.
Students begin drafting their information books, focusing on how to organize information by creating a table of content for their books.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Tuesday, December 16, 2014. We will use coins to purchase items during math.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why is it important to learn how to purchase items? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading: A-Z Reading World Holidays by Cecelia Maeson
Book Summary
People all over the world celebrate holidays rich in tradition. Celebrations include preparing and eating food, playing games, and telling stories. In this informational text, students learn about seven holidays from around the world and how each one is celebrated.
About the Lesson
Targeted Reading Strategy
– Connect to prior knowledge
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of connecting to prior knowledge to understand text
– Compare and contrast information
– Identify r-controlled /o/ sound
– Recognize subject-verb agreement
– Arrange words in alphabetical order
Vocabulary
– Content words: Chinese New Year, Christmas, dreidel, Hanukkah, Holi, kinara, Kwanzaa, menorah, mkeka, New Year, Ramadan, traditions
Before Reading
Build Background
– Ask students to identify holidays they celebrate. Invite them to describe how they celebrate them. Record student responses on the board.
– Have students use the information on the board to identify similarities and differences between the ways the holidays are celebrated. Explain that people around the world celebrate different holidays and that they have special ways of celebrating, called traditions.
Preview the Book
Introduce the Book
– Guide them to the front and back covers and read the title. Have students discuss what they see on the covers. Encourage them to offer ideas as to what type of book it is (genre, text type, fiction or nonfiction, and so on) and what it might be about.
– Show students the title page. Discuss the information on the page (title of book, author’s name).
– Preview the table of contents on page 3. Remind students that the table of contents provides an overview of the book. Ask students what they expect to read about in the book, based on what they see in the table of contents. Ask students what holidays might be shown in the photographs. (Accept all answers that students can justify.)
Introduce the Reading Strategy: Connect to prior knowledge
– Explain to students that good readers use what they already know about a topic to understand and remember new information as they read.
– Model connecting to prior knowledge using the information on the covers.
Think-aloud: As I look at the front cover of this book, I notice fireworks exploding in the sky. I’ve seen people light fireworks to celebrate the Fourth of July. They are very colorful. How would you describe fireworks that you have seen? I didn’t see the Fourth of July listed in the table of contents. What other holidays do you know that use fireworks as part of the celebration? What else do you know about fireworks?
– Have students preview the covers of the book. Ask them to make connections to prior knowledge and to discuss the photographs on the pages. Ask open-ended questions such as the following: What holidays might be represented in these photographs? What traditions are represented in the photographs? What else do you see that may be important in a book about world holidays?
– As we read, encourage students to use other reading strategies in addition to the targeted strategy presented in this section.
Introduce the Comprehension Skill: Compare and contrast
– Explain that one way to understand and organize new information in a book is to explain how topics are alike and different. Write the words compare and contrast on the board. Point out that explaining how things are alike is called comparing and explaining how things are different is called contrasting. Write the word alike under compare and the word different under contrast on the board.
– Draw a Venn diagram on the board. Label the left side Pen and the right side Pencil.
– Show students a pen and a pencil. Model how to compare and contrast using these objects.
Think-aloud: I can compare and contrast a pen and a pencil. I know a pen uses ink to make marks on a page, but a pencil uses lead. I will write ink on the Venn diagram under the heading Pen and lead under the heading Pencil to show one way that these two objects are different. I know that a pen and a pencil are both used for writing. I will write writing tools on the diagram where the circles overlap to show one way that these two objects are the same.
– Invite students to suggest other ways that a pen and a pencil are the same and different. Record student responses on the Venn diagram under the appropriate heading.
Introduce the Vocabulary
– Explain that the names of holidays are listed in the table of contents. Read the table of contents together.
– Review the correct pronunciation for the following holidays: Hanukkah (HAN-nuh-kuh), Kwanzaa (KWAN-zah), Holi (ho-LEE), and Ramadan (RAH-meh-dahn). Discuss the fact that each of these words is the name of a holiday celebrated around the world that students will read about in the book. Point out that the holidays all begin with a capital letter because they name a specific holiday.
– Have students work in small groups to discuss what they already know about the holidays listed in the table of contents.
Turn to the glossary on page 16. Read the words and discuss their meanings aloud.
Set the Purpose
– Have students read to find out how holidays around the world are celebrated and how the traditions are similar and different. Remind them to stop after every couple of pages to think about what they already know about holiday traditions and to think about how they celebrate these holidays.

Independent Reading

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 13 Tapping Informational Know-How for Drafting
Minilesson
Connection: Ask students to review their tables of contents, selecting a chapter they are especially ready to write. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate planning and writing chapters. Restate the strategy in clear and explicit language.
Active Engagement: Set students up to plan a chapter of a second-grader’s information book. Debrief—highlight the work students did on the sample chapter that is transferable to other books and other topics.
Link: Send students off to begin drafting their information books, tucking in reminders about how to write informational texts and how to connect their writing to the science they have been learning.
Students continue to draft their information books.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, December 17, 2014. We will investigate rolling cups during science.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Can we predict the behavior of a rolling cup? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading: A-Z Reading World Holidays by Cecelia Maeson
Read to the end of page 6. Ask students to highlight places in the text where they connected to prior knowledge.
– Model connecting to prior knowledge.
Think-aloud: When I read about Chinese New Year and placing good-luck sayings in homes, I thought about the fortunes that are inside fortune cookies. When I go to a Chinese restaurant, I always have a fortune cookie at the end of the meal. I wonder if wishing for good luck is something that is important in the Chinese culture.
– Ask students to share new information about the holidays they have discussed in their groups. Draw a Venn diagram on the board. Label the left side Chinese New Year and the right side Christmas. Have students identify similarities and differences they notice between Chinese New Year and Christmas. (Both holidays include traditions of giving gifts and using colorful objects to celebrate. Christmas is in December, but Chinese New Year is in January or February. Many people place a tree in their home to celebrate Christmas, but people place good-luck sayings in their home to celebrate Chinese New Year.) Record this information on the board.
– Check for understanding: Read to the end of page 8. Ask volunteers to share how they connected to prior knowledge as they read. Ask open-ended questions to facilitate the discussion: Which traditions are similar with your own holiday traditions? What are some of the symbols and customs associated with these celebrations? How are these four holidays similar and different? Check for students’ understanding during the discussion.
– Read the remainder of the book. Ask them to think about what they already know about holiday celebrations and traditions to help them understand new information as they read. Remind them to fill in their vocabulary worksheet with additional information they learned about the holidays in the book.

Independent Reading

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 14 Studying Mentor Texts
Connection: Remind students of the path of their learning so far in this unit, and let them know how it connects to today’s teaching point. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Tell students there are many ways science writing fits within information books. Explain that they can figure out some of them by looking at published texts. Then they can try out those ways! Point out a technique writers use to include science in an informational text. Show students an example of your own writing that incorporates this technique and channel them to think how to do likewise in their own books.
Active Engagement: Point out another technique, and ask students to help you figure out how to use it in your own writing.
Link: Remind writers that they know how to use authors as mentors, and ask then to get started finding, in published works, a technique that can help the with their current writing.
Students continue to draft their information books.

Day 4:
Morning Message:
Ni hao Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, December 18, 2014. We will make purchases and practice making change during math.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why is it important to understand how to know how to make change from purchases? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading: A-Z Reading World Holidays by Cecelia Maeson
After Reading
Reflect on the Reading Strategy
– Discuss how making connections between information they read about and what they already knew about the topic keeps them actively involved and helps them remember what they have read.
– Think-aloud: As I read about Kwanzaa and Hanukkah, I thought about how these two holidays use candles to celebrate. I thought about how at my church, we light candles to celebrate the season before Christmas, which is called Advent. We light one candle each Sunday before Christmas. This is similar to Kwanzaa and Hanukkah because people who celebrate those holidays light candles to celebrate as well.
– Have students share examples of how they connected to prior knowledge to understand the information in the book.
Reflect on the Comprehension Skill
– Discussion: Have students provide examples of how Hanukkah and Kwanzaa are alike and different (alike: use candles, begin in December, eat with family and friends, give gifts; different: a kinara is used for Kwanzaa to hold the candles and a menorah is used for Hanukkah, Kwanzaa lasts seven days and Hanukkah lasts eight nights).
– Enduring understanding: People all over the world value particular customs, art, symbols, and traditions in holiday celebrations. Now that you know this, what does this information teach you about the similarities among and differences between people of other cultures?

Independent Reading

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 14 Studying Mentor Texts
Conferring and Small-Group Work
Help students pop out their science content in their information books by nudging then to articulate how and why to use a particular toll or material. Provide examples to support students’ writing.
Students continue to draft their information books.

Day 5:
Morning Message:
Good Morning Wildcats,
Today is Friday, December 19, 2014. We will show our creative side during the winter assembly

Spelling Test

Phonemic Awareness

- Winter Assembly
(9 a.m.)

Math
Lesson 5 – 1 Playing Beat the Calculator
Students play Beat the Calculator to develop fact power by using mental strategies to add two 1 – digit numbers.

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Vocabulary: addition fact, fact power
1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
– Students use >, , , <, or =) 431

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Math Message
Students share five addition facts they know as the teachers chart them horizontally and vertically. (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers divide the class into two groups and pose an addition fact. Students in one group solve the fact with a calculator. Students in the second group add the facts mentally. (“We do”, whole class)
Repeat the activity with other addition facts. Mix easy and challenging facts so each group has the chance to find the sum first.
Teachers tell students that they will use their brains and their calculators to practice addition facts.

Teachers select three children to demonstrate the game. One student is the Caller, the second student is the Calculator, and the third student is the Brain. (See directions TG 447) (“We do”, whole class)

Playing Beat the Calculator
Groups of three students play the game.

Observe
Teachers circulate to provide guidance and to assess the students’ progress.
Which students in the Brain role are automatic in their fact recall?
Which students in the Brain role appear to be using efficient strategies to find the sum? (“We do”, small groups)

Discuss
For the facts you didn’t automatically know, what strategies did you use to find the sums?
What did you find easy about this game? What did you find challenging?

Practice
Subtract -10 Number Stories
Students complete journal 2, p. 103. (“We do”, partners)

Math Boxes 5-1
Students complete the mixed practice in journal 2, p. 104. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, independent)

Lesson 5-2 Using Coins to Buy Things
Students will review coin equivalencies and make different combinations of coins for the same amount of money.

Goals:
– Solve problems more than one way.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary: equivalencies

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students count by 5s, 10s, and 25s. Students refer to The Number-Grid Poster
Begin at 50. Count by 5s to 150.
Begin at 140. Count by 10s to 250.Begin at 100. Count by 25s to 300. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
Students find the total value of 10 pennies, 6 nickels, 6 dimes, and 4 quarters.
Students share their strategies and justify their answer for finding the value of this combination of coins.

Reviewing Money Equivalencies
Teachers guide the students reading My Reference Book, pp. 110-11.
Teachers have students respond in unison to the following questions about the coins and the $1 bill.
Display a nickel.
“What is it called? How much is it worth?
Write nickel and 5 cents on the Class Data Pad.
”How much are two nickels worth?”
Repeat with a penny, a dime, a quarter, and a dollar bill.
Teachers pose questions about coin equivalencies and record them on the Class Data Pad as a Table of Equivalencies.

Explain to the students that they will exchange coins buying and selling items in Pine School’s Fruit and Vegetable Sale. (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Buying and Selling
Teachers display the Pine School’s Fruit and Vegetable Sale poster from Math Masters p. 121.
Students count out the coins they would use to buy one pear. Partners check each other’s coin combinations.
Student volunteers share their coin combinations they used. Teachers list the four possible combinations. Possible combinations: 13 pennies; 1 dime and 3 pennies; 2 nickels and 3 pennies; 1 nickel and 8 pennies (“We do”, whole class)
Repeat the activity with other fruits and vegetables.

Partnerships take turns being customer and clerk at the Pine School’s Fruit and Vegetable Sale. Students record four transactions on journal 2, p. 107. (“We do”, pairs)

Summarize
Student volunteers share some of their answers and discuss the possible coin combinations for each transaction. (“We do”, whole class)

Assessment Opportunity
Observe and evaluate students’ responses for Problems 1 and 2. Most students should be successful. Some students make need additional guidance for exercises 3 and 4.

Lesson 5-3 Counting Up with Money
Students will find coin combinations to pay for items and make change by counting up.

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Vocabulary

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers pose number stories for students to solve on slip of paper.
Tayla has some flowers in a vase. She takes out 7 flowers. Then there are 6 flowers. How many flowers were in the vase before Tayla took some out? (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines. Adjust to telling temperature to the nearest degree. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
You want to buy a toy that costs 48 cents. Which coins would you use to pay for it?

Students share their solutions. Explain that any group of coins that has a total of 48 cents is a correct solution.
Ask: “How can you find the fewest possible coins needed to buy the toy?”
Sample answer: Start with the coin that has the highest value, a quarter. I can use 1 quarter. Then I count from 25 cents with the coin that has the next highest value. I can use 2 dimes, so I count 25 cents, 35 cents, 45 cents. I cannot use any nickels. The fewest possible coins needed to buy the toy is: 1 quarter, 2 dimes, and 3 pennies. (“We do”, whole class)

Making Change
Point out to the students that there are times when you do not have exact change when buying an item, so the clerk needs to give you back the correct amount of change. Tell the students: “In today’s lesson we will learn how to make change by counting up to find the correct amount.

Students turn to Pine School’s Fruit and Vegetable Sale in journal 2, p. 106.
Teachers pose the following problem: “I am buying an orange. I give the clerk 2 dimes. How much change should the clerk give me back?”
Teachers demonstrate how to make change by counting up.
Start with the cost of the item: 18 cents.
Count up to the amount of the money used to pay for the items: 20 cents.
Display the transaction as follows:
I bought an orange. It costs 18 cents. I paid 2 dimes (20 cents). My change was 2 pennies (2 cents)

Point out that the child could have paid for an orange with a quarter. In that case the change would have been:

I bought an orange. It costs 18 cents. I paid 1 quarter (25 cents). My Change was1 nickel and 2 pennies (or 7 pennies)

Teachers pose a few more similar problems. Students work collaboratively to determine the change and record the transactions on the chart. (“We do”, whole class)

Students take turns being the clerk and the customer. The customer selects an item and pays for it by giving coins to the clerk with a total value greater than the price of the item. The clerk counts up to make change. (“We do”, partners)

Several students share transactions with the class.
Teachers add the transactions to the table and compare how they are alike and different. (“We do”, whole class)

Going Shopping
Partners continue the shopping activity. They take turns being the customer and the clerk. Each child records a few transactions as customer in their journals, on p. 109, using the EDM symbols for coins. (“We do”, partners)

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers circulate and observe the students’ transactions noting their progress.

Summarize
Invite partners to share the transactions they recorded on journal p. 109.
Then students separate their coins and bills and return them to the storage baggies. (“We do”, partners)

3. Practice
Playing Salute!
??Students play Salute! game that was learning during unit 3. (“We do”, small groups of three)
Math Boxes
Students complete the mixed practice in journal 2, p. 110.

Lesson 5-4 Coin Calculations (2 Days)
Students make purchases and practice making change.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make connections between representations.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students show how they can pay for an item using coins.
An apple that costs 55 cents (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
What does a vending machine do? How does it work?
Several students share their answers. (“We do”, whole class)

Buying Items with Exact Change
Teachers display a copy of the Milk and Juice Vending Machine and pose the following questions:

Which coins or bills can you use in the vending machine?
Can you buy something if you don’t have the exact amount of coins or bills?
What does the “exact change” light mean?

Teachers review the concept of making change: the buyer pays with coins or bills that add up to more than the cost of the item, and vending machine gives back the money owed (the difference).

Explain that in today’s lesson students will buy items from the vending machine with and without exact change.

Buying Items without Exact Change
Teachers pose the following question:
What happens when the exact change light is off?
Teachers ask students to pretend that they want to buy a carton of orange juice. Have students suggest various coin combinations they might use to pay with exact change.
Teachers and students display the coin combinations on the SmartBoard or with the “Big Money” magnetic coins. (“We do”, whole class)

Then ask students to pretend they don’t have exact change to buy the juice.
Display 3 quarters.
“What change would the machine give back?”
Display the transactions with coins. (“We do”, whole class)

“Are there other ways to pay for the juice without exact change?” (“We do”, whole class)

Assessment Opportunity
Students record their transactions with paper and pencils.

Repeat the transactions as needed. (“We do”, partners; small groups)

Students complete Problems 1-2 in journal 2, p. 112-113. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, independent)

Summarize
A few students share their transactions for problem 2 in journal, p. 113.
Students separate and return their coins to the storage baggies.

3. Practice
Playing Target to 50
Students play and record their turns on the Target Record Sheet.

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers circulate and observe.
Which students are correctly representing their numbers with base-ten blocks?
Which students seem to have a strategy for deciding whether to make a 1- or a 2- digit number? To add or subtract your number?

Discuss
Students share answers to the following questions:
How did you decide to make a 1- or a 2- digit number? To add or subtract your number?
How did you know when to exchange?

Math Boxes 5-4
Students complete the mixed practice in journal 2, p. 111. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, independent)

Science
Rollers
Rolling Cups
Inquiry Question: Can we predict the behavior of a rolling cup? What happens if weight is added to a rolling-cup system?
Investigation Summary
Students roll paper cups down ramps. They observe the way cups roll and use the predictable curved rolling path to meet challenges. They put cups together to make them roll straight and weigh them in various ways to see how weight affects rolling.
Science Content
– Cups roll in the direction of the smaller end.
– To roll straight, two cups can be taped together so the ends are the same size.
– The amount and location of an added weight can change the way a system rolls.
Teacher Observation
– Check predictions and descriptions of cups rolling down slopes.
Guiding the Investigation
– Review rolling.
– Introduce cups.
– Distribute materials.
– Review cup rolling.
– Distribute tape.
– Add weight to the straight roller.
– Teacher models to students how to tape the cups and add the weight.
Teacher proposes:
– Park-the-car problem.
– The fall-on-your-face problem.
– The try to go straight.
– Students work with a partner to discuss how they would solve the proposed problems.
– Students solve the proposed problems independently or with a partner.
– Teacher assesses progress.
– Students show-and-tell.
– Return materials.
– Discuss the addition of weight.

Wrapping Up Part 2
– Making word bank entries No new words were introduced in this part. Review relevant words from previous parts.
– Make content chart entries
Add these new concepts to the content chart: What happens when you put a cup on a slope? How can you tell which direction a cup will roll? How can you make a cup go straight? How do weights change the motion of a rolling cup?

Social Studies
Government Quiz 2
Research Project: States
– Teachers will guide students to begin their projects on states using child friendly educational websites. Students will be provided with guidelines to focus on researching information for their assigned states.

- Students will label each state on the U.S.A. map, highlighting their state with color.

- Students continue to complete the final draft of the state research.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang, LuAnn Lawson, Kim Akins, and Tina Williams

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Week of December 7

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

This is a reminder that math fact fluency such as addition and subtraction facts through 20, including doubles and near doubles facts and combinations of addends to make 10 should be mastered at this stage of second grade. Please continue to support your child by practicing these skills using counters, pennies, pictures and number models.

Students will take the math Unit 4 Written Assessment and the math Unit 4 Cumulative Assessment on Thursday, December 11 and Friday December 12 respectively. Please refer to the graded homework to assist your child’s review for the assessments.

A second quiz for the social studies Government Unit will be administered on Tuesday, December 16. A study guide will be sent home on Monday, December 8. Please refer to it to assist your child to prepare for the quiz.

Our Winter Assembly will take place on Friday, December 19 at 9 a.m. in the gym. Second grade students who will be performing “Am I Wrong” and are encouraged to wear attire according to the career of their choice. Please assist us in dressing your child to help make this a fun and meaningful performance.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 14 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students offer rhyming words. Can say “Give me 5” to remind students of 5 word limit.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads the nonsense word groups. Student say the onset sound found in each series. Ex. T: zab, zib, zub, S: /z/
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over enunciate the medial sound. Ex. T: rib, S: rIb
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
– Guided writing: Teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Centers:
– Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3-4 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level two-five sight words
b. Students read informational texts about experiments and investigations
c. A.R. on mini-iPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Greetings in Hawaiian: “When you say hello, I say Aloha”
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Doodle-lee-do” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 82-83

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, December 8, 2014. We will compare and contrast standard units of measurement.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How do the U.S. Customary measurement units and the Metric System differ? Share your thoughts with a partner.

Reading: Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part Four: Nonfiction Readers Can Read More Than One Book about a Topic to Compare and Contrast
“Today I want to teach you that nonfiction readers grow our understanding of a topic by reading many books on it. When we read the second, third, and/or fourth book on a topic, we mix and match what we’re reading now with what we read before to grow a more complete understanding of this topic. One way nonfiction readers mix and match information across books is by making quick notes.”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Do-4U the Robot Experiences Forces and Motion by Mark Weakland

Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 10: Designing and Writing New Experiment
Minilesson
Connection: Situate students in the work of the unit so far, and let them know that they can continue with their plans today. Name the teaching point.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Set writers up to explore a new problem. Ask partners to say aloud the procedure for their revised experiment, discussing a variable they will change.
Link: Remind students of the ways scientists structure their writing. Set writers up to design, conduct, and write up new experiments.
Students continue to write about their experiments.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, December 9, 2014. We will each select a state and begin researching about it.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How is a state different from a country? Share your thoughts with a partner.

Shared Reading: The Power of Magnets by Elizabeth Austin
The Power of Magnets introduces the reader to the science behind magnets. Through examples and a hands-on activity that encourages students to make their own magnet, readers will learn about the practical applications of magnets. Photographs and diagrams support the text.
Targeted Reading Strategy: Summarize
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of summarizing to understand text
– Identify main ideas and supporting details in an informational text
– Identify long /i/ (as in -ight) word family
– Identify and use commas in a series
– Arrange words in alphabetical order
Vocabulary
Content words:
Story critical: attracts (v.), current (n.), electricity (n.), force (n.), magnetism (n.), repel (v.) Enrichment: code (n.), generators (n.), invisible (adj.)
Before Reading
Build Background
– Ask students to share what they know about magnets. Create a KWL chart on the board. Explain that the K stands for information they know, the W stands for what they want to know, and the L stands for what they have learned. Record students’ ideas in the K column. Let them know you will add to this chart after reading the book.
– Encourage students to volunteer questions that they have about magnets. Record what they are wondering or wanting to learn in the W section of the KWL chart.

Independent Reading

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 10: Designing and Writing New Experiment
– Conferring And Small-Group Work: Reminding Writers to Plan “Let’s take a step back, rewind and think about what you need to do. Scientists plan how their writing will go, before they begin their trials, so they know how they will keep track of the information.”
Students continue to write about their experiments.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, December 10, 2014. We write to explain the science observations of the needle magnet compass exploration.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why does the tip of the needle always point to the north? Share your thoughts with a partner.

Shared Reading: The Power of Magnets by Elizabeth Austin
Introduce the Book
– Guide them to the front and back covers and read the title. Have students discuss what they see on the covers. Encourage them to offer ideas as to what type of book it is (genre, text type, fiction or nonfiction, and so on) and what it might be about.
– Show students the title page. Discuss the information on the page (title of book, author’s name).
– Preview the table of contents on page 3. Remind students that the table of contents provides an overview of the book. Ask students what they expect to read about in the book, based on what they see in the table of contents. (Accept all answers that students can justify.)
Introduce the Reading Strategy: Summarize
– Explain to students that one way to understand an informational text is to put the most important information in each paragraph or section into their own words. A good summary is brief (no more than two sentences) and includes only the most important information. One strategy readers can use to summarize is to underline important words as they read and use these words to create a sentence in their own words about what they read.
– Read page 4 aloud to students. Model how to summarize.
Think-aloud: Whenever I read a book, I always pause to summarize the most important information in my mind. As I read this page aloud, I will underline what I think are the most important words to help me create a summary. (Read aloud and underline the following words: magnet, metal, attracts, electricity, magnetism), Now that I’ve underlined these words, I can use them to restate in my own words what I just read about. I think a good summary of this first section might sound something like this: Magnets attract other metals. Many objects in our homes have electricity running through them that comes from magnets.
Have students read page 6 and ask them to underline the most important words on the page. These may be important words, like magnet, that appear often, or they may be words that are in bold. When they are finished reading, ask students to work with a partner to write a summary of page 6. Remind them that their summary should be brief and in their own words. Invite student volunteers to share the summary they created with their partner. Remind students that as they read, they should use the strategy of summarizing to put text into their own words, which will make it easier to understand and remember.
– As we read, encourage them to use other reading strategies in addition to the targeted strategy presented in this section.
During Reading:
Model summarizing important information in the book. Think-aloud: After reading page 7, I underlined several important words that I can use in writing my summary: pole, magnet, attract and repel. I can use these details to help write a summary in my own words. Here is my brief summary for this page: Magnets have two poles, a north pole and a south pole. Poles that are the same will repel each other, while poles that are different will attract each other because of the force of magnetism.

Independent Reading

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 10: Designing and Writing New Experiment
– Share: Comparing results
Divide the class in half, and ask each half to determine from their results whose catapult flung cotton balls the farthest. Ask volunteer to recreate the experiments of the best catapult from each group to see if the winning results can be repeated—and see if the lab reports can be followed! Ask students to write down their ideas and hypotheses about why these two catapults shot farther than all the others and to connect these ideas to their own experiments.
Students continue to write about their experiments.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, December 11, 2014. We will explore rolling wheels on ramps during science.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What type of rolling system will roll in a straight line? Share your thoughts with a partner.

Shared Reading: The Power of Magnets by Elizabeth Austin
Introduce the Comprehension Skill: Main idea and details
– Explain to students that every book has a main idea that is the most important idea in the book. Often the main idea is related to the title of the book, so they can use the title for clues about the main idea. Invite students to look at the title page of the book again to make predictions about what the main idea of the book will be.
– Tell students that as they read, they will be looking for details that give them more information about, or support, the main idea. Explain that when reading informational text, they can also often use the table of contents to find supporting details. Ask students to return to page 3 to review the table of contents.
– Model using the table of contents to identify possible supporting details.
Think-aloud: As I look over page 3, I see that I am going to learn about invisible magnetism and magnets everywhere. I will pay attention to the details in each of these sections to help me identify supporting details.
– Introduce and explain the main-idea-and-details worksheet. Draw a similar chart on the board. Say: I can use this chart to help me keep track of the main idea and details in each section of the book. I will use the section heading as a clue to the main idea for that section.
During Reading:
– Check for understanding: On a separate sheet of paper, have students draw a web similar to the main-idea-and-details worksheet. Have them write the main idea of the first section, “Invisible Magnetism,” and the details that support the main idea.
– Remind them to continue thinking about the important details of the book as they read so they can summarize the information in their mind as they read.

Independent Reading

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 11: Editing—Domain-Specific Language
Minilesson
Connection: Liken the particular ways in which students talk about things they know well to how scientists talk about the subjects they study using specialized words. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Teach the concept of technical language, inviting students to brainstorm domain-specific terms they know on topics they know well.
Active Engagement: Redirect students’ attention to the shared class topic, forces and motion, and together, generate a list of domain-specific words. Suggest that the class come up with a system for recording technical language.
Link: Suggest that students view their work to be sure it includes forces and motion lingo—and if not, to incorporate it in clear, thoughtful ways.
Students edit their writing.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, December 12, 2014.
We will create different configurations of a wheel and axle system to explore rolling.
Inquiry Question: How can a wheel-and-axle system be changed?
Share what you have written yesterday with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

Students read independently.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
ask, when, men, read, need, short, core, sport, report, port, escort, solid, liquid, gas, size, texture
The above words will be tested on December 12.
Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 11: Editing—Domain-Specific Language
Students continue to edits their writing assignments with a partner. They focus specifically on science language.

Math
Lesson 4-10 The Centimeter
Students are introduced to the centimeter as a standard unit of a length.

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Have students do place-value exercises on slates.
Level 1: Write 73. Circle the digit in the tens place. Put an X on the digit in the ones place.
Level 2: Write 415. Circle the digit in the tens place. Put an X on the digit in the ones place. What is the value of the digit that is not marked?
Level 3: Write 2,308. Circle the digit in the hundreds place. What is the value of the digit in the tens place? In what place is the 8?

Daily Routines: Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Take out your 12-inch and 10-centimeter rulers. Compare the two rulers. Talk to our partner about how they are the same and how they are different.

Introducing the Centimeter (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up:
Invite students to share the similarities and differences they noticed between the two rulers.

Explain that the space, or interval, between each number is a standard unit of measure called centimeter, which is a unit of length in the metric system. The abbreviation for centimeter is cm. Although people in the United States use the U.S. customary system in everyday life, the metric system of centimeters, meters, kilograms liters, and so on, is used by people in the United States and around the world for scientific purposes. Knowing how to measure in both systems is important.

Distribute the tape measurers to partnerships. Have students compare the tape measurer with their 12-inch and 10-centimeter rulers. Have students share what they notice.

Ask: Why do people need tape measurers if we already have rulers? How can one tape measurer be both 60 inches long and 150 centimeters long?

Have students compare the length of on inch on the 12-inch ruler with the length of a centimeter on the 10-centimeter ruler. Remind students to use halfway marks between numbers on both rulers to help them measure to the nearest inch or centimeter.

Model how to fold a piece of paper at the halfway mark. Ask: Why do we call this the halfway mark? Have students fold a piece of paper at points or beyond the halfway mark and then check which side of the paper is closer to the fold. Use visuals like this to discuss measurements to the nearest inch or centimeter.

Measuring with the 12-inch and 10-centimeter Rulers
Students use their tape measures or their 12-inch and 10-centimeter rulers to measure the lengths of the pictures in Problem 1 and 2 on journal page 87. Students share their measurement strategies and results. Ask: Why do our measurements in inches always come out in smaller numbers than our measurements in centimeters? Help students see that it takes fewer units to measure something with a longer unit (inches) than with a shorter one (centimeter).

Differentiate: To highlight the centimeter and inch intervals on their rulers, have students lightly shade the space between 1 and 2 with a different color. They continue alternating between the two colors as they shade each centimeter or inch space. Then when they use their rulers to measure, they count the shaded spaces.

Students complete journal page 87.

Summarize: Have students share something they learned about measurement.

3. Practice (Partner/Small Group)
Students play the Exchange Game. Reference Book, pp. 146-148; Math Master, p. G21

Differentiate: Students use the double ten frame to place their cubes until they can exchange 10 cubes for a long.

Observe:
– Which students are using efficient strategies to make exchanges?
– Which students can tell you the number represented by the base-10 blocks?
– Students complete Math Journal 1, p. 88.

Lesson 4-11 Matching Facts with Strategies, Measuring a Path, Exploring Arrays. (2 Days)
Students match subtraction facts with strategies, measure a path in inches and centimeters, and explore arrays.

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Pose number stories. Have students share their strategies.
Level 1: At the market, Leyanna bought 12 peaches. Her family ate 6 of the peaches that night. How many peaches are left?
Level 2: Jermaine has 9 books sitting on his desk. He took 4 of the books back to the library. How many books are still on Jermaine’s desk?
Level 3: Wisdom has 13 strawberries in her lunchbox. She ate some of the strawberries at lunch. After lunch, Wisdom has 7 strawberries in her lunchbox. How many did she eat at lunch?
Daily Routines: Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Look at the My Subtraction Fact Strategies Table on journal page 48. Talk with a partner about your favorite subtraction strategies.

Reviewing Subtraction Fact Strategies (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: Invite students to share a favorite subtraction strategy. Encourage them to apply their favorite strategy to solve one or two facts. Some students might use the doubles strategy, whereas others might use the going-back-through-10 strategy.

Assign students in groups to work on the following explorations: (Small Group)

Exploration A: Matching Facts with Strategies
Students independently match subtraction facts from Math Masters, page 110 to strategies they could use to solve them on journal page 89. In small groups, students discuss their reasoning for their pairings, focusing especially on differences in how they matched facts and strategies.

Differentiate: Have students who struggle refer to their My Subtraction Fact Strategies on journal page 48. Consider having students focus on only one or two strategies.
Academic Language Development: Encourage students to explain what they are doing or thinking when they match facts to a strategy. Extend their understanding of the term match in this context.

Exploration B: Measuring a Long Path
Students use the inch side of their tape measures to measure a path taped on the floor. They record the length of each part of the path on Math Masters, page 111 and then find the total length. Students repeat the activity using the centimeter side of their tape measure.

Exploration C: Exploring Arrays
Students use spinner to generate a number and take that number of counters. They build a rectangular array using all the counters and then draw the array. Students then build a different array for the same number and draw that result.

While introducing this exploration, tell students that an array is an arrangement of objects in rows and columns. Display an example of an array.
Summarize: Have students share a strategy they used to make arrays in Exploration C.

3. Practice (Partner/Small Group)
Students use number grids to solve = 10 number stories in Math Journal 1, p. 90, 91

Lesson 4-12 Unit 4 Progress Check

Goals:
– Understand 3-digit place value.
– Read and write numbers in expanded form.
– Compare and order numbers.
– Add multiple numbers using models or strategies.
– Measure the length of an object.
– Select appropriate tools to measure length.
– Tell and write time using analog and digital clocks.
– Use A.M. and P.M.
– Make sense of the representations you and other use.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.

Day 1: Administer the Unit Assessments.
Day 2: Administer the Cumulative Assessment.

Self Assessment (Independent)
Students complete the Self Assessment to reflect on their progress in Unit 4.

2a Assess
Unit 4 Assessment (Independent)
Students complete the Unit 4 Assessment to demonstrate their progress on the Common Core Standards covered in this unit.

Differentiate: Adjusting the Assessment
To scaffold items 1 and 2, provide students with a toolkit clock and label the hour hand and minute hands.
To extend item 3, have students write additional activities they do throughout the day and label them with a time and A.M. or P.M.
To scaffold items 4, 5, and 6, provide students with base-10 blocks and a place value mat.
To extend items 7 and 8, have students use their 6-inch rulers to measure items longer than 6 inches.

Unit 4 Cumulative Assessment

Goals:
– Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
– Determine whether the number of objects in a group is odd or even.
– Express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
– Count by 1s.
– Mentally add 10 to and subtract 10 from a given number.
– Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number-line diagram.
– Tell and write time using analog and digital clocks.
– Solve problems involving coins and bills.
– Read and write monetary amounts.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

2b Assess
Cumulative Assessment
Students complete the Cumulative Assessment. The problems in the Cumulative Assessment address content from Units 1-3.

Differentiate: Adjust the Assessment
To scaffold item 1, provide students with a toolkit clock and label the hour hand and minute hands.
To extend items 2 and 3, provide students with +/-0 and+/-1 problems with larger numbers.
To extend item 4, have students complete number sequences in the thousands.
To scaffold items 5 and 6, provide students with real nickels and quarters.
To scaffold item 7, provide students with a filled-in number grid.
To scaffold item 8, provide students with 18 counters.

Look Ahead
Math Boxes 4-12: Preview for Unit 5 (Small Group, Partner or Independent)
Math Boxes 4-12 are paired with Math Boxes 4-8. These problems focus on skills and understandings that are prerequisite for Unit 5. Use information from these Math Boxes to plan instruction and grouping in Unit 5.

Science
Small Group Exploration
Needle Magnets to make compasses.
Students will work in small groups to assemble needles and pieces of cork. Each group will float the needle in a bowl of water and observe how the needle swings around so one end of it points north. Students will take turns moving the need around and watch how the same end will again point north.

Lab Observation: Students write to explain their observations of the needle magnet compass exploration.

Rollers
Rolling Wheels
Investigation Summary
Students set up cardboard ramps down which they roll plastic disks. They put the disks on slim shafts to make wheel-and-axle systems. They try all kinds of configurations of wheel sizes, axle length, and axle position to get the rolling systems to perform a variety of tricks.
Science Content
– Wheels roll down a slope.
– A slope is a surface that is higher on one end.
– Axles support wheels.
– Wheel-and-axle systems with wheels of different sizes roll toward the smaller wheel.
Teacher Observation/Assessment
– Check to see how well students perform. Note result on paper
Guiding the Investigation
– Review spinning.
– Introduce wheels.
– Demonstrate setting up a ramp.
– Describe working with a partner.
– Distribute ramps and large wheels.
– Discuss early results.
– Distribute axles.
– Make tricky rollers.
– Provide small wheels.
– Allow more wheel construction.
– Show and tell.
– Return materials.
– Teacher visits students as they work.
– Students work with a partner to explore and respond to the inquiry question.
– Students share result.

Wrapping Up
– Making word bank entries No new words were introduced in this part. Review relevant words from previous parts.
– Make content chart entries
Add these new concepts to the content chart: What happens when you put a disk of a different size to one end of the axle? How can you tell which direction that wheel-and-axle system will roll?

Social Studies
What Makes a Good Citizen?
Objectives:
– Identify characteristics of a good citizen such as a belief in justice, truth, equality, and responsibility for the common good.
– Identify ordinary people who exemplify good citizenship.
Vocabulary: justice, public service
Discuss the meaning of a hall of fame. Ask students to name other halls of fame that they have heard of, such as the Baseball Hall of Fame or the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Point out that to win a place in a hall of fame, a person must make an important contribution to a certain field.
Explain that Jackie Robinson is in a real hall of fame-the Baseball Hall of Fame. Discuss the character trait of individualism. Explain that it can be difficult to be yourself when others expect you to act differently. Discuss how Jackie Robinson did not let what other people thought about him keep him from pursuing his dreams, working hard, and setting a good example for others.
Read about: Paul Revere and discuss how he showed patriotism, Sojourner Truth and how strongly she felt about honesty, Helen Keller and her courage to overcome difficult situations, courageous ordinary citizens who risked their lives to do their civic duty when our country was attacked.

Research Project: States
– Teachers will guide students to begin their projects on states using child friendly educational websites. Students will be provided with guidelines to focus on researching information for their assigned states.
– Students will label each state on the U.S.A. map, highlighting their state with color.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of November 30

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We hope you and your family enjoyed a memorable Thanksgiving and holiday weekend.

Students will take the vocabulary quiz from the Motion Unit on Thursday, December 4th. Students can prepare for the quiz by reviewing Chapter 13 in the Harcourt Science Textbook and completing the science assignments.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 13 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students offer rhyming words. Can say “Give me 5” to remind students of 5 word limit.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads the nonsense word groups. Student say the onset sound found in each series. Ex. T: zab, zib, zub, S: /z/
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over enunciate the medial sound. Ex. T: rib, S: rIb
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
– Guided writing: Teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Centers:
– Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3-4 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level two-five sight words
b. Students read informational texts about experiments and investigations
c. A.R. on mini-iPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Greetings in German: “When you say hello, I say Guten Tag”
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Do Your Ears Hang Low?” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 82-83

Day 1:
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Monday, December 1, 2014. We will explain 3-digit number represented by base-10 blocks by making trades or counting.
Inquiry Question:
How might trading 10 tens for a flat help you keep track of your information more easily? Share what you think with a partner.

Video Conference with L’Ecole Vaucanson from Paris at 9:00 a.m.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Motion by Darlene Stille
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part Two: Nonfiction Readers See More Than the Text on the Page
“Today I want to remind you those nonfiction readers can push ourselves to respond to the new things we are learning. We can respond on Post-its or mini- pads to the new things we’re learning, and we don’t just copy down the words on the page. We jot things like: ‘This makes me think ____________.” “This makes me wonder ____________.” “This is just like ____________.” “This surprises me because ____________.’ ”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 6: Student Self-Assessment and Plans
Minilesson
Connection: Build energy for this new session by challenging students to be independent with checking their writing as they are with other second-grade routines. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Build excitement around the second- and third-grade checklist. Demonstrate using the checklist with your demonstration lab report and setting goals for upcoming work. Restate the transferable strategy.
Active Engagement: Set students up to practice using another part of the second- and third-grade checklist. Gather students and reiterate comments students made regarding goal setting.
Link: Restate the teaching point, and set students up for independent work.

Day 2:
Morning Message:
Ni hao Wildcats,
Today is Tuesday, December 2, 2014. During science we will construct and explore how twirly birds work.
Inquiry Question:
What makes twirlers wings and twirler birds spin? Why? Share your ideas with a classmate!

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Roll, Slope, and Slide by Michael Dahl
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part Two: Nonfiction Readers See More Than the Text on the Page
“Today I want to remind you that nonfiction readers don’t just ask questions, we also work hard to answer them. When we have a question about our topic that the page doesn’t answer, we hunt elsewhere in the book—or we pick up another book to find it!”
Tip: “We can use the table of contents and the index in this book and in other books to find answers!”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 7: Remember All You Know about Science and about Scientific Writing for New Experiments
Minilesson
Connection: Remind students that they have “published” their results by sending them into the community, and rally their enthusiasm to do so again, with even more clarity, with another set of experiments Name the teaching point.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Ask students to bring past knowledge and experience, both to hypothesize and to plan their writing about this experiment. Channel students to plan and record a procedure for testing their hypothesis. Organize a fishbowl, with four volunteers going through the experiment that the class has planned, while you coach and the class records. Channel students to record their planned procedures, emphasizing the importance of precise procedures. Encourage them to record their results, including the unit of measurement.
Link: Send students off to test their hypotheses, reminding them to write up their experiment so that others can use and replicate their results.

Day 3
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, December 3, 2014. We will discuss ways to organize the data in a comprehensible and efficient manner.
Inquiry Question:
Why is it important to present data in a clear manner? Explain to a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Aloud: Move It by Adrienne Mason
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part Three: Nonfiction Readers Tackle Tricky Words in Our Books
“Today I want to teach you that when readers come across a hard word in our nonfiction texts, we use all we know to figure out what it might mean.”
Tip: “We can figure out what words mean by reading a little further, consulting the pictures and the sidebars on the page, checking for a glossary, or simply fitting another word in the place of the hard word and then reading on.”
“We use the charts in the room and think of all the different ways we already know to figure these words out. We ask ourselves, ‘What word would sound right here? What kinds of words would make sense?’ ”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 7: Remember All You Know about Science and about Scientific Writing for New Experiments
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Steering Students’ Attention to Data to Think and Write More in Conclusions
Present
Mid-Workshop Teaching—Using Tables to Organize Information: present students with data. Ask them to turn and talk with a classmate to discuss ways to organize the data in a comprehensible and efficient manner. Guide students to see that if they put the data side by side in a table, it will help them understand the information more clearly.
Share: Using Charts and Tables to Present Data
Offer students an example of adapting a chart or table to help analyze and interpret data. Suggest that they too, can innovate to explain and present their data.

Day 4
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, December 4, 2014. We will compare the roles of public officials, including the mayor, governor, and president.
Inquiry Question:
How are the mayor, governor, and president alike? How are they different?
Explain to a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Do-4U the Robot Experiences Forces and Motion by Mark Weakland

Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part Three: Nonfiction Readers Tackle Tricky Words in Our Books
“Today I want to teach you that when readers come across a hard word in our nonfiction texts, we try to pronounce it reading it part by part, then check the text features—pictures, captions, labels—to help us figure out what it means.”
“Sometimes readers will come across a hard word in our nonfiction texts and we may try every strategy we know to figure it out but still not understand what it might mean. When we’ve tried and we still are unsure, we jot it down on a Post-it and try to figure it out with our partner.”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 8: Studying a Mentor Text—The “Result” Page
Minilesson: Review and discuss how scientists organize data.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Discuss students’ work and offer support.
Mid-Workshop Teaching: Remind students to use precise language as they write.

Day 5
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Friday, December 5, 2014. We will identify characteristics of a good citizen such as a belief in justice, truth, equality, and responsibility for the common good.
Inquiry Question:
What characteristics are common in a good citizen?
Explain to a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

Students read independently.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
such, because, turn, here, why, germ, herd, clerk, nerve, serve, fern, food, fuel, build, material, ago
The above words will be tested on December 12.
Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud:
Do-4U the Robot Experiences Forces and Motion by Mark Weakland
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part Four: Nonfiction Readers Can Read More Than One Book about a Topic to Compare and Contrast
“Today I want to teach you that nonfiction readers often read more than one book on topics we love. Then we can compare and contrast the information. We note the ways in which different books on the same topic are organized. We also note that they give us different angles and details about the same topic.”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 9: Comparing Results and Reading More Expert Materials to Consider New Questions
Minilesson
Connection: Remind students of the work they did in the previous session, and suggest that they are ready for the next step. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Compare your results with those of a student in the class who conducted a related experiment, looking for connections and suggesting possible reasons why. Debrief—recall what you did in ways of thinking and writing students can duplicate I their conclusions.
Active Engagement: Set the students up to examine the next set of results you and the student each got, comparing posting questions, and generating possible explanations.
Link: Remind students of the work they have done today, and pair them up in new partnerships so that they can try out the work of comparing results with a different “scientist.” Suggest several paths students may take as they do this work.

Math
Lesson 4-6 Using Base-10 Blocks to Show a Number (Day 1)
Students make sense of a 3-digit number represented by base-10 blocks by making trades or counting.

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Make sense of the representations you and other use.
– Make connections between representations.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk:
Mental Math and Fluency
Teacher will flash a Quick Look Card for 3 to 5 seconds. Students share what they saw and how they saw it.
Differentiation:
Level 1: 8 dots and 2 dots
Level 2: 4 dots and 5 dots
Level 3: 9 dots and 8 dots
(“We do”, whole class)

2a. Focus
Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.
Math Message: Complete journal page 76. You may use base-10 blocks to help you.

Drawing Base-10 Blocks for Numbers
Math Message Follow-Up Have students compare their drawings. Review the base-10 blocks (cube, long, and flat). Discuss the similarities and differences in the numbers and their base-10 representations.

Solving the Open Response Problem (Partner/Independent)
Distribute the Open Response and base-10 blocks. Read the problem as the whole class. Tell students that, in addition to telling who is correct, an important part of the task is explaining how they decided. Ask students to check their thinking. Let them devise their own strategies for counting 10 long as 100.

Differentiate: Discuss the drawing referencing actual base-10 blocks. If students still have trouble, show 1 long and 12 cubes and ask them what number is shown. Bring their attention back to the base-10 blocks for the open response problem and ask how they can figure out what number the blocks represent. For those who have difficulty with writing, supply a sentence frame, such as: “I believe that …is correct because …”, “There are … flats, … longs, and … cubes. I counted them like this…”
Partners may work together to share ideas about the task, but students should complete their own explanations and drawings.

Summarize: How did you show your thinking about which number was correct? Did you use words, pictures, numbers, or something else?

Lesson 4-6 Using Base-10 Blocks to Show a Number (Day 2)
The class analyzes explanations and drawings, and students revise their work.

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Make sense of the representations you and other use.
– Make connections between representations.

2b. Focus
Setting Expectations (Whole Class)
Briefly review the open response problem from Day 1. Ask: “What do you think a complete answer to this problem needs to include?
Revisit the guidelines for discussion from Units 1 and 2. Solicit more suggestions from the class and add items you feel are important.
Provide additional sentence frames to help students respond: I see … in the drawing. I do not see … in the drawing.
Tell students to look at other students’ work to see if they understand how others solved the problem.

Reengaging in the Problem
Students analyze and critique other students’ work in pairs and in a whole-group discussion. Have students discuss with partners before sharing with the whole group.

Revising Work
Return students’ work from Day 1. Have students examine their responses. Ask:
– Did you state who you think is correct?
– Is your explanation, including any drawings, clear enough that someone else could understand it?
Tell students to revise their drawings and explanations. Make base-10 blocks available. Tell students to add to their earlier work using colored pencils or to use another sheet of paper, instead of erasing their original work.

Differentiate: For those who did well on day 1, suggest that they draw a different set of base-10 blocks that also represents the number 354.

Summarize: Display the original problem. Ask: We’ve done other problem before with base-10 blocks. How was figuring out the number here different?

3. Practice (Partner or Independent)
Students complete Math Boxes 4-6 and 4-10.

Lesson 4-7 Playing Target
Students use base-10 blocks to model addition and subtraction of multidigit numbers.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and other use.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Display base-10 blocks. Students represent the number for the base-10 blocks.
Differentiation:
Level 1: 4 longs and 3 cubes. Add 4 more cubes.
Level 2: 5 longs and 7 cubes. Add 3 more cubes. What trade can I make?
Level 3: 7 longs and 5 cubes. How can I remove 6 cubes? What number is shown now?

Daily Routines: Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Complete the Math Message on journal page 78.

Making Exchanges (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: Ask a volunteer to explain the exchange that Luke made. Emphasize that 5 longs and 10 cubes are equivalent to 6 longs.
Distribute base-10 blocks. Have students use longs and cubes to represent the number in Problem 1 and 2 on journal page 78 and answer the questions. Discuss the answers. Have volunteers explain the exchanges they made to use the fewest blocks to show the totals.
Have students represent 56 with the fewest possible blocks. Then have them subtract 7 ones. As you circulate, Ask students to explain how they found the answer.
Pose additional base-10 block problem until most students seem comfortable making the necessary exchanges.
– Show 31. Take away 4.
– Show 34. Take away 15.
– Show 19 and 33. What is the total value?
– Show 35 and 27. What is the total value?
Explain that students will use base-10 blocks to add and subtract while playing Target to 50.

Playing Target to 50 (Partner)
Explain the rule for Target.
Play a few rounds with the class and show students how to record their turns on the Target Record Sheet. When students seem comfortable with the game, have them play in partnership as teacher circulates.

Observe
– Which students are correctly representing their numbers with base-10 blocks?
– Which students seem to have a strategy for deciding whether to make 1- or 2-digit numbers? To add or subtract their numbers?
Discuss
– How did you decide whether to make a 1- or 2-digit number? To add or subtract your number?
– How did you know when to make an exchange?

Summarize: Bring the class together and ask students to talk about the game. Ask: What was easy? What was challenging?

Practicing Place-Value Concepts
Students work on page 79 of their Math Journal.

Lesson 4-8 How Big Is a Foot?
Students measure objects with a foot-long foot.

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Pose 10-more and 10-less problems. Leveled exercises:
Level 1: What is 10 more than 90? 10 more than 100? 10 less than 80? 10 less than 130?
Level 2: What is 10 more than 87? 10 more than 143? 10 less than 93? 10 less that 139?
Level 3: What is 10 more than 93? 10 more than 295? 10 less than 107? 10 less than 204?

Daily Routines: Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: With a partner, read My Reference Book, pages 98-99. Talk about two things you learned from your reading.

Discussing Units of Length (Whole Class and Partner)
Math Message Follow-Up: Have students share what they learned from reading My Reference Book, pages 98-99. Explain that in this lesson the class will learn about the foot and about the importance of using consistence measurement units.

Reading and Discussing How Big Is a Foot? (Whole Class)
Literature Link: Read How Big Is a Foot? by Rolf Myler with the class.
Discuss why the bed in the story didn’t turn out to be the right size.
To emphasize the message in the story, mark off a distance on the floor and measure it in “teacher feet” placed heel to toe. As students to count your steps, point out that you are leaving no gaps between your feet. Record the total number of teacher feet the students count. (“I do. We do”)
Next have a student measure the same distance the same way. Make sure the student leaves no gaps. Record the total in student feet, using the student’s name to record the unit.
Compare the two measurements. Informally develop the idea that it takes more small units than large units to measure something.
Ask: What could we do to make sure we get the same number of the feet every time we measure the marked distance? Does it matter which foot we use if we all agree to use it?

Measuring with a Foot-Long Foot (Whole Class, Small Group)
Show the class a foot-long (12-inch) ruler and explain that the foot is a standard unit of measurement in the United States. Compare it to the standard (12-inch) foot on Math Master, page TA23. Mention that sometimes a foot-long foot is called “the standard foot.”
Students work in partnership to measure the lengths of a few objects around the room. Students measure the objects independently and then collaborate with their partners to agree on an approximate number of feet for each object. Explain that most objects will not have a measurement that is an exact number of feet. For example, a desktop might be a little more than 2 feet wide.
As partners measure objects, provide sentence frames to facilitate their discussions:
– It measures about… feet.
– It is a little less than … feet.
It is about halfway between … and … feet.
Students record their measures on journal page 81.
Differentiate: Provide students with additional cutouts of the foot-long foot so they can line them up heel to toe as they measure.

Summarize: Have students discuss why they and their partner were able to agree on measures when they measure with the foot-long foot.
Have students carefully fold their foot-long foot in half and store it in their journal for use in Lesson 4-9.

3. Practice (Partner/Independent)
Renaming Numbers
Students complete journal page 82 and 83.

Lesson 4-9 The Inch
Students are introduced to the inches as a standard unit of a length.

Goals:
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Show cards and ask students what they saw and how they saw it.
Level 1: 6 dots and 4 dots
Level 2: 9 dots and 5 dots
Level 3: 8 dots and 6 dots

Daily Routines: Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Take out your foot-long foot and one square pattern block. About how many square pattern blocks long is the foot-long foot?

Sharing Strategies (Whole Class)
Have students share their strategies for measuring the length of the foot-long foot with the square pattern block. To check the result, have a volunteer line up square pattern blocks end to end along the length of the line segment and count the total. Ask: How many square pattern blocks long is the line segment?
Explain that today we will learn about a unit of measure called the inch.

Introducing the Inch (Whole Class)
Tel students to examine the cut-out 12 inch ruler. After a few minutes, invite students to share what they notice.
– There are numbers from 0 to 12.
– The spaces between the numbers are the same size.
– Some of the lines on the ruler are longer than others.
– There is a longer line for each number.
– There is a shorter line marked about halfway between each of the numbers.
Explain that the space, or interval, between each number is a standard unit of measure called an inch. The measurement system of inches, feet, pounds, quarts, and so on, which is used for everyday purposes in the United States, is called the U.S. customary system of measurement. Explain how the halfway mark will help when students measure to the nearest inch.
Have students use the 12-inch ruler to measure the length of the foot-long foot. Tell students to always include a unit after the measure so that others will know what it means.

Emphasize that any ruler is made up of equally spaced same-size units.

Have students count the intervals. Ask: How many spaces are there in all on the ruler? How many inches are there on the ruler?
Ask students to count the inch spaces between 6 and 9 on their rulers. Ask: What is the distance between 6 and 9? Read more about measuring with inches on My Reference Book, page 101.

Differentiate: As students count the intervals, have them use a square pattern block instead of a finger so they can see a concrete representation of each space.

Measuring with Different Tools (Partner/Independent)
Distribute six 1-inch square pattern blocks to each partner. Have students use the square pattern blocks to measure the items pictured on journal page 84. Students record the lengths. Teacher circulates to assess. When students are done, bring the class together to discuss their methods.
Next have students use the 12-inch rulers to measure the length of the same items on journal page 84. Students record the lengths. Ask them to share their methods for using the ruler. Ask: How is measuring lengths with the pattern blocks the same as measuring lengths with the 12-inch ruler? Have partners discuss how they could show someone that measuring with pattern blocks yields the same results as measuring with the 12-inch ruler.

Summarize: After a few minutes, have students share their thinking with the whole group.

3. Practice (Partner/Independent)
Students complete Math Journal page 85, 86.

Science
Spinners: Twirlers
Lab Observation:
– Teacher models to students how they might write a lab observation.
– Students work with a partner to discuss how they would write their lab observations.
– Students write independently to explain the following question:
How can air start an object spinning?

Making Twirly Bird
Materials: Twirly Bird sheets, paper clips, and scissors
– Introduce the twirly bird.
– Teacher models to students how to construct a twirly bird.
– Students work with a partner to discuss how they would construct their twirly birds.
– Students construct twirly birds independently from the twirly bird pattern.
– Show and tell.
Wrapping Up Part 3
– Making word bank entries Add these new words to the class word bank: twirler, wing, air resistance)
– Make content chart entries
Add these new concepts to the content chart: How are twirlers, zoomers, and tops the same? What makes twirlers wings and twirler birds spin? What other kinds of things rotate or spin?
– Read science stories.

Share Twirlers
Ask several volunteers to share their twirlers and to demonstrate how they work. Then ask,
– What kind of wings made the twirlers spin fast?
– What kind of wings made the twirlers spin slowly?
– What kind of wings made the twirlers fall slowly?
– What kind of folds did you make to get your twirler to spin?
– How could you change your twirler to make it better?

How Do Magnets Move Things?
Interactive Read-Aloud: Magnets Pulling Together, Pushing Apart by Natalie M. Rosinsky

Objectives:
– Hypothesize how magnets interact with each other.
– Know that one way to change how something is moving is to push or pull it.
– Know that objects can be moved by being pushed and pulled with magnets.
Vocabulary: magnet, pole, attract, repel
Ask students to look around the classroom to see how magnets are being used. Explain that a magnet is an object that can pull things made of iron and steel.
Have students work in pairs to investigate how magnets work. Our hypothesis is “What will happen when you bring together the ends of two magnets?”
Students explore, observe, and record their observations on a chart. They should review their hypothesis to see if it was supported.

Social Studies
Lesson 5: Our Country’s Government
Objectives:
– Describe our nation’s government.
– Compare the roles of public officials, including mayor, governor, and president.
– Identify and explain the significance of the national Capitol building.
– Recognize the Constitution as the defining document for our country’s government.
Vocabulary: Congress, Supreme Court, rights, President, Constitution
Civics and Government: Ask students to recall what they learn about the way local and state governments are organized. Discuss the branches of the federal government. Emphasize that Congress makes the laws for our country, the President carries out the country’s laws, and the Supreme Court sees that our country’s laws work fairly. Discuss that all this work takes place in Washington D.C., our nation’s capital. Explain that Washington D.C. is not a part of any of the 50 states, but instead it belongs to the country as a whole.
Civics and Government: Explain to students that Congress is made up of two parts, or houses, called the Senate and the House of Representatives. Point out that people in each state vote to elect people to represent them in Congress, so that all parts of the country have an equal voice in our country’s government. Tell students that lawmakers elected to Congress work together to make laws that protect all people, not just a few.
Discuss that the people who work in the President’s office make sure that the laws of our country are obeyed. Point out that the members of the Supreme Court are not elected but are appointed by the President and approved by the Senate. Emphasize that the job of the Supreme Court is to make sure that laws passed by Congress agree with the Constitution and are working fairly. Explain to students that along with telling how the government is to be run, the Constitution lists certain rights and freedoms that are guaranteed to all Americans.

Lesson 6: Signs of Citizen Pride
Objectives:
– Identify selected symbols and patriotic symbols such as the U.S. and state flags and Uncle Sam.
– Identify selected symbols such as state and national birds and flowers.
– Explain how selected customs, symbols, and celebrations reflect an American love of individualism, inventiveness, and freedom.
Vocabulary: patriotism, anthem, patriotic symbol, peace
Review the definition of patriotism, which is the feeling of pride people have for their country. Point to the word respect. Lead students to see that when they respect something or someone, they act in a way that shows their regard or honor. Invite students to give examples of ways they show respect each day. Explain to students that each color of the U.S. flag stands for an idea that Americans believe in – red stands for courage, white for purity, and blue for truthfulness. Encourage students to show their understanding by naming actions, people or things that are courageous, pure, and truthful. Point out that each star on the flag stands for one state in the United States. Tell students that each state has its own flag. Display the Illinois flag and discuss the meanings of any symbols on the flag. Explain that when we pledge allegiance to the flag, we are promising to be true to the United States.
Present “The Star-Spangled Banner” by Francis Scott Key. Tell students that it is the national anthem or the official song of the United States. Point out that spangled means “sparkling” or “shining” and that banner is another word for flag. In other words, our flag has shining stars on it. Explain the meanings of words such as hailed, gleaming, perilous, ramparts, gallantly, and o’er. Play the song and invite students to sing along.
Help students recognize that symbols and celebrations in the U.S. reflect Americans’ love of individualism, inventiveness, and freedom. Explain that individualism means being different and standing out from others.
Discuss the bald eagle, Uncle Sam, and the rose and what each represents. Ask students to tell where they have seen these symbols used.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of November 23

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

There will be no classes on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of this week because of the Thanksgiving Holiday. We hope your celebration is memorable. Students return Monday, December 1.

The Winter Assembly will be held Friday, December 19 in the gym. Please mark your calendars because we would love for you to attend. We will notify families of the time of the assembly as soon as we are informed.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 12 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students offer rhyming words. Can say “Give me 5” to remind students of 5 word limit.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads the nonsense word groups. Student say the onset sound found in each series. Ex. T: zab, zib, zub, S: /z/
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over enunciate the medial sound. Ex. T: rib, S: rIb
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Centers:
– Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3-4 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level two-five sight words
b. Students read informational texts about experiments and investigations
c. A.R. on mini-iPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Greetings in Korean: “When you say hello, I say Annyeong haseyo”
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Five Fat Turkeys” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa Wildcats,
Today is Monday, November 24, 2014. We will learn how pictures and captions in nonfiction text add details to what we are reading.
Today’s Question: How does information text differ from other genres? Share what you know with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part Two: Nonfiction Readers See More Than the Text on the Page
“Today I want to teach you that nonfiction readers read more than just the words on the page. We ‘study’ and ‘read’ pictures too. We figure out how these pictures connect with or add to the words on the page.”
“I want to remind you that sometimes we find pictures without any text. When this happens we search for words to explain what the picture is teaching.”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Tip: “We look carefully at the details of the picture and we read the labels, the headings, the sidebars, and any other words that will help us to understand exactly what this picture is telling us and how it connects to the words we’re reading.”

- Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read-Aloud: My First Thanksgiving Feast by Shaivi Patel
Skill: Identifying the point of view of narrator.
Discussion Questions:
– Who is telling the story?
– Why did the author compose the story from the point of view of the turkey?
– Why is using this point of view important for this particular story?

Writers Workshop:
Giving Thanks This Thanksgiving
– Teachers ask: Think about one person you are thankful for this Thanksgiving. Today we will write a letter to tell him or her how you feel and why you are thankful he or she is in your life.
– Students will select an important person in their life to write a letter of thanks.
– Pairs of students will discuss the person he/she has selected.
– Teacher presents think-alouds of scenarios as a means to engage students thinking.
– Teacher will present and discuss an example of a letter on the Smart Board.
– Students work in assigned pairs to share ideas of their letters.
– Students will compose the rough draft of their letters.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Tuesday, November 25, 2014. We will continue to examine and discuss how an object spins in the air?
Inquiry Question: Would the size of the wings of the twirler affect how it spins? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Close Reading: “Breathing Underwater” From Toolkit Texts selected by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis
– Teachers will display the article on the Smart Board
– Teachers will review close reading strategies necessary to answer the following text-dependent questions about key ideas:
1. How are humans similar to the animals in the article?
2. How are the animals different? (“I do”, whole class)

- Small group discussion:
What does the author want us to learn as we read the article? Why do you think that? (“We do”, whole class)
– Students will orally read the passage. (“We do”, whole class)
– Teachers will provide individual copies of the passage to the students.
– The students will reread the text dependent questions orally.
– Students will reread with a pencil using the following annotations; question marks, circling important information/ evidence of the answer to the essential question. (“You do”, independent)

- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read-Aloud: Twas The Night Before Thanksgiving by Dav Pikey

- Student volunteers will share their rough draft of letters of thanks.

- Students edit, illustrate and publish their letters of thanks.

- Students will present their published letters in small groups.

Math
Lesson 4 – 4 Numeration and Place Value
Students will discuss place value and represent 3 – digit numbers using base – 10 blocks and expanded form.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
– Teachers will pose addition and subtraction number stories.
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Emilee read 8 pages of her book last night and 6 pages this morning. How many pages did she read in all?
Level 2: Tayla scored 7 points. Joshua scored 9 points. How many points did they score in all?
Level 3: Ean brought 17 oranges to share with his baseball team. His teammates ate 8 of them. How many oranges does he have left? (“We do”, whole class; small groups)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Math Message
Nicholas thinks that the number 5 in the number 52 is worth the same as the 5 in the number 25. Doe you agree with Nicholas? (“We do”, whole class)
– Student volunteers share their thoughts about the values of the digits in the problem while the teachers chart the students thinking.
(To highlight how the values of 5 are different, write each number as the sum of the values of its digits: 52 = 50 + 2 and 25 = 20 + 5). (“We do”, whole class)
– Teachers explain to the students that they will use base – 10 blocks to make representations of numbers that show the value of digits.

Reviewing Values of Digits
– Teachers display a cube, a long, and a flat reminding students that these are base – 10 blocks. Teachers display and name what the value of each base – 10 is worth.
When displaying a cube: This is a base – 10 cube. It represents 1.
When displaying a long: This is a base – 10 long. It represents 10.
When displaying a long: This is a base – 10 flat. It represents 100.
– Teachers guide students to read p. 71 of “My Reference Book”. Highlight the base – 10 shorthand drawings as shown on the page as a quick and easy way to draw base – 10 blocks. (“We do”, whole class)
– Math helpers disseminate the base – 10 blocks, 0-9 number cards and Place – Value Mats to each pair of students.

Matching Numbers to Base – 10 Block Representations
– Teachers display a Place Value Mat and place 3 flats, 5 longs, and 2 cubes on the appropriate place – value columns. Tell the students that the collection of blocks represents a number.

Ask: How many hundreds are in this number? Have the students place a 3 card in the hundreds column of their Place – Value Mats. What is the value of 3?

Ask: What is the value of the 3? Ask: How many tens are in this number? Have the students place a 5 card in the Tens column of their Place Value Mats. What is the value of 5?

Ask: How many ones are in this number? Have the students place a 2 card in the Ones column of their Place – Value Mats. What is the value of 2?

Ask students to read the three-digit number in unison. Then remind them of the numbers sentences we wrote during math talk. Ask: How could we write a number sentence for this number? (352 = 300 + 50 + 2) Explain that a representation like this, showing the value of each digit, is called the expanded form of a number.

- Teachers repeat the activity with the number 304. Display 3 flats and 4 cubes and ask the children to show the number with number cards on their Place Value Mats.
– Teachers write 304 and 34 on the board. Ask: Which number matches the base – 10 blocks? Which digit in 304 shows there are no longs (tens)? Write 300 + 4 to show the number in expanded form. The expanded form for this number could also be written as 300 + 0 + 4 to show there are no tens.

- Teachers continue to pose different numbers as students use their cards to represent three – digit numbers. (“We do”, whole class in pairs)

Assessment Opportunity
– Teachers observe and note for student accuracy and which students need additional support. (“I do”)

Summarize
– Teachers ask: What are the two different ways you have learned to represent numbers? (base – 10 blocks and expanded form with number cards) (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Playing Odds and Evens
– Students play in partnerships. (“We do”, pairs; small group)

Assessment Opportunity
– Teachers observe and note:
Which students are able to identify odd and even numbers?
Which students are able to write correct number models? (“I do”)

Discuss
How did you know whether the numbers were odd or even?
How did you know which numbers to include in your number models?

Math Boxes
– Students complete journal 1, p. 73. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Lesson 4 – 5 Using Place Value to Compare Numbers
Students will use place value and expanded form to compare 3 – digit numbers.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
– Students count up and back by 100s. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Begin at 100. Count up by 100s to 1,000.
Begin at 900. Count back by 100s to 0.
Level 2: Begin at 220. Count up by 100s to 920.
Begin at 850. Count back by 100s to 150.
Level 3: Begin at 248. Count up by 100s to 748.
Begin at 975. Count back by 100s to 175.

Daily Routines
– Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Math Message
Which number is larger: 220 or 229? Be prepared to explain how you know.

Sharing Strategies
– Students share how they know which number is larger. (“We do”, pairs; whole class)
– Teachers display the numbers on the board one below the other so that the place-value positions are aligned.
– Students compare the values of the aligned numbers starting at the left.
– Teachers remind the students of the meaning of > is greater than. Write 229 > 220 having the students read the number sentence aloud.
Then remind the students of the meaning of < is less than. Write 220 547 as students read the number sentence aloud.

Then display 337 and 325 following the same steps. Display the number sentence 337 > 325. Ask: After we knew there were more tens in 337, did we need to look at the ones? Explain your thinking.

Repeat as many 3 – digit examples as needed. (“We do”, whole class)
– Students complete journal 1, p. 74. (“You do”, independently; “We do”, pairs)

Differentiation
– Students build the numbers with base – 10 blocks or base – 10 blocks on the Smart Board to help them write the expanded form and compare. (“We do”, small group)

Introducing Number Top – It
– Students read the directions to Number Top – It in My Reference Book, p. 170 – 172.
– Students work in pairs to make Place Value Mats by gluing or taping together Math Masters G7 – G8.
– Students fold or cover the thousands and the ten thousands columns of their game mats.
– Teachers model several rounds of the game. (“We do”. whole class)
– Students play. (“We do”, pairs)

Assessment Opportunity
– Students complete the Exit Slip (Math Masters, p. TA8) (“You do”, independent)

3. Practice
Math Boxes 4 – 5
– Students complete the mixed practice in journal 1, p. 75.

Science
Spinners–Twirlers
Twirlers spin as they fall through the air. You may have seen seeds falling from maple trees in late summer. Maple seeds are fitted with little wings that interact with air to rotate rapidly, producing a wonderful visual effect. Spinning slows the fall of the seed, so that a breeze can carry the seed to a location some distance from the parent tree where it will have a better chance to produce a new tree. The effectiveness of a twirler, whether it is a seed or a toy, is influenced by a number of variables – the length of the wings, the amount of twist in the wings, the stiffness of the wings, the weight and length of the body, and so forth. When the twirler is perfectly balanced, it spins smoothly, descends slowly, and lands softly.
Inquiry Question: How can air start an object spinning?
Investigation Summary
Students make twirlers (flying spinners) that rotate by air resistance, first modifying soda straws with wings, and then making twirly birds from paper and paper clips.
Science Content
– Variations in design can influence the rotational motion of spinning objects.
– Air resistance can act as the force that initiates rotational motion.
Teacher Observation
– Check to see how well students compare spinners and whether they know that a force is needed to start the motion.
Guiding the Investigation
– Review spinning.
– Set the challenge.
– Distribute straws
– Split one end of the straw.
– Suggest wings.
– Assemble the twirlers.
– Test the twirlers.
– Teacher visits students as they work for assessment.

Social Studies
Find States and Capitals
Objectives:
– Use symbols on maps.
– Locate states and state capitals on a map.
– Recognize state borders.
Vocabulary: border, capital
Tell students that in this lesson they will find out more about the 50 states and their capitals. Ask volunteers to share what they know about our state capital.
Remind students that each state has its own government. Point out that each state also has a capital, or a city that serves as the center of state government. Explain that state capitals are usually marked on a map in a way that makes them stand out from other cities in the state. This helps people know where to go or where to write if they want to contact their government leaders.
Using the large United States map in our class, point out to students the capital of Illinois. Explain that the star symbol makes state capitals easy to find. Then have students trace the line around our state with a finger. Emphasize that this line is our state’s border with other states and, in some cases, with other countries and/or bodies of water. Then have students trace the border of the continental United States.
Using a map of the United States, students work in pairs to identify states’ borders and capitals.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of November 16

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We extend our warmest thanks for the numerous parents and guardians who attended last week’s parent conferences. I was a pleasure to chat about your child’s progress.

Picture re-take day is Monday, November 17.

The government vocabulary quiz will be given on Friday, November 21. Students were given the vocabulary cards last Friday. Students should study these cards to help them understand concepts and skills covered in class.

There will not be classes on Wednesday, November 26 through Sunday, November 30 in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 11 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students offer rhyming words. Can say “Give me 5” to remind students of 5 word limit.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads the nonsense word groups. Student say the onset sound found in each series. Ex. T: zab, zib, zub, S: /z/
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over enunciate the medial sound. Ex. T: rib, S: rIb
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Centers:
– Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3-4 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level two-five sight words
b. Students read informational texts about experiments and investigations
c. A.R. on mini-iPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Greetings in Vietnamese: “When you say hello, I say Xin chao”
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “The Fox Went Out on a Chilly Night” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Day 1:
Morning meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Monday, November 17, 2014. We will explore different ways to initiate rotational motion.
Inquiry Question: How can spin objects be kept in motion?
Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part One: Nonfiction Readers Read to Become Smarter about Our World and the Things in It
“Today I want to teach you that nonfiction readers train our mind to pick out topic sentences. Nonfiction readers know that text paragraphs have one special sentence within them that tells us the topic of what that entire paragraph is about.”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud
Force And Motion by John Graham

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 3: New Wanderings, New Experiments
Share—Interpreting Scientific Results and Developing Conclusions
Select a partner whose results didn’t match those of the earlier experiment, creating a situation that begs for explanation. Then set that partnership up to share the experiment with the class. Explain to the class that when writing the conclusion page, it is important to ask “why?’ and to speculate about the answers. Channel the whole class to do this work to make sense of the experiment the duo just shared. Tell students that scientists often consult outside sources—other scientists’ experiments, other articles and resources—to help them interpret their own results and write their conclusions. Close class by reminding students that their conclusion pages need to reflect that they have been asking why and developing hypotheses to explain what happen.
Students continue to write about their experiments. They work with an assigned partner to coach each other about their writing.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Tuesday, November 18, 2014. Using the analogue and digital clock, we will practice telling time to the nearest half hour.
Inquiry Question: How are analogue and digital clocks alike? How are they different? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Close Reading: “Breathing Underwater” From Toolkit Texts selected by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis
– Teachers will display the article on the Smart Board
– Teachers will review close reading strategies necessary to answer the following text dependent questions about key ideas:
1. How are humans similar to the animals in the article?
2. How are the animals different? (“I do”, whole class)
Further small group discussion:
What does the author want us to learn as we read the article? Why do you think that? (“We do”, whole class)
– Students will orally read the passage. (“We do”, whole class)
– Teachers will provide individual copies of the passage to the students.
– The students will reread the text dependent questions orally.
– Students will reread with a pencil using the following annotations; question marks, circling important information/ evidence of the answer to the essential question. (“You do”, independent)
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 4: Author Share Scientific Ideas/Conclusions
Minilesson
Connection: Remind students that the previous shared session left them asking why, and channel them to continue speculating explanations for that phenomenon. Coach partners to challenge each other to speak with more clarity. Encourage listeners to try to follow the speakers’ ideas. Accentuate the fact that scientists go through life asking, “Why?” Tell students that this kind of thinking goes into the conclusion of a lab report. Name the question that will guide the inquiry.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Introduce a mentor lab report, and coach writers to research the piece as they read through it, learning how their own writing could go. Scaffold students’ inquiry, collecting their observations on a class anchor chart.
Link: Send students off to revise their lab reports, using all they have learned from the mentor lab report.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, November 19, 2014. We will examine and discuss how an object spins in the air?
Inquiry Question: How can air start an object spinning? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part One: Nonfiction Readers Read to Become Smarter about Our World and the Things in It
“Today I want to remind you of some of the ways that readers can retell our nonfiction texts to our partners. We can retell our texts across our fingers, teaching what we have learned. We can also retell by using special transition words like or, and, however, and but.”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud
Force And Motion “Floating and Sinking” by John Graham

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 4: Author Share Scientific Ideas/Conclusions
Conferring and Small-Group Work—Using Revision Materials and Writing Partnerships to Bring Revision Work to Life
Provide students with an opportunity to talk out their ideas with a partner so that they can practice and grow ideas together. Some students may need additional coaching to talk and get down their ideas. Provide them with prompts such as “Why do you think your hypothesis was correct? One reason is… Another reason is… I think this happens because…”
Students continue to write about their experiments. They work with an assigned partner to coach each other about their writing.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, November 20, 2014. We will discuss how Americans choose their leaders.
Inquiry Question: What are some important characteristics of a good leader? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part One: Nonfiction Readers Read to Become Smarter about Our World and the Things in It
“Today I want to remind you that partners don’t just retell our nonfiction books to each other. We can also ask each other questions to make sure we understand. First, readers teach our partner about what we have learned and then we ask questions like, ‘What does that really mean?’ and ‘Can you give an example of that information?’ ”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud
Force And Motion “Balancing Act” by John Graham

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 5: Scientists Learn from Other Sources as Well as from Experiments
Minilesson
Connection: Channel students to share what they know about what scientists do, then suggest today you will add one more item to their list. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Elevate the idea of learning from a lecture by suggesting this occurs at colleges all the time. Explain that you will give your lecture twice and set students up to take notes.
Active Engagement: Ask students to turn and teach each other what they just learned. Return to your lecture, and this time channel students to listen and take notes in ways that prepare them to talk about their experiments in forces and motion. Then get them talking.
Link: Set students up to read more sources and to take notes about new information to then add into their writing.
Students continue to write about their experiments.

Day 5:
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Friday, November 21, 2014. We will focus on using new vocabulary in our writing to make it sound like an expert scientific report.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to have our writing sound like an expert scientific report? Share what you think with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

Students read independently.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
well, large, must, big, even, grew, stew, drew, chew, few, brew, standard, unit, metric, color, shape
The above words will be tested on December 5.
Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 5: Scientists Learn from Other Sources as Well as from Experiments
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Writer’s Learning Trajectories
“Scientists, you should be using the information you learn from almost every page of your lab report. How many of you have added some of the information you learned into your diagram?—thumbs up. This will make a huge different in your conclusions. You’ll probably end up needing to write big flaps of new information or whole new pages!
“Scientists, whenever you try to learn about a new topic, you should pay attention to the special words that go with that topic. Like if a new kid came to our class and was trying to learn about writing workshop, the kid might pay attention to a word like minilesson or revision. Make sure that you are using some of the new vocabulary in your writing. Think of the important words you learned to make your writing sound like an expert scientific report.”
Students continue to write about their experiments.

Math
Open Response Assessment
Solving the Open Response Problem
This Open Response requires students to apply skills and concepts from Unit 3 to interpret and apply the subtraction strategy of going through 10.
After a brief introduction, (We do”, whole class) students make sense of another child’s subtraction strategy and apply it to a new problem. (“You do”, independent)
Discussing the Problem
After completing the problem, students discuss their strategies. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)
Teachers ask volunteers to describe Grace’s strategy in their own words. Ask: Why do you think Grace subtracted to get to 10?
Teachers ask volunteers to show Grace’s strategy to solve 14 – 8.
Teachers encourage each volunteer to use the number line. Finally, ask for a review a few other strategies students could use to solve 14 – 8.
Looking Ahead
Math Boxes 3 – 12
Students preview skills and concepts for Unit 4 in journal 1, p. 66. (“We do”, partners, “You do”, independent)

Lesson 4 – 1 Clocks and Telling Time
Students tell time to the nearest hour and half hour.
Goals:
– Work with time and money.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.

Vocabulary: estimate, analog clock, minute

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Students count chorally using a class number line. Students may use their individual number lines as support.

Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Count by 5s from 5 to 100.
Level 2: Do start-and-stop counting by 5s. Start one group at 5 and count by 5s to 60. Stop. Start another group where the first group left off, counting by 5s to 125.
Level 3: Do start-and-stop counting by 5s, with the first group starting at 350 and ending at 400. Stop. Have another group start where the first group left off, counting by 5s to 450. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
– Teachers display two clock faces as shown on p. 336 in the TG.
Teachers ask: Which clock shows 4:30? Explain to a partner how you know. Use the words minute hand and hour hand. (“We do”, whole class; partners)

Estimating Time with the Hour and Minute Hands
Have volunteers share their responses and explanations.
– Teachers display the demonstration clock set at 4:00. Have the students observe the movement of the hour hand as the minute hand is slowly moved toward 12 to show 5 o’clock. At several points, teachers stop and ask: What do you notice about the hour hand as you move the minute hand?
-Teachers rephrase the time using the following phrases:
– about ____ o’clock
– just before _____ o’clock
– between _____ and _____ o’clock
– almost _____ o’clock
– Teachers point out that telling time is always an estimate – by the time you say the time, it’s already a little later.
– Teachers demonstrate that the minute hand will always point to the 6 for times that are half-past the hour such as 2:30, 3:30, and 7:30.
Ask questions such as the following:
– If you don’t need to know the exact time, which hand is more important?
– Could you tell the time if your clock had only the minute hand?
– What if your clock had only an hour hand? Could you estimate the time?
Explain.
– Which hand helps you tell the time to the nearest minute?

- Teachers read about the clock’s hour hand on p. 106 of My Reference Book.

Reviewing Units of Time
– Students use toolkit clocks to review the clock’s functions and units of time to answer the following questions:
– How many hours does it take for the hour hand to move from the 1 to the 2? From 2 to the 3?
– How long does it take the hour hand to move completely around the clock face?
– How many minutes does it take for the minute hand to move from the 1 to the 2? From the 2 to the 3?
– Students count the minute marks by fives all the way around the clock.
– How many minutes are there in 1 hour?
– Teachers have students watch the hour hand while moving the minute hand from one hour to the next. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)

Reviewing Time to the Hour and the Half Hour
– Students complete journal p. 67. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)
3. Practice
Practicing with Fact Triangles
– Students use both sets of Fact Triangles to practice addition and subtraction facts. (“We do”, partners; small groups)
Math Boxes 4 – 1
– Students complete mixed practice on p. 68 of journal one. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs)

Lesson 4 – 2 Telling Time to the Nearest 5 Minutes
Students will tell time to the nearest 5 minutes.
Goals:
– Understand place value.
– Work with time and money.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Vocabulary: hour hand, minute hand, analog clock, digital clock

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
– Teachers will point to the class number line while students count chorally. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Count by 5s from 0 to 30.
Level 2: Count by fives from 45 to 90.
Level 3: Count by 5s from 110 to 160.

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
Students use a copy of the 5-Minute Clock to make individual clocks. (“We do”, pairs; individuals)

Math Talk
Telling Time to the Nearest 5 Minutes
– Students use their clocks to show the time school starts. (“We do”, whole class)
– Students share their determined placement of the hour and minute hands.
– Teachers remind students that they reviewed telling time to the nearest hour and half hour in Lesson 4 – 1. In this lesson, students will be telling time to the nearest five minutes.
– Review students understanding of the minute hand by reading My Reference Book, page 107.
– Teachers use the demonstration clock to start a discussion about the movement of the minute hand. Remind students that as the minute hand travels around the clock, the distance between to adjacent numbers represents 5 minutes. Display 9:00 moving the minute hand slowly forward to 9:20, pausing on each number 1 thru 4 chorally reading the time at each 5 – minute interval. Show additional times counting and pausing at each number with the minute hand. Remind students to watch the hour hand moving slowly to the next number over a period of 60 minutes. (“We do”, whole class; partners)

Reviewing Digital Clocks and Notation
– Teachers display 4:30 on the demonstration clock. What time does the analog clock show? Remind students how time is shown on a digital clock as follows:
Numbers are separated by a colon.
The number on the left of the colon tells the hour.
The number to the right of the colon tells the number of minutes after the hour. (“We do”, whole class)

Telling and Writing Time
– Students work in pairs taking turns setting the hands on their clocks and saying and recording the time on paper or erasable boards. (“We do”, pairs)
– Students complete Math Journal 1, p. 69. (“You do”, individuals)

Assessment Opportunity
– Teachers observe and note students’ ability to complete the problems on p. 69 accurately.

Summarize
– Students share some of their examples from Problem 7 on p. 69. (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
– Students play Evens and Odds (“We do”, partners)
Math Boxes 4 – 2
– Students complete journal 1, p. 70. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs)

Lesson 4 – 3 A.M. and P.M.
Students tell time using A.M. and P.M.
Goals:
– Understand place value.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and other use.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.

Vocabulary: A.M., P.M., 24-hour interval

1. Warm Up
– Students use the Class Number Grid of Class Number Line to find the distance from one number to another. (“We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: 17 to 37; 15 to 45
Level 2: 83 to 108; 110 to 76
Level 3: 125 to 158; 156 to 183

Daily Routines
– Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Math Message
Taylor starts school at 9:00 and goes to bed at 9:00. How can this statement be true?

Introducing A.M. and P.M.
– Teachers discuss that there are 24 hours in a day. The first 12 hours of the day (from midnight to noon) are A.M. hours, and the second 12 hours (from noon to midnight) are P.M. hours.
– Teachers use the demonstration clock moving the hands and saying the A.M. hours (12:00 midnight, 1:00 A.M., 2:00 A.M., and so on) and then the P.M. hours (12:00 noon, 1:00 P.M., 2:00 P.M., and so on).

Exploring a 24-Hour Timeline
– Teachers display a horizontal line with arrows on both ends. Explain that a timeline is like a number line on which the intervals indicate time periods. Tell the students that this timeline will show all the hours in one day and is called a 24 – hour timeline. Set the demonstration clock to 12:00 midnight, the start of a new day. Make tick marks at the beginning of the timeline and label them 12, 1, 2, and so on, to 12. Add a bracket above the timeline labeling each 12 hours as A.M. and then the final 12 hours as P.M. (“We do”, whole class)
– Students volunteer to share events that occur during the day, such as getting up for school, beginning the school day, and eating dinner. Each volunteer says a time, including A.M. or P.M. (“We do”, whole class)

Practicing with A.M. and P.M.
– Students draw pictures of events on journal p. 71 that occur at the given times. (“You do, individuals; “We do”, small group)
– Teachers encourage students to refer to the 24-hour time line to help them distinguish between A.M. and P.M.

Assessment Opportunity
– Teachers observe and note students’ drawings on p. 71.

3. Practice
Introducing and Playing Addition Top-It
– Students and teachers read My Reference Book on p. 170 – 172.
– Teachers model a few rounds with a student and show students how to record their number models on the Addition Top – It record Sheet. (“We do”, whole class)
– Students play the game recording the number models to complete the record sheet. (“We do”, pairs, small groups)

Assessment Opportunity
– Teachers observe
What strategies are the students using to determine the sum?
Which students are using the correct comparison symbols on the Addition Top – It Record Sheet?

- Discussion
How did you figure out the sums?
How did you know which comparison symbol to write on the record sheet? (“We do”, whole class)
Math Boxes 4 – 3
– Students complete the mixed practice on journal, p. 72. (“You do”, independent)

Catch –Up and Game Day Friday
Playing Addition Top-It
Students and teachers read My Reference Book on p. 170 – 172.
Teachers model a few rounds with a student and show students how to record their number models on the Addition Top – It record Sheet. (“We do”, whole class)
Students play the game recording the number models to complete the record sheet. (“We do”, pairs, small groups)

Playing Salute!
Students play Salute! to practice addition by solving for a missing addend, which is an important strategy for developing fluency with addition and subtraction facts.
Teachers review the directions for “Salute!” on pp. 162 and 163 of My Reference Book. (“I do”, whole class)
Students play in groups of three, taking turns being the dealer using four cards each of 0 – 10. (“We do”, small groups)
Teachers circulate among groups encouraging students to reflect on and discuss strategies for a more efficient round looking for the following strategies:
Counting back by 1s
Counting back in pieces (by numbers larger than 1)
Counting up by 1s
Counting up in pieces
Think addition, especially with a known or easier fact
Making 10
Near doubles

Telling Time
Students work with an assigned partner to take turns practice telling time using plastic analogue clocks.

Science
Spinners–Zoomers
Zoomers are traditional toys made from a button and a piece of string. The string is passed through one button hole and back through the other and tied to make a loop. With the button in the middle, the string loop around a person’s thumbs. After the button has been twirled around to put some twist in the string, the string is pulled tight. The string unwinds, causing the button to spin. The momentum of the rotating button winds the string the other way. Pulling the string tight again spins the button in the opposite direction. Once the rhythm is established, the spinning can go on indefinitely.
Inquiry Question: How can spinning objects be kept in motion?
Investigation Summary
Students use disks and a length of string to make zoomers.
Science Content
– There are different ways to initiate rotational motion.
– The motion of an object can be changed by pushing or pulling.
– Tops and zoomers both spin, but in different ways.
Teacher Observation
– Check for understanding.
Guiding the Investigation
– Review spinning.
– Introduce zoomers.
– Students construct zoomers.
– Get the zoomers going.
– Students use round disks and squares in the kit to make additional zoomers.
– Visit students as they work.
Interactive Read Loud: Balance and Motion “Move It, But Don’t Touch It” by Delta Education
Adding to the content chart entries:
– How are tops and zoomers the same?
– How do you start the motion of tops and zoomers?
– How can you change the spinning motion of a zoomer?

Lab Observation:
– Students write to explain the following question:
How can spinning objects be kept in motion?

Spinners–Twirlers
Twirlers spin as they fall through the air. You may have seen seeds falling from maple trees in late summer. Maple seeds are fitted with little wings that interact with air to rotate rapidly, producing a wonderful visual effect. Spinning slows the fall of the seed, so that a breeze can carry the seed to a location some distance from the parent tree where it will have a better chance to produce a new tree. The effectiveness of a twirler, whether it is a seed or a toy, is influenced by a number of variables – the length of the wings, the amount of twist in the wings, the stiffness of the wings, the weight and length of the body, and so forth. When the twirler is perfectly balanced, it spins smoothly, descends slowly, and lands softly.
Inquiry Question: How can air start an object spinning?
Investigation Summary
Students make twirlers (flying spinners) that rotate by air resistance, first modifying soda straws with wings, and then making twirly birds from paper and paper clips.
Science Content
– Variations in design can influence the rotational motion of spinning objects.
– Air resistance can act as the force that initiates rotational motion.
Teacher Observation
– Check to see how well students compare spinners and whether they know that a force is needed to start the motion.
Guiding the Investigation
– Review spinning.
– Set the challenge.
– Distribute straws
– Split one end of the straw.
– Suggest wings.
– Assemble the twirlers.
– Test the twirlers.
– Teacher visits students as they work.

Social Studies
Government
Lesson 3: Choosing Leaders
Interactive Read Aloud: Read and discuss the chapter “Choosing Leaders”.
Main Idea: Americans choose their leaders.
Objectives:
– Recognize the importance of leaders throughout history.
– Discuss what makes a good leader.
– Identify ways that public officials are selected, including election and appointment to office.
Vocabulary: election, vote, appoint
Link History with Civic and Government: Ask students to name leaders from long ago whom they have learned about through stories, books, or movies. Encourage students to discuss with partners their impressions of the leaders and their ideas about what it means to be a leader. Point out that just as each person is different, each leader has a different way of leading. Some leaders of long ago were wise; others were careless or cruel. Many years ago, some leaders had the power of life and death over their people. These leaders were looked upon as gods. Whatever they decided became law.

Skill: Making a Choice by Voting
Vocabulary: majority rule
– Remind students that to vote means to make a choice. Explain that in most elections people are choosing the best person to do a specific job. There are several ways to decide who will do the best job. First, a voter should consider the qualities a person would need to do the job. Next, the voter should learn about the person’s qualifications for the job. Reading newspapers, listening to speeches, and watching television news programs are a few ways to learn more about how well each candidate is prepared for the job.
– Remind students about our election for student council. We read the candidates’ campaign posters and listened to their speeches, but we could vote for only two students.
– Ask students to pretend that our classroom is a community that needs a new mayor. Have each table grouping nominate a candidate and prepare that person to give a speech. We make ballots with the candidates’ names on them, cast our ballots for a candidate and count the ballots to determine the winner.

Vocabulary quiz
– government: a group of citizens who run a community
– law: a rule that people of a community must follow
– tax: money paid to the government that is used to pay for services
– vote: a choice that gets counted
– patriotism: a feeling of pride that people have for their country
– consequence: something that happens because of what a person does
– brotherhood: friendship or cooperation
– mayor: a leader of our city
– governor: a leader of our state

Lesson 4: Our State Government
Objectives:
– Compare the roles of mayor and governor.
– Describe state government.
– Identify some responsibilities of state government.
Vocabulary: governor, legislature, property
Civics and Government:
Explain to students that the governor of the state is elected by the voters of that state, usually for a four-year term. Voters in most states elect other state leaders such as lieutenant governor (governor’s assistant), treasurer (in charge of the state’s money), and attorney general (in charge of state’s laws). Point out that, as with a mayor, a governor has the power to appoint other state officials. Students complete a graphic organizer (word web) to organize information about state government as we read the chapter.
– Explain to students that a state legislature can impose taxes and decide how the state government will spend its money. Members of a state legislature are elected by that state’s voters.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of November 9

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We are looking forward to seeing you on Report-card Pickup day, which is Wednesday, November 12.

In order to be considerate to all, please keep your appointment time. Each conference is allotted for ten minutes. However, should you feel the need to discuss your child’s progress further, you can always request another appointment and we will be happy to accommodate.

School will be closed Tuesday, November 11, in honor of Veterans’ Day. Report-card Pickup Day, Wednesday, November 12, is also a non-attendance day for students.

Student picture retake will be held on Monday, November 17th.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! By Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 10 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Students repeat only the one none-rhyming word. Tuesday and Thursday: Eyes open when word pair rhymes; eyes closed when word pair doesn’t rhyme.
Onset Fluency: Teacher identifies the category for the day. Teacher says the nonsense word. Student say “Not (nonsense word), (real rhyming word)! Ex. T: sallow, S: Not sallow, yellow!
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-a-d/, S; pad
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over enunciate the final sound. Ex. T: even, S: eveN
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: lot, S: lot; l-o-t
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word or word part. Students repeat it. Teacher says add/*/ at the beginning/end and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

- Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Centers:
1. Listening Center:  Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study:  Building Fry Sight Words (3-4 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center: 
a. Students practice reading level two-five sight words 
b. Students read informational texts about experiments and investigations
c.  A.R. on mini-iPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Greetings in Chinese: “When you say hello, I say Ni hao”
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Five Currant Buns” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Monday, November 10, 2014. We will identify some governmental services in the community, such as libraries, schools, and parks, and explain their value to the community.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important for the government to provide these services to our communities? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part One: Nonfiction Readers Read to Become Smarter about Our World and the Things in It
“Today I want to teach you that when nonfiction readers begin reading our books we make a quick study of the lay of the land. That is, we glance at the table of contents, the chapter heading, and the subheadings to get an idea of how the text will go.”
“Today I want to teach you that just as we read fiction in a story voice, we read nonfiction with an explaining voice. This voice often explains or teaches new things.”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by John Graham

Session 2: Studying a Mentor Text—Procedural Writing
Share: Self-Assessment
Introduce students to the Information Writing Checklist for Grade 2 and 3.
Students check their writing against the checklist to see if it fits the criteria.

Day2:
Veterans’ Day

Day 3:
Report Card Pick-Up/Parent-Teacher Conferences

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, November 13, 2014. We will construct toys that demonstrate spinning.
Inquiry Question: What causes an object to spin? Share your answer with a classmate!

Shared Reading
A Taste of a Taco
By Rebecca Kai Dotlich

We feast on crackly
shells of corn;
tomatoes diced,
lettuce torn,
and onions in
a snow-white – row
crumble
to the plate below.

Spicy meat
cheesy slivers,
fiery red sauce
spills
a river;
a dribble of taco bit –
before we spoon
the rest of it.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part One: Nonfiction Readers Read to Become Smarter about Our World and the Things in It
“Today I want to teach you that non-fiction readers don’t roar through texts at the speed of lightning. We pause often to collect our thoughts about what we’re learning, and we put all we learned about a topic into different mental containers.”
Tip: “We can use the section headings to help us do this or even create our own section headings for our books when they don’t have any!”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by John Graham
Session 3: New Wanderings, New Experiments
Mini Lesson
Connection: Tell students that just as they revised their lab reports, scientists also revise their experiments. Rally students to design and conduct their own variations on the class’s first experiment. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Lay out some materials that students can use when they devise their own innovations from the initial experiment. Demonstrate your step-by step process: reread your lab report, think about how things could have gone differently, imagine a way to test things out, plan a new experiment, then record it. Recall what you did that you hope students do when conducting their very different experiments.
Active Engagement: Extract from students a recount of what they should do first, next, and then channel them to do those things. Coach into what they do.
Link: Channel writers to review the writing they will be doing during the various stages of the experiment. Get them started writing the first parts of their new lab reports while still in the meeting area.
Students continue to conduct and write about their experiments.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa Wildcats,
Today is Friday, November 14, 2014. We will investigate the stability of spinning tops during science.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Is the top you’re spinning more stable when it’s going fast or when it slows down? Why? Share with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

- Students read independently.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
also, around, form, three, small, mean, clean, peak, dream, beach, team, length, weight, height, temperature, distance
The above words will be tested on November 21.
Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by John Graham
Session 3: New Wanderings, New Experiments
Conferring and Small-Group Work—Coaching Partners to Help Each Other
Explain and demonstrate to students that their job is to envision their partner’s writing and to signal if the writing is confusing or unclear so that the partner knows when he/she needs to go back and revise. “Can you picture each step of that? Wait, I’m confused! What comes next? Can you say more about that?”
Students continue to conduct and write about their experiments. They work with an assigned partner to coach each other about their writing.

Math
Lesson 3 – 11 Exploring Rectangles, Fact Wheels, and Coins (2 Days)
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Work with time and money.
– Reason with shapes and their attributes.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Students cover rectangles with squares, practice addition and subtraction facts on a fact wheel, and make coin stamp booklets.
Vocabulary: square, rectangle fact wheel
1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Students solve number stories.
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Brennan and Gregory are diving for rings and the bottom of the pool. Brennan collected 8 rings. Gregory collected 3 rings. How many rings did they collect together?
Level 2: Mr. Hoang and Kyra are playing checkers. Mr. Hoang won 7 games. Kyra won 12 games. How many more games did Kyra win than Mr. Hoang?
Level 3: Cha Nia has some rolls of yarn that are different colors. She wants to make a sweater with 16 different colors on it. How many colors of yarn does Cha Nia have right now? (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message
Students use stick on notes to cover the front side of their calculators.

Students share their answers and show how they used stick on notes to cover the calculator.
Teachers display two calculators: one covered with 2 stick on notes and one covered with 4 to 6 stick on notes. Have students compare the two ways of covering a calculator.
Teachers ask: On the calculator covered with 2 stick on notes, is there room for 4 more notes? (NO.) 2 more notes? (No.) Why not? (Some parts of the calculator are covered twice or four times) Does overlapping give us a good estimate of how notes it takes to cover the calculator? (No.) Why not?
Teachers explain that if we are estimating how many squares it takes to cover something, it is ok for some space to be left over on the edges.

Exploration A: Covering a Rectangle with Different – Size Squares
Activity Card 43
Students cover the rectangle (Math Masters, p. 86) with 1 – inch, then 2 – inch squares to explore how measurement relates to the size of the unit. (“You do:, individuals; “We do”, partners, whole class)
(In this case, when students use larger squares to cover the rectangle, fewer squares are needed. When smaller squares are used, more squares are needed.)

Teachers gather students to the carpet to discuss their thinking using the following questions:
What did you notice when you covered the rectangle/
How does covering the rectangle with small squares differ from covering it with large squares?
Why did we need more small squares than large squares?
Would it take more large triangles or more small triangles to cover the rectangle?
(“We do”, whole class)

Exploration B: Practicing Addition on a Fact Wheel
Activity Card 44
Students work to solve addition facts shown on a fact wheel. They write the subtraction facts related to the addition facts. (“We do”, partners; small group)

Exploration C: Making Coin Stamp Booklets
Activity Card 45
Students work to make booklets showing various groups of coins. They find the total value of each group of coins.

After completing Explorations on day two, teachers gather students to the carpet to revisit each Exploration and have students share the mathematics they used.

Introducing “What’s My Rule?”
Math Message Follow Up
Students share their strategies they used to solve the Math Message.
Summarize by writing the number model 7 + 3 = 10.

Teachers display a table labeled Tayla and Samantha, and place a unit box and an empty rule box near the table. Explain that this is one way to show the information from the problem. The unit box shows that we are talking about years, and the table shows that Samantha is 7 and Tayla is 10.
Teachers pose additional questions to use to complete the table (eg. If Samantha is 8, how old is Tayla?), and so on. (“We do”, whole class)

Using Function Machines
Teacher display function machines on chart paper. The machines are set to follow certain rules. Introduce the terms input and output.
Teachers model using the first of four function machines.
Teachers read the We know portion at the bottom of each function machine (eg. We know inputs rule Find: outputs)
Have students demonstrate using the function machine explaining their thinking as they complete “What’s My Rule?” tables.

Solving “What’s My Rule?” Problems
Students solve problems in journal 1, p. 56. (“We do”, partners, small groups; “You do”, individuals)

Summarize
Students share with a partner how they used the rule to find the missin input number in Problem 3 on journal p. 56. (“We do”, partners)

3. Practice
Students cut out the Fact Triangles in journal 1, Activity Sheets 4 – 5. (“You do”, individuals)

Math Boxes
Students complete the Mixed Practice in journal 1, p. 57. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Lesson 3 – 12 Progress Check Unit 3
(Day 1)
Unit Assessment
Students complete the Self-Assessment
Assessment items reflect mastery expectations to this point.
Students complete the Unit 3 Assessment to demonstrate their progress on the Common Core State Standards covered in this unit. (“You do”, independent)
Common Goals For MathematicalContent (GMC)
Core State Standards for Mathematics
– 2.OA.2
– 2.NBT.5
– 2.NBT.7
– 2.NBT.9

- Add within 20 fluently.
– Subtract within 20 fluently.
– Add within 100 fluently
– Subtract within 100 fluently.
– Add multidigit numbers using models or strategies.
– Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work.

Science
Interactive Read Loud: Balance and Motion by Delta Education

Spinners
Purpose
In Spinners, students will
– Construct toys that demonstrate spinning.
– Discover different ways to produce rotational motion.
– Explore variables that influence the spinning of tops, zoomers, and twisters.
Science Concepts
– Objects and systems that turn on a central axis exhibit rotational motion.
– The amount and position of mass affect how an object rotates.
– A push or pull (a force) is needed to initiate rotational motion in objects and systems.
Tops
Inquiry Question: How can spinning tops be changed?
Investigation Summary
– Students make tops from plastic disks and shafts, and spin them. After finding the arrangement of parts that produces the best top, they make tops from other materials.
Science Content
– Objects and systems that turn on a central axis exhibit rotational motion.
– You need a force to start a top spinning.
– The amount and position of mass affect how an object rotates.
Teacher Observation
– Check for understanding that speed and mass can affect how an object spins.
Guiding the Investigation
– Introduce motion.
– Propose Tops.
– Describe the top material.
– Distribute the top materials.
– Visit students as they work.
– Discuss top progress.
– Add colorful design to tops.
– Distribute spinning design sheets.
– Observe the path of a spinning top.
– Assess progress: Teacher observation
– Collect materials.
– Discuss top results
– Make word bank entries.
– Make content chart entries.

Lab Observation: Is the top you’re spinning more stable when it’s going fast or when it slows down? Why?

Social Studies
Government
Lesson 2: Community Governments
Objectives:
– Describe a community government.
– Explain a role of a judge in a court.
– Identify some governmental services in the community, such as libraries, schools, and parks, and explain their value to the community.
Vocabulary: mayor, council, court, judge, government, services, tax
Read and discuss civics and government. Remind students that a government is a group of citizens who run a community and that these people are usually elected to office by other citizens. Point out that even a small community needs a government to make decisions and provide services to citizens. Give an example of a school board and explain the kinds of decisions the members of the board make. Ask:
“If community leaders visited our classroom, what would you want to talk to them about?”
“What are some ways a town meeting could be a better way to make decisions than to have a few people in a community make decisions? What are some problems with this way of getting things done?
Civic and Government
Explain that sometimes in a courtroom, the judge makes a decision alone, and sometimes, a judge and a jury, or group of citizens, work together to make a decision. In addition to deciding whether a person has broken a law, courts also settle disagreements between two people or between a person and a business. For example, two people may go to court because they cannot agree on the boundary between their houses. Or a person might think a business did or did not do what it said it would do. Ask students to brainstorm with a partner why local governments need courts and judges. Have students share and chart their answers.
Read and discuss services provide by the governments.


Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of November 2

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

In order for us to enter grades into IMPACT in a timely manner, the FOSS Air and Weather Unit Test will take place on Wednesday, November 5 instead of Thursday, November 6 as previously mentioned. We will review concepts learned in class from lab investigations, and students will complete a study guide in class to prepare for the test.

A copy of the conference schedule will be sent home with students on Wednesday, November 5 to remind you of your conference time. We are looking forward to seeing you on Report-card Pickup day, which is Wednesday, November 12.

In order to be considerate to all, please keep your appointment time. Each conference is allotted for ten minutes. However, should you feel the need to discuss your child’s progress further, you can always request another appointment and we will be happy to accommodate.

Friday, November 7 is a non-attendance day for students. (It’s a Professional Development Day for staff.)

School will be closed Tuesday, November 11, in honor of Veterans’ Day. Report-card Pickup and Parent Conferences will be held Wednesday, November 12, and is also a non-attendance day for students.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed!by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 9 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Students repeat only the one none-rhyming word. Tuesday and Thursday: Eyes open when word pair rhymes; eyes closed when word pair doesn’t rhyme.
Onset Fluency: Teacher identifies the category for the day. Teacher says the nonsense word. Student say “Not (nonsense word), (real rhyming word)! Ex. T: sallow, S: Not sallow, yellow!
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-a-d/, S; pad
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over enunciate the final sound. Ex. T: even, S: eveN
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: lot, S: lot; l-o-t
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word or word part. Students repeat it. Teacher says add/*/ at the beginning/end and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Centers:
– Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3-4 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level two-five sight words
b. Students read informational texts about experiments and investigations
c. A.R. on mini-iPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Greetings in Japanese: “When you say hello, I say Konnichiwa”
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Five Waiting Pumpkins” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Monday, November 3, 2014. In the writing workshop, we will learn how to write lab reports and science books.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why do scientists write? Explain to a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit Three
Characters Face Bigger Challenges — and So Do Readers
Part One: Getting to Know Our Characters’ Wants and Troubles
“Today I want to teach you that we can get to know the characters in a book well by paying attention to their wants and problems. We do this even as we get ready to read by looking at the title and the blurb on the back of the book and asking, ‘What kind of problem will this character face?’ or ‘What does this character want?’ We can then use our answers to these questions to help guide our observations and jottings as we read right from the very first page of the book.”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book

Interactive Read Aloud:
Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson

Session 1: Learning to Write about Science
Mini Lesson
Connection: Ask students to visualize the kinds of writing work scientists do, and then describe that work. Confirm that scientists do write to plan, to record what happened, adding that they also write to teach. Explain that in this unit, students will first write like scientists do when the goal is to learn. Establish the format of today’s lesson: students will be guided through the process of conducting an experiment and writing within each step of that experiment. Name the teaching point.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Teach through guided practice: Take students through the process of doing an experiment and writing a lab report. Coach them as they form and record a hypothesis, then conduct and record the experiment. Channel students to plan and record a procedure for testing their hypothesis. Ask the volunteers to share their planned procedures, naming the precise steps they will follow and to then conduct one leg of the experiment in front of the class. Channel students to record results, including the unit of measurement. Channel the class to conduct multiple trials. Debrief—reiterate for the class what the volunteers did that you are hoping all writers have learned to do.
Link: Set students up to conduct and record the second leg of the experiment with more independence, while still in the meeting area, contrasting the results from this trial with those from the earlier trail.
– Students write their lab reports.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Hola Wildcats.
Today is Tuesday, November 4, 2014. We will learn how to use the going – back – through – 10 strategy for subtraction.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why does stopping at 10 make it easier to subtract from a teen number? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit Three
Characters Face Bigger Challenges — and So Do Readers
Part One: Getting to Know Our Characters’ Wants and Troubles
“Today I want to teach you that as we go forward in our reading of a book, we carry and build an understanding of who the characters are. In the beginning of our books we hold in our heads the information we learned from reading the blurb. As we read, we begin to add new information about the setting and characters’ lives. We read on, expecting that soon, a problem will show up.”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book

Interactive Read Aloud:
Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson

Session 1: Learning to Write about Science
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Engagement
Share: Writing Like Scientists
Ask writers to show partners where they did each of the kinds of writing you have explained and listed as the components of a lab report. Chart:
To Write Like a Scientist…
1. Ask a question about how the world works.
2. Record a hypothesis, a guess.
3. How will you test it? Record your procedure.
4. Conduct multiple trials, and record your results.
5. Analyze your results, and write a conclusion.
– Students write and revise their lab reports.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, November 5, 2014. We will practice the going – up – through – 10 strategy for subtraction.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why is it helpful to go up ten? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit Three
Characters Face Bigger Challenges — and So Do Readers
Part One: Getting to Know Our Characters’ Wants and Troubles
“Today I want to teach you that while reading we make predictions about what will happen to a character. We often think about the problems that a character faces and ask, ‘What would I do if I had this problem? How would I try to work it out or get what I want?’ ”
Tip: “Readers make predictions about their characters by paying close attention to the patterns in a character’s behavior. They think, ‘Does this character act a certain way over and over again? What does that make me think about how she will work out her problem?”

- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book

Interactive Read Aloud:
Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson

Session 2: Studying a Mentor Text—Procedural Writing
Connection: Help students understand the purpose of writing up their experiments with exact, precise information. Then name the question that will guide the inquiry: What does a scientist do when writing the procedure section of his or her lab report? How do procedures go? Name the question that will guide the inquiry.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Set students up for a mini-inquiry, preparing them to study a mentor text for something they could try in their own writing. Introduce the mentor text, encouraging students to study it. Chart students’ observations about the mentor procedural text.
Link: Explain that writers will all begin anew, writing a whole new procedural page, and set them up to imagine how it will be much better. Reiterate the importance of precise procedures, and channel all students to disassemble their books, removing their old procedure pages and replacing them with blank pages.
– Students write and revise their lab reports.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Ni hao Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, November 6, 2014. In social studies, we will discuss how laws and rules are alike and why laws are important for our community.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What would happen if our class had no rules? Explain to a classmate.

Students take the spelling test.

Reading Workshop
Unit Three
Characters Face Bigger Challenges — and So Do Readers
Part One: Getting to Know Our Characters’ Wants and Troubles
“Today I want to teach you that readers don’t only make predictions at the beginning of our books, we also confirm or revise predictions as we go along. If what happens in the story matches what we predicted would happen, we notice that and carry our prediction with us as we read on. If what happens in the story does not match what we predicted, then we need to revise our thinking.”
Tip: “Readers read on and create new predictions about what will happen, and then we read on with this revised prediction in mind.”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
set, put, end, does, another, head, bread, dead, sweat, deaf, spread, rock, mineral, break, weather, soil
The above words will be tested on November 14.
Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book

Interactive Read Aloud:
Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson

Session 2: Studying a Mentor Text—Procedural Writing
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Channeling Students to Use Mentors from Start to Finish
Mid-Workshop Teaching
Noticing More in the Mentor Text
Teach students to reread the mentor text or other books containing experiments, noticing yet more that they could try. This support scaffolds the students in naming strategies they admired when they studied the mentor text.
– Students write and revise their lab reports.

Day 5:
Professional Development Day for Staff, Non-Attendance Day for Students

Math
Lesson 3 – 8 Using Double to Subtract
Students use double to solve subtract facts.
Goals:
– Subtract within 20 fluently.
– Use subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Vocabulary: think – addition strategy, related facts

1.Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Students solve subtraction number stories and share their strategies with the whole class. (“You do”, individuals; “We do”, partners; “We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Isaiah gathered 8 leaves for a science project. Hew only needed 4. How many extra leaves did he gather?
Level 2: Johanna had 15 oranges. She shared 6 with her friends. How many does she have left?
Level 3: Jalene had 38 pages left to read in her book. She read 9 pages before bed. How many pages does she have left?

Daily Routines: Students complete daily routines (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
Students solve the following subtraction number story.
Mia had 16 stickers and then gave 8 to her sister. How many stickers does Mia still have? (“You do”, individuals; “We do”, partners)

Using Think – Addition with Doubles
Students share how they figured out the number of stickers Mia stills has. (“We do”, whole class)
Some students may have used the think – addition strategy, using the double 8 + 8 = 16 to help them solve the number story.
If the think – addition strategy is not mentioned, the teachers will ask the following:
“What do I need to 8 to get 16?” Then write 8 + __ = 16. “What addition fact could help us figure this out? What do you notice about this fact? Yes, it’s a double” (“We do”, whole class.
Teachers remind students that doubles facts are one type of helper fact we can use to figure out unknown facts. Related facts are groups of addition and subtraction facts that use the same numbers, such as 2 + 3 = 5, 3 + 2 = 5, and 5 – 2 = 3.
Students work to create another subtraction number story they can solve with the help of a doubles fact.
Differentiate
Teachers list a few doubles facts and their related subtraction facts and discuss how they can use doubles to solve the subtraction facts. As students needing additional support solve and share their stories, help them identify helper double facts in each used. (“We do”, small group, individuals)
For example:
Ian has 14 new colored pencils in his desk. He sharpened 7 of them. How many pencils does Ian have left to sharpen?

There are 18 baseball players warming up on the baseball field. There are 9 players from the home team. The rest of the players are from the visiting team. How many players are from the visiting team?

Note: Giving students opportunities to find their own names for fact strategies can help foster a sense of ownership of the strategies.

Using Double to Subtract
Teachers guide students to think more broadly about using addition doubles to solve to help them subtract. Teachers ask: “How did we use addition doubles to solve other addition facts?”
Teachers display the following:
6 + 7 = ____
5 + 6 = ____
9 + 8 = ____
Students work together to record a double that is close to these facts on slips of paper.
Groups of students share their thinking. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)
Differentiate
Teachers pose one or two more subtraction facts asking the following:
“What is a related addition fact?”
“What did you notice about the related addition fact?”
“Is it close to a doubles fact?”

Students complete journal 1, p. 58.

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers circulate, check, and note whether students are correctly identifying opportunities to apply the new subtraction strategy. (“You do”, individuals)

3. Practice
Practicing with Fact Triangles
Students practice addition and subtraction facts using the fact triangles they cut out in lessons 3 – 3 and 3 – 7. (“We do”, partners)

Lesson 3 – 9 Going – Back – Through – 10 Strategy for Subtraction
Students will use the going – back – through – 10 strategy for subtraction.
Goals:
– Subtract within 20 fluently.
– Use subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
– Represent sums and differences on a number-line diagram.
– Make connections between representations.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.

Vocabulary: friendly number, going back through 10

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Students solve simple addition and subtraction problems. Students may use their number as support.

Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: How many spaces are there from 23 to 33? From 16 to 26?
Level 2: How many spaces are there from 38 to 43? From 45 to 74?
Level 3: How many spaces are there from 63 to 51? From 136 to 147?

Students share solution strategies. (“You do”, individual; “We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math message
Students write a number model for this story.
Karla is riding the elevator of her apartment building. She gets on the elevator at floor 16. Karla rides down 7 floors to her aunt’s apartment. On what floor is her aunt’s apartment? (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Sharing Strategies
Have students share their number models.
Teachers display 16 – 7 = ? and ask: “What part of the story does the question mark represent?”
Teachers explain that you are going to repeat the same number story, but with additional information.
Karla is riding the elevator of her apartment building. She gets on the elevator at floor 16. She rides down 7 floors to her aunt’s apartment. She stops at floor 10 along the way. On what floor is her aunt’s apartment?

Assessment Opportunity
Students draw a picture to represent the number story.
Teachers circulate and observe, looking for pictures that clearly show how Karla’s elevator ride is split into two parts: one from floor 16 to floor 10, and the other from floor 10 to floor 9. (Note: If no students clearly show this thinking, use the sample student picture on p. 301 in the TG.)

Teachers explain that Karla’s elevator ride can be shown on a number line.
Teachers draw an arc on the number line beginning at 16 back to 10 and display the number model 16 – 10 = 6. Then teachers circle 6. Ask:” Why does stopping at 10 make it easier to subtract from a teen number?” Explain that 10 is a friendly number because teen numbers can be broken into a 10 and one or more 1s., and because students are familiar with groups of tens.
Teachers say: “Taking away the two parts, 1 and 6, which is 7 from 16, gives us the final answer: 9”.

Teachers pose additional problems as needed. Tell the students that this strategy for solving subtraction problems is called going back through 10. In today’s lesson you will continue thinking about ways to break apart numbers and use the friendly number 10.

Academic Language Development
Teachers provide charted sentences frames to help students think sequentially about the steps they take in going – back – through – 10 strategy. For example: To solve 17 – 8 = ?, I know that 17 – 7 = 10. So I know that 17 – 8 = 9 because I took away 7, but I need to take 8 away in all. So I have to take away 1 more. (“We do”, whole class; small groups)

3. Practice
Going Back Through 10
Students complete journal 1 pp. 60 -61. (“You do”, individuals; “We do”, partners)

Teachers gather students on the carpet to discuss their thinking. (“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes
Students complete the Mixed Practice in journal 1, p. 62. (“We do”, pairs; “You do”, individuals)

Lesson 3-10 Going – Up – Through – 10 Subtraction Strategy
Students will use the going – up – through – 10 strategy for subtraction.
Goals:
– Subtract within 20 fluently.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Represent sums and differences on a number-line diagram.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary: going up through 10

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers flash the following sequence of Quick Look Cards: 101, 112, and 120.
(“We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Quick Look Card 101 Double Ten Frame with 6 dots on the left frame, and 6 dots on the right frame.
Level 2: Quick Look Card 112 Double Ten Frames with 8 dots on the left frame and 6 dots on the right frame.
Level 3: Quick Look Card 120 Double Ten Frame with 9 dots on the left frame and 8 dots on the right frame. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
Students solve problem 1 on journal 1, p. 63. (“You do”. Individuals; “We do”, partners)

Going up Through 10
Teachers circulate, observe and note students who broke the total distance (the length, or number of spaces, between two numbers on the number line) into two parts from 8 to 10 and from 10 to 17, and then added 2 plus 7 to find the total of 9 miles.

Sharing Strategies
Teachers ask students to share how they used the going up to 10 strategy to solve the story. If no students use the strategy, teachers will display and discuss how to solve problem 1 using the going up to 10 strategy. (“We do”, whole class)

Practicing Going Through 10
Students solve problem 2 on journal p. 63 by going through 10. They show on the number line how to solve the problem by either going up to 10 or back through 10.

Going Up Through10
First find the distance from 7 to 10 (3) and then find the distance from 10 to 15 (5). Finally, add the distances together for a total of 8. So 15 – 7 = 8.

Going Back Through 10
Start from 15. Take away 5 (to land on 10) and then take away 2 more (to land on 8). So 15 – 7 = 8.

Summarizing Subtraction Strategies
Students discuss the following question: If you want to solve a subtraction fact that you don’t know, what strategies could you use?
Teachers pose a few subtraction facts to provide a context, such as 12 – 6, 15 – 8, and 16 – 7.
Encourage students to refer to their My Subtraction Fact Strategies table on journal page 48.

Teachers record their strategies on Class Data Pad as the discussion continues about each of the following strategies:
think addition, counting up, going back through 10, counting back, going up through 10, using double to subtract

Assessment Opportunity

Teachers circulate, observe and note students’ review of strategies on journal p. 48.

3. Practice
Playing The Exchange Game
Students play The Exchange Game to practice exchanges between $1, $10, and $100 bills.
My Reference Book pp. 146 – 148
Math Masters, p. G14 (“We do”, partners; small groups)

Math Boxes
Students complete the practice in journal 1, p. 64. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Game/Catch up Day
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

- Playing Salute!
Students play Salute! to practice addition by solving for a missing addend, which is an important strategy for developing fluency with addition and subtraction facts.
Teachers review the directions for “Salute!” on pp. 162 and 163 of My Reference Book. (“I do”, whole class)
Students play in groups of three, taking turns being the dealer using four cards each of 0 – 10. (“We do”, small groups)
Teachers circulate among groups encouraging students to reflect on and discuss strategies for a more efficient round looking for the following strategies:
Counting back by 1s
Counting back in pieces (by numbers larger than 1)
Counting up by 1s
Counting up in pieces
Think addition, especially with a known or easier fact
Making 10
Near doubles
Subtraction/Addition Top It

- Playing Name That Number
The teacher reviews the rules for the game using
My Reference Book pp. 154 – 155; Math Masters p. G16
The teacher plays a sample or two rounds to demonstrate how to play. (“I do”)
Students use one or more operations to name a target number. (“We do”, small groups)
– Assessment Opportunity
The teacher observes which students are making appropriate names for the target umber, and which students need additional support. (“I do”)
The teacher poses the following questions:
– How did you and your group work together?
– How is the target number like the tag (number at the top of the name – collection box) in a name collection – box? (“We do”)

- The Fact Triangles Routine
The teacher demonstrates the procedures for Fact Triangle Routine.
1. Partner A covers one corner of a Fact Triangle with a finger or thumb concealing part of an addition or subtraction fact.
2. Partner B says the complete fact.
3. Partners trade roles and repeat
Practice
Partners use their fact triangles to practice addition and subtraction facts. (“We do”, partners)

Science
Review for the unit test.
– Air is matter and takes up space.
– Air is all around objects.
– Air resistance affects how things move (i.e. parachute).
– Air can be compressed.
– The pressure from compressed air can move things.
– Weather describes conditions in the air outside.
– Meteorologists are scientists who study the weather.
– Scientific journals record what is observable.
– Temperature describes how hot or cold the air is.
– Temperature is measured with a thermometer.
– The unit used to measure temperature is degrees Celsius (C) or degrees Fahrenheit (F).
– There are three main types of clouds: cirrus (high and feathery), cumulus (puffy like cotton candy), and stratus (low and stretched out like a blanket).
– Clouds are made of water drops.
– Wind moves clouds in the sky.
– Meteorologists use rain gauges to measure how much rain or snow has fallen.
– Natural sources of water include streams, rivers, lakes (fresh water), and the ocean (salt water).
– Bubbles are filled with air.
– Wind is moving air.
– Bubbles can show the changing direction and speed of the wind.
– Meteorologists use a wind scale to describe the strength of the wind.
– Meteorologists use an anemometer to measure the speed of wind.
– A pinwheel provides evidence about how fast the wind is blowing.
– Meteorologist use wind vanes to observe the direction of the wind.
– A wind vane points in the direction the wind is coming from.
FOSS Air and Weather Unit Test

Social Studies
Our Government
Introduce the Unit
Objectives:
– Use a visual to predict content.
– Interpret a quotation.
– Use a K-W-L chart to prepare for the unit.
Tell students that in this unit, they will learn about the government and laws of cities, states, and our nation.
Present the quote “The government is us: we are the government; you and I.” by Theodore Roosevelt and explain that he was the 26th President of the United States. Ask students to tell what they think the quote is saying. Ask why they agree with the quote or why not.

Use the K-W-L chart to list and discuss what students know and want to learn about government and citizenship.

Preview the Vocabulary: government, law, tax, patriotism, vote
Objective:
– Use visuals to determine word meanings.
– Use words and visuals to predict the content of the unit.
Interactive Read Aloud: Community Rules – Making and Changing Rules and Laws in Communities by Jake Miller
Have students look at the pictures from the book when explaining the vocabulary. Begin a shape summary with the word government at the top. Add the rest of the vocabulary words as branches. Ask students to work with a partner to describe how they think each word is related to government. Have students share answers with the class.
– Students work independently to write sentences using each of the vocabulary words.
Lesson 1: Getting Along in a Community
Objectives:
– Identify functions of government.
– Describe how governments establish order, provide security, and manage conflict.
– Recognize laws in the community and the consequence of breaking them.
Vocabulary: government, law, consequence, order
Read lesson 1. Ask students to share knee-to-knee some ways to get along with others in a community. Chart students’ responses. Explain that the word brotherhood doesn’t refer only to boys and men; it refers to all people. Alternative words could be friendship or cooperation.
Discuss with students the need for order or safety in a school or community. Ask what school would be like if no one were in charge.
Read and discuss civics and government. Have students break out in groups to give examples of laws in their community. Ask how laws and rules are alike and why laws are important to our community. Point out that laws help people in a community live together safely and peacefully, and that some laws protect citizens’ health and safety, and others preserve order or protect property.
Students work in groups to take turns naming laws in their community. The other group members should think of a suitable consequence for breaking the law.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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