Picture Day

Picture day is Wednesday, October 29 instead of Thursday, October 30. Sorry for the mistake.

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Week of October 26

Dear Parents and Caretakers,

The World Language Field trip permission slip and fee were due last Friday, 10/24. We need both on Monday. Legally, students cannot attend a field trip without a signed permission slip.

Picture day is Wednesday, 10/29. A notification was sent home last Wednesday.

The social studies Community Unit Test will take place Friday, 10/31. The study guide will be sent home on Monday, 10/27. Please refer to it to assist your child to prepare.

The FOSS Air and Weather Unit Test will be administered Thursday, 11/6. We will review concepts learned in class from lab investigations. Additionally, students will complete a study guide in class to prepare for the test.

Report card pick-up/conference day is only about two weeks away on Wednesday, November 12. Please stop by our school to sign up if you haven’t done so. The sign-up sheets are posted on the wall next to our classrooms’ doors. If you do not sign up by November 4, we will assign you one of the available slots so that a copy of the conference schedule can be sent home with students on November 5.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! By Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 8 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Students repeat only the one none-rhyming word. Tuesday and Thursday: Students repeat only the two rhyming words.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads word pairs. Students do “Thumbs Up” if the words begin with the same sound. “Thumbs Down” if they do not.
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: g-o, S; go
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers reads word pairs. “Thumbs Up” if the words end with the same sound. “Thumbs Down” if not.
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: go, S: go; g-o
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add/*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
Language Awareness: Teacher says the sentence. Students repeat the sentence, and then say the sentence while counting the words by raising fingers. Students then say how many words were in the sentence.
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level one sight words
b. Students read informational texts about the weather (A Child’s book about Weather, Storms, A Man Who Named the Clouds)
c. A.R. on mini- iPads
4. Accelerated Reading in library (Monday 103; Tuesday 106; Wednesday 103 and 106)

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Greetings in Spanish: The class sings “Buenos días” Spanish Greeting Song
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Frog Went A-courting” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa Wildcats,
Today is Monday, October 27, 2014. In social studies, we compare and contrast between needs and wants.
Today’s Inquiry Question: When might a want become a need? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit Two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Today I want to teach you that readers can smooth out our reading and make it sound more like talking by going back to reread the phrase or sentence with the new word in it. Readers know that to really learn a new word they must try to say the word in context. Saying the word soon after figuring it out will help us remember the word for a long time.”
– Chart and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Punctuation Takes A Vacation by Robin Pulver
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
– Each student begins recopying his/her edited “Small Moment” story. Students will illustrate their stories with watercolor paints and watercolor paper to create a story book.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Good Morning Wildcats,
Today is Tuesday, October 28, 2014. We will review what we learned about the FOSS Weather Unit.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How do we protect our water resource? Share your thinking with a partner.

Reading Workshop
Unit Two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Today I want to remind you that while retelling a story, we can try to make sure to use the new words we’ve learned.”
Tip: “Using new words often helps make sure that the new word is remembered.”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

World Language Field Trip 9:10a.m.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, October 29, 2014. We will discuss and practice using the counting- up and counting-back strategies to solve subtraction problems.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Look at the following problems:
54 – 51 =
84 – 7 =
Which problem is best to count up? Which is best to count back? Share what you think with a classmate.

Interactive Read Aloud: Flash, Crash, Rumble and Roll by Franklyn M. Branley

- Students read independently until picture time.

Picture Day

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
– Each student begins recopying his/her edited “Small Moment” story. Students will illustrate their stories with watercolor paints and watercolor paper to create a story book.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, October 30, 2014. We will read and discuss about thunderstorms in science.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why are thunderstorms important? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading
“How Big is the Atlas Moth?”
By Deborah Ruddell

If she settles in the middle
of the pillow on your bed,
you’ll barely have a corner left
to rest your tired head.

Of course, you’ll be uncomfortable,
But still – for what it’s worth –
You’ll get to share your pillow with
THE BIGGEST MOTH ON EARTH!

Reading Workshop
Unit Two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Sometimes, while working to figure out an unknown word, readers can lose track of what is happening in the story. Today I want to remind you that we can then get our reading back on track by touching each page to retell the big parts of the story.”
Example: “We can say things like, ‘Okay, so this is the part when ____________ and this is the part where ____________.’ ”
– Chart and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
– Each student begins recopying his/her edited “Small Moment” story. Students will illustrate their stories with watercolor paints and watercolor paper to create a story book.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Ni hao Wildcats,
Today is Friday, October 31, 2014. We explore strategies for finding missing numbers and missing rules in “What’s My Rule?” problems.
Today’s Inquiry Question: If my input number is 2 and my output number is 4, what are the possible rules for this problem? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
boy, follow, came, want, show, nurse, curve, turn, burn, curl, purse, growth, affect, gravity, stress, fruit
The above words will be tested on November 7.
Teacher display the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication
Writing Workshop
– Reading Aloud for Visitors –An Author’s Celebration:
In this publishing party, students will read their personal narratives aloud to their buddies (103 and 106) and visitors.

Math
Lesson 3 – 4 Playing Salute!
Students play Salute! to find missing addends.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Record comparisons using >, =, or, , <, =)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1:
10 ___ 8
19 ___ 21
Level 2:
113 ___ 131
767 ___ 676
Level 3:
2, 909 ___ 2, 990
8, 418 ___ 8,148

Daily Routines: Students complete daily routines (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
Teachers display a name collection box for the number 16.
Students write as many different names for the number 16 as they can. (“We do”, pairs)
Sharing Equivalent Names
Students share their equivalent names for the number 16.
Teachers encourage students who have not included subtraction names for 16 to write one or two subtraction names. (“We do”, whole class)

Introducing and Playing Salute!
Students play Salute! to practice addition by solving for a missing addend, which is an important strategy for developing fluency with addition and subtraction facts.
Teachers review the directions for “Salute!” on pp. 162 and 163 of My Reference Book. (“I do”, whole class)
Students play in groups of three, taking turns being the dealer using four cards each of 0 – 10. (“We do”, small groups)
Teachers circulate among groups encouraging students to reflect on and discuss strategies for a more efficient round looking for the following strategies:
Counting back by 1s
Counting back in pieces (by numbers larger than 1)
Counting up by 1s
Counting up in pieces
Think addition, especially with a known or easier fact
Making 10
Near doubles

Assessment Opportunity
Observe
Which addition facts do children seem to be fluent with, and which facts do they seem to struggle with the most?
Which children use efficient strategies – such as think addition, making 10, or near doubles – to solve addition facts? Which students still use counting-based strategies? (“I do”, small groups)

Discuss
What strategies did you use to figure out the addends?
What did you find challenging about the game? What did you find easy?
Did you find an easier way a fact could be solved? (“We do”, whole class)

Practicing Subtraction Using Fact Triangles
Students practice subtraction facts using Fact Triangles. Partner A covers one of the numbers with his or her thumb, and Partner B finds the covered number. Partners trade roles. Allow for several minutes of practice. (“We do”, pairs)

Summarize
Teachers remind students that in today’s lesson they practiced solving facts two ways: by playing Salute! and by using Fact Triangles.
Teachers ask: How is playing Salute! similar to practicing subtraction facts using Fact Triangles?

3. Practicing with Name – Collection Boxes
Students solve problems involving name – collection boxes in journal 1, p. 52. For Problems 1 and 4, encourage students to include both addition and subtraction expressions (as well as drawings and words). (“You do”, individual)

Math Boxes
Students complete mixed practice, journal 1, p. 53. (“You do”, individual)

Lesson 3 – 5 Subtraction Strategies: Counting Up and Counting Back
Students discuss and use the counting – up and counting- back strategies for subtraction.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.
– Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Vocabulary: counting back, counting up
1. Warm Up Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Students solve subtraction fact number stories. Students share solution strategies. (“You do”, individual; “We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Morgan made 12 friendship bracelets. She gave 6 to her friends. How many bracelets does Morgan have now?
Level 2: Amir had 13 crayons. He gave 6 to Christian. How many crayons does Amir have now?
Level 3: Joshua had 15 marbles. During a game, he lost some to his friend. Joshua now has 7 marbles. How many marbles did Joshua lose?

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math message
You are playing Salute! with two friends. The dealer says the sum is 11, and the other player has an 8. What card do you have? (“We do”, whole class)
Sharing Strategies
Have students share how they solved the Math Message problem. Make sure the following two strategies are discussed:
Counting Back: Start at 11. Count back 8: 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3. I end at 3, so my card is 3.
Counting Up: Start at 8. Count up to 11. That’s three counts, so my card is 3.

Exploring Counting Strategies for Subtraction
Teachers display 12 – 9 = ___________ and ask students to trying solving using both counting up and counting back. Encourage students to us the number line to demonstrate each strategy on the Class Number Line and record the following:
Counting back 9 numbers from 12: 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3. The answer is 3.
Count up from 9 to 12: 10, 11, 12. That is 3 counts, so the answer is 3.
Students complete the strategy grid in journal 1, p. 48 using a number line. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Differentiate
Have students use different colored pencils to make jumps on the number line copies (“We do”, small groups)

Assessment Opportunity
Observe and discuss the strategies students use to solve each given subtraction example. (“You do”, individual)

3. Practice
Students play Salute! (“We do”, small groups)
Math Boxes
Students complete the Mixed Practice in journal 1, p. 54. (“We do”, pairs; “You do”, individuals)

Lesson 3- 6 - 0 and – 1 Fact Strategies and Subtraction Top – It
Students explore the – 0 and – 1 fact strategies and play Subtract Top – It
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Vocabulary: – 0 facts, – 1 facts, difference

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students use , and = to compare pairs of numbers. (“We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: 21 ___ 12
78 ___ 81
Level 2: 504 ___ 405
808 ___ 880
Level 3: 1,113 ___ 1, 131
4,554 ___ 5,445
Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)
2. Focus
Math Message
Students use either counting up or counting back to solve 11 – 3 = ____and 14 – 12 = ____.

Sharing Strategies
Teachers ask students to share how they decided which strategy to use? (“We do”, whole class)
Teachers explain to students that they will be exploring two additional strategies: the – 0 (minus 0) and the – 1 (minus 1) strategies.
Discussing the – 0 and the – 1 Strategies
Teachers display the following – 0 and – 1 facts vertically and horizontally:
5 – 0 = _____
___ = 8 – 0
7 – 0 = _____
___ = 9 – 1
3 – 1 = ____
9 – 0 = ____
4 – 0 = ____

Students solve these facts on slips of paper or erasable boards.
Teachers prompt students to look at the patterns to determine rules for solving these types of facts.

Students record the – 0 and – 1 strategies on p. 48 in journal 1. (“We do”, pairs; small groups)

Demonstrating and Playing Subtraction Top – It
Teachers model a round or two of Subtraction Top- It using My Reference Book, pp. 170 -172. (“We do”, partners)
Teachers encourage students to use the various subtraction strategies they have learned to solve the facts: think addition, counting up and counting back, and – 0 and – 1.

Assessment Opportunity

Teachers observe
What strategies are students using to find the difference? Are they finding them accurately?
Do students recognize when it is easier to count up and when it is easier to count back?

Discuss
Teachers ask: How did you figure out the differences?
When did you decide to use a strategy?

3. Practice
Playing Name That Number
Students use one or more operations to name a target number.
My Reference Book pp. 154 – 155
Math Masters, p. G16 (“We do”, partners; small groups)
Math Boxes
Students complete the practice in journal 1, p. 55. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Lesson 3 – 7 “What My Rule?”
Students find missing numbers and missing rules in “What’s My Rule?” problems.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Vocabulary: “What’s My Rule?”, function machine, input, output
1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers flash Quick Look cards 111, 100, and 106 and allow a second look to students.
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Double Ten Frame with 9 dots on the left and 5 dots on the right frame.
Level 2: Double Ten Frame with 5 dots on the left and 6 dots on the right frame.
Level 3: Double Ten Frame with 8 dots on the left and 5 dots on the right frame. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message
Tayla is 3 years older than Samantha. If Samantha is 7 years old, how old is Tayla?
Introducing “What’s My Rule?”
Math Message Follow Up
Students share their strategies they used to solve the Math Message.
Summarize by writing the number model 7 + 3 = 10.
Teachers display a table labeled Tayla and Samantha, and place a unit box and an empty rule box near the table. Explain that this is one way to show the information from the problem. The unit box shows that we are talking about years, and the table shows that Samantha is 7 and Tayla is 10.

Teachers pose additional questions to use to complete the table (eg. If Samantha is 8, how old is Tayla?), and so on. (“We do”, whole class)

Using Function Machines
Teacher displays function machines on chart paper. The machines are set to follow certain rules. Introduce the terms input and output.

Teachers model using the first of four function machines.
Teachers read the We know portion at the bottom of each function machine (eg. We know inputs rule Find: outputs)
Have students demonstrate using the function machine explaining their thinking as they complete “What’s My Rule?” tables.

Solving “What’s My Rule?” Problems
Students solve problems in journal 1, p. 56. (“We do”, partners, small groups; “You do”, individuals)

Summarize
Students share with a partner how they used the rule to find the missin input number in Problem 3 on journal p. 56. (“We do”, partners)

3. Practice
Students cut out the Fact Triangles in journal 1, Activity Sheets 4 – 5. (“You do”, individuals)

Math Boxes
Students complete the Mixed Practice in journal 1, p. 57. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, individuals)

Science
Review FOSS Unit 1
– Air is matter and takes up space.
– Air is all around objects.
– Air resistance affects how things move (i.e. parachute).
– Air can be compressed.
– The pressure from compressed air can move things.
– Weather describes conditions in the air outside.
– Meteorologists are scientists who study the weather.
– Scientific journals record what is observable.
– Temperature describes how hot or cold the air is.
– Temperature is measured with a thermometer.
– The unit used to measure temperature is degrees Celsius (C) or degrees Fahrenheit (F).
– There are three main types of clouds: cirrus (high and feathery), cumulus (puffy like cotton candy), and stratus (low and stretched out like a blanket).
– Clouds are made of water drops.
– Wind moves clouds in the sky.
– Meteorologists use rain gauges to measure how much rain or snow has fallen.
– Natural sources of water include streams, rivers, lakes (fresh water), and the ocean (salt water).
– Bubbles are filled with air.
– Wind is moving air.
– Bubbles can show the changing direction and speed of the wind.
– Meteorologists use a wind scale to describe the strength of the wind.
– Meteorologists use an anemometer to measure the speed of wind.
– A pinwheel provides evidence about how fast the wind is blowing.
– Meteorologist use wind vanes to observe the direction of the wind.
– A wind vane points in the direction the wind is coming from.
Demonstration: Cloud in a Bottle
Materials:
2-liter clear plastic pop bottle, matches, warm water
Process:
Fill the clear plastic 2-liter bottle one-third full of warm water and place the cap on. As warm water evaporates, it adds water vapor to the air inside the bottle. This is the first ingredient to make a cloud.
Squeeze and release the bottle and observe what happens. You’ll notice that nothing happens. Why? The squeeze represents the warming that occurs in the atmosphere. The release represents the cooling that occurs in the atmosphere. If the inside of the bottle becomes covered with condensation or water droplets, just shake the bottle to get rid of them.
Take the cap off the bottle. Carefully light a match and hold the match near the opening of the bottle.
Then drop the match in the bottle and quickly put on the cap, trapping the smoke inside. Dust, smoke or other particles in the air is the second ingredient to make a cloud.
Once again, slowly squeeze the bottle hard and release. What happens? A cloud appears when you release and disappears when you squeeze. The third ingredient in clouds is a drop in air pressure.
Explanation:
Water vapor, water in its invisible gaseous state, can be made to condense into the form of small cloud droplets. By adding particles such as the smoke enhances the process of water condensation and by squeezing the bottle causes the air pressure to drop. This creates a cloud!
Courtesy of http://www.weatherwizkids.com/

Interactive Read Aloud: Flash, Crash, Rumble and Roll by Franklyn M. Branley

MAKE LIGHTNING IN YOUR MOUTH
MATERIALS:
Wint-O-Green or Pep-O-Mint Lifesavers, dark room, mirror
PROCESS:
Go to a really dark room and stand in front of the mirror. Wait a few minutes until your eyes get accustomed to the darkness.
Put a Wint-O-Green or a Pep-O-Mint lifesaver in your mouth.
While keeping your mouth open, break the lifesaver up with your teeth and look for sparks. If you do it right, you should see bluish flashes of light.

- Students discuss in groups what they think caused the sparks when they broke the lifesavers.
– A student from each group shares an explanation with the class.

EXPLANATION:
Why does this happen? When you break the lifesaver apart, you’re breaking apart sugars inside the candy. The sugars release little electrical charges in the air. These charges attract the oppositely charged nitrogen in the air. When the two meet, they react in a tiny spark that you can see.
– Students work in pairs to complete the Air and Weather Study Guide

Social Studies
Community
Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 6 – Needs and Wants
Main Idea: Everyone has needs and wants.
Vocabulary: need, want
Culture and Society: Explain that people all over the world have the same basic needs but they meet those needs in different ways. Point out that we all need food but that we eat different types of food, we all wear clothing but it sometimes looks different, and we live in different types of homes.
Role Play: Divide the class into groups. Have each group act out a scenario that demonstrates needs and wants. Give students examples and prompts to assist them with the activity.

Students continue to design a map of their neighborhood and write to describe important places in their neighborhood.

Community Building
Group Charades
– Teachers provide broad categories to small table groupings of students.
– Groups choose a leader to pull an animal name out of a bag.
– Groups collaborate to decide what movements to portray to the class.
– The rest of the class guesses what the animal is.

Review for Community Unit Test

Community Unit Assessment
– Students take a written assessment about the Community Unit.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of October 19

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Murray Language Academy is participating in Literacy Week during the Scholastic Book Fair. The activities schedule is posted on this website. Literacy Night is Wednesday from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. The second grade teachers will present Guiding Readers With Non-Fiction Texts in room 106 at 6 p.m. promptly. We look forward to seeing you.

The field trip has been approved by CPS. On Tuesday, October 28, students will participate in World Language Field Trip to view the Brazilian film “Worms” at the Logan Theater for the Arts at the University of Chicago, where they will have an opportunity to speak with the film’s director. Permission slips will be sent home on Monday, October 20. Tickets were offered to the school at no cost to students. However, the bus fee for each student will be $3. Please submit the permission slip and fee by Friday, October 24.

The Harcourt Science Chapter 7 Test on Weather will be administered on Thursday, October 23. Please have your child review the Harcourt textbook, graded homework and the Weather quiz to prepare for the test.

Math fact fluency such as addition and subtraction facts through 20, including doubles and near doubles facts and combinations of addends to make 10 should be mastered at this stage of second grade. Please continue to support your child practice these skills using counters, pennies, pictures and number models. Weekly three-minute timed quizzes will be given to ensure the mastery of these vital math skills.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 6 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Wednesday and Friday: Thumbs up when word pair rhymes; thumbs down when word pair doesn’t rhyme. Tuesday and Thursday: Students repeat only the two rhyming words.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads each sentence. Students give the repeated onset. Ex. T: Phil felt foolish. S: /f/
Blending: Teacher says the onset and the rime. Students say the whole word. Ex. T: /d-esk/ S: desk
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says both words. Students listen, and then isolate and say final sound. Ex. T: six, fox S: /ks/*
* Use sounds
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and segment the onset and rime. Ex. T: mat, S: mat; m-at
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add/*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
Language Awareness: Teacher says the sentence. Students repeat the sentence, and then say the sentence and clap each word. T: The cat is black. S: The cat is black. The – cat – is – black.
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Centers:
1. Listening Center: Author Study of the books by Kevin Henkes
2. Word Study: Building Fry Sight Words (3 letter words) Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers
3. Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading level one sight words
b. Students read informational texts about the weather (A Child’s book about Weather, Storms, A Man Who Named the Clouds)
c. A.R. on mini- iPads
4. Accelerated Reading in library (Monday 103; Tuesday 106; Wednesday 103 and 106)

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Greetings in French: The class sings “When You Say…”

When you say hello
I say bonjour
When I say bonjour
You say hello
When you say hello
I say bonjour
Repeat after me bonjour.

When you say thank you
I say merci
When I say merci
You say thank you
When you say thank you
I say merci
Repeat after me merci.

When you say goodbye
I say au revoir
When I say au revoir
You say goodbye
When you say goodbye
I say au revoir
Repeat after me au revoir.

- Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Five Little Owls” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Good Morning Wildcats,
Today is Monday, October 20, 2014. In social studies, we will compare cities, suburbs, and rural or farming areas.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why do some people choose to live in cities and others choose to live in rural areas? Share what you think with a classmate.

Literacy Week
Students present the project: My Favorite Story in small groups

Reading Workshop
Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Readers, you must know that readers are curious about words. We try our best always to understand what words and phrases mean. One of the fun jobs for readers is to collect words. Today I want to teach you that you can keep track of new and interesting words that you read by putting them on Post-its and sharing them with your partner. When you’re not sure what they mean, you can talk about them with your partner to try to figure them out.”
– Chart and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication

Mini Lesson
– Connection: Remind students of all they have learned about editing both this year and last. Name the teaching point.
– Teaching: Model how to edit for spelling by breaking a word down to syllables and thinking about the vowel sounds in each one.
– Active Engagement: Set students up to work on the spelling of a second misspelled word, thinking about each syllable and the vowel sounds in each part.
Link: Send students off to edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
– Explain and model to the students how to use multiple sources such as our Word Wall, My On-the-Go Words, and the Scholastic First Dictionary to fix up spelling.

- Students edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Good Morning Wildcats,
Today is Tuesday, October 21, 2014. We will use fact strategies to solve addition problems.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How do you solve 12 + 14? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Literacy Week
Teachers present Top Ten Favorite Books to students
Students discuss their favorite books in small groups.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: The Crayon Box by Shane DeRolf

Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Once we have noticed and collected new words, we need to go back to the page where we found that word and try to figure out what the new word means in that part of the text. Today I want to remind you that we can think about how the words might go on the page or what the words will say before we read. We ask ourselves, ‘What’s happening in the story? What will the words say?’ before we read the words. The pictures can help too. We can look at the pictures carefully thinking about who is in the story and what is happening, to get us ready to read the words. When we do this, we can guess what a word will mean even when it looks tricky to read. We can substitute a word or group of words that makes sense in that place. Then we can use those words to help us figure out the meaning of the new word.”
– Chart and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
– Review with students how to use multiple sources such as our Word Wall, My On-the-Go Words, and the Scholastic First Dictionary to fix up spelling.

- Students continue to edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, October 22, 2014. As we are working to figure out tricky words, we want to be sure to continue to build stamina and push ourselves to read more and more.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What strategies do you use to read “tricky” words? Turn and tell a classmate.

Literacy Week
Teachers and students wear black for Black Out Day

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig

Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Today I want to remind you that we need to use every bit of information that a book gives us to help us figure out what new words mean. You can read back in your book and then read ahead, using the context to figure out the word or phrase in question. Then you can replace unfamiliar vocabulary with words you think might mean the same to help you hold on to meaning.”
Example: “So, if you got stuck on the word prized in an excerpt that reads Lily finally admitted to her mother that she was playing catch with the neighbor’s dog when he ran through and ruined her prized rose bush, you could think about what would make sense and substitute a word. Then you might say, ‘Hmm, it sounds like it must have been a special rose bush, so maybe it means something like special.’”
Tip: “When readers use their own, different word for an unknown new word to keep meaning going, they then need to go back and collect the new word. So in the above example they might meet with their partner, show the place where they did the substituting and say, ‘So prized probably means special.’ They can then ask their partner, ‘Does that make sense to you?’”
– Chart and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
– Students use multiple sources such as our Word Wall, My On-the-Go Words, and the Scholastic First Dictionary to fix up spelling.

- Students continue to edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Ni hao Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, October 23, 2014. We will write subtraction number stories and generate related addition and subtraction facts.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How are 8 + 4 related to 12 – 4? Discuss what you think with a classmate.

Literacy Week
Students and teachers dress as their favorite book characters

Reading Workshop
Shared Reading
“All Worn Out”
By Kristy Dempsey

Tippy – toe, Kitty Cat
is sneaking through the house,
pushing on a puff of yarn,
wishing for a mouse.
Kitty like to play all day,
jumping, pouncing, leaping.
Where is Kitty hiding now?
Shh! Kitty’s sleeping.

Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Four: Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
“Today I want to teach you that even as we are working to figure out tricky words, we want to be sure to continue to build stamina and push ourselves to read more and more. We can look at our reading logs and set new goals for themselves.”
Tip: “Readers can think, ‘How much do I usually read during reading workshop or at home each day? Can I try to read even more today?’ Then we set a goal for the amount of pages we’ll read during reading time.”
– Chart and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
– Students use multiple sources such as our Word Wall, My On-the-Go Words, and the Scholastic First Dictionary to fix up spelling.

- Students continue to edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konichiwa,
Today is Friday, October 24, 2014. We are going to identify ways people and places change over time.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why do people and places change over time? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Literacy Week
Read Out Loud: The power of the spoken word
Parent Read Aloud

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words:
means, old, any, same, tell, blue, true, clue, glue, due, argue, hero, action, cause, influence, kind
The above words will be tested on October 31.
Teacher display the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Students take the phonemic awareness quiz.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Students with Language and Conventions
– Students use multiple sources such as our Word Wall, My On-the-Go Words, and the Scholastic First Dictionary to fix up spelling.

- Students continue to edit their writing using their editing checklists.

Math
Lesson 2 – 13 Cumulative Assessment
Students complete the cumulative assessment.
Goals for Mathematical Practice
2.OA.2 Add within 20 fluently. Know all sums of two 1 – digit numbers.
2.NBT.2 Count by 1s, 5s, 10s.
2.MD.8 Solve problems involving coins and bills. Read and write monetary amounts.
Math Boxes
Students practice and maintain skills in Journal 1, p. 44. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 3 – 1 Open Response and Engagement (Day 1)
Students will solve an open response problem using their own fact strategies.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: making ten, double ten frame, near doubles

1. Warm Up Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
The teacher flashes a Quick Look Card for three to five seconds before removing it and prompting students to remember what they saw. The teachers give a second look at the card. Then students will share both what they saw and how they saw it. (“We do”, whole class)

Leveled for Differentiation (“You do”, individuals)

Level 1: Quick Look Card 81 Double ten frame with 5 dots in one frame and 4 dots in the second frame.
Level 2: Quick Look Card 96: Double ten frame with 5 dots in one frame and 6 dots in the second frame.
Level 3: Quick Look Card 110: Double ten frame with 7 dots in each frame

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines (“We do”, whole class)

2a. Focus
Math Message
Making 10 on a Double Ten Frame

The teacher shows Quick Look Card 86 (Double ten frame with 6 dots on the left frame and 4 dots on the right frame). Students work in pairs to complete problems 1 and 2 in math journal 1, p. 45 (“We do”, pairs)

The teacher poses these questions: “How did you see it as 10? Did you count them one by one? Does this card show a doubles fact? How do you know? Does the double ten frame show a combination of 10? How can you use the double ten frame to explain that the total number of dots is 10?”
Students share their strategies with the whole class (“We do”, whole class)

Solving the Open Response Problem
The teacher distributes Math Master p. 61, reading the problem with the students. Flash Quick Look Card 117 for 3 to 5 seconds (Double ten frame with 8 dots on the left and 6 dots on the right frame). Flash the card again. Tell the students to record the total number of dots they saw and to write an explanation of how they figured it out. Remind the students that the explanation can include words and drawings to help explain their thinking. Students’ drawings should show how they moved the dots not just the dots they viewed in the ten frame. (“You do”, individual)

Differentiation
Students who could not produce a drawing of the ten frame after seeing the card twice, give them a third look at the card. If additional support is need, provide a copy of the 8 + 7 double ten frame so they can try to determine the total number of dots without counting one by one. (“You do”, individual)

Summarize
Using My Math Reference Book, p. 18, discuss how to improve students’ explanations by adding details and units to the explanation. (“We do”, whole class)

After collecting the students’ work make notes to chart strategies used. (“I do”, teacher)

Lesson 3 – 1 Open Response and Engagement (Day 2)
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Getting Ready for Day 2
The teacher prepares one of the following for discussion:

1. Display a response that includes a drawing showing how the student determined the number of dots in the double ten frame, but does not include a written explanation that supports what is shown in the drawing.
The teacher poses the following questions: “What does this drawing tell you about how the child saw the double ten frame? Do the words help you understand how the child saw the double ten frame? Why or why not? Can the drawing or written explanation be improved? How?” (“We do”, whole class)

2. Display responses that show and explain a making ten strategy. The examples may or may not include a number model and may differ in how they show dots moving from one frame to another.
The teacher poses these questions: “How do you think the child saw the double ten frame? How the number model connect to the double ten frame? (“We do, whole class)

3. Display a response that explains a strategy other than making 10, such as near doubles.
The teacher poses these questions: “What strategy did this child use to determine the number of dots in the double ten frame? How do you know? Is there another way to use doubles with this double ten frame? How?” (“We do”, whole class)

Making – 10 Strategy
(Have extra copies of Math Masters, p. 61 for revisions.)
2b. Focus

Setting Expectations
The teacher reviews the open response problem and discusses how to use double ten frames, drawings and words to explain their thinking. Review how to respectfully discuss their own and other students’ work. (“I do”, whole class)

Reengaging in the Problem
Students discuss others’ explanations and drawings for determining the number of dots on a double ten frame. (“We do” whole class; “We do”, partners)

Revising Work
Students use a colored pencil to improve their clarity and completeness of their drawings and explanations. (“You do”, individual)

3. Practice Math Boxes 3 – 1
Students practice and maintain skills in journal 1, p. 46.

Lesson 3 – 2 Subtraction from Addition: Think Addition
Students write subtraction number stories and generate related addition and subtraction facts.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
– Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
– Add and subtract multidigit numbers using models or strategies.
– Model real-world situations using symbols.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: subtraction number story, subtraction facts, addition facts, related facts, think – addition strategy

1. Warm Up Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
The teacher poses simple addition – fact number stories. Students share their strategies. (“We do”, whole class)

Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Marion’s family is at the library. Marion checks out 7 books. His sister checks out 3 books. How many books do they check out all together?
Level 2: Adama’s family is at the library. Adama place some books in her bag. Her sister places 2 books in her bag. Together they have 10 books. How many books does Adama have in her bag?
Level 3: Ean has some library books to return. Heaven has 4 books to return. Together they need to return 10 books. How many books does Ean have to return?
Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines (“We do”, whole class)

2a. Focus
Math Message
Students make up a subtraction story for the number sentence 10 – 3 = 7. (“You do”, individual)
The teacher displays 10 – 3 = 7 along side an empty unit box on chart paper. As students share their subtraction stories, ask them to supply labels for the unit box and write them in. (“We do”, whole class) Students will use one of the two strategies:
1. Change – to – Less
Start with a number of objects. Decrease the number of items. Find out the number of items left.
Comparison
Two separate quantities are known. Compare them to find the difference between them. Tell how many more or less.

Generating Related Addition and Subtraction Facts
The teacher displays a domino with 5 dots on one side and 4 dots on the other. Help students discover the addition facts and subtraction facts it shows. “Which addition facts describe this domino? Use the turn around rule. Which subtraction facts describe this domino? Repeat with additional dominoes as needed. (“We do”, whole class)
Students complete math journal 1, p. 47 (“You do”, individual)

Assessment Opportunity
Circle the class and note students’ work on p. 47.

Summarize

In journal 1, p. 48, children record the think – addition strategy along with one or two examples showing each strategy. (“We do”, partners)

Doubles and Combinations of Ten Timed Quiz (3 minutes) 0n Friday, 10/24
Lesson 3 – 3 Fact Families
Students generate fact families using related numbers on Fact Triangles.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
– Add and subtract multidigit numbers using models or strategies.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Vocabulary: facts table, row, column, diagonal, related facts, fact family, Fact Triangle

1. Warm Up Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
The teacher flashes Quick Look Cards for 2 – 3 seconds before removing it and prompting students to remember what they saw. Allow a second look. Students share both what they saw and how they saw it. The teacher asks questions to encourage students to share a variety of strategies. (“We do”, whole class)

Leveled for Differentiation

Level 1: Quick Look card 87 (Double ten frame with 8 dots on the left frame and 2 dots on the right frame)
Level 2: Quick Look Card 98 (Double ten frame with 9 dots on the left frame and 2 dots on the right frame)
Level 3: Quick Look Card 118 (Double ten frame with 7 dots on the left frame and 8 dots on the right frame)

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines (“We do”, whole class)

2a. Focus
Math Message
The teacher has the students look at the Facts Table on journal 1, p. 50. “How does it show an answer to and addition fact? Talk about you ideas with a partner (“We do”, whole class; “We do”, partners)

Exploring Patterns on the Addition/Subtraction Facts Table
The teacher displays the table from Math Masters, p. TA15. As the teacher discusses the meanings of row, column, and diagonal, students follow along on journal p. 50.
Use the table to find the sums for several addition facts. (Students use a black sheet of paper with an arrow in the lower right – hand corner to highlight the row and column of interest.
The teacher scribes noted patterns on chart paper:
Each number is 1 less than the number to its right and 1 more than the number on the left.
Each number is 1 less than the number below it. After the first row, each number is 1 more than the number above it.
If you start at the top left and move the diagonal toward the bottom right, each number increases by 2. If you start at the top right and move down the diagonal toward the bottom left, all numbers along the diagonal are the same. (“I do”, teacher; “We do”, whole class/small groups)

Discussing Fact Families
The teacher explains that, “Today we will use their knowledge of related addition and subtraction facts to create fact families”.
The teacher displays a unit box and a large fact triangle with a dot at the top (which show the number that is the sum of the other 2 numbers). Students label unit boxes and write number sentences to show ways that the 3 numbers on the fact triangle are related.
The teacher poses these questions: “Do you think all facts will have 4 facts in their fact family? Why or why not? How many different facts are there for the fact family like 5, 5, 10 that include doubles? (“We do”, whole class)

Introducing The Fact Triangles Routine
The teacher demonstrates the procedures for Fact Triangle Routine.
1. Partner A covers one corner of a Fact Triangle with a finger or thumb concealing part of an addition or subtraction fact.
2. Partner B says the complete fact.
3. Partners trade roles and repeat
Practice
Partners use their fact triangles to practice addition and subtraction facts. (“We do”, partners)
Students complete Math Boxes 3 – 3 in journal 1, p. 51 (“We do”, individual/partners)

Assessment Opportunity
The teacher uses the Addition Fact Inventory from journal 1, pp. 94 -95 to record students’ progress.

Science
Weather Eyewitness DVD
– Students will view and discuss the mythical and scientific beginnings of the study of weather.
Science Response to Weather DVD
– Students work in pairs to discuss the key points about the technological advances of the study of weather. Then we chart the learning points on paper for reviewing purposes and to support the students’ writing.
Review for Chapter Test (Tues. and Wed.)
Harcourt Chapter Test

Social Studies
Community
Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 4 – A Citizen of Many Communities
Objectives:
– Use your address to identify where you live.
– Locate communities, states, the United States, and selected countries on maps and globes.
– Compare cities, suburbs, and rural or farming areas.
Link Geography and History
Explain that Patty’s neighborhood is located in a city called Pittsburgh, which is in the state of Pennsylvania. Show students Pittsburgh on a map. Point out that Pittsburgh is located where two rivers, the Allegheny and the Monongahela, meet to form a third river, the Ohio. Explain that one reason Pittsburgh was able to grow into a large, important city was because the waterways made it easy for businesses to transport goods.
Have students look at the picture of Pittsburgh. Explain that areas like cities, with a lot of people, buildings, and businesses that are close together, are often called urban. Areas with more open land are called farms. And areas with fewer buildings and streets are called rural.
Display a map of the United States. Have volunteers take turns locating our state and various states in the United States.
Main Idea: You are a citizen of your city, state, and country.
Vocabulary: city, suburb, state, country

Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 5 – About Change
Main Idea: People and places change over time.
Vocabulary: change
Objectives:
– Identify ways people and places change.
– Compare photographs of a place taken at different times.
Link History and Economics: Ask students if they think their city always looked the way it looks today. Show an old picture of Chicago next to a current one. Ask students to explain why they think the city has changed.
Explain that places change to serve the needs of the people who live and work there. Point out that some places, especially small towns, can become smaller over time. Tell students that this might happen when people move from small towns to find work in big cities because there are more jobs.

Students continue to design a map of their neighborhood and write to describe important places in their neighborhood.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of October 12

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The Mid-term Progress Reports were sent home with the students on Friday, October 10. Please discuss the report with your child and complete the bottom portion to return to us. If we have requested a conference with you, kindly email us to schedule an appointment.

Monday, October 13 is a non-attendance day for students and staff in observance of Columbus Day.

The Chapter 7, Harcourt textbook science quiz about weather will be given to the students on Thursday, October 16. Please assist your child by reviewing the chapter in the textbook with a focus on the yellow highlighted vocabulary words.

The Social Studies Community Vocabulary Quiz will be given Friday, October 17. Please refer to the graded study guide and vocabulary sheets to support your child.

The Unit 2 Math Progress Check, as well as the cumulative assessment, will be administered Friday, October 17 and Monday, October 20 respectively. Please review graded homework and the unit 1 test to support your child’s success.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 6 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Wednesday and Friday: Thumbs up when word pair rhymes; thumbs down when word pair doesn’t rhyme. Tuesday and Thursday: Students repeat only the two rhyming words.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads each sentence. Students give the repeated onset. Ex. T: Phil felt foolish. S: /f/
Blending: Teacher says the onset and the rime. Students say the whole word. Ex. T: /d-esk/ S: desk
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says both words. Students listen, and then isolate and say final sound. Ex. T: six, fox S: /ks/*
* Use sounds
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and segment the onset and rime. Ex. T: mat, S: mat; m-at
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add/*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
Language Awareness: Teacher says the sentence. Students repeat the sentence, and then say the sentence and clap each word. T: The cat is black. S: The cat is black. The – cat – is – black.
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Teachers administer the TRC (Text Reading and Comprehension)
Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Greetings in other Languages: Teach children the proper pronunciations and then challenge them to greet at least 5 friends in other languages (they move around the room to do this.)
Konichiwa (koh-Nee-chee-wah) is hello in Japanese.
Jambo (JAHM-bo) is hello in Swahili.
Hola (OH-la) is hello in Spanish.
Ni hao (nee-Ha-OW) is hello in Chinese.
Bonjour (bohn-Zhoor) is hello in French.
Buon giorno (bwohn-JOR-noh) is hello in Italian.
Annyong ha shimnikka (An-YOH HASHim-ni-kah) is hello in Korean.
Al Salaam a’ alaykum (ahl sah-LAHM-ah-ah-LAY-Koom)) is hello in Arabic.
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Verses One and Two of “Fooba Wooba, John” from Fountas and Pinnell Sing a Song of Poetry p. 101

Day 1:
Columbus Day

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Buenos Dias, Wildcats
Today is Tuesday, October 14, 2014. During independent reading we will check our words by asking three questions. ‘Does this go with what is happening in the story? Does this sound like it would sound in a book? Do the letters I see match the sounds in the word I’m saying?”
Today’s Inquiry Question: What types of questions do you ask yourself when you are reading? Share your thoughts with a partner.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Day Walt (Day 1)

Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Three: Readers Fix Our Reading When We Make a Mistake
“Today I want to remind you that we can’t wait for someone else to check our words. As second-grade readers, we need to watch ourselves as we read. We have to be the kind of readers who always check on our own reading to know if it’s right. We can do this in three ways, with three questions. When we check our words we can ask ourselves, ‘Does this go with what is happening in the story? Does this sound like it would sound in a book? Do the letters I see match the sounds in the word I’m saying?’ ”
– Chart and explain examples to students.

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 15 Learning Craft Moves from Any Mentor Text

Mini Lesson
– Connection: Use the example of learning to cross the street as a metaphor for learning to use mentor texts independently. Just as over time children need less and less support in crossing the street, so, too, they will need less and less support learning form a mentor author. Name the teaching point.
– Teaching: Tell writers that whenever they want help improving their writing, they can call on the services of a mentor author. Review the chart listing steps for doing so. Demonstrate how you call on the help of a mentor author so that students will self-initiate this work in ways that improve their writing.
– Active Engagement: Recruit students’ help thinking how the author made a part powerful, and name the craft moves she used that they can try, too.
– Link: Give students an opportunity to reread their writing and plan with their partners. Then remind them that they can use the chart to help then learn from a mentor text of their choice.
Share: Sharing Favorite Parts of Writing
Ask students to choose a part of their writing that they would love to share.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, October 15, 2014. We will use tally marks, arrays, and numerical expressions involving addition and subtraction to give equivalent names for whole numbers.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How many ways can you express number 12? Share your answer with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Day Walt (Day 2)

Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Three: Readers Fix Our Reading When We Make a Mistake
“Today I want to remind you that readers can reread to make sure what we are reading is right. We can reread thinking about how the words we just read sound and ask ourselves, ‘Can I say it that way?’ For example, when I’m reading Tom want into the store I have to stop and ask myself, ‘Can I say it that way?’ No way! So I try something else: Tom went into the store. Can I say it that way? Yes I can! When readers notice something is not right we don’t just keep reading. We stop, we check it, and we try something else. One thing we can try is changing a word so that it sounds like how we, or people we hear in real life, would talk.”
– Chart and explain examples to students.

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 16 Being Bold—Trying New Craft Moves
Mini Lesson
– Connection: Ask students to revisit the writing they did in the prior session, reflecting on the craft moves they learned from their new mentor authors. Set the stage for children to take risks as they write. Name the teaching point.
– Teaching: Demonstrate trying something new you learned from a mentor author in your own story. Model first how daunting this can be. Model how to be bold, trying out a craft move in several ways until the writing feels just right.
– Active Engagement: Ask students to find a craft move from their own mentor texts, and then help you incorporate it into your story. Debrief, highlighting some of the work that partners did to revise your story.
Link: Send students off to try out what they‘ve learned from their mentor author in their own writing.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Ni hao Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, October 16, 2014. We will skip count, add, and subtract to solve Frames – and – Arrows problems.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What do you need to identify when you solve a Frames –
and – Arrows problems? Why is this important? Share your answer with a classmate.

Shared Reading
“My Pet”
By David L. Harrison

See those bats?
In the maple tree?
The one on the left
Belongs to me.

Haven’t told him yet
He’s my pet.

He hangs all day
Napping with friends,
Then at dusk
When the day ends
He spends the dark night
In silent flight.

A hungry shadow
Sweeping the skies
Wolfing down
Mosquitoes and flies.

Haven’t told him yet
I love my pet.

Reading Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Amos and Boris
Unit two

Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Three: Readers Fix Our Reading When We Make a Mistake
“Readers, we have been working to get through the hard parts and make sure that our reading makes sense. Today I want to remind you that especially when everything looks right and makes sense, we still need to reread to make our reading sound smooth. So we read, fix, and read again–putting it all back together!”
– Chart and explain examples to students.

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 16 Being Bold—Trying New Craft Moves
– Share: Learning from Mentor Authors
Ask a student to share the work he/she has done under the mentorship of a new author. Ask the student questions to probe for more information. Ask the class to notice ways in which the student’s writing was similar to the published writing.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa, Wildcats,
Today is Friday, October 17, 2014. We are going to create a map to describe our neighborhood.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why are maps important? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words for next week:
much, before, line, right, too, loud, sound, found, shout, count, mouth, urban, suburban, rural, magnet, touch
Teacher display the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check. The spelling test will take place every Friday.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 17 Writers Can Help Each Other
– Remind students that they have consulted professional writers such as Jane Yolen to look for craft ideas, for revision technique and for inspiration. “Today you’re going to apprentice yourself to other master writers. You’re going to apprentice yourself to–each other!”
– Model to students how to elicit the help of a classmate.
– Students meet in partnerships to offer each other feedback on their writing.

Math
Lesson 2 – 10 Name – Collection Boxes
Objectives:
– Use tally marks, arrays, and numerical expressions involving addition and
subtraction to give equivalent names for whole numbers.

Students generate equivalent names for numbers and write them in name – collection boxes.
Vocabulary: name – collection box, equivalent
1. Warm Up Math Talk
– Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
The teacher flashes Quick Look Cards for 3 – to – 5 seconds before removing it and prompting students to describe what they saw. The teacher allows an additional time to view the cards and follow up by asking students to share both what they saw and how they saw it. (“We do”, whole class)
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Quick card 86
Level 2: Quick card 103
Level 3: Quick Card 99
– Daily Routines
2. Focus
– Math Message
Students write as many different names for the number 8 on Name – Collection Box copies.
Several students share the strategies used. (“We do”)
– Discussing Name – Collection Boxes
The teacher displays a name – collection box on chart paper. Volunteers share the different names they generated for the number 8.
The teacher guides the students to use their “My Reference Book” page 53.
– Practicing with Name – Collection Boxes
The students work in pairs and independently to complete problems 1 – 4 on Journal 1, p. 38 (“We do”, pairs; “You do” independently)
After completion of page 38, the teacher poses the following questions:
– How are equivalent names for numbers the same?
– How are equivalent names for numbers different?
3. Practice
Students practice identifying odd and even numbers and decomposing numbers into double facts. Players write number models to express even numbers as the sums of two equal addends. They express odd numbers as the sums of two equal addends and 1 more or 1 less. (“We do”, pairs)
Assessment Opportunity
The teacher observes which children are correctly identifying odd and even numbers, and which children are able to identify the even numbers closest to an odd number. (“I do”)
The teacher poses questions: “How did you know whether the numbers were odd or even? How did you figure out which numbers to use in your number models?” (“We do”, pairs and teacher)
– Math Boxes 2 – 10: Journal 1, p. 39
Students practice and maintain skills. (Independent “You do”)

Doubles Facts and Combinations of Ten Quiz
Lesson 2 – 11 Playing Name That Number
Objectives:
– Use tally marks, arrays, and numerical expressions involving addition and subtraction to give equivalent names for whole numbers.

Students many ways to name numbers.
Vocabulary: name – collection box, equivalent
1. Warm Up Math Talk
– Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
The teacher has students count chorally by 25s.
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Count from 0
Level 2: Count from 50
Level 3: Count from 125
– Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.
2. Focus
– Math Message
The teacher displays a name – collection box for the number 20.
Students write as many names for 20 as they can on sticky notes.
The teacher has the students to share their names for 20 and add their sticky notes to the Name – Collection Box displayed on chart paper. (“We do”)
– Demonstrating Name That Number
The teacher reviews the rules for the game using
My Reference Book pp. 154 – 155; Math Masters p. G16
The teacher plays a sample or two rounds to demonstrate how to play. (“I do”)
Students use one or more operations to name a target number. (“We do”, small groups)
– Assessment Opportunity
The teacher observes which students are making appropriate names for the target umber, and which students need additional support. (“I do”)
The teacher poses the following questions:
– How did you and your group work together?
– How is the target number like the tag (number at the top of the name – collection box) in a name collection – box? (“We do”)
Solving Number Stories on a Number Line
Students use number lines to solve number stories in Journal 1, p. 40. (“You do”, independent)
Math Boxes
Students practice and maintain skills in Journal 1, p. 41. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 2 – 12 Frames and Arrows
Objectives:
– Use manipulatives, number grids, tally marks, mental arithmetic, paper & pencil, and calculators to solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of multidigit whole numbers; describe the strategies used.

Students will skip count, add, and subtract to solve Frames – Arrows problems.
Vocabulary: Frames – and – Arrows diagram, frame, arrow, arrow rule
1. Warm Up Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
The teacher poses addition-fact number stories. Students share solution strategies. The teacher posts children problem solving strategies.
Leveled for Differentiation
Level 1: Nicholas has 8 baseball cards. Kendall gives him 3 more. How many baseball cards does Nicholas have now?
Level 2: Hunter has 9 tennis balls. Heaven gives him 7 more. How many tennis balls does Hunter have now?
Level 3: Gabrielle has 8 baseballs. Her bag can hold 13 baseballs. How many more baseballs does she need to fill the bag?
Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.
2. Focus
Math Message
The teacher poses series of numbers. Students identify what number comes next.
50, 55, 60, 65, 70, ____
160, 150, 140, 130, ____
The teacher asks, “How did you find next number?”
“What rule could you use to find the next number in each sequence?”
“Today we will be solving more problems involving rules.”
Solving Frames – and – Arrows Problems
The teacher displays the Frames – and – Arrows diagram explaining the arrow, boxes, and rule box.
The teacher solves the example for the + 2 rule. (“I do”)
The teacher provides additional Frames – and – Arrows problems from Math Masters p. 54. The teacher selects a scribe to complete the whole class for exercises 2 and 3. (“We do”)
Students work in pairs to solve exercises 4 and 5.
(“We do”, pairs)
Differentiation: The teacher provides counters and number lines to students to have a visual support.
Then the teacher provides Frames – and – Arrows with a few of the frames filled in and the rule missing. (“I do”)
Students solve and explain their thinking about how they solved the missing frames and rules. (“We do”)
Frames – and – Arrows Diagrams
Students complete Journal 1, p. 42. (“We do”, pairs; “You do”, independent)
Differentiate the Activity (“We do”, small group)
The teacher encourages the students to think
Frames – and – Arrows as a two-step process.
1. Decide which operation is being used. Are the numbers getting bigger or smaller?
2. Find the number that is being added or subtracted. Count up or count back using counters on a number grid or number line.
Assessment Opportunity
The teacher observes students as they work and evaluates the work completed on p.42. (“I do”)
Playing Name That Number
Students work with partners to play Name That Number, Math Masters p. G16 and Math Reference Book p. 155. (“We do”, pairs)
Math Boxes
Students practice and maintain skills in Journal 1, p. 43. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 2 – 13 Unit 2 Progress Check (Day 1)
Students complete the Unit 2 assessment and self-assessment.
Differentiate:
The teacher provides counters and ten frames for items 1, 2, 3, 6; and dominoes for item 4
Goals for Mathematical Content
2.OA.2
Add within 20 fluently.
Subtract within 20 fluently.
Know all sums of two 1 – digit numbers automatically.
2.OA.3
Determine whether the number of objects in a group is odd or even.
Express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
2.NBT.7
Add multi-digit numbers using models and strategies.
2.NBT.9
Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work.
Goals for Mathematical Practice
SMP2
Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs, and concrete objects. (GMP2.1)
Make sense of the representations you and others use. (GMP2.2)
SMP3
Make sense of other’s mathematical thinking. (GMP3.2)

Science
FOSS Investigation 3 part 3
Wind Speed
Review last week’s lesson about wind speed. Allow students to go outside and observe their pinwheels and discuss their observation with a partner.
Lab Observation:
Students write to explain the inquiry question.
Inquiry Question:
How do people describe the strength of the wind?

FOSS Investigation 3 part 4
Wind vanes Inquiry Question:
How can we use a wind vane to observe the direction of the wind?
– Students learn about wind vanes, a tool to determine wind direction. They compare the movement of the wind vane to those of bubbles and clouds.
Science Content:
– Meteorologist use wind vanes to observe the direction of the wind.
– A wind vane points in the direction the wind is coming from.
– Students observe and record wind direction and types of clouds for the next 3 days.

What Makes Rain?
Have students:
– Fill a tin can with water and ice.
– Set the can over a bowl of warm water.
– Soon water vapor in the air will form drops on the cold can. The drops will run down the side of the can.

Social Studies
Vocabulary Quiz
Community
– Students work independently to write a paragraph describing their neighborhoods.
Make a Map:
– Provide students with aerial photos of various cities. Discuss what the photos show. Have each student draw a map of his/her neighborhood using the photo as a guideline. Invite them to create their own details on the map, such as street names, businesses and other items.
Skill: Read a Map Key
– Explain to students that in order to use a map, they must be able to recognize map symbols and to find their meaning by using the map key. We look at a map and practice using the map key to interpret the map symbols.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of October 5

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The Mid-term Progress Reports will be sent home with the students on Friday, October 10. Please discuss the report with your child and complete the bottom portion to return to us. If we have requested a conference with you, kindly email us to schedule an appointment.

On Tuesday, October 28, students will participate in World Language Field Trip to view the Brazilian film “Worms” at the Logan Theater for the Arts at the University of Chicago, where they will have an opportunity to speak with the film’s director. Permission slips will be sent home on Monday, October 6. Tickets were offered to the school at no cost to students. However, the bus fee for each student will be $3.

The Unit 2 Math Progress Check, as well as the cumulative assessment will be administered Friday, October 17 and Monday, October 20 respectively. Please review graded homework and the unit 1 test to support your child’s success.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 4 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher identifies the category for the day. Teacher says the nonsense word. Students say “Not (nonsense word), (real rhyming word)! Ex. T: Zace, S: Not zace, face!
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads word pairs. Students do “Thumps Up” if the words begin with the same sound. “Thumb Down” if they do not.
Blending: Teacher says the syllables. Students repeat the syllables, and then say the whole word. Ex. T: /mag-net/ S: /mag-net/; magnet
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over-enunciate the final sound. Ex. T: fan, S: faN
Segmenting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and segment it into syllables. Ex. T: behind, S: behind; /be-hind/
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the syllable. Students repeat the syllable. Teacher says add/*/ at the end and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
Language Awareness: Teacher says the sentence. Students repeat the sentence and then separate it into separate words. T: I love school! S: I love school! I – love – school! Walk It Out or “Chop It Out”
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Teachers administer the TRC (Text Reading and Comprehension)
Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Review meeting rules with students.
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: If All the Little Raindrops verse one from Fountas and Pinnell Sing a Song Poetry p. 138
A spelling test will take place each Friday (or Thursday if there is no class on Friday).

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Monday, October 6, 2014. In Math, we will analyze and critique each other’s work in pairs and share what we learn with the whole class.
Today’s inquiry question: How can working together help you solve problem in math? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part One: Readers Notice and Tackle Tricky Parts: Chunking Parts of Words, Drawing on Meaning as Well as Phonics
“Today I want to teach you that readers use words we know to help us read new words. If we see a word like shopping we can ask ourselves, ‘Do I know any words that can help me read this?’ Then we can say, ‘I know show, so I think the beginning will sound like /sh/ and I know hop, so that can help with the middle sound!’ ”
“Readers also pay close attention to endings to make sure our reading doesn’t just make sense but also looks right. We notice familiar endings like -ing, -ed, -s, and use them to help with our reading.”

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 12 Emulating Authors in Ways that Matter
Mini Lesson
– Connection: Tell students that sometimes we get so caught up in noticing and trying out various craft moves that we lose sight of why we use particular ones. Name the teaching point.
– Teaching: Demonstrate the process you use to think about why the mentor author writes as she does. Illustrate the problem you see in students’ writing by showing a time you emulated a craft move without aiming to accomplish something. Demonstrate revising your writing by using a craft technique in a way that enhances meaning.
– Active Engagement: Ask the class to help you revise your text, again using the same craft move to convey your meaning.
– Link: Sum up for the students what they need to do in their own writing to apply what they have learned from authors and to make their writing better.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Hola Wildcats,
Today is Tuesday, October 7, 2014. During the reading workshop, we will identify words that we should be able to read in a snap and why it is important to do so.
Today’s inquiry question: How might our comprehension be lost if we take too long to figure out a word? Share your answer with a partner.

REACH B.O.Y Reading Assessment

Reading Workshop
Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Two: Readers Read Known Words in a Snap and Check to Make Sure New Words Make Sense
“Today I want to remind you that not every word is a trick word. We can read and when we see a ‘snap word’ we can read it in a snap. As readers read more and more books, for more and more minutes, we begin to build up a collection of words that we don’t need to work to figure out. Those words can just be read with ease and this frees our brain up to pay more attention to what a book means.”
– Chart and explain examples to students.

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Close Reading: “Follow the Directions” Lesson 2
Pairs of students read the passage to find answers to the comprehension questions using the three annotations: circling, marking question marks and highlighting. (“We do”, pairs)
– Two groups of students (a total of 4 students) share their answers to the comprehension questions citing evidence from the passage. (“We do”, small groups)
– The students edit their answer sheets. (“You do”, individual)
– Each group selects a reporter to share out. (“We do”, whole class)
– The students edit their answer sheets. (“You do”, individual)
– Each group selects a reporter to share out. (“We do”, whole class)

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Conferring and Small-Group Work–Helping Students Increase the Volume of their Writing
Mid-Workshop Teaching: Writers try out craft moves in many parts of many pieces
Share: Noticing the Words Mentor Authors Choose
Ask students to reread Owl Moon, this time with a lens toward editing moves. Have students share their observations about what is happening at the word level of the text.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Konnichiwa Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, October 8, 2014. We will discuss how bubbles can be used to find out about wind speed and direction.
Today’s inquiry question: Why is it important to know about wind speed and direction?

Reading Workshop
Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Two: Readers Read Known Words in a Snap and Check to Make Sure New Words Make Sense
“Today I want to remind you to use what we are learning during word wall work to help read the words in our books that pop up again and again. One way to do this is by reading the word wall before we start to read each day so that our brain is on alert for these words and this can make it easier to read these words quickly.”
Tip: “These are words that should be ‘snap’ words for us, but are not. When you find a word like this, you can put it on a card and practice reading it—and other words you want to know—until you know it in a snap! You can keep all of these words on a word ring and read them quickly at the beginning and end of reading workshop to help you get faster and faster as you practice. You can even play games with your partner to practice these words.”
– Chart and explain examples to students.

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Assembly: The Ned Show in Gym (9:00 – 9:45)

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 13 Mining Mentor Texts for Word Choice (Studying and Revising for Precise and Specific Language)
Mini Lesson
– Connection: Ask students to reread the writing that is in their folder, selecting two pieces for the upcoming mini-celebration. Name the teaching point.
– Teaching and Active Engagement: Conduct a “symphony share” where each student shares out examples of beautiful language he or she noticed in Owl Moon. Point out how Jane has made some important choices about language and how they can do the same. Read your story to the class and model reflecting on the language choices you have made. Give students and opportunity to revise your writing.
– Link: Send students off, reminding them to use both the craft strategies and the language choices that they’ve learned from Owl Moon to get their writing ready for the celebration.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Ni hao Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, October 9, 2014. We will confer in small groups during Writers’ Workshop.
Today’s inquiry question:
What have we learned from authors and to make our writing better?

Reading Workshop
Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part Two: Readers Read Known Words in a Snap and Check to Make Sure New Words Make Sense
“Today I want to teach you that readers use what we know about words to figure out a tricky word. We can use parts we know in words to help us. Before we read a word we can think about the word we are getting ready to read and ask ourselves ‘What parts will I see at the beginning of the word? At the end of the word? In the middle of the word?’ ”
Example: “If I am getting ready to read this page about a little boy who just fell down and cried, I’m thinking I will see the cr at the beginning of the word and a /d/ sound at the end of the word. Now I’ll look at the word to see if that matches. If it doesn’t I can try again, still holding what I think the word will mean in my head to help me.”
– Chart and explain examples to students.

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Shared Reading
“Recess”
By Avis Harley

Some play soccer,
Some run races.
Others read
in quiet places.

Some find leaves
Or draw with chalk.
Some play tag,
while others talk.

A few play chess.
Lots play ball.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Planning and Reflecting on Your Conferences and Small-Group Teaching
Mid-Workshop Teaching: Using writing partners as editing partners

Share: Interviewing Writing Partners Can Teach Both Partners about Writing

Day 5:
Morning Message: Buenos Dias Wildcats,
Today is Friday, October 10, 2014. We will work in pairs to describe our neighborhood to our partner.
Today’s Question: How are neighborhoods different from each other? How are they alike?

Parent Read Aloud

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words for next week:

Teacher display the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check. The spelling test will take place every Friday.

say, great, where, help, through, gold, colt, fold, mold, sold, told, limited, resource, offspring, parent, stages

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Students work with their assigned partner to read, discuss, and edit their Small Moment Narratives.

Math
Lesson 2 – 7 (Day 2)
Objectives:
– Use manipulatives, number grids, tally marks, mental arithmetic, paper & pencil, and calculators to solve problems involving the addition
and subtraction of multidigit whole numbers; describe the strategies used.
Students discuss their solutions and revise their work.
– Focus 2b
Setting Expectations
Students revisit guidelines for a cooperative learning environment and discuss what needs to be included in a full response. (“We do”)
The teacher models and has students role – play based on class guidelines. (“I do”, “We do”)
Sentences stems for discussion:
– I noticed ___________.
– I like how you _________.
– Could you explain _______.
– I don’t understand _______.
– I wonder why _______.
– I think this could be improved if _______.
The teacher tells the students that they are going to look at other children’s work and think about those explanations.
Reengaging in the Problem
Students reengage in the problem by analyzing and critiquing other students’ work in pairs and share with the whole class. (“I do”; “We do”, Partner; “We do”, whole class)
Revising Work
Students improve the clarity and completeness of their number stories and explanations using the following questions:
– Did you write a subtraction number story?
– Did you include a drawing?
– Does your number model match your number story?
– Did you decide whether the turn – around rule works for subtraction?
– Does your explanation connect to your number story or number model? (“You do”)
Assessment Opportunity
The teacher collects and review students’ revised work using the given rubric. (“I do”)
– 3 Practice
Students practice and maintain skills, Journal 1, p. 32
(“You do”)

Lesson 2 – 8 Exploring Addition Tools, Odd and Even Patterns, and Shapes ( 2 Days)
Objectives:
– Use manipulatives, number grids, tally marks, mental arithmetic, paper & pencil, and calculators to solve problems involving the addition
and subtraction of multidigit whole numbers; describe the strategies used.
– Create and complete two-dimensional symmetric shapes or designs.
– Recognize numbers as odd or even.
Students explore counting up, odd and even numbers, and shapes.
Vocabulary: divide, half, halves, fourths
1. Warm Up Math Talk
– Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
Students solve number stories.
Level 1: Olivia’s soccer team has 6 soccer balls. Carson’s soccer team has 7 soccer balls. How many soccer balls do the two teams have all together?
Level 2: Ruth has 11 books in her library bag. Five of the books are for her brother Jason. How many books are not for Jason?
Level 3: Meredith is 17 years old. She is 8 years older than her sister Maddie. How old is Maddie?
– Daily Routines
2. Focus
– Math Message (Whole Class “You do”, “We do”, whole class)
Start at 0 and count up to 46. You may count any combination of 1s, 5s and 10s or any other way you want. Be prepared to share your strategy.
Students share strategies for counts.
Exploration A: Using Tools to Add
Activity card 26
Paired students follow the instructions on Journal 1, page 33 to represent sums on number grids and number lines and record their work. (“We do”, pairs)
Exploration B: Sorting Dominoes
Activity card 27
Students work in partnerships to sort dominoes into three groups: those with two even numbered groups of dots, those with two odd numbered groups of dots, and those with one even – and one odd – numbered dots. (“We do”, small group)
Exploration C: Making Geoboard Shapes
Activity card 28 (“We do”, Partner)
The teacher demonstrates how to make three and four sided shapes on the geoboard, and to use Geoboard Dot paper to draw the three and four sided geoboard shapes. (“I do”)
Students work in pairs and independently to make several geoboard shapes with three and four sides. (“We do”, pairs; “You do”, individual)
Students share and discuss the mathematics they engaged in for each exploration. (“We do” whole class)
3. Practice
– Playing The Exchange Game (“We do”, pairs)
Assessment Opportunity
The teacher observes which children are making appropriate exchanges, and which children need additional support. (“I do”)

The teacher asks the pairs, “How did you and your partner work together? What mathematics did you use in this game?” (“We do”, pairs/teacher)
– Math Boxes 2 – 8: Journal 1, p. 35
Students practice and maintain skills. (Independent “You do”)

Lesson 2 – 9 Even Numbers and Equal Addends
Objectives:
– Recognize and manipulate odd and even numbers.
Students identify even and odd numbers, and they write number models to express even and odd numbers as sums.
Vocabulary: equal addends
1. Warm Up Math Talk
– Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
The teacher poses number stories and have students share their solutions and strategies.
Differentiated Instruction
Level 1: There are 6 mittens on the counter and 8 mittens on the shelf. How many mittens are there in all?
Level 2: There are 15 pencils in my pencil box. Of these pencils, 9 are colored pencils. The rest are regular pencils. How many are regular pencils?
Level 3: Nora had some stickers in her notebook and then Kelly gave her 6 more. Now Nora has 13 stickers in her notebook. How many stickers did Nora have at the start?
– Daily Routines
2. Focus
– Math Message (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, Partner)
Using slips of paper, students write as many double facts as they can. (You do)
Teacher asks, “Are the sums of the facts you wrote odd or even?”
Several students share the strategies used, and explain why the sums of doubles facts are even. (“We do”, whole class)
– Introducing and Playing Evens and Odds
The teacher explains and models playing Evens and Odds game. (“I do”, whole class)
Students practice identifying odd and even numbers and decomposing numbers into double facts. Players write number models to express even numbers as the sums of two equal addends. They express odd numbers as the sums of two equal addends and 1 more or 1 less. (“We do”, pairs)
Assessment Opportunity
The teacher observes which children are correctly identifying odd and even numbers, and which children are able to identify the even numbers closest to an odd number. (“I do”)
The teacher poses questions: “How did you know whether the numbers were odd or even? How did you figure out which numbers to use in your number models?” (“We do”, pairs and teacher)
3. Practice
Students continue playing Evens and Odds on copies of Math Masters p. TA6
Math Boxes 2 – 9: Preview for Unit 3
Students complete Journal 1, p. 37
(“You do”, Independent)
Assessment Opportunity
The teacher reviews Math Boxes page 37 to assist with grouping students for Unit 3. (“I do”)

Firsty Move Chess
Lesson 2 – Quadrants and Setting up the Chessboard

REACH B.O.Y. Math Assessment

Science
Weather
Investigation 2 part 3:
Watching Clouds
Inquiry Question:
Are clouds all the same?
What kinds of weather do different clouds bring?
Students observe and compare several types of clouds and discuss how they move across the sky. They read FOSS Science Stories to find out more about what meteorologists do.
Science Content:
– There are three main types of clouds: cirrus, cumulus, and stratus.
– Clouds are made of water drops.
– Wind moves clouds in the sky.
Interactive Read Aloud: The Shapes in the Sky A book About Clouds by Josepha Sherman
Review the chart of how to work cooperatively.
Measuring temperature/observing and recording weather patterns (daily)
– Working in pairs, students use thermometers to measure and record the temperature in the morning, noon, and afternoon. They will also observe and record weather. We, as a class, will do this for the next four weeks to compare and learn about weather patterns.
Interactive Read Aloud: Weather Words by Gail Gibbons
Investigation 3 part 1 Bubbles in the Wind
Inquiry Question:
How can bubbles be used to find out about wind speed and direction?
– Students use bubbles to blow bubbles outside. They investigate how the air moves bubbles in a variety of locations around the school building.
Science Content:
– Bubbles are filled with air.
– Wind is moving air.
– Bubbles can show the changing direction and speed of the wind.
Lab Observation:
Students write to explain how bubbles can be used to find out about wind speed and direction.
FOSS Investigation 3 part 2
Wind Speed
Inquiry Question:
How do people describe the strength of the wind?
– Students go outside to feel and observe the wind. They are introduced to a descriptive wind scale and an anemometer, a tool use by scientists to more accurately measure the speed of the wind.
Science Content:
– Meteorologists use a wind scale to describe the strength of the wind.
– Meteorologists use an anemometer to measure the speed of wind.
Anemometer
– Each student makes a pinwheel and goes outside to explore wind speed.

Social Studies
Interactive Read Aloud: Chores by Nick Bruce
Lesson 2 – A member of Different Groups
Review the chart we listed the previous day of students’ roles.
Compare and Contrast: Students work in groups to discuss, chart, and explain how the roles will be different when students get older.

Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 3 – Around the Neighborhood
Main Idea: People share places in the neighborhood.
Vocabulary: neighborhood, map, location
– Students work in pairs to describe their neighborhood to each other.

Students continue to work on their Anti-Bullying Posters.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of September 28

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Students received the PTO fundraising packets on Thursday, 9/25/14. This year’s goal is for each student to sell a minimum of five products. Classes with 100% participation will receive a pizza party sponsored by the PTO. Please consider helping the school reach our goal. PTO fundraising efforts provide our students with a wide range of programs, materials and enriching experiences.

Students will receive their Mid-term Progress Reports on Friday, October 10th. Please visit IMPACT on a regular basis to be informed of grades and missing assignments. Missing assignments need to be submitted immediately.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 4 (Daily, Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher identifies the category for the day. Teacher says the nonsense word. Students say “Not (nonsense word), (real rhyming word)! Ex. T: Zace, S: Not zace, face!
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads word pairs. Students do “Thumps Up” if the words begin with the same sound. “Thumb Down” if they do not.
Blending: Teacher says the syllables. Students repeat the syllables, and then say the whole word. Ex. T: /mag-net/ S: /mag-net/; magnet
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over-enunciate the final sound. Ex. T: fan, S: faN
Segmenting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and segment it into syllables. Ex. T: behind, S: behind; /be-hind/
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the syllable. Students repeat the syllable. Teacher says add/*/ at the end and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
Language Awareness: Teacher says the sentence. Students repeat the sentence and then separate it into separate words. T: I love school! S: I love school! I – love – school! Walk It Out or “Chop It Out”
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Teachers administer the TRC (Text Reading and Comprehension)
Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Review meeting rules with students.
– Greeting: Ball Roll
1. With everyone seated in a circle, choose the first greeter. She/He says a friendly “Good Morning, (child’s name) to someone across from her/him.
2. The receiver greets her back in the same way.
3. The greeter gently rolls the ball to the receiver, who becomes the next greeter.
4. Continue until everyone has been a greeter and rolled the ball. (The first greeter will be the last receiver.)
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Black Socks
1. Sing/chant this as a whole group, emphasizing the italicized words.
Black socks,
They never get dirty.
The longer I wear them, The stronger they get.
Sometimes
I think I should wash them
But something inside me
Keeps saying not yet,
not yet, not yet.
2. Pause after the last not yet and then repeat the song/chant.
3. Form two groups and do the song/chant as a round, with the second group coming in on the word never. Remember to pause after the last not yet.
A spelling test will take place each Friday (or Thursday if there is no class on Friday).

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning message: Bonjour
Today is Monday, September 29, 2014. In math, we will explore doubles and combinations of 10 to build fact fluency.
Today’s Question: How can you tell which number goes with 4 to make ten? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit One
Taking Charge of Reading
Part Four: Being an Independent Problem Solver
“Today I want to teach you that sometimes as readers we come across a word in our book we do not know. When this happens we stop and think quickly, ‘What could I do to figure out this word?’ Once again, as second-grade readers, we have decisions to make.”
Tip: “We could think about what is happening. Then reread to get a running start, all the time thinking about what would make sense here.”
“We also can start right in with the letters, chunking them and trying to figure out what the word might be saying, and then after a bit of that, we reread and put the first bit of the word in there, and think, ‘What might the rest of this word be?’ ”

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 1: “Studying the Masters for Inspiration and Ideas”
Session 7: Working Hard; Setting Goals and Making Plans for Writing Time
Share: Introduce a chart of moves that create strong writing, and invite students to share their writing and plans with one another in pairs.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.
Confer with small groups of students during writing to provide feedback.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Aloha
Today is Tuesday, September 30, 2014. We will explore tools used to measure weather.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How do you measure the weather?

Reading Workshop
Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part One: Readers Notice and Tackle Tricky Parts: Chunking Parts of Words, Drawing on Meaning as Well as Phonics
“Readers are problem solvers. This means we notice and name the troubles we are having as we read. When we come across a hard word we don’t just mumble over it—we try something. When that doesn’t work, we try something else! Today I want to teach you that readers can break words into parts to help us solve problems. As we do this, we think about what the word could say and what’s happening in the story to help us figure it out.”
“Readers can look at words and think about whether there are words we know inside the word that can help us to understand that new word.”
Example: “If we see the word tablecloth we can think to ourselves, ‘I have never seen this word before, but it has table at the beginning and cloth at the end, and I know what both of those words mean. Hmm. Maybe it means a cloth that you put on a table? I think I have seen that at a restaurant, maybe that is what this word is!’ ”

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Close Reading: “Follow the Directions”
Lesson 2
The teacher projects the informational passage “Follow the Directions!” on the Smart Board
The teacher reads the passage aloud. (“I do”)
The teacher and students read the charted comprehension questions aloud. (“We do”, whole class)
Questions:
1. What should you do if the green light is on?
2. Why most likely did the teacher write the sign?
3. What does remove mean in step 4?
4. Why did the author number the steps 1, 2, 3, 4?
– The teacher and students reread the passage aloud. (“We do”, whole class)

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 8: Revising with Intent
– Books to showcase: Owl Moon by Jane Yolen; The Leaving Morning by Angela Johnson; A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket; Bad Kitty Meets the Baby by Nick Bruel; Amelia’s Notebook by Marissa Moss
Mini Lesson
– Connection: Show students’ examples of various published books that are written with different intentions, some meant to be funny, and some meant to be sad and so on. Share with students what you were trying to do as a writer in your demonstration piece. Name the teaching point.
– Teaching: Reread your own writing aloud, voicing various intentions you have for its effect on readers. Demonstrate how you decide on an intention—making the story funny—and revise accordingly. Demonstrate how you generate an alternate intention and again revise accordingly. Model considering the possible intentions, and then choosing one for your revision. Debrief, restating the teaching point.
– Active engagement: set students up to consider their own intentions for previously written pieces. Share examples of different intentions that students have for their writing.
– Link: Remind students how powerful it is to consider what they want their readers to think and feel as they read their writing.
– Share: Have students read their writing in small groups, using their voice to show their intentions. Share out a couple of students’ intentions. Share the quote from Judy Blume— “Exercise the writing muscle every day, even if it only a letter, notes, a title list, a character sketch, a journal entry. Writers are like dancers, like athletes. Without the exercise the muscles seize up.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.
Confer with small groups of students during writing to provide feedback.

Day 3:
Morning Message: Ni hao
Today is Wednesday, October 1, 2014. We will examine an author’s craft to assist us with our writing.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why is it important to examine an author’s writing to help us with our own writing? Explain to a classmate!

Reading Workshop
Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part One: Readers Notice and Tackle Tricky Parts: Chunking Parts of Words, Drawing on Meaning as Well as Phonics
“Today I want to teach you that readers can break up a word to help us problem-solve. We look at the first few letters of the word plus the vowel and then a letter or two after the vowel and try to use that running start in a word to help us figure it out.”
“Remember that every syllable has a vowel in it, so vowels are keys when breaking apart a word into its constituent parts.”

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 9: Close Reading
Mini Lesson
Close Reading: Owl Moon by Jane Yolen
– Connection: Ask students to recall the intentions they came up with yesterday for their stories. Tell students that to create an intended effect on readers, they can study books to learn how.
– Teaching and Active Engagement: Name a question that will guide the inquiry
– Guided Inquiry: Set students up to study a powerful part of the mentor text and to name the effect it has. Remind them of questions they will ask. Scaffold students’ work in naming and discussing how the author makes this part of the text so powerful. Challenge students to see and name more on the page. Share out some examples. Channel students to name what the author has done that they, too, can do. Name what the students have done and link this work to their writing. Remind them how studying a text in this way is like having another teacher. Set students up to go through the process of learning another craft move from a mentor text, using the same steps you’ve just led them through. Scaffold the experience as needed.
– Link: Recap the craft moves that students have figured out from today’s work. Suggest they try these in their own work, if their writing calls for it.
– Share: Trying Out Craft Moves
Acknowledge the difficulty in separating the mentor author’s topic from her craft moves. Ask students to Post-it the most important parts of their stories, in partnership, in preparation for trying out more craft moves in their writing in future workshop.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.
Confer with small groups of students during writing to provide feedback.

Day 4:
Morning Message: Guten Tag
Today is Thursday, October 2, 2014. In science, we will observe and compare several types of clouds and discuss how they move across the sky.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Are clouds all the same?
What kinds of weather do different clouds bring?

Shared Reading: “Invitation” by Shel Silverstein
If you are a dreamer, come in
If you are a dreamer, a wisher, a liar,
A hope-er, a pray-er, a magic bean buyer…
If you’re a pretender, come sit by my fire
For we have some flax-golden tales to spin.
Come in!
Come In!

Reading Workshop
Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part One: Readers Notice and Tackle Tricky Parts: Chunking Parts of Words, Drawing on Meaning as Well as Phonics
“Today I want to teach you that readers use what we know about letters and patterns from word study to help us read our books. We can look closely at words and say, ‘Do any of these letters go together to make special sounds? Can I use those sounds to help me read?’ ”
Tip: “What we are really trying to do is carry our word work into reading workshop to help us read words.”

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Survive Alive Mobile Unit from the Chicago Fire Department – Students will receive a mini lesson on fire safety and role play an escape plan with the fire fighters. (20 – 30 minutes)

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 10: Learning to Write in Powerful Ways
Mini Lesson
– Connection: Begin by asking students to mimic your actions exactly. Then ask them to come up with their own actions, modeled after the ones you show them. Remind students of the work they did in previous sessions, looking carefully at the crafting techniques used in “Owl Moon”, and then marking places in their writing where they could give these a go. Name the teaching point.
– Teaching: Model using the “Learning Writing Moves from Our Favorite Authors” chart as a resource for making your own writing more powerful.
– Active Engagement: Recruit students to join you in finding other places in your writing to try out craft moves employed by the mentor text. Revise your shared writing, based on students’ suggestions.
– Link: Ask students to look through the writing in their folders and make plan for the day’s work. Remind students that they can look at books for ideas to make their writing more powerful.
– Share: Providing Feedback to Peers
Have students provide feedback to writers who feel they need advice from readers.

Day 5:
Morning Message: Buonguiorno,
Today is Friday, October 3, 2014. We will work in pairs to describe our neighborhood to our partner.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How are neighborhoods different from each other? How are they alike? Explain to a classmate!

Reading Workshop
Unit two
Tackling Trouble
Assessment-Based Small-Group Work
Part One: Readers Notice and Tackle Tricky Parts: Chunking Parts of Words, Drawing on Meaning as Well as Phonics
“Today I want to teach you that readers can think about what kind of word would make sense to help us figure out the tricky part. We might say to ourselves, ‘This word needs to be a describing word because it comes before a thing.’ We can then use our thinking about the kind of word needed and what is happening in the story to help us take a try at reading the tricky word.”

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words for next week:
name, good, sentence, man, think, right, might, high, tight, flight, bright, ancestor, community, push, pull, strength
Teacher display the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check. The spelling test will take place every Friday.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 11
Learning to Write in Powerful Ways
Help students develop the habits of writers: being more observant, catching their thinking on paper, setting goals and using all they know to make writing better. Help students learn to use published text to take their writing to the next level.
Mini Lesson: Today’s session aims to echo the one that precedes it so that students have a familiar format for studying and trying out a professional writer’s craft moves.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Math
Lesson 2–3 Doubles and Combinations of 10
-Students explore doubles and combinations of 10 to build fact fluency.
– Interactive Read Aloud
Two of Everything: A Chinese Folktale by Lily Toy Hong (Whole Class “I do”)
Vocabulary: doubles, combinations of 10, doubles fact, number sentence, sum
1. Warm Up
-Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, Partner)
– Math Talk
Students solve number stories
Level 1: An egg carton has 6 eggs in the top row and 6 eggs in the bottom row. How many eggs in all?
Level 2: The first week of September has 7 days, and the second week of September has 7 days. How many days are in the first two weeks of September?
Level 3: Abby’s crayon box has two rows of crayons. The second row has 8 crayons. Abby’s crayon box has 16 crayons in all. How many crayons are in the first row?
-Daily Routines
2. Focus
– Math Message (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, Partner)
Teachers introduce double ten frames. (Whole Class “I do”)
Students examine a blank double ten frame “We do”, Partner)
– Using Double Ten Frames
Students explore strategies for finding the total number of dots shown on double frames. (“We do”, Partner)
Naming Doubles and Combinations of 10
Students sort facts into two groups, doubles, doubles and combinations of 10, and record fact strategies “We do”, Partner)
3. Practice
– Playing Fishing for 10
Students practice finding combinations of 10 (“We do”, Partner/Small Group)
– Math Boxes 2 – 3: Journal 1, p. 23
Students practice and maintain skills. (Independent “You do”)
Assessment Check-in: Assessment Handbook pp. 98 – 99 (Whole Class “I do”)

Lesson 2–4 The Making – 10 Strategy
– Students use a strategy based on place value to add within 20.
Vocabulary: addend, making 10, helper fact
1. Warm Up Math Talk
– Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
Teachers flash the following cards in sequence 87, 88, and 91. Students share strategies for finding the total dots on each card. Teachers highlight strategies that involve mentally moving dots to complete a ten frame.
– Math Talk
Differentiated Instruction
Level 1: Quick Look Card 87
Level 2: Quick Look Card 88
Level 3: Quick Look Card 91
– Daily Routines
2. Focus
– Math Message (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, Partner)
Using erasable boards, students write as many combinations of 10 as they can. (You do)
Teacher asks, “How do you know you found all of the combinations?”
Several students share the strategies used. (“We do”)
– Exploring the Making – 10 Strategy
Teachers list combinations of 10 so that they are ordered by their first addends – going from smallest first addend to the largest (0 -10).
The teacher posts the chart to support independent math thinking.
3. Practice
Students practice the Making 10 – Strategy on journal 1, p. 24
(“We do”, Partner “You do”, Independent)
Playing the Number – Grid Game
1. Players put their markers/counters on the number grid.
2. Students take turns rolling the die then moving their markers determined by each roll.
3. Students play to reach exactly 110 on the number grid.
– Math Boxes 2 – 4: Journal 1, p. 25
Students practice and maintain skills. (Independent “You do”)
Assessment Check-in: Math Journal 1, p. 24 (Whole Class “I do”)

Lesson 2–5 The Near – Doubles Strategy
– Students use near – doubles strategy to solve addition facts.
Vocabulary: near – doubles strategy, helper fact
1. Warm Up Math Talk
– Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
The teacher pose number stories (leveled for differentiation)
– Math Talk
Level 1: A truck has 9 wheels on one side and 9 wheels on the other side. How many wheels are there in all?
Level 2: Tommy and Missy are collecting rocks. Missy finds 8 rocks. Tommy finds 8 more than Missy. How many rocks did Tommy find?
Level 3: Quinlynn has some stickers. Ping has 7 more stickers than Quinlynn. Ping has 14 stickers. How many stickers does Quinlynn have?
– Daily Routines
2. Focus
– Math Message
Assessment Opportunity
The teacher shows students Quick Look Cards 79 and 81 in sequence.
Using half sheets of paper and pencils, students write how they figured out the number of dots on the last Quick Look Card. (“You do”)
Students share how they figured out the number of dots on Quick Look card 81. (“We do”)
Teacher asks, “How do you know you found all of the combinations?”
Several students share the strategies used. (“We do”)
– Discussing the Near – Doubles Strategy
The teacher displays 6 + 7 and 9 + 8.
Students collaborate in pairs determine the doubles that are close to these facts. (“We do”)
The teacher poses the following questions.
“How can you use a near by doubles fact to figure out the answer to 6 + 7?”
“How can you apply the same strategy to solve 9 + 8?”
– Identifying Helper Double Facts
The teacher displays the Fact/Helper Doubles Fact chart.
The small groups of students brainstorm and discuss additional facts that can be added to the chart (Continue this process throughout week). (“We do”)
– Playing The Exchange Game Partners play the Exchange Game to practice making exchanges between $1 bills and $10 bills and between $10 bills and $100 bills. (“We do”)
3. Practice
– Math Boxes 2 – 5: Journal 1, p. 28
Students practice and maintain skills. (Independent “You do”)
Assessment Check-in: Math Journal 1, p. 24 (Whole Class “I do”)

Lesson 2–6 The Turn – Around Rule for Addition
– Students use dominoes to explore the turn – around rule for addition.
Vocabulary: turn – around rule
1. Warm Up Math Talk
– Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
The teacher flashes Quick Look Cards 76, 88, and 119 (ten frames) in sequence, and asks what they saw and how they saw (leveled for differentiation)
– Math Talk
Level 1: Quick Look Card 76
Level 2: Quick Look Card 88
Level 3: Quick Look Card 119
-Daily Routines
2. Focus
– Math Message
The teacher displays a visual of a domino with four dots on one side and five on the other side, and a unit box listing domino dots as the unit.
Using erasable boards and markers, students write an addition fact for the domino. (“You do”)
Students share the facts they wrote (“We do”)
Teacher rotates the domino and asks, “Did anyone write a different fact? If no, record the fact. (“We do”)
– Exploring the Turn – Around Rule for Addition
Journal 1, p. 22
Explain that pairs of students will work with dominoes to explore a rule for addition. (“We do”)
– Assessment Check – In
The teacher displays a domino with 3 dots on one side and 6 dots on the other side.
– Assessment Opportunity
Students use Exit Slips to write the fact and the turn – around fact.
Differentiated Strategy
Students select a domino and tell the addition fact orally as the teacher writes it on the exit slip. . The teacher rotates the domino. hen the student tells the turn – around fact orally while the teacher writes the turn – around fact. (“We do”)
Students collaborate in pairs writing facts. Then rotating the dominoes to write a second turn – around fact. (“We do”)
A few volunteers share their pairs of facts and the teacher records each on chart paper.
The teacher poses these questions: “What do you notice about each pair of facts? Do you think the sum will always stay the same when we switch the addends/the numbers we are adding? Why?”
– Identifying Odd and Even Numbers
Journal 1, p. 29
Paired partners count out 10 pennies each for a pool of 20 pennies. One at a time, students grab a handful of pennies. Then they count what each grabbed and add both totals together. They identify if the total of both is an even amount or an odd amount. Findings are written on p. 29. (“We do”)
3. Practice
– Math Boxes 2 – 6: Journal 1, p. 37
Students practice and maintain skills. (Independent “You do”)

Lesson 2–7 Subtraction and the Turn – Around Rule
Day 1: Students solve an open response problem by writing number stories and models.

Vocabulary: turn – around rule, number story
1. Warm Up Math Talk
– Mental Math and Fluency (Whole Class “I do”, “We do”, You do)
Students solve number stories using addition and subtract facts.
The teacher poses number stories and students solve and share their solutions and strategies (leveled for differentiation).
– Math Talk
Level 1: Logan has 4 red tomatoes and 8 yellow tomatoes. How many tomatoes does Logan have in all?
Level 2: Gavin has 8 red grapes and 13 green grapes. How many more green grapes than red grapes does he have?
Level 3: Johan has 7 raisins in his hand and some in a baggie. He has 16 raisins in all. How many raisins are in Johan’s baggie?
– Daily Routines
2. Focus
– Math Message
Students turn to Journal 1, p. 31. Do problem 1, then talk with your partner the solution and strategy used.
– Writing number Stories and Number Models
(“I do”, “We do”)
A few students share their solutions (8 + 2 = 10).
The teacher writes the turn – around fact (2 + 8 = 10). And asks, “Can we write the number model this way? Why?
Differentiated Strategy
The teacher models a new version of the math message with the order of addends reversed. “Jessica has 8 goldfish and 2 dogs. How many pets does she have in all? Does the number story still make sense? Why? Is the total number of pets the same or different?
– Solving the Open Response Problem
Read problem 1 as a class. Point out that the students can use the blank space to illustrate their numbers stories. Tell students to use numbers up to 20 in their number stories, and remind them to include a number model.
– Then paired students should share ideas about the task on Math Master p. 39.
Read Problem 2 as a class. Tell partners, “Think about the turn – around rule using the subtraction fact from their number model in Problem 1.”
The teacher prompts partners to discuss how the turn – around rule would affect their subtraction stories.
Summarize
Students read My Reference Book, p. 22 on GMP8.1 (“We do”)
Ask: “How did Rosa explain how she used doubles to help her figure out other facts?”
Ask: How did you explain that the turn – around rule does not work for subtraction? (“We do”)
The teacher collects the students’ work to evaluate and prepare for day 2.

Science
Harcourt: Weather: The big idea is weather can be observed, measured, predicted, and compared.
Lesson 1: How does weather change?
Vocabulary: weather, weather pattern, seasons
– Students observe weather and identify how it changes over time.
– Students use their lab manual p. 71.

Introduce the Harcourt Science Book
Harcourt: Weather
Lesson 2: Why Do We Measure Weather?
Vocabulary: temperature, thermometer, wind, precipitation
– Identify tools used to measure weather. Use metric and standard English (customary) to measure temperature.
– Introduce the Watching the Weather packet. Explain to students that they are going to spend the next four weeks observing and recording weather patterns with a partner. Review the chart of how to work cooperatively.

Interactive Read Aloud from Harcourt Text Book:
“What is the Water Cycle?
Vocabulary: water cycle, evaporate, condense,
drought

Review the chart of how to work cooperatively.
Measuring temperature/observing and recording weather patterns (daily)
– Working in pairs, students use thermometers to measure and record the temperature in the morning, noon, and afternoon. They will also observe and record weather. We, as a class, will do this for the next five weeks to compare and learn about weather patterns.
Interactive Read Aloud: Rain or Shine

Social Studies
Read “A Community of People”. Point to chart to review our vocabulary (community, citizen, role, cooperate, country, map, rule, fair, responsibility). ). Discuss how the word community can mean different things to different people, that a community can be as large as a city or town or as small as a neighborhood or school.
Ask students to name places they go where there are rules. Explain that some rules help us get along with others, while other rules help keep people safe.
– Students work in table groupings to write rules for our class.

Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 2 – A member of Different Groups
Interpret Quotation: “All the world’s a stage…And one man in his time plays many parts.” – William Shakespeare
– Students work in pairs to discuss roles they have at home and in school. Chart some of the roles as a whole class activity.

- Students work in pairs to plan designs for their anti-bullying posters.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of September 21

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We sincerely thank the group of second grade parents/guardians who chaperoned the recent field trip to the Museum of Science and Industry. The children enjoyed an engaging experience.

Students have begun using the Week-by-Week Homework for Building Reading Comprehension and Fluency Informational Passages. Each week on Mondays, students will receive a new article to read and questions to answer. Please monitor their reading for accuracy and intonation and their answers to the questions each week. The completed stories are due the following Monday. This is considered part of the minimum of 30 minutes reading at home each day.

Students will take the Math Unit 1 assessments on Tuesday and Wednesday. Please refer to the graded homework to help your child review. The following concepts will be assessed: Counting by ones, Determining placements of numbers on the number line and number grid, Calculating amount of coins, Skip-counting by 2s, 5, 10s, and 25s, Using relation symbols such as , and = correctly, and Finding unknown quantity such as 7 + ___ = 10

Parent-teacher conferences/Report card pick up for the first quarter is Wednesday, November 12. The sign-up schedules are posted outside of rooms 103 and 106. Please make your appointment as time slots are provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Additionally, the sign-up sheets for Second Grade Parents Weekly Read Alouds are posted next to the conference sheets.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 3 (Daily, Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher identifies the category for the day. Teacher says the nonsense word. Students say “Not (nonsense word), (real rhyming word)! Ex. T: Zace, S: Not zace, face!
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads word pairs. Students do “Thumps Up” if the words begin with the same sound. “Thumb Down” if they do not.
Blending: Teacher says the syllables. Students repeat the syllables, and then say the whole word. Ex. T: /mag-net/ S: /mag-net/; magnet
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over-enunciate the final sound. Ex. T: fan, S: faN
Segmenting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and segment it into syllables. Ex. T: behind, S: behind; /be-hind/
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the syllable. Students repeat the syllable. Teacher says add/*/ at the end and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the/*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds
Language Awareness: Teacher says the sentence. Students repeat the sentence and the separate it into separate words. T: I love school! S: I love school! I – love – school! Walk It Out or “Chop It Out”
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Teachers administer the TRC (Text Reading and Comprehension)
Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily) based on Morning Meeting Ideas by Susan Lattanzi Roser
– Greeting: Friends in Our Class
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Super Gooney Bird
A spelling test will take place each Friday (or Thursday if there is no class on Friday).

Day 1:
Morning meeting
Morning message: Today is Monday, September 22, 2014. We will learn how to craft powerful endings to our stories.
Inquiry question: Why is it important to end a story in a powerful way? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Reading Workshop:
Unit One
Taking Charge of Reading
Part Three: Partners Can Talk about Books to Grow Ideas
“Today I want to teach you that readers take care of our partnerships. Just like when we play games with friends, we cheer each other on. We can do the same thing with our reading partners. We can share the parts that are tricky and help each other figure out those parts. When things are not clear we can use each other to understand our books better. A reading partnership can be so-so or it can be awesome. To make our partnership awesome, we find ways to let each other know that we are listening carefully to everything our partner says. When we really listen, we react or respond to whatever our partner tells us.”

Shared Reading:
“Cooperation” by Sara Holbrook p. 24

Cooperation’s hard
and it’s work
to make caring last.
Sometimes,
forgiveness is tough to chew
and understanding melts too fast.

I could always order my way,
that’s easy.
I could protect
me first and only.
I could never compromise.
But stubborn gets,
well,
lonely.

Independent Reading

Phonemic Awareness

Writing Workshop:
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 1: “Studying the Masters for Inspiration and Ideas”
Session 5: Letter to Teachers; Revising with the Masters; Crafting Powerful Endings
Mini Lesson: Revising with the Masters
Reread the beginnings of the two whole-class mentor texts. Discuss the setting and explain how it transports the readers to a place and sets the stage for what’s to come. Have students work in pairs to compare the ending of the stories. Then as a whole class create a chart about what makes for a “good ending”. When sending students off to write, remind them of the many things they’ve learned from the masters to make writing more powerful.
Students continue to write their Small Moment narratives.

Day 2:
Morning meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, September 23, 2014. For science, we are going to review how pressure from air can push water around a syringe system?
Today’s Inquiry Question: How can compressed air be used in our daily lives? Share what you are thinking with a partner.

Reading Workshop:
Unit One
Taking Charge of Reading
Part Three: Partners Can Talk about Books to Grow Ideas
“Today I want to teach you that readers prepare and plan for partner reading time. We mark places where we had some big ideas, where we figured out a new strategy, or where we were confused. Partners can then talk about these things with each other. This is a way we can begin to collect ideas and tips to use whenever we read. Remember, two brains are better than one!”

Close Reading: Lesson 2
“Clouds”
– Teachers explain the second reading process.
We will read the selected text more than one time. During the second reading we will read with a pencil. As we read, we will annotate or mark some words in the passage or text.
– Teachers introduce the three annotations we will use with copies of text
1. Circling unknown words
2. Using a question mark to show we don’t understand what the author is telling us
3. Highlighting evidence to prove our answers to questions about the text

Independent Reading

Phonemic Awareness

Writing Workshop:
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 1: “Studying the Masters for Inspiration and Ideas”
Session 5: Letter to Teachers; Revising with the Masters; Crafting Powerful Endings
Mid-Workshop Teaching
Help students understand when they revise, they need to focus on whole sections of their stories at a time. In addition to endings, writers revise beginnings. They think, “Have I set up my story the way I want it to? Does it set the stage for what’s to come? Does it create the mood or tone I want? Does it hook readers, making them want to read on?” Students can also revise the most exciting, or sad, or revealing part, making sure to slow down and stretch that part out.
Share: Share some endings students have crafted for their narratives.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, September 24, 2014. In the writing workshop, we will learn how to reread like detectives to make sure our writing makes sense and sounds right.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What does it mean to “Read Like a Detective?” Share your thinking with a classmate.

Reading Workshop:
Unit One
Taking Charge of Reading
Part Three: Partners Can Talk about Books to Grow Ideas
“Today I want to teach you that reading partners are friends and friends often recommend books to each other. When your partner takes your suggestions and reads the same books, you will have so much more to talk about because you’ve both read the same books!”
Tip: “When you want to recommend a book, you start with the title of the book, tell a little bit about the characters or the subject that you found interesting and why you think your friend might enjoy reading the book.”
“When you need a recommendation, ask your partner which books they think you might like reading.”

Independent Reading

Phonemic Awareness

Writing Workshop:
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 1: “Studying the Masters for Inspiration and Ideas”
Session 6: Rereading Like Detectives: Making Sure Our Writing makes Sense and Sounds Right
Interactive read aloud: Nothing Ever Happens on 90th Street by Roni Schotter
Channel students to notice and name important parts of the mentor text during the read-aloud.
Mini Lesson: Rereading Like Detectives
– Connection: Share with students two pages from the demonstrated text—one with many run-on sentences and one page with correct end punctuation. Recruit students to turn-and-talk, observing what is different about the two pages. Then share out some of their observations. Name the teaching point.
– Teaching: Demonstrate how to reread your own writing to look for and include end punctuation. Invite students to read and think alongside you as you demonstrate on the next sentence.
– Active Engagement: Set students up to fix their stories’ punctuation, working in partnerships. Then share out some examples.
– Link: Encourage students’ partnership work before sending them off to continue editing on their own.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, September 25, 2014.
In science, we will learn that weather can be observed, measured, predicted, and compared.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How do people measure the weather?
Share your thinking with a classmate.

Phonemic Awareness

Reading Workshop:
Unit One
Taking Charge of Reading
Part Three: Partners Can Talk about Books to Grow Ideas
“Today I want to teach you that reading partners try to invent new things to do together with our books. We can find new ways to talk about books, to collect our thinking, or to figure out tricky parts. Partners can also use the reading charts we have created together. In other words, just like grown-up readers, we can decide what we will do when we get together to talk about our books. Readers prepare and plan for partner reading time.”

Shared Reading: “Happy All Around” by Sara Holbrook

Happy settles,
An orange campfire in my chest,
peaceful.
Not a scattering wildfire
quickly covering the ground.
A slow glow,
my inner circle,
warm,
attracting others all around.

Independent Reading

Phonemic Awareness

Writing Workshop:
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 1: “Studying the Masters for Inspiration and Ideas”
Session 7: Working Hard; Setting Goals and Making Plans for Writing Time
Mini Lesson: Working Hard
– Connection: Introduce a quote by Jane Yolen—or another quote that emphasizes the importance of setting and working toward goals. Name the teaching point.
– Teaching: Introduce the Narrative Writing Checklist for the second and third grade, and give each child a copy. Demonstrate how to compare your own writing against the checklist, setting goals for the unit.
– Active Engagement: Set students up to compare their writing against the checklist, working in partnerships to set new goals. Invite a couple of students to share their goals and reasons for choosing these.
– Link: Send students off to write, emphasizing their individual goal pursuits.

Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.
Confer with small groups of students during writing to provide feedback.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, September 26, 2014. For reading, we are going to discuss how partners can find new ways to talk about books.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How can a reading partner help figure out how to read a tricky part in a story? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Phonemic Awareness Assessment

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words for next week:
very, after, things, our, just, girl, dirt, shirt, third, thirst, birth, system, produce, consume, life, cycle
Teacher display the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Independent Reading

REACH B.O.Y. Assessment

Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.
Confer with small groups of students during writing to provide feedback.

Math
Lesson 1-12 Exploring Base-10 Blocks, Area, and Dominoes (Day 2)
Students count by 100s and 10s to find the value of base-10 “building,” use shapes to cover rectangles, and sort dominoes according to the number of dots.
Goal: Read, write, and model with manipulatives whole numbers up
to 10,000; identify places in such numbers and the values of the digits in those places; read and write money amounts in dollars-and-cents notation.
1. Warm Up
– Mental Math and Fluency
2. Focus
– Math Message
– Discussing Procedures and Expectations for Explorations (Whole Class “I do”)
– Exploration C: Sorting Dominoes (Partner “You do”)
3. Practice
– Playing the Number-Line Squeeze (Partner “You do”)
– Math Boxes 1-12 (Independent “You do”)

Unit 1 Progress Check Lesson 1-13
– Teachers model how to self-assess using the Self-Assessment p. 5
– Students complete the Self-Assessment
– Students complete the unit Assessment to demonstrate their progress on the Common Core State Standards covered in this unit: counting coins, placing numbers on a number line, skip counting, relational signs (>, <, =), Finding Equivalent names for numbers, determining odd and even numbers
– Unit 1 Challenge (Optional)
– Students problem solve using calculators (keys 2 and 5 are considered broken); using coins to purchase school items; and using the fewest coins to identify a given amount

Open Response Assessment
– Teachers introduce the problem by distributing the assessment master p. 10, giving the directions and setting expectations for successfully completing the problem.
– Students complete the open response
– Students share their strategies with the class
– Students edit their Open Response Assessment
– Students complete Math Boxes 1-13

Lesson 2–1 Grouping by 10s
Vocabulary: total, trade
Students explore place –value concepts as the play The Exchange Game with money and practice grouping by 10s using $1, $10, and $100 bills
Goal: Read, write, and model with manipulatives whole numbers up
to 10,000; identify places in such numbers and the values of the digits in those places; read and write money amounts in dollars-and-cents notation.
1. Warm Up
– Mental Math and Fluency
Level 1 Count up and back by 10s from a multiple of 10
Level 2 Count up to 50 by 10s. Stop. Continue to count by 5s.
Level 3 Count up by 10s from 100. Stop. Continue to count by 5s.
– Daily Routines
2. Focus
– Math Message
Students cut out the play money
Students count the money.
Students put the money in a Zip Lock bag and label it with the amount on a post-it
Students label their bags with their toolkit numbers.
– Making Exchanges
– Introducing Making Exchanges (Whole Class “I do”)
– Making Exchanges with bills
– Counting play money to find a total
3. Practice
– Playing the Exchange Game Math Master p. G14 (Whole Class “We do”, Partner “You do”)
– Math Boxes 2- 1 Journal 1, p. 18 (Independent “You do”)
Assessment Check-in: Journal 1, p. 17 (Whole Class “I do”)

Lesson 2–2 Addition Number Stories
Vocabulary: addition number story, unit box, label, number model
Students write and solve addition number stories.
Goal: Demonstrate automaticity with all addition facts through 10 + 10 and fluency with the related subtraction facts.
1. Warm Up
– Mental Math and Fluency
Children solve addition facts using Quick Look Cards
Level 1 Quick Card 102
Level 2 Quick Card 78
Level 3 Quick Card 82
– Daily Routines
2. Focus
– Math Message
Students solve an addition number story.
There are 5 children skating.
There are 8 children playing ball.
How many children are there in all?
– Representing Number Stories
Students are introduced to unit boxes and number models. (Whole Class “I do”)
– Creating and Solving addition Number Stories
Students create number stories and represent them with unit boxes and number models. Journal 1 p. 19. (Whole Class “We do”, Partner “You do”)
– Writing Number Stories
Students write and solve number stories about a picture Journal 1 p. 19. (Whole Class “We do”, Partner “You do”)
3. Practice
– Completing Number-Grid Puzzles
Students fill in missing numbers on number-grid puzzles. Journal 1, p. 20 (Whole Class “We do”, Partner “You do”)
– Math Boxes 2 – 2
Students practice and maintain skills. Journal 1, p. 21 and inside back cover (Independent “You do”)
– Assessment Check-In: Journal 1 p. 19 (Whole Class “I do”)

Science
Science Observation Logs
Air and Water Fountain
Assessment Opportunity
Inquiry Question:
How can I use air to push water around a system?
– Students write the answer to the inquiry question using charted vocabulary and scientific terminology.

Investigation 1 part 6:
Rockets
Inquiry Question:
How can I use compressed air to propel a balloon rocket?
Students and teachers set up a balloon rocket system and find out how far the air in the balloon will propel the system along a flight line.
– Air can be compressed.
– The pressure from compressed air can move things.
– Students write the answer to the inquiry question using charted vocabulary and scientific terminology.
Science Observation Logs
Rockets (Day 2)
Inquiry Question:
How can I use compressed air to propel a balloon rocket?
– Students write the answer to the inquiry question using charted vocabulary and scientific terminology.

FOSS: Investigation 2 part 1
Weather Calendar
Inquiry Question:
How can we keep a record of daily weather condition?
The class shares what they think they know about weather and how it relates to air. A class meteorologist begins recording daily weather observation on a class calendar. Symbols are used to indicate five basic types of weather.
Science Content:
– Weather describes conditions in the air outside.
– Meteorologists are scientists who study the weather.
– Scientific journals record what is observable.
– Discuss how weather affects farming.

Social Studies
Interactive Read Aloud:
Read and discuss with students Enemy Pie by Eric Munson
– During this time, break and have students turn knee-to-knee to share their impressions of the characters.
– Teachers chart strategies utilized in the story to stop bullying. Students are encouraged to add strategies to the chart. The chart will serve as a model for how to behave appropriately.

Review for Quiz about Anti-bullying:
– Small groups of students discuss and complete questions from the study guide.

Unit 1 Living in a Community
Introduce the unit
Objectives:
– Use a visual to predict content.
– Interpret a quotation.
– Use a comparison chart to prepare for the unit.
Prior Knowledge: Using a word web, teachers lead the class in brainstorming a list of details to describe the community and its people.
Visual Learning: Students examine the image showing people at the entrance of their neighborhood. Have them predict what they might learn about communities in this unit.
Interpret Quotation: “I am a part of all that I have met.” – Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Compare and Contrast: Discuss and chart how communities are alike and different.

Preview the Vocabulary
Objectives:
– Use visuals to determine word meanings.
– Use words and visuals to predict the content of the unit.
Link Picture and Words: Ask students to look at the pictures that illustrate community, citizen, role, cooperate, country, and map. Have them tell what they see. How are community maps and country maps different? When would you use each?

Some Things Go Together
Objectives:
– Obtain information about a topic using a variety of visual sources such as literature.
– Describe how things can be grouped.
– Recognize that people live, work, and play together.
Read and Respond: “Some Things Go Together” by Charlotte Zolotow
Question to think about: How do friends go together?

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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