Week of April 6

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We are looking forward to meeting parents at the third quarter parent/teacher conferences on Monday, April 7. A copy of the finalized schedule was sent home last week. Please be cognizant of your scheduled time so we can accommodate all families in a respectful manner. There is no school for students on this day.

As part of the FOSS science program, second grade students are observing and feeding mealworms (beetle larvae stage), Painted Lady butterflies (pupae stage), and crickets (nymph stage). These experiences are providing a path to develop scientific thinking, including formulating inquiry questions essential for the insect research project.
Therefore, students will be writing insect-themed research papers as well as designing and creating an insect habitat. Please provide your child with a cardboard shoebox. If your child did not bring Crayola Model Magic last fall, please submit one package this week.

Additionally, we sent home a letter last week requesting your assistance in obtaining a book about an insect (of choice) for your child for his/her in-class research project. Please comply by April 8.

The EnVision Math topic 14 test will be administered on Friday, April 11. Please refer to the graded class/homework and the online lessons to assist your child.

Spring Break is the week of April 13, 2014. We hope you have a wonderful week!

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 29
Rhyming (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the nonsense word. Students produce real rhyming words.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and then isolate the onset from the rime, as written. Ex: T: pouch, S: pouch /p-ouch/
Blending (Words change daily)
- Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Segmenting (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, Teacher: found, Students: found; /f-ou-n-d/
Substituting (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
- Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
- Greetings in French: Salut
- Sharing: Students share what they have written about their insects or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: Sing “What is an Insect Song” by Dove Whisper on You Tube

Differentiated Instruction:
- Students work in pairs to read charted spelling sentences.
- Fry’s Word List assessment
- Guided writing/conferencing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
Fry Third Hundred Sight Words, List Three (1-13)
important, until, children, side, feet, car, mile, night, walk, white, sea, began, grow
Students use Playdough with alphabet cookie cutters to make this week’s sight words.
Then pairs of students compose sentences orally utilizing the words.

Day 1
Report Card Pick Up/Parent Teacher Conferences

Day 2
Today is Tuesday, April 8, 2014. We will estimate the sum and difference of 2 two-digit numbers.
Inquiry Question: How would you estimate $1.19 + $1.21?
Share what you know with a classmate!

Spelling: Words with –ear: appear, beard, clear, smear, dreary, earrings, fear, gear, hear, near

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that non fiction readers have read closely to find the main ideas in the text. We read the first sentence of a paragraph and ask, ‘What is this saying?’ Then we read on, sentence by sentence, asking, ‘How does this fit with what’s been said so far?’ to help us find the main idea. Readers take the sentences we’ve read and say what we learned in one short statement.”
Tip: “Readers of nonfiction can think about the topic of the whole book and the subtopic of the section. Then, as we read the sentences on the page, we can think, ‘What’s the part of the larger topic this section is dealing with? What does the author want me to think, know, or understand about that subtopic?’ ”

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: The Big Book of Bugs Damselflies and Dragonflies by DK Publishing p.18-19
Questions to Guide Discussion:
- What are the characteristics of the habitats of damselflies and dragonflies?
- What elements of the habitat are essential to the insects’ survival?
- Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter two, which is the insect’s habitat.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the habitat of insects for their All-About Books.
- Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the habitats of their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter two: Habitat(s) of the Insect).
- Students work independently to take notes on the habitat(s) of their insects.

Day 3
Today is Wednesday, April 9, 2014. We will elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about our insect’s habitat.
Inquiry Question: What is the most interesting fact you have learned during the insect research project? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Mid-Workshop Teaching Point: “Readers are on the lookout for when our book switches topics. We know that sometimes there isn’t a heading that will alert us to the change, and instead we should think, ‘What part of the main topic is this dealing with? Is it the same or different from the last page?’”
Teaching Share: “Sometimes the author is being clever with the section heading and we need to figure out what the section is really about. We can read each sentence and think, ‘How does this fact fit with the heading?’ Then, at the end of the page or section, we can retitle that section with a heading that makes sense.”

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: The Big Book of Bugs Stick and Leaf Insects by DK Publishing p. 26-27
Questions to Guide Discussion:
- What are the characteristics of the habitat of stick and leaf insects?
- What elements of the habitat are essential to the insects’ survival?
Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s habitat(s).
- Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
- Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s habitat(s).

Day 4
Today is Thursday, April 10, 2014. We will observe, discuss, and write the characteristics of artifacts.
Inquiry Question: How can an old photograph tell us about the past? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that we can come to our clubs with confusions or misunderstandings and talk to the other members of the club to clarify them. We may start by saying what we read in our book and explaining what’s confusing. Then, the other members in the club can talk back to the questioning member to explain or ask further questions to help fix up the confusion.”

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Ants, Facts and Cool Pictures by James Mayrose (Kindle)
Questions to Guide Discussion:
- What and how do aphids produce food for ants?
- What is the reciprocal relationship between ants and aphids?
- Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter three, which is the insect’s diet.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the diet of the insects for their All-About Books.
- Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the diet of their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter two: The Insect’s Diet).
- Students work independently to take notes on the diet of their insects.

Day 5
Today is Friday, April 11, 2014. We will use prior knowledge to predict an outcome.
Inquiry Question: If you hear a rumbling noise and look up to see dark clouds in the sky, what can you predict will happen? Share what you know with a classmate!

Second Grade Parents Read-Aloud

Weekly Spelling Test

Word Knowledge Quiz

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Readers can have reactions to the information presented in our books. We can think about how we feel when we read a section or part of our book, and make a statement about what our response is. We can say, ‘That is really important because . . . ’ ‘This part makes me feel . . . ,’ or ‘This seems really surprising because. . . .’”

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Preying Mantis!!! What Do Praying Mantis Eat? by Nathaniel E. J. Hogan (Kindle)
Questions to Guide Discussion:
- What is the diet of the praying mantis?
- What is the diet of larger praying mantis?
Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s diet.
- Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
- Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s diet.

Math
Lesson 14-3 Estimating Sums and Differences
Objective: Children will estimate the sum and difference of 2 two-digit numbers.
Essential Understanding: Rounding can be used to estimate sums and differences as can place value and number relationships.
Vocabulary: estimate
1. Develop the concept:
- How can you estimate a two-digit sum and difference?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to estimate a sum to see if there is enough money to buy two items, and estimate a difference to see if you have more or less money left over.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to estimate, answer if yes you have enough money or no you do not have enough money.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to estimate, answer if yes you have enough money or no you do not have enough money. Then students will solve story problem. Finally, students will write a subtraction sentence using 2 two-digit numbers and explain how to estimate the difference.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 14-4 Problem Solving: Try, Check, and Revise
Objective: Children will solve problems involving adding and subtracting money by using the try, check, and revise strategy.
Essential Understanding:
Some problems can be solved by making a reasoned first try for what the answer might be and then through additional reasoning arrive at the correct answer.
1. Develop the concept:
- How can trying a method, checking the result, and revising as necessary be used to solve problems?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to use try, check, and revise problem-solving strategy to solve two-digit addition and subtraction problems involving money.
Guided practice: Teachers guide students to use a price chart to practice the try, check, and revise strategy.
- Independent practice: Students will work independently to use a price chart to practice the try, check, and revise strategy. Then students will solve story problems and write to explain the story problems were solved
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Topic 14 Reteaching/Shopping Games
Provide children with more examples and practice for each lesson in the topic.
Set A: Teachers guide students to complete and record addition problems using two-digit coin amounts.
Set B: Teachers guide students to subtract using two-digit coin amounts.
Set C: Teachers guide students to estimate the sum of 2 two-digit numbers.
Set D: Teachers guide students to estimate the difference of 2 two-digit numbers.

Topic 14 Test

Science
Integrated with language arts
Science Content:
- Insects need air, water, and space.
- Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
- The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
- The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.
Thinking Processes:
- Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
- Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
- Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
- Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.

Social Studies
Skills Read a Time Line
Objectives Trace the history of space exploration on a time line.
Create and interpret time lines.
Sequence and categorize information.
Ask a volunteer to tell what day of the week it is and then to write it on the board. Ask children what day comes next. Have volunteers write the remaining days in horizontal line across the board. Draw a long line under the words and short vertical lines between them. Tell children that together you have created a simple time line.

What You Need to Know – Review the concepts of left and right. Ask children to point to the left-hand page and then to the right-hand page in their books. Emphasize that when they read a time line, just as when they read a sentence, they move from left to right. Point out that each mark on this time line represents a period of ten years.
Discuss the people and events included on the time line. Ask children to tell what they know about space flight exploration. If children have visited one of the space centers, encourage them to tell about their experiences.
Examine Primary Sources Learning About the Past
Objectives:
- Name sources of information, such as people, places, and artifacts.
- Obtain information about a topic using a variety of sources.
- Compare sources of information about the past.
Vocabulary: history, source, artifact
Motivate: Remind children that Earnest says to look for the story in history. Explain that history is the story of what happened in the past. Historians–or people who study history– look at things from long ago to learn about the way people lived. Historians also find out about the past by talking with people, reading what people have written, and visiting places such as museums or monuments.
History: Read aloud the text on pages 222-223. Be sure children understand that a source is where something comes from. The source of milk is a cow; the source of rain is from clouds; the source of a story is a person’s memory or imagination. Stress that a story about the past is called history. Then direct attention to the pictures on page 222. Ask volunteers to tell what they might learn about the past from people like those shown in each picture.
Visual Learning Ask volunteers to suggest who the people shown in the pictures might be. Have children point out visual clues that might help them identify who each person is.
Read and Respond: Discuss ways children can use places to help them learn about the past. Point out that some places, such as libraries and history museums, are built specially to house materials that show or tell how people before us have lived. Other places, such as monuments or historical markers, remind us of special people or events from history. In cemeteries, names, dates, and other information carved into tombstones can provide historical information. Buildings can help us learn how people lived and worked in the past, while the names of streets can tell us the names of important people and places of the past.
History: Explain that an artifact is an object from another time or place. Point out that letters and notes can help us learn about people’s everyday lives, and that newspapers and ticket stubs can give information about important events at a certain place and time.
Learning About the Past
- Small group activity
- Students work cooperatively to observe, discuss, and write the characteristics of artifacts and explain how technology has developed over time to replace these artifacts.
Skills: Predict a Likely Outcome
Objectives:
- Recognize the importance of knowing the past to predict the future.
- Follow steps for making a prediction.
Vocabulary: predict
Ask students to imagine they are on the playground. They hear a rumbling noise and look up to see dark clouds in the sky. Lightning flashes, thunder claps, and a teacher carrying an umbrella comes outside and begins rushing them indoors. Ask students what they think will happen next. Explain that they have just predicted an outcome.
Why It Matters
People can use what they learn from the past to predict the future, or tell what they think will happen.
What You Need to Know
List the following steps on the Smart Board for students to follow to predict a likely outcome.
Step1: Think about what you already know.
Step 2: Find new information.
Step 3: Tell what you think will most likely happen next.
Step 4: Check whether what you predicted does happen.
Read aloud Step 1 through 4. Illustrate the steps by reminding students of the prediction they made earlier. “First, We thought about what we already knew about rainstorms. We identified a pattern – dark clouds roll in; lighting flashes and there is thunder. Next, we found new information – a teacher carrying an umbrella rushed the children indoors. Finally, we made a prediction about what would happen next.”
Explain that in this case, we could not check our prediction because the story was make-believe. Ask students to give the kinds of prediction we can check.
Explain that not all predictions turn out to be correct. Sometimes there are clouds but it doesn’t rain. Still it is a good idea to use what you know about clouds causing rain and take your umbrella just in case. Many stories have surprise endings and your prediction doesn’t come true. Still, making predictions as you read helps you pay attention and think about what you are reading.

Thank you for your support,

Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of March 30

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The social studies land and water test will be administered on Tuesday, April 1. Please have your child refer to the graded social studies to review.

The EnVision Topic 13 Test will be administered on Wednesday, April 2. Please review graded homework, classwork, and activities on EnVision website.

The third quarter parent teacher conferences are Monday, April 7. The finalized schedule will be sent home Wednesday, April 2.

As part of the FOSS science program, second grade students are observing and feeding mealworms (beetle larvae stage), Painted Lady butterflies (pupae stage), and crickets (nymph stage). These experiences are providing a path to develop scientific thinking, including formulating inquiry questions essential for the insect research project.
Therefore, students will be writing insect-themed research papers as well as designing and creating an insect habitat. Please provide your child with a cardboard shoebox. If your child did not bring Crayola Model Magic last fall, please submit one package this week.

Additionally, we sent home a letter last week requesting your assistance in obtaining a book about an insect (of choice) for your child for his/her in-class research project. Please comply by April 8.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 28
Rhyming (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the nonsense word. Students produce real rhyming words.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and then isolate the onset from the rime, as written. Ex: T: pouch, S: pouch /p-ouch/
Blending (Words change daily)
- Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Segmenting (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, Teacher: found, Students: found; /f-ou-n-d/
Substituting (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
- Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
- Greetings in Turkish: Merhaba
- Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: Sing, “Icky Insects” by Silly Bus You Tube

Differentiated Instruction:
- Students work in pairs to read charted spelling sentences.
- Fry’s Word List assessment
- Guided writing/conferencing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
RTI: Third Hundred Fry Words List 2 (14-25)
example, begin, life, always, those, both, paper, together, got, group, often, run
- Word Stamps:
Give students the list of sight words, stamps, and ink. Have students stamp each word.
- Students work in pairs to read the sight words.

Day1
Morning Message: Today is Monday, March 31, 2014. We will read and discuss about insects.
Inquiry Question: Are insects important to our environment? Share what you know with a classmate!

Word Knowledge
Spelling: Words with the Vowel Digraph –ee
agreed, between, deep, feeling, seem, sleep, steel, street, week, wheels

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Launching The Unit
This part is all about reminding children that they already know a lot about how to read nonfiction and that it’s time to switch from thinking about characters to reactivating that nonfiction mindset. Bring out your old nonfiction charts. Remind children of all they know.
Explain to students about book clubs:
- A reading club is formed around a basket of books that has been collected because the books relate to one another in some way.
- A reading club doesn’t involve a particular task, other than reading and talking about books.
- Reading clubs aren’t a permanent daily structure of every reading workshop period all year, but instead are used a couple times a year for two to four weeks at a time.
- In a reading club, readers partner with other children who are reading at about the same reading level and have the same or similar interests.
- Partners read and talk about texts in their reading clubs, and then they ponder questions, develop ideas, develop theories, celebrate discoveries, and so on.
- The work that students do in reading clubs allows them to become experts on their topics and increases their comfort and familiarity with different kinds of texts and reading strategies.
- Club and partnership work are teacher-supported as the teacher confers with individuals, partners, and club members.
- Reading clubs are in addition to, not instead of, daily independent reading.
Assign students into clubs.
During conversations, mentor children in the kind of independent talk they will initiate in their club. When mentoring students’ conversations, exemplify the kind of independent thinking that students are expected to do as they read.
- Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Insects
- Teachers guide students utilizing a KWL chart.
- Teachers chart what the students know, followed by what the students would like to learn.

Interactive Read-Aloud: About Insects A Guide for Children by Cathryn Sill
Questions to guide the read-aloud
- What are the characteristics of an insect?
- What is unique about an insect?
- How do insects travel?
- Are insects important to our environment? Why?
- Teachers present the rubric to explain expectations for the insect All-About Books.

(Discussion points used the following day to model note taking for insect research projects.)
- Students work in pairs to view books on insects.

Day 2
Morning Message:
Today is Tuesday, April 1, 2014. We will read and discuss taking notes about insects.
Inquiry Question: What are common characteristics of insects? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
- Interactive Read Aloud: Insects What Does It Take To Be An Insect? P. 4-5 by Molly Marr
Using the read aloud to review with students that when we read nonfiction texts independently, we don’t just roar on, tearing through the text at the speed of a Ferrari. We pause quickly and often to collect our understanding. We think, “What have we learned so far?” or “What was this part about?” and hold this information in our mind as we move forward in the book. Of course, when readers stop to recollect what we’ve just read, we are likely to be more mindful, also, of what ought to come next. Tell students they need to learn to categorize text into sections to make sense of the sections, and teach them how to make mental containers as they read and drop the information they learn into the various categories.
- Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
- Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter one, which is what is an insect and its characteristics.
- Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing the characteristics of insects for their All-About Books.
- Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the characteristics of insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter One: Characteristics of Insects).
- Students work independently to take notes on the characteristics of insects.

Day 3
Morning Message:
Today is Wednesday, April 2, 2014. We will read and discuss taking notes about your chosen insect.
Inquiry Question: What are the characteristics of your chosen insect? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
This part is all about reminding children that they already know a lot about how to read nonfiction and that it’s time to switch from thinking about characters to reactivating that nonfiction mindset. Bring out your old nonfiction charts. Remind children of all they know.
“Today I want to teach you that we need to come to our clubs prepared to talk about our topics. One way we can do this is to really listen to the text. We don’t just read with explaining voices; nonfiction readers, in fact, actually explain the text to ourselves as we go along—we pause after a few words and explain whatever we’ve read to ourselves, using our own words if we can. It’s almost like the explaining voice in our head is a real teacher who makes sure we understand each section before moving on. Then we will be ready to explain and talk in our clubs about our topic.”
- Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
- Interactive Read Aloud: Grasshoppers by Julie Murray p. 4-11
- Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter one; what are the specific characteristics of each student’s chosen insect.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing the characteristics of insects for their All-About Books.
- Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the characteristics of each student’s chosen insect, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter One: Characteristics of each student’s chosen insect).
- Students work independently to take notes on the characteristics of their chosen insects.

Day 4
Morning Message:
Today is Thursday, April 3, 2014. We will estimate sums and differences with money.
Inquiry Question: How can sums and differences are estimated? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that we need to come to our club ready to talk about the main ideas about our topic. We can figure out the main idea by noticing the who and the what of the page or part. This helps us name the subject and the action as we read. To find the main idea, we can think, ‘What’s the relationship between the who and the what?’ and ‘How can I say this main idea as a sentence?’ ”
- Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.
- Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
- Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.

Day 5
Morning Message:
Today is Friday, April 4, 2014.
We will read and discuss early uses of calendars and clocks as ways to measure time.
Inquiry Question: How do you measure time? Share what you know with a classmate!

- Second Grade Parents Read-Aloud

- Spelling Test

- Word Knowledge Quiz

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that club members don’t just ‘read’ information to one another. We explain and discuss it. Careful nonfiction readers always try to put what we’ve read into our own words. We might read a bit, then put the text down and say, ‘What the author is saying is that . . .’ or ‘What this means is . . ..’ This will help us prepare to talk in our clubs later.”

Writing
Teachers redemonstrate to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.
- Using their notes, students continue composing a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.
- Students read independently or with a partner.

Math
Topic 13 Reteaching
Provide children with more examples and practice for each lesson in the topic.
Set A: Teachers guide students to count coins starting with the coin of greatest value.
Set B: Teachers guide students to find the total amount, counting the bills first, then the coins from the greatest to the least value.
Set C: Teachers guide students to show the same amount in different ways.
Set D: Teachers guide students to use an organized list to show the same amount.

Math Games
- Stamping Coins: Students stamp out the coins, skip count and write the amount.
- Spinning for Money: Each player puts 7 pennies, 5 nickels, 5 dimes, 4 quarters, and one dollar bill into the bank. Players take turns spinning the Spinning for Money Spinner and taking the coins shown by the spinner from the bank. Whenever possible, players exchange the coins for a single coin or bill of the same value. For example, a player could exchange 5 pennies for a nickel, or 2 dimes and a nickel for a quarter.
- Buying Fruit and Vegetables: Select the fruit and vegetables from the Fruit and Vegetables Stand Poster that you would like to buy. Write the name of each item. Then draw the coins you could use to pay for each item.

Topic 13 Test

Topic 14 Money
Topic Essential Understanding: How can sums and differences be estimated?
Vocabulary: estimate
Topic Opener:
Interactive Math Story: Using Addition at the Arts and Crafts Fair by Bella Pony
Activate Prior Knowledge: How can you use mental math to add?
Lesson 14-1 Adding Money
Objective: Children will complete and record addition problems using two digit coin amounts.
Essential Understanding:
The process for adding money, written using cent notation, is the same as adding whole numbers.
1. Develop the concept:
- How is adding money amounts in cents similar to adding tens and ones?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to add money amounts in cents.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to add two-digit money amounts written vertically.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to add two-digit money amounts written vertically. Then, solve and write story problems using 2 two-digit numbers.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 14-2 Subtracting Money
Objective: Children will subtract using two-digit coin amounts.
Essential Understanding:
The process for subtracting money, written using cent notation, is the same as subtracting whole numbers.
1. Develop the concept:
- How is subtracting money amounts in cents similar to subtracting tens and ones?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to subtract money amounts in cents and record the cent symbol.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to subtract money amounts in cents and record the cent symbol.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to subtract money amounts in cents and record the cents symbol. Then students will solve subtraction story problems using money amounts. Finally, students will write and solve a story problem for 50 cents – 25 cents.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Science
Integrated with language arts
Science Content:
- Insects need air, water, and space.
- Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
- The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
- The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.
Thinking Processes:
- Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
- Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
- Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
- Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.

Social Studies
- Review for the Land and Water Unit Test

- Land and Water Unit Test

Interactive Read Aloud:
…If You Lived in Colonial Times by Ann McGovern
Unit 5 Past and Present
Objectives:
- Use a visual to predict content.
- Interpret a quotation.
- Use a sequence chart to prepare for the unit.
Vocabulary: history, settler, landmark, colony, artifact
Access Prior Knowledge:
- Ask children to name activities they do in school every day. Record the activities they mention on separate sentence strips and display the activities on the board in random order. Then call on volunteers to arrange the activities in time order.
Visual learning:
- Present picture and ask questions to guide students to discover time line. Point out that time is always passing. Over time, some things change and some stay the same. Have children predict what changes they might learn about in this unit.
Interpreting Quotations:
- Read aloud the quotation “The present was an egg laid by the past that had the future inside its shell.” –Zora Neale Hurston
Tell children that Zora Neale Hurston was a famous African American writer. Then draw a hen, an egg, and a baby chick on the board. Explain that when Hurston wrote the quotation, she made a comparison between time, which readers cannot picture, and a simple process that is familiar to most people. Use questions to guide students to understand the significance of the quotation.
Explain that the quotation shows that the present, past, and future are all connected.
Access Prior Knowledge:
- Discuss the idea that one way we learn about the past is by studying objects that give clues about how people lived long ago. Ask children to consider items in their homes that might give clues about the past, such as photographs, old clothing, artworks, antique furniture, or old-fashioned cooking utensils.
Mark Connections:
- Have volunteers read the word history and its definition. Remind children that when they are reading, looking at the pictures can help them understand the words. Ask how the pictures help them understand what history means.
Visual Learning:
- Ask children to look at the pictures used to illustrate the words settler and colony. Have volunteers read the definitions aloud. Ask children what they can tell about the place the people are settling from details in the picture. (There are trees for building.) Discuss how the clothes people wore, the kinds of houses they built, and the kinds of food they ate all depended on the place where they settled.
- Explain that when the Pilgrims and other people came to America, America was a colony of England. Even though the colonists lived here, they were still English citizens and had to obey English laws.
- Review questions.

Lesson 1
Objectives:
- Identify early uses of calendars and clocks as ways to measure time.
- Describe the order of events by using designations of time periods such as ancient times and modern times.
- Use vocabulary related to chronology, including past, present, and future.
Vocabulary: ancient, modern
Interactive Read Aloud: If I Were a Kid in Ancient China by Cobblestone Publishing
Culture and Society: Explain that early people recognized that a day was the period from sunrise to sunrise, a month was the length of time it took the moon to change from full to new to full again, and a year was the time it took for Earth to move through all four seasons. Ask children to explain how we break these larger periods of time into much smaller ones. For example we know that there are 24 hours in a day, 60 minutes in an hour, and 60 seconds in a minute
Visual Learning: Calendars Ask volunteers to describe what they see in the pictures. Tell children that the symbols at the bottom of this page represent the first five months of the year on the Mayan calendar. Ask children to compare the ancient calendars to modern calendars.
History: Help children locate China and Central America on a map. Tell children that the Mayas and Aztecs both developed great civilizations in the area of present-day Mexico and that they remained powerful for hundreds of years. Explain that even though China and Central America are in different parts of the world, the peoples who lived in both places long ago needed to record and measure time. Have children locate Italy on a map. Tell children that this is where Aloysius Lilius, the man who developed the calendar we use today, lived and worked. Stress that he came up with the idea for this calendar long after the Mayas and ancient Chinese developed theirs.

Thank you for your support,

Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of March 23

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

If you haven’t signed up for the third quarter parent/teacher conferences which are on April 7, please do so as soon as possible. The sign-up schedules are posted outside the front door of rooms 103 and 106. Please sign up. We have extended the sign up date to March 31. Parents, not signed up on the schedule, will be assigned the time slots available!

FYI ¬– We will administer the EnVision Math Benchmark Assessment on Wednesday, March 26. The assessment will include concepts learned in Topics 9, 10, 11, and 12. Please have your child begin reviewing these concepts on the EnVision website and their graded papers.

Additionally, students will be taking the Science Chapter 4 test on Thursday, March 27. Please make sure your child refers to the graded science homework as well as the students’ textbook to review.

Friday, March 28 is an attendance day for all students and staff. It is one of the make-up days for the previous closing of schools due to extreme weather conditions.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 27
Rhyming (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the nonsense word. Students produce real rhyming words.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and then isolate the onset from the rime, as written. Ex: T: pouch, S: pouch /p-ouch/
Blending (Words change daily)
- Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Segmenting (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, Teacher: found, Students: found; /f-ou-n-d/
Substituting (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
- Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
- Greetings in Polish: Cześć
- Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: Sing “A Hole in the Bottom of the Sea” (food chain) from You Tube, Barefoot Books

Differentiated Instruction:
- Guided writing/conferencing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
- Fry’s Word List assessment
- RTI
Sight Word Learning Activity:
Third Hundred Fry Sight Words; List 2 (1-13)
saw, left, don’t, few, while, along, might, close, something, seem, next, hard, open
Fry Word Race (RTI) This is a partner game. You and your partner will have your own board.
Directions: Pick six to thirteen words out of your Fry word stack. Write one word in each box. On your turn, roll the dice. Say the word for the number you rolled. If you said it correctly, you may cover a box with a marker. The first person to get to the end is the winner.

Day 1:
Morning Message: Today is Monday, March 24, 2014. We will read and discuss food webs.
Inquiry Question: Why might a food chain be related to a food web? Share what you know with a classmate!

Spelling: Words that begin with wh-
whale, what, when, where, whether, which, while, whine, whirl, white

Reading
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 14 Good. Better. Best.
Interactive Read-Aloud: The Incredible Book Eating Boy by Oliver Jeffers
Guiding Questions:
- Why did Henry love books? How do you know?
- What sequence did Henry follow when eating a book?

Have a student share his or her writing with the whole class.
Students also share their writing with a partner.

Review vocabulary words by having students get up to stretch and say out loud what the words mean: introduction, opinion, persuade, conclusion, evidence

Minilesson
Connection: Tell students a story about watching movies and then comparing them in a discussion with friends. Relate this to the kind of thinking and writing they can do across books. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Show students how you compare similar books. Model your thinking closely about what aspects of the book you are comparing, and then include this thinking in your writing. Debrief, reviewing the steps you went through to compare books and think closely about the comparison.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to practice this work using books from your collection.
Link: Remind students how making comparisons between books is another kind of evidence that can support their opinion. Give them an opportunity to come up with some possible books to compare.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, March 25, 2014. We will practice showing the same amount of money using different sets of coins.
Inquiry Question: How do you show 87 cents two different ways? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“We know that, just like real people, characters can act differently depending on who they are with or who they are around. Today I want to teach you that, as readers, we can come up with possible reasons this is so. We can closely study the patterns around our characters’ interactions and then make theories about these patterns. We can try to figure out why they’re acting or reacting in certain ways. Are they trying to impress or embarrass or annoy the other character they’re with? Why?”
“Readers can even come up with new theories as we study characters’ reactions and interactions. We can look from book to book to book within a series to see if and when these patterns tend to repeat.”
- Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read-Aloud: The Incredible Book Eating Boy by Oliver Jeffers (Day 2)
Guiding Question:
- How was Henry transformed in the story?
Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 14 Good. Better. Best.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Pushing Children to Think Deeply about Books
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 3:
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, March 26, 2014. We will learn how to utilize punctuation to give readers rest stops.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important for readers to take rest stops? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“Whether we’re reading alone or talking in our clubs, readers come up with theories about why characters do certain things or say certain things. We also read to find out what the author is trying to teach us. Today I want to teach you that we can think about how these theories and ideas matter to the real world. For example, after reading Chester’s Way, we may ask, ‘What does this make me think about copycats now?’ or ‘Does this book or this series help me to think differently about best friends now?’ ”
- Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read-Aloud: Bailey by Harry Bliss
Guiding Questions:
- Why is Bailey the “top dog” at Champlain Elementary School?
- How does reading books affect Bailey?

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session15 Giving Readers Signposts and Rest Stops
Minilesson
Connection: Gather your writers and explain how longer sentences need some rest stops. Name the teaching point.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Invite your writers to notice some rest stop punctuation in a few well-written sentences. Guide them through the steps of first noticing the punctuation and then asking themselves what the purpose of the punctuation is. Record punctuation observations in a class chart.
Link: Before sending students off, give them a chance to try rest-stop punctuation in their own fabulous writing. Remind the class that punctuation is one way of taking care of your readers.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, March 27, 2014. We will read and discuss how people’s decisions affect their lives
Inquiry Question: How might a bad decision affect a person’s life? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Four: Readers Let a Series Book Lead Us into Learning about a Topic
“Readers, sometimes reading one book can lead us to wonder about new topics. Today I want to teach you that when you find yourself wondering about something as you read your series book, you can stop and say, ‘I want to learn more about that!’ ”
Tip: “While reading and talking about our series books, we may wonder things like, ‘What kind of place is this?’ or ‘Who are/were these people?’ or ‘What is life like for ____________?’ This can help us find topics we may want to learn more about.”
Tip: “We can look over the books we have read so far and come up with some possible topics to learn about. Today I want to teach you that this can be done in different ways, on our own or in our clubs. We can work together to find out more about one thing we wonder about, or we can each investigate a different topic and then bring back what we each find to share with our clubs.”
- Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.
Interactive Read-Aloud: Bailey at the Museum by Harry Bliss
Guiding Questions:
- Why is Bailey enthusiastic about the field trip?
- How does Bailey help “save the day” on the field trip?
- Why is he able to resolve the problem at the museum?
Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 16 Writing Introductions and Conclusions to Captivate
Minilesson
Connection: Tell students that you are impressed with their nomination writing and all of the strategies that they are using to make their pieces powerful and persuasive. Explain that opinion writers have the challenge of catching the attention of their audience and communicating their claims, before releasing them. Name the inquiry question.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Set writers up to investigate a mentor text by guiding then through a series of steps that help students discover answers to the overarching question. Then listen in and coach, to elicit and collect their comments. Coach students to study structure, voice, word choice, and craft as they work in pairs. Listen in and highlight observations that students make. Reconvene the group to elicit students’ observations. Repeat their observations using more precise language, and record these on sticky notes to add to a Venn diagram chart.
Link: Send writers off to work independently, reminding them to call on prior knowledge as well as what they have learned today about writing introductions and conclusions.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 5:
Morning Message: Today is Friday, March 28, 2014. We will begin reading and discussing about insects.
Inquiry Question: How do you know if a living thing is an insect? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Heggerty Phonemic Awareness Assessment

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 16 Writing Introductions and Conclusions to Captivate
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Motivating Students to Make Revisions when They Think that They’re All Done

Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Lesson 13-2 Counting Collections of Coins
Objective: Children will count collections of coins that include half-dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies.
Essential Understanding:
Money amounts can usually be counted in different ways. When counting money, it is usually easier to start with the coin or bill with the greatest value.
Materials: Coins (half-dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels, pennies), paper bag
Vocabulary: greatest value, least value
1. Develop the concept: How can you find the value of a set of mixed coins?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to find the total value of different collections of coins by counting on from the coin with the greatest value to the coin with the least value.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to draw coins from the greatest to the least value, and count on to find the total amount.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to draw coins from the greatest to the least value, and count on to find the total amount. Then, students will solve story problems using coins. Finally, students will write a story about finding 75 cents, and draw this amount in coins.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 13-3 Ways to Show the Same Amount
Objective: Children will show the same amount of money using different sets of coins.
Essential Understanding:
The same amount of money can often be represented using different combinations of coins and bills.
Materials: Coins (half-dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels, pennies)
Vocabulary: dollar bill, dollar coin, dollar sign, decimal point
1. Develop the concept: How can you show 100 cents, or 1 dollar, with different groups of coins?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to make the same amount of money using different coins, including dollar coins.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to make the same amount of money using different coins, including dollar coins.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to write each total amount of given sets of coins, and circle coins which equal 1 dollar, then draw three coins to 80 cents. Finally, students will draw coins to show 1 dollar.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Benchmark Test: Topics 9-12

Lesson 13-4 One Dollar
Objective: Children will count money amounts greater than one dollar and write the amount with a dollar sign and a decimal point.
Essential Understanding:
Specific coins or bills each have a unique value. The size of a coin does not indicate its value.
Materials: Number cube, bills, coins (quarters, dimes, nickels, pennies)
Vocabulary: None
1. Develop the concept: How do you count combinations of money that include both bills and coins?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to write and say dollar amounts.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to count on to find the total amount.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to count on to find the total amount and draw a picture to solve a number story. Finally, draw 1 dollar bill and four coins, label the coins and write the total amount.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 13-5 Problem Solving: Making an Organized List
Objective: Children will make an organized list to find different combinations of coins.
Essential Understanding:
Some problems can be solved by generating a list of outcomes, and organizing that list in a systematic way so that all outcomes are accounted for
Materials: Coins (quarters, dimes, nickels)
Vocabulary: tally mark
1. Develop the concept: How can an organized list show the different ways to make the same amount of money?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how making an organized list can help you show all the possible ways to make a certain amount of money.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to use coins, organized charts and tallies for given amounts of purchases for school supplies.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to use coins, organized charts and tallies for given amounts of purchases for school supplies.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Science and Social Studies Integrated
Food Web
Objective: Students will know that a food web is many food chains linked together.
In a web all the parts are connected, which makes it strong and work effectively.
Picture a spider’s web. All the parts work together to make the web an effective way for the spider to catch prey.
Have note cards created with numerous animals and plants. Then read a teacher created story. As the story continues the students will toss the yarn to their peer. The students will continue until they have created a web. Now the teacher will discuss how in a web the animals rely on one another.
Sometimes an animal may become extinct or have a reduced number. Cut a few connecting strings. Look what happens to our web then. Often animals can adapt their food choice.
The food web we just created is not as complex or complete as the food webs in nature. This is because many times animals can eat more than one type of prey.
Guiding Questions:
Why is it called a food web?
What could happen if part of the food web is somehow disrupted?
Interactive Read-Aloud: Who Eats What? Food Chains and Food Webs by Patricia Lauber
Review
What are the characteristics of an environment? What are the characteristics of a habitat? Review how animals adapt for their environments.
Review the various geographical areas including, tundra, desert, rainforest, grassland, ocean, and freshwater.
Review the similarities and difference of food chains and food webs.

Chapter 4 Test

As we begin a language arts and science integrated unit of study about insects, students are expected to write a research paper about an insect of choice for the next few weeks. Therefore today, we are going to visit the library to borrow and select books for our “All About Insects” books.
Science Content:
- Insects need air, water, and space.
- Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
- The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
- The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.
Thinking Processes:
- Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
- Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
- Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
- Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.

Using Tables:
Objective: Students will understand the characteristics of tables. Also, students will create their own table.
A table is a chart that is used in many non-fiction texts to organize information.
It is important to know how to read these tables.
Tables have many characteristics! Show a chart on the Smart Board. Begin teaching about the characteristics of the chart.
The title shows what information can be found on a table. It is important to look at all of the titles on charts because sometimes a chart can tell more than one thing.
To read a chart you must down the column and across the row.
Have students go back and work with their learning partners to work with a chart. They must answer these questions:
What is the title of the table?
What does the table show?
How is the information organized?
Write something you learned from the table.

Use a Map Scale
Objectives:
- Recognize that maps can be different sizes.
- Define map, scale
- Use a scale to find real distances.
Display two United States maps that are different sizes. Ask children to describe the differences between the maps. Then have them tell how maps are different from the actual areas that they show.
Why It Matters:
Explain that maps not only show where places are located, they also can tell the distances between places. Ask children why it would not be practical to make a map that is as large as the area it shows. Explain that distances and places on maps are smaller than their real sizes and that a map scale can tell you how much smaller.
What You Need to Know:
Explain to children that once they know how far apart two places are on a map, they can find out how far apart they are in real life. Emphasize that a map scale can show them that a certain distance on the map stands for longer, real distance on Earth. For example, 1 inch on a map might stand for 1 mile on land. Point out that not all map scales are the same size. You can use the scales on the two United States maps you displayed as an example.
Why might 1 inch stand for 10 miles on one map and for 100 miles on another map?
Emphasize the importance of marking accurately when using a scale strip. Remind children to distinguish between miles and kilometers on the map scale.

Caring for Natural Resources
- National Geographic video: Changing Earth
- Students will view and discuss the change in bodies of water as seen from NASA’s Space Shuttle photography
Objective: Students will learn about conservation through recycling.
There are over six billion people in the world today. Therefore, the natural resources need to be protected.
Conservation is one way of preserving earth’s natural resources.
When you conserve you use less of an item or you use it more effectively.
Examples could include turning off water when brushing teeth or using both sides of a paper when writing.
Recycling is another way to help the world.
Describe to me what it means to recycle.
When you recycle you take something and use it again.
What are some ways to encourage their communities to recycle?
Pollution can negatively affect out natural resources.
Can someone describe to me what pollution is?
Pollution is when natural resources are polluted. Garbage can cause pollution in communities.
What are some of the causes of pollution? Describe these causes. What can you do to reduce pollution?

Thoughtful Decisions
Objective: Students will describe how people’s decisions affect their lives.
How many decisions have you made already today?
Did you decide to brush your teeth? What to eat for breakfast. Should you should talk during the lesson?
Decisions affect the way people live.
How does the decision to recycle affect a person’s life?
There are five steps to making a decision.
Step 1: Know you have to make a decision
Step 2: Gather Information
Step 3: Identify Choices
Step 4: Predict Consequences
Step 5: Take Action
Sometimes people make decisions inappropriately because they do not know all the information or do not know the consequences of the decision they have been making.

Review the study guide that was assigned on Tuesday. This will assure the students are all studying correct material over the weekend.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of March 16

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! Students are encouraged to wear green on Monday, March 17th.

The Topic 12 Math Test will be administered on Thursday, March 20. Please refer to graded classwork, homework, and EnVision math online to support your child’s learning.

If you haven’t signed up for the third quarter parent/teacher conferences which are on April 7, please do so as soon as possible. The sign-up schedules are posted outside the front door of rooms 103 and 106. Please sign up. We will be sending home the finalized schedule March 24.

FYI we will administer the EnVision Math Benchmark Assessment on Wednesday, March 26. The assessment will include concepts learned in Topics 9, 10, 11, and 12. Please have your child begin reviewing these concepts on the EnVision website and their graded papers.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 26
Rhyming (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the nonsense word. Students produce real rhyming words.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and then isolate the onset from the rime, as written. Ex: T: pouch, S: pouch /p-ouch/
Blending (Words change daily)
- Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Segmenting (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, Teacher: found, Students: found; /f-ou-n-d/
Substituting (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
- Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
- Greetings in Filipino: Kumusta
- Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: “Over In The Meadow” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p.209-210 and You Tube, Barefoot Books

Differentiated Instruction:
- Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
- Fry’s Word List assessment
- RTI
Sight Word Learning Activity:
Third Hundred Fry Sight Words; List 2 (1-13)
saw, left, don’t, few, while, along, might, close, something, seem, next, hard, open
Fry Word Race (RTI) This is a partner game. You and your partner will have your own board.
Directions: Pick six to thirteen words out of your Fry word stack. Write one word in each box. On your turn, roll the dice. Say the word for the number you rolled. If you said it correctly, you may cover a box with a marker. The first person to get to the end is the winner.

Day 1:
Morning Message: Today is Monday, March 17, 2014. We will learn how to determine whether a shape has been divided into equal or unequal parts.
Inquiry Question: How can you determine if a shape is divided into equal parts? Share what you know with a classmate!

Spelling Words: Tri-blends thr-
thread, three, threw, thrift, thrill, throat, throb, throne, through, throw

Reading
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 11 Publishing Our Opinions for All to Read
Minilesson
Connection: Drumroll the upcoming writing celebration. Remind students that writers fancy up their writing before publishing, and ask them to recall which tools located in the classroom they can use as resources to do this. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Start a quick study of one of the books you have written about. Think out loud about what you see, noting not just the feature but why you think the author or illustrator included it. Start a quick chart to list different extras writers might include.
Active Engagement: Invite students to find the extras in their books, asking why the author may have chosen to include them.
Link: Remind students of their ongoing work and invite them to add the work of including extras to their plans for the day.
Students publish one of their letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, March 18, 2014. We will read and discuss strategies to use to support our opinions when writing.
Inquiry Question: How can you persuade someone to agree with your opinion when writing? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Two: Even When Readers Think We Know How a Series Will Go, We Are Ready to Be Surprised
“Readers, you know how when we come to the end of a book, we know some of our work is just beginning? Well, today I want to teach you that when we end a book, we can reflect, asking, ‘What was the whole book about?’ and ‘Was the author trying to teach us something?’ Then we might go back and find evidence in the book that the author really was trying to teach that lesson.”
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.
Interactive Read-Aloud: Dear Mrs. LaRue, Letters from Obedience School by Mark Teague
Questions to Guide Analyzing the Text:
Why is Ike corresponding via letters with Mrs. LaRue?
Is Ike expressing his point of view with Mrs. LaRue? If so, what is Ike’s thinking?
What vivid details is Ike expressing in his letters to persuade Mrs. LaRue to allow Ike to return from Obedience School?
Turn and Talk: What additional details would you share with Ike to persuade Mrs. LaRue further?

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 11 Publishing Our Opinions for All to Read
Students continue to publish one of their letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: When is Handwriting a Priority?

Day 3:
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, March 19, 2014. We will read and discuss the characteristics of fresh water and salt water environments.
Inquiry Question: What are the similarities of and differences of fresh water and salt water environments? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“Today I want to remind you that when we meet with club members, we don’t only think about our current series, we think about all the series books we have read, and we think about the patterns in those books. We can think about the types of characters, the types of problems, even the messages the different authors might be teaching. We can talk with our club, thinking ‘What is the same in these series?’ and ‘What is different?’ ”
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.
Interactive Read-Aloud: LaRue Across America: Postcards from the Vacation by Mark Teague
Questions to Guide Analyzing the Text:
- Why was the original plan for a vacation changed for Mrs. LaRue and Ike?
- Who has Ike contactedvia the postcards regarding the road trip? Explain why.
- What details does Ike include in the postcards to persuade Mrs. Hibbins to intervene and contact Mrs. LaRue?
Turn and Talk: What additional details would you share with Ike to persuade Mrs. Hibbins further?

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 12 And the Nominees Are…
Minilesson
Connection: Tells students a story about visiting a bookstore and noticing all of the award-winning books. Explain that this is the work they will be undertaking: writing nominations for their own favorite books. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Walk students through the steps you take: first, choosing a book to nominate, then thinking about what makes your chosen book so special and the reasons why it is deserving of an award. Debrief.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to practice, first by choosing a book to nominate, and then by planning the reasons why their books deserves an award. Ask students to rehearse their writing with their partners.
Link: Send students off to write, reiterating the procedure you introduced during the minilesson.
Students begin writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, March 20, 2014. We will continue to write nominations for our favorite books.
Inquiry Question: What will you include when writing nominations for favorite books? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“There are lots of ways that a reading club can tackle comparing and contrasting series books. Today, you will have a few options for how your club will do this work. You could get lots of ideas going by having two members read a couple books in one series while the other members read two books in another series, or you could focus on character similarities and differences across series. Other book clubs may prefer to focus on the big ideas. Maybe you might even think about how certain types of books (funny, detective, etc.) are similar and different.”
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.
Interactive Read-Aloud: Detective LaRue, Letters from the Investigation by Mark Teague
Questions to Guide Analyzing the Text:
- In this sequel, Ike again implores the help of Mrs. LaRue. What is at the heart of Ike’s correspondence with Mrs. LaRue?
- Does Ike continue his ways of persuasion or has he developed any additional strategies? If so, what are they?
Turn and Talk: What strategies would you employ to persuade Mrs. LaRue?

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 12 And the Nominees Are…
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Getting Mileage Out of Any Learning Tools You Have at Hand

Day 5:
Morning Message: Today is Friday, March 21, 2014. We will review the value of pennies, nickels, and dimes, and determine the value of different combinations.
Inquiry Question: What is the value of two dimes, 1 nickel and four pennies? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Heggerty Phonemic Awareness Assessment

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 12 Prove it! Adding Quotes to support Pinions
Minilesson
Connection: Share your observations about the impressive work students have been doing in this unit. Recall prior learning about quotation marks and hint at the new work they can do. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate how you use direct quotes from the touchtone text to support your opinion. Reread your writing, thinking about your opinion. Then go back to the text to find evidence to support your opinion. Finally, add in the direct quote, using revision strips and quotation marks. Restate the entire teaching point, recapping your process, to reinforce the demonstration.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to plan for their independent work. Ask students to recall their writing and make a plan for how to make it stronger by quoting the books they are writing about.
Link: Remind students to call upon all they know to make their writing strong and powerful. Give them an opportunity to get started on their revision work, right in the meeting area, before sending them off to work independently.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Lesson 12-7 Wholes and Equal Parts
Objective: Children will determine whether a shape has been divided into equal or unequal parts. If the parts are equal, children will count the number of parts.
Essential Understanding: A region can be divided into equal-sized parts in different ways. Equal-sized parts of a region have the same area but not necessarily the same shape.
Vocabulary: equal, unequal, halves, thirds, fourths
1. Develop the concept:
- What does “equal parts” mean? How do you identify equal and unequal parts?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how find and make equal parts.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to write the number of parts, and circle equal or unequal.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to write the number of parts, and circle equal or unequal.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 12-8 Problem Solving
Objective: Children will use clues to solve riddles about plane shapes and solid figures.
Essential Understanding: Some problems can be solved by reasoning about the conditions in the problem.
Vocabulary:
1. Develop the concept:
- How can you use clues about the attributes of plane shapes and solid figures to solve a problem?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to use multiple clues to identify plane shapes and solid figures.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to cross out shapes that do not match the clues. Then circle the shape that answers the question.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to cross out shapes that do not match the clues. Then circle the shape that answers the question.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Re-teaching
Students will be retaught specific skills they have already learned in Unit 12 in preparation for their test on Thursday.
These concepts include:
Students will revisit how to count flat surfaces, vertices, and edges of solid figures, and how to relate plane shapes to solid figures.

Learning how to name polygons based on sides, angles, and vertices.
How we can make new shapes in existing shapes. Ex. Making a rectangle into two squares.
How we can cut shapes into other shapes. Ex. How can we cut a rectangle into four triangles?
How can we cut rectangles into square rows and columns? How to count those rows and columns to find area?
Students will revisit wholes and parts of shapes.
Students will revisit how to use reasoning strategies to solve geometry problems.

Unit 12 Test

Topic 13 Counting Money
Objective: Children review the value of pennies, nickels, and dimes, and determine the value of different combinations.
Activate Prior Knowledge: What is the value of one penny? One nickel? One dime? Which coin is worth 1 cent? 5 cents? 10 cents? Finally, review how to count by ones to count pennies, by fives to count nickels, and by tens to count dimes.
Interactive Math Story: Farm Cents by Gerry Arthur
Topic Opener: Counting Money
Topic Essential Question: What strategies can be used to count money?
Lesson 13-1 Coins
Objective: Children will identify the value of a group of half-dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies.
Essential Understanding: Specific coins each have a unique value.
The size of the coin does not indicate its value
Materials: Coins (half-dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels, pennies)
Vocabulary: half-dollar, quarter, dime, nickel, penny, coins, cent
1. Develop the concept: How can you find the value of a group of half-dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how about counting different kinds of coins.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to find the total amount from varying combinations of coins by skip counting with the coin of highest value to the coin with the least value.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to find the total amount from varying combinations of coins by skip counting with the coin of highest value to the coin with the least value. Then students solve number stories to find and draw the coins to each story problem. Finally, students write a short story about what coins can used to buy an orange for 60 cents.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Science and Social Studies Integrated
Objective: Students will understand the characteristics and habitats of a freshwater habitat.
A pond, lake, river, creek are often freshwater.
Describe what a pond is.
A pond is a small freshwater environment.
Many animals and plants call ponds and other freshwater environments their habitats.
Show pictures of some of these animals including fish, beaver, water lilies, and the water strider.
Fish have gills to breath underwater.
The beaver has webbed feet so it can swim more easily through water. The beaver also has extremely sharp teeth to cut down trees and build homes.
The water lilies grow on the top of the water to get the needed sunlight for survival.
The water strider’s legs help it walk on water without ever sinking.
What do we notice about the legs of the water strider?
Pretend you are a fresh water animal or plant. Draw yourself with the adaptations that would help you survive. Or write about the adaptations you would have and why. Be sure to label your adaptations.
Students will be able to describe the life in an ocean and the differences between salt water and fresh water.
The students view short videos, which introduce oceans. One of the videos is an introduction to the types of animals in the ocean environment.
Students will also watch “Why the oceans are salty” from

25 Most Terrifying Sea Creatures

Students will learn about the environments of both the desert and rainforest. They will describe one similarity and one difference of these environments.
Rainforest: A wet environment that gets rain nearly every day.
Often there is less growth near the bottom of the rain forest.
Infer why there is less growth near the bottom of the rainforest.
The rainforest has very tall trees that reach for the sunlight. Therefore other plants have adapted to grow near the top of these trees.
Desert: A dry environment that gets little rain. Few plants and animals can survive in this environment.
Plants that do survive have adapted in order to survive.
A cactus stores water to use when needed.
Other animals have adapted the way they find food.
On a Chicago summer is it cooler or hotter at night?
It is also cooler in the desert. Therefore, many animals, like the lizard, hide in the shade all day and search for food at night when it is much cooler.
Read Aloud: What Can Live in a Desert? by Sheila Anderson
Grassland:
Grassland is an open area covered with grass. There are few trees. This makes it difficult for large animals to hide anywhere.
What could be one issue for large animals in the grassland?
Often animals travel in groups to stay more protected from predators.
Read Aloud: What Can Live in a Grassland by Sheila Anderson
Tundra: A cold and snowy environment. The plants grow low to the ground to help protect them from the harsh cold environments. They also grow close together.
Animals in this area have thick fur and fat. Both of these help animals in the frigid tundra stay alive.
How have plants and animals adapted to living in the tundra.
Why do plants on the tundra grow close together?
Food Chain
Objective: Students will be able to describe how a food chain works.
A food chain is the order in which living things eat one another.
Begin by showing a basic food chain.
A human eats a hamburger. The hamburger is a cow. The cow ate grass. We just created a simple food chain.
A food chain transfers energy from living thing to living thing.
The grass has received energy from the sun. The cow then ate that grass so the energy was transferred to the cow. The human then received the energy when he/she ate the cow meat.
In the food chain there are two types of animals; they are either predators or prey.
A predator is an animal that hunts for food. The prey is the animal that is being hunted.
Often an animal can be both a predator and the prey.
A snake can be the predator of mice, but will be the prey for an owl.
Have students go back to their seat. Each cluster will have a set of animals and plants. They will be given time to put themselves in an order they believe to be accurate.
The students will the go to the front of the class and say for example.
I am a snake. I am the predator for the mouse and the prey for an owl.
Guiding Questions:
Describe why an animal can be the predator and the prey.
What is transferred in the food chain?

Place shortening in a Ziploc bag. Have the students put one hand in another Ziploc bag and then put that hand in the shortening bag. Leave the other hand bare. Students will then place their hands in cold water to see how much warmer the bag with shortening (fat) is than the hand without.

Read Aloud: Ox Cart Man by Donald Hall
This book is about the past and farming in the past.
Before reading:
What is the past?
This book is about how farming was in the past.
Can anyone predict what may be the same and what may be different than the read-aloud that was on Friday?
What may be different?
After Reading:
Chart Ox Cart Man on the Venn diagram.
Engage prior knowledge through read aloud: Poem That Kind of Day by Eloise Greenfield
Discuss two more Natural Hazards.
How can the weather affect the moods of people?
Well, there are sometimes events in the weather that change the lives of people.
Can someone tell me a natural hazard that would affect humans?
There are many natural hazards that can affect people.
These powerful hazards will change the lives of humans.
Also, humans must adapt to survive the storms, and every storm takes a different way of surviving.
Blizzards: Wind drives stow in a heavy snowstorm called a blizzard.

What safety measures do humans need to take because of a blizzard?
Floods: When snow melts or there is a lot of rain, creeks and rivers may flood or leave their banks.
Continue guided note page
Hurricanes are created in the Ocean. They are high wind and rainstorms of the coasts. It creates a circular motion with center called the eye.

Describe how a human would have to react to a hurricane to stay safe.
Tornado: A strong, whirling wind that causes great damage to land and buildings.

How do humans need to react to the natural hazard called a tornado?

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of March 9

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Daylight savings time begins Sunday, March 9 at 2 a.m. Please set your clocks ahead one hour.

The science vocabulary quiz will be given on Thursday, March 13th. Please have your child review definitions of the following vocabulary words from Chapter 4 of the Harcourt Science Textbook: habitat, adapt, rain forest, grassland, desert, ocean, pond, food chain, food web, and environment.

The third-quarter-parent/teacher conferences will take place on Monday, April 7. The sign-up schedules are posted inside the front door of our school. Please sign up.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 25
Rhyming & Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
- Teacher identifies the category for the day. Teacher says the nonsense word. Students say “Not (nonsense word), (real rhyming word)!”
Example, Teacher: “Fafrica”, Students: “NOT Fafrica; Africa!”
Blending-Basic Sight Word Review (Words change daily)
- Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and then isolate the specified sound.
Segmenting-Basic Sight Word Review (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, Teacher: car, Students: car; /k-ar/
Substituting (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
- Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds
Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
- Greetings in Navajo language: yatahey (hello)
- Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: “The Brook” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell

Differentiated Instruction:
- Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
- RTI: One-on-one Assessment of Third Hundred Fry sight Words, List One

Day 1:
Morning Message: Today is Monday, March 10, 2014. We will learn how to read closely to generate ideas for writing.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to read a text closely? Share what you know with a classmate!

Word Knowledge:
Spelling
Tri-blends shr-
shred, shrew, shrewd, shriek, shrill, shrink, shrimp, shrine, shrub, shrunk

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 8: Reading Closely to Generate More Writing
Minilesson
Connection: Use an example to illustrate the importance of close reading. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate by looking back at an important part of the touchtone text. Highlight the fact that you pause to attend closely to what’s in the text, saying or writing what you notice. Make it clear that noticing is not enough. Instead, writers need to ask, “What new ideas does this give me?” Debrief by explaining to students how you notice new details and incorporated them into your planning.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to try the same work using the touchstone text.
Link: Remind students that they should be working toward the goal of writing more about their opinions, and that close reading of their books can give them more ideas to write about. Prompt them to think back to all the strategies they’ve learned to make their writing powerful.
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, March 11, 2014. We will identify, draw polygons, and list their attributes.
Inquiry Question: How does a square differ from a triangle? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Two: Even When Readers Think We Know How a Series Will Go, We Are Ready to Be Surprised
“Today I want to teach you that when we finish a chapter or a chunk of text, we can stop and make sure we are accumulating the story. One way we can do this is to ask ourselves, ‘What is going on with my character so far?’ or ‘What do I know about my character so far?’ ”
Tip: “We can keep track of our thoughts by jotting them on a Post-it or using a graphic organizer, such as a T-chart.”
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read-Aloud: The Day The Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt p. 1 – 15

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 8: Reading Closely to Generate More Writing
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Linking Details and Ideas

Day 3:
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, March 12, 2014. We will read and discus natural resources.
Inquiry Question: How have you used natural resources today? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Two: Even When Readers Think We Know How a Series Will Go, We Are Ready to Be Surprised
“Readers, we know that characters, like people, aren’t always one way—even if they are often predictable. This is because characters are complex. Today I want to teach you that as we talk and learn about characters, we can use this knowledge to challenge and revise our all-or-nothing thinking. Instead of saying, ‘Pinky always,’ we might say, ‘Sometimes he ____________.’
Tip: “When we notice our character acting in a way we don’t agree with or are confused by, we can sort out our thinking in a partnership conversation. We might say things like, ‘I disagree with what Jamaica did,’ or ‘I don’t know what Maria means by ____________,’ or ‘Why does Harry think that is important?’ ”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read-Aloud: The Day The Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt p. 16 – 31

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 9: Gathering More Evidence to support Each of Our Opinions
Mini-lesson
Connection: Congratulate students on the close reading work they did yesterday. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Let students know that you are aware that they are noticing details and using them to come up with an opinion. But now, they need to take it to the next level and search for even more details to support each of their opinions. Demonstrate taking an idea or opinion from a section of a letter and returning to a book to collect related details and evidence. Debrief, describing the process you followed to gather more details and evidence from the text.
Active Engagement: Ask students to join you in supporting a new opinion.
Link: Add on to the anchor chart and remind students of the importance of using strategies outlined on it.
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, March 13, 2014. We will discuss and compare the tools people used in the past to the tools used today.
Inquiry Question: Why are tools important in farming? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Two: Even When Readers Think We Know How a Series Will Go, We Are Ready to Be Surprised
“Since we know characters don’t always act predictably, we can expect to be surprised now and then by things they do and say. Today I want to teach you that we can read our series on the lookout for those surprising moments—when a character acts out of character. When we see a character acting in a surprising way, we can pause and do some big thinking, jotting on a Post-it what we notice that is different and why we think that this is so.”
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read-Aloud: Bink and Gollie by Kate DiCamillo

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 9: Gathering More Evidence to support Each of Our Opinions
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Using the Classroom Environment to Teach

Day 5:
Morning Message: Today is Friday, March 14, 2014. We will learn how rectangles can be partitioned into equal squares.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to divide a rectangle into square? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Heggerty Phonemic Awareness Assessment

Reading
- Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 10: Why is the Author Using a Capital Here?
Mini-lesson
Connection: Let writers know that as their writing becomes more complex, so too does their use of capitals.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Name a questions that will guide the class inquiry. In this case, “Why is the author using a capital letter here?”
Guided Inquiry: Set writers up to read apart of a letter about a book, letting them know that they should listen and read along, thinking about the inquiry question. Read through the mentor text a second time, reminding students of the guiding question and pushing them toward closer examination. Pull the students back together and challenge them to think about the difference uses of capitals across the writing. Remind them of the inquiry question and get them working to answer it with a partner. Add the students’ observations to the class chart.
Link: Send students off to revise, edit, and work on their letters, keeping in mind all the strategies they have learned so far.
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Lesson 12-2 Relating Plane Shapes to Solid Figures
Objective: Children will identify the plane shapes that form the flat surfaces of solid figures.
Essential Understanding: Three-dimensional or solid figures have length, width, and height. Many can be described, classified, and analyzed by their faces, or flat surfaces, edges, and vertices. Many everyday objects closely approximate standard geometric solids.
Vocabulary: plane shapes, circle, square, triangle, rectangle, polygon
1. Develop the concept:
-What plane shapes form the flat surfaces of some common solid figures?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to identify and circle the plane shape or shapes that can be made by tracing the flat surfaces or faces of a solid figure. Also, children will identify and circle the solid figure or a figure that have flat surfaces or faces that can be traced to make a given plane shape.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to circle the plane shape or shapes you can make by tracing the flat surface or face of a solid shape.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to circle the plane shape or shapes you can make by tracing the flat surface or face of a solid shape
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 12-3 Polygons and Angles
Objective: Children will identify and draw polygons (triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, and hexagons) and list their attributes.
Essential Understanding: A shape can be identified by the number of its sides, vertices, or angles.
Vocabulary: angle, side, quadrilateral, pentagon, hexagon
1. Develop the concept:
-How can polygons (triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, and hexagons) be identified by attributes (sides, angles, and vertices)?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to identify shapes by finding how many sides, vertices and angles they have.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to identify shapes by finding how many sides, vertices and angles they have.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to identify shapes by finding how many sides, vertices and angles they have.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 12-4 Making New Shapes
Objective: Children will recognize and name trapezoids, parallelograms, and hexagons, put shapes together to make new shapes, and identify the number of sides and vertices in each shape.
Essential Understanding: Some shapes can be combined to make new shapes.
Vocabulary: trapezoid, parallelogram
1. Develop the concept:
-How can new shapes be made by combining other shapes?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to use smaller shapes to make a larger shape. Then, identify the number of sides and vertices of that larger shape.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to use smaller shapes to make a larger shape. Then, identify the number of sides and vertices of that larger shape.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to use smaller shapes to make a larger shape. Then, identify the number of sides and vertices of that larger shape.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 12-5 Cutting Shapes Apart
Objective: Children will cut shapes apart to make new shapes.
Essential Understanding: Some shapes can be decomposed into other shapes.
Vocabulary:
1. Develop the concept:
-How can cutting larger shapes make new smaller shapes?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how cut apart a larger shape to make smaller shapes.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to draw lines to make new shapes.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to draw lines to make new shapes.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 12-6 Dividing Rectangles into Equal Squares
Objective: Children will divide rectangles into equal squares and count how many squares and count how many squares are needed to completely partition the rectangle.
Essential Understanding: Rectangles can be partitioned into equal squares.
Vocabulary: rows, columns
1. Develop the concept:
-How can a rectangle be partitioned into equal squares and the number of squares be counted accurately?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to divide rectangles into equal squares and count them accurately.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to divide rectangles into equal squares and count them accurately.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to divide rectangles into equal squares and count them accurately.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Science and Social Studies Integrated
Students will continue working on and editing their map.
Allow students to volunteer to present what they have already created on their map, and then discuss what that particular student is doing well, and what he/she should add.
Students will learn about what makes an item a natural resource, and how often they use these natural resources every day.
List natural resources on the board and the uses of that resource.
Students will review a natural resource map to see which areas have which natural resources.
Begin the discussion of water and trees as natural resources.
Discuss how much water the students have used since they woke up that morning.
For exact usage use:

http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/freshwater/water-calculator-methodology/

Then discuss the use of wood. Trees must be removed for lumber which is used for buildings and furniture.
How do people waste natural resources?
What are some ways in which us as second graders to preserve our natural resources?
Students will begin discussing the use of air and soil.
Read Aloud: Wind Power by David Neufeld
Who here has ever seen a windmill before?
Can some describe to me how these windmills look?
What does the environment where these windmills are located look like? Can someone infer why it is such barren land?
Can anyone infer how the windmill helps make energy?
How does soil help meet our need for food?
Have a discussion about some of the pros and cons of using natural resources to help humans.
Introduce the multi- level independent read aloud to support students of all reading levels.
Switch the students thinking about the use of natural resources from the perspective of a human to a prospective of a living item in that environment.
Yesterday we talked about how humans use the natural resources.
How do other living species use the same natural resources?
What happens when there are no natural resources for these animals and plants to use?
Often because of humans or other environmental factors animals are forced to adapt in order to survive.
Some of these adaptations include extra blubber on ocean animals or how ducks have oily skin. These small adaptations happen over time. Often animals slowly change with the environment. The environment is constantly changing and animals and plants are a part of the environment.
Students will compare the tools people used in the past to the tools used today.
Discuss how technology has adapted in just the students’ lives.
Read-Aloud: Heartland by Diane Siebert
Predict which tools we believe the characters in Heartland had that people from long ago also had.
Teacher and students will fill in a time line on the Smart Board. The time line will be focused on the time period of Heartland in comparison to the students’ birthdate, and approximate birth of parents, and grandparents
Oreo experiment
Students are each given one Oreo. The students must open the cookie and eat the cream out of the middle before they eat the cookie. Then you say that because humans harmed their environment they no longer have arms. They must complete the same task as above. They must adapt.
Guiding questions:
How did you feel when you could not use your hands to get the white part out of the cookie?
How did you adapt?
Was your adaption effective?
If you had another cookie how would you adapt you original method?
Duck feather experiment:
Students will have two duck feathers, one they will cover in grease and the other they will not. The students will then dip each feather into water and notice the differences. The plain feather is before an animal like a duck adapted.
Students will write about their observations from the experiments.
Guiding questions:
What did the oil on the feather do to help a bird who is consistently in water?
Science Vocabulary Quiz

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of March 2

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We sent home the Rotational Unit Study guide a few days ago for the unit test, which will take place on Tuesday, March 4. Please make sure your child is prepared for the test.

Students will be taking the social studies test about Kenya on Friday, March 7. A social studies study guide for this test will be sent home on Tuesday, March 4 to help your child prepare.

The third-quarter-parent/teacher conferences will take place on Monday, April 7. The sign-up schedules are posted inside the front door of our school. Please sign up.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 24
Rhyming & Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
- Teacher identifies the category for the day. Teacher says the nonsense word. Students say “Not (nonsense word), (real rhyming word)!”
Example, Teacher: “Fafrica”, Students: “NOT Fafrica; Africa!”
Blending-Basic Sight Word Review (Words change daily)
- Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and then isolate the specified sound.
Segmenting-Basic Sight Word Review (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, Teacher: car, Students: car; /k-ar/
Substituting (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
- Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

- Word Recognition
Fry Third Hundred Sight Words List 1 (14-25)
keep, tree, never, start, city, earth, eyes, light, thought, head, under, story
Sight Word Baseball
Materials: cards with sight words, baseball bases, scoreboard
Directions:
Teachers divide students into two teams. Teachers display a sight word. Student reads a sight word. Students reading accurately proceed on bases.
Strikes are given for missed words. After three strikes the second team plays.
(The team with the highest score facilitates the game the next day.)
Variation: Players use each sight word in a complete sentence.

Differentiated Instruction:
- Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
- In a Nutshell: (5–8 minutes) RTI
Students sound out an irregular word and then practice saying the word when it is pointed out.
MODEL
Student use white board to write on.
Prepare a list of the following irregular words for you to refer to: bowl, can’t, climb, fight, high, I’ve, knee, know, laugh, might.
1. We are going to take a look at a set of words. These might be new words you may not have learned yet. You can sound them out, but some letters change the sound in a word so you say the word a bit differently. Let’s take a look at one.
2. Write the word bowl on the board.
3. Let’s sound out this word. My turn first. Point to each letter as you say it. In this word, the w is silent. Now let’s blend the sounds together to say bowl. That’s right!
PRACTICE
4. Now it’s your turn. When I touch the letters, you say the sounds and then read the word. Have each student practice sounding out bowl and saying the word correctly.
5. Write the next word on the list on the board, and ask a student to sound it out. If the student struggles, model sounding out the word. Then have the student practice sounding it out and saying it again.
6. Continue introducing the rest of the list, giving each student the opportunity to sound out 1 or 2 words.
7. Once each of the new irregular words have been introduced, write them all on the board in a random arrangement.
Now, we’re going to practice reading all the words we just learned. Ready? Point to words randomly, pausing on each for a few seconds, and call on each student individually to read multiple words.
Let’s sound out this word. My turn first. Point to each letter as you say it. In this word, the w is silent. Now let’s blend the sounds together to say bowl. That’s right!
If students pronounce a word incorrectly, ask them if they think it sounds correct.

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
- Greetings in Illini: aya niikah (hello friend)
- Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: “River” and “Teacher, Teacher” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 223, 255

Day 1:
Morning Message: Today is Monday, March 3, 2014. We will read and discuss about the earth’s most valuable resource—water.
Inquiry Question: Why is water considered a valuable resource? Share what you know with a classmate!

Spelling Words, Three-Letter Blends: squ-
squad, square, squash, squat, squeak, squeal, squeeze, squid, squint, squirm

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part One: Readers Figure Out How a Series Goes, Noticing Patterns and Predicting What Will Happen
“Readers, we know that Post-its are a place to write what is happening or what we notice. But they’re not just for that. Today I want to teach you that they are also a place to explore our thinking about the book. As we jot we can ask ourselves: ‘What is it about this that makes me think it is important?’ or add ‘because.’ ”
Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 3: Writers Generate More Letters (Developing New Opinions by Looking at Pictures)
Mini Lesson
Connection: Gather students and recall an image from your shared story. Choose a scene that is portrayed in a picture rather than in the words of text. Go back to the text to show that the scene you recall wasn’t created through the printed words. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Go back to picture in the text and study it closely. Debrief, highlight your use of the pictures to help you develop and support a new opinion.
Active Engagement: Give students a chance to try this work in their own books.
Link: Reiterate that this strategy is one of several they have learned for generating ideas about books.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Assessing and Teaching Your Writers Using the Opinion Writing Checklist.

Day 2:
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, March 4, 2014. We will read and discuss about the earth’s most valuable resource—water.
Inquiry Question: Why is water considered a valuable resource? Share what you know with a classmate!

Inter Active Read Aloud: Mercy Watson Goes for a Ride by Kate DiCamillo Chapter 1-6
Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part One: Readers Figure Out How a Series Goes, Noticing Patterns and Predicting What Will Happen
“Readers, we already know that series are full of patterns. Today I want to teach you that when we pay close attention to those patterns, we can use them to predict what will happen next in the story. We can say, ‘I bet this means that ____________ will ____________.’ ”
Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 4: Writers Make Their Letters about Books Even Better by Retelling Important Parts
Mini Lesson
Connection: Gather some intriguing sentences, ones that are sort of cliffhangers, and then read them aloud to your writers. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate how to explain more to your reader by retelling important parts that are connected to your opinion. Return to one of the sentences you just read as an example. Slow down your demonstration, really showing what it looks like to recall important parts and retell them.
Active Engagement: Invite your writers to do this work by first planning the opinion they’ll write about today. Next, prompt writers to rehearse that part of the story they will retell, with a partner.
Link: Reiterate that explaining information to readers is always one way to write better, and remind students that talking and listening to a writing partner really helps with this work. Then send them off to write.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Continuing to Teach from Information Gathered and Further Helping Writers with Retelling

Day 3:
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, March 5, 2014. We will learn that writers write with a specific audience in mind.
Inquiry Question: How might your writing change if your audience is a second grader from another English speaking country? Share what you know with a classmate!

Inter Active Read Aloud: Mercy Watson Goes for a Ride by Kate DiCamillo Chapter 6-10
Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part One: Readers Figure Out How a Series Goes, Noticing Patterns and Predicting What Will Happen
“Today I want to teach you that when we are preparing to work with our club mates, one thing we can do is look over our Post-its and ask ourselves, ‘Will this help me talk well about the book?’ or ‘Is this Post-it important to understand the book?’ Then we collect the Post-its that will help us talk long and strong about the book.”
Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 5: Keeping Audience in Mind
Minilesson
Connection: Engage students in a quick-shared inquiry about where their letters should live. Reiterate what has been said so far, and transition from the idea of where letter lives to the idea of a specific audience. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Using your read-aloud text, engage students in thinking about what a letter might sound like to someone who has already read the book. Emphasize how you think about what you would probably talk about if you were together. Reinforce the work you just did by saying it again as a series of steps.
Active Engagement: Give students a chance to try this work, setting them up with a letter to someone who hasn’t read the book.
Link: Prepare students for independent work by giving them a few moments to decide on the specific audience they’ll be addressing, considering how that choice will affect the content of their letter.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Drawing on Three Teaching Resources for Strong Writers

Day 4:
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, March 6, 2014. We will begin reading and discussing living things and their environment.
Inquiry Question: How do living things benefit from their environment? Share what you know with a classmate!

Inter Active Read Aloud: Mercy Watson Goes for a Ride by Kate DiCamillo Chapter 10-14
Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part One: Readers Figure Out How a Series Goes, Noticing Patterns and Predicting What Will Happen
“Today I want to teach you that when we read on our own or work with a partner, we think about how different books in the series go together. We can ask, ‘Did one happen first?’ ‘Did the character learn something in one book that he or she uses in the next?’ ‘Do other characters come back?’ We can talk about the things that are the same and different or how parts in the different books fit together.”
Tip: “Just like in everyday conversations, we work hard to make sure we understand what our partner is saying. As he or she talks we listen actively, and if we don’t understand something, we ask, ‘What do you mean?’ Or if we want to understand our partner’s thinking more deeply, we might say, ‘Why do you think that is important?’ ”
Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 6: Using a Checklist to set Goals for Ourselves as Writers
Minilesson
Remind students the importance of the work of final revisions and edits. “Today I want to teach you that when writers are ready to share their writing, they give it one last read, looking for ways to make it even better. They use all they have learned ever to make their writing the best it can be!”
- Begin with a shared reading of the Opinion Writing Checklist, giving students opportunity to turn, talk, and process the various criteria they’ll be self-assessing. Demonstrate to students how to read through their writing, looking for places where they have, or have not, done various things on the checklist. Have students work with a partner to offer feedback and suggestions for revision.
- Confer with students in small groups or one-on-one to provide support for their revisions.

Day 5:
Morning Message: Today is Friday, March 7, 2014. We will learn to identify solid figures by their faces or flat surfaces, edges, and vertices.
Inquiry Question: How is the shape of a can different from the shape of a shoebox? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 7: Writing about More than One Part of a Book
Minilesson
Connection: Welcome students to the new bend by praising the work they’ve already done. Invite students to recall what they already know about getting started with writing, and encourage them to think about what it looks like when they do their best. Gather students’ ideas on a chart and then share them, capturing the major lessons you hope they took from Bend 1. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Invite students to recall some of the ways they developed opinions about books from Bend 1. Explain that they have graduated to a point where they can write about more than one opinion in a single letter. Debrief by walking students through the steps you took to plan your new letter.
Active Engagement: Invite writers to keep going with the work you started together, coming up with more opinions they might write about. Call the students back together, sharing some of what you heard.
Link: Ask students to plan for the sections of their own letters before heading off to work independently.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Writers in Paragraphing

Math
Lesson 11-8 Subtracting Three-Digit Numbers
Objective: Children will subtract three-digit numbers using a standard algorithm.
Essential Understanding: The standard subtraction algorithm for three-digit numbers breaks the calculation into simpler calculations using place-value starting with the ones, then the tens, and then hundreds.
Vocabulary:
1. Develop the concept:
- How do you subtract 2 three-digit numbers using paper and pencil?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to subtract three-digit numbers.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to use place value frames to subtract first the ones, then the tens.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to use place value frames to subtract first the ones, then the tens.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 11-9 Problem Solving: Use Logical Reasoning
Objective: Children will use logical reasoning to solve problems.
Essential Understanding: Some problems can be solved by reasoning about the conditions in the problem.
Vocabulary:
1. Develop the concept:
- How can you use logical reasoning to help solve problems?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to use logical reasoning to solve riddles.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to use clues to solve riddles.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to use clues to solve riddles
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Topic 11 Reteaching

Provide children with more examples and practice for each lesson in the topic.
Set A: Teachers guide students to use mental math to add three-digit numbers.
Set B: Teachers guide students to use models and regrouping to add three-digit numbers.
Set C: Teachers guide students to count on or back to find the missing part.
Set D: Teachers guide students to use regrouping to subtract three-digit numbers starting with the ones.

Topic 11 Test

Topic 12 Geometry
Topic Essential Understanding: How can shapes and solids be described, compared, and used to make other shapes?
Vocabulary: cone
Topic Opener:
Interactive Math Story: Building Blocks by Bill Whitney
Activate Prior Knowledge: What are the attributes of the cube and cylinder?
Lesson 12-1 Flat Surfaces, Vertices, and Edges
Objective: Children will identify solid figures by their faces or flat surfaces, edges, and vertices.
Essential Understanding:
Three-dimensional or solid figures have length, width, and height. Many can be described, classified, and analyzed by their faces, or flat surfaces, edges, and vertices. Many everyday objects closely approximate standard geometric solids.
Vocabulary: sphere, pyramid, cylinder, cone, cube, rectangle, prism, solid figure, flat surface, face, edge, vertex, vertices
1. Develop the concept:
- How are the attributes, such as the number of flat surfaces, vertices, and edges used to describe and classify three-dimensional geometric figures?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to classify geometric shapes.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to identify the number of flat surfaces, or faces, edges, and vertices on solid figures, and identify objects that have the same shape.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to identify the number of flat surfaces, or faces, edges, and vertices on solid figures, and identify objects that have the same shape.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Science
Review for Unit Test
Students are guided to use tops, zoomers, twirlers, wheel-and-axle system, cups, marbles, and runways to review concepts learned in this unit.

Rotational Unit Test

Pre-assessment for the science unit focused on the environment
Introduction to the unit
Vocabulary Introduction
Environment, habitat, adapt, desert, rain forest, grassland, tundra, ocean, pond, food chain, and food web
Not discussing the vocabulary today, but letting the students hear the words they will hear the rest of the unit.
Guiding questions to informally gage schema?
What is a habitat? Ocean? Grassland? Etc.
What types of animals would we experience in each?
Can anyone describe the difference between a food chain and a food web?
Are humans in a food chain or food web?
Students will describe a variety of landscapes using colorful word choices.
Do a photo walk using the smart board and PowerPoint. Show a variety of pictures and have student describe what they are seeing.
Read aloud: Living Things and Their Environments Harcourt Science Book
Students will be able to describe the effects people have on the environment.
Intro: Brainstorm of the variety of ways in which people have an effect on the environment.
Recognize the effects on people today and predict the effects in the future. People have an effect on the environment.
Read The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
This is a fiction book with non-fiction messages and implications.
As I read discuss the implications of mistreatment of natural resources.
What did we learn about what could happen when natural resources are mistreated?
How can we as second grade class help reduce how much we waste natural resources?

Social Studies
Shared Reading
The Force of Water by Lacy Finn Borgo
Book Summary
The Force of Water teaches the reader about earth’s most valuable resource—water. The book explains how water changes our planet’s surface, how it changes form as it moves through the water cycle, and how and why it is important to living things. Photos and other visual aids support the text.
Targeted Reading Strategy
- Ask and answer questions
Objectives
- Use the reading strategy of asking and answering questions
- Identify main ideas and details
- Recognize and understand the use of bold print
- Arrange words in alphabetical order
Vocabulary
- Content words: deltas, floodplain, groundwater, irrigate, pollute, nutrients, recedes, sediment, tributaries, watershed, water vapor, massive, transport
Before Reading
Build Background
- Ask students to tell what they already know about water. Ask them if they have ever heard the term “water cycle” and, if so, to explain how it works.
- Create a KWL chart on the board and give students the KWL worksheet. Work together to fill in the first column (K) with things students know about water. As a group, brainstorm some things students would like to know about the topic and have students fill in the second column (W) of their worksheets. Write some shared ideas on the class chart, as an example.
Introduce the Reading Strategy: Ask and answer questions
- Model asking questions while looking at the table of contents.
- Think-aloud: When I’d like to know more about a topic, I can use the section titles in the table contents to think of questions I’d like to have answered. For example, the section after the introduction is titled “Water on the Move.” This makes me wonder what happens to water once it has soaked into the ground. (Write your question in the (W) column of the KWL chart and invite students to add it to their worksheets.)
- Have students share any questions they have based on the table of contents or the covers of the book and add these to the second column (W).
- Have students preview the rest of the book. Show students the title page, photos, diagram, map, graphs, and captions. Draw students’ attention to the map on page 7. Encourage students to use all of these resources to think of questions to add to their KWL chart.
- Show students the glossary. Review or explain that a glossary is an alphabetized list of words from the text with their definitions. Some glossaries, such as this one, also contain page numbers that tell where the reader can find each word in the book. Tell students that they can use the glossary to find the answers to some of their questions. For example, they can look at the glossary to find where in the book they should go to learn more about sediment. Ask students to tell which page mentions sediment (8).
- As students read, encourage them to use other reading strategies in addition to the targeted strategy presented in this section.
Introduce the Vocabulary
- Model how to apply word-attack strategies. Have students find the word tributaries on page 6. Tell students that they can look at the letter the word begins with and then use what they know about syllables and vowels (one vowel sound per syllable) to sound out the rest of the word. Remind students to look for clues to the word’s meaning in the sentence that contains the unfamiliar word, as well as in sentences before and after. Point out that in this book, they may also look to the photos for clues to find meaning.
- Remind students of the other strategies they can use to work out words they don’t know. For example, they can use what they know about letter and sound correspondence to figure out the word. They can look for base words, prefixes and suffixes, and other word endings. They can use the context to work out meanings of unfamiliar words.
- Remind students that they should check whether unfamiliar words make sense by rereading the sentence.
Set the Purpose
- Read the story together on the Smart Board to find answers to their questions about water.

Lesson 3: Maps and Globes
Objectives:
- Identify major landforms and bodies of water, including continents and oceans, on maps and globes.
- Compare maps and globes.
- Use a globe to find the poles, the cardinal directions, and the equator.
Vocabulary: continents, cardinal directions, equator, globe
Geography: Have students take turns locating Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America on the map. Ask them to identify the continent in which we live. Point out islands that are near the continents. Explain that islands are usually considered to be part of the continent they are closest to. Provide examples such as Great Britain and Europe and Japan and Asia. Ask “Which is the largest continent? Which is the smallest?’
Help students locate the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, and Arctic Oceans on the map. Explain that almost three-fourths of Earth’s surface is covered with water and that most of that water is salt water. Help students determine that the Pacific Ocean is the largest of the four oceans and the Arctic is the smallest. Explain that the Pacific Ocean is also the deepest ocean in the world. Ask “Why is a map such as this one so useful?”
Display a globe and a world map. Ask students to compare and contrast the images of the continents and oceans shown on the globe and a map. Have them compare the colors used on the globe and map. Invite students to name the continents and oceans shown on the globe.
Next, help students locate the North Pole and the South Pole on the globe. Remind them that east is the direction where the sun appears every morning, and west is where the sun sets each evening. Invite students to use their fingers to trace the symbol for the equator around the globe. Emphasize that this line only appears on maps and globes. Have students put a finger on any area north of the equator. Explain that most of the world’s dry land and most of its people are in this part of the world. Then have them put a finger on any area south of the equator. Explain that only two continents, Australia and Antarctica, lie completely within this area. Ask “What are the two things you can learn about Earth from looking at a globe?”
Students will begin creating their own maps of their new town.

Read Aloud: Me on the Map by Joan Sweeney
The scenario: The students have just bought empty land in which they can do anything they want. They must make a map of their new state/city.

What are some of the key characteristics of a map?
Why do we need all of these parts to make our map effective?
Can anyone predict what might happen if someone did not have all of the parts of a map?
What if it lacked a compass?
A key?
A river, ocean, or, mountain?
Why do people use maps?

I want you to make a map of your new state.
Map must have title
Map must have a map key
Map must have a compass rose
Map must have various landforms labeled on the key

Kenya Unit Test

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of February 23

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The Mid-term Progress Reports will be sent home with the students on Wednesday, February 26. Please discuss the report with your child and complete the bottom portion to return to us. If we have requested a conference with you, kindly email us to schedule an appointment. Keep in mind that we do teach the before-school program, and therefore, cannot meet with you during the following times: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 7:45 a.m. to 8:15 a.m.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction:
Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 23
Rhyming & Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
- Teacher identifies the category for the day. Teacher says the nonsense word. Students say “Not (nonsense word), (real rhyming word)!”
Example, Teacher: “Fafrica”, Students: “NOT Fafrica; Africa!”
Blending-Basic Sight Word Review (Words change daily)
- Teacher says in individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and then isolate the specified sound.
Segmenting-Basic Sight Word Review (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, Teacher: car, Students: car; /k-ar/
Substituting (Words change daily)
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
- Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
- Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

- Word Recognition
- Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students.
- Working in pairs
- Allowing extended time
- Using graphic organizers
- Drawing pictures to support writing
- In a Nutshell: (5–8 minutes) RTI
Students sound out an irregular word and then practice saying the word when it is pointed out.
MODEL
Student use white board to write on.
Prepare a list of the following irregular words for you to refer to: bowl, can’t, climb, fight, high, I’ve, knee, know, laugh, might.
1. We are going to take a look at a set of words. These might be new words you may not have learned yet. You can sound them out, but some letters change the sound in a word so you say the word a bit differently. Let’s take a look at one.
2. Write the word bowl on the board.
3. Let’s sound out this word. My turn first. Point to each letter as you say it. In this word, the w is silent. Now let’s blend the sounds together to say bowl. That’s right!
PRACTICE
4. Now it’s your turn. When I touch the letters, you say the sounds and then read the word. Have each student practice sounding out bowl and saying the word correctly.
5. Write the next word on the list on the board, and ask a student to sound it out. If the student struggles, model sounding out the word. Then have the student practice sounding it out and saying it again.
6. Continue introducing the rest of the list, giving each student the opportunity to sound out 1 or 2 words.
7. Once each of the new irregular words have been introduced, write them all on the board in a random arrangement.
Now, we’re going to practice reading all the words we just learned. Ready? Point to words randomly, pausing on each for a few seconds, and call on each student individually to read multiple words.
Let’s sound out this word. My turn first. Point to each letter as you say it. In this word, the w is silent. Now let’s blend the sounds together to say bowl. That’s right!
If students pronounce a word incorrectly, ask them if they think it sounds correct.

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
- Greeting in Korean: An nyoung
- Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
- Group Activity: Hello song in different languages. (Youtube)
Message: Today is Monday, February 24, 2014. We will write to share ideas about characters from our reading.

Day 1:
Message: Today is Monday, February 24, 2014. We will write to share ideas about characters from our reading.
Inquiry Question: How can you describe or explain a character’s behavior? Share what you know with a classmate!
Word Knowledge
Spelling Words: scr- Blends
scrap, scrape, scratch, scream, screech, screen, scribe, script, scroll, scrub

Reading Workshop
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part One: Readers Figure Out How a Series Goes, Noticing Patterns and Predicting What Will Happen
“Just like sports fans follow our favorite teams and television watchers follow our favorite shows, so, too, readers follow our favorite series. Today I want to teach you that as we read on in a series we carry everything we know about the series with us. We enter each book in the series expecting to reencounter certain things, like a recurring cast of characters or setting.”
Tip: “When we read our series books, we see new things because of all we already know. We notice things that are out of the ordinary or pay attention to the introduction of new characters, new places, or new experiences.”

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 1: Writing Letters to Share Ideas about Characters
In this session, teach students that writers are often inspired by their reading and reach out to others to share their ideas about characters.
Interactive Read Aloud: Pinky and Rex and the Bully by James Howe
Mini Lesson
- Connection: Inspire students with energy around letters about books, by first recalling experience with letters and then describe how letters about books bring together two things the love—writing and books. Have at hand a few familiar books with strong characters to visually call to mind some of these beloved characters. Name the teaching point.
- Teaching: Demonstrate one way to get started writing a letter, by recalling opinions you have about a character. Demonstrate how you might begin a letter, recalling what students already learned about opinion writing from prior units of study. Prompt students to explain ideas, and have them join you as you think of some examples to support the idea you’ve grown about your character. Debrief about your steps.
– Active Engagement: Invite students to share their opinions about characters in their own books as a way to plan their writing.
Link: Invite students to go to it as letter writers. Remind then where to find paper. Most importantly, reinforce that they have a lot to write about.
Students compose letters.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Spreading Writing Energy
Give a Mid-Workshop Teaching about the structure of a letter if necessary.

Day 2:
Message: Today is Tuesday, February 25, 2014. We will discuss different concepts of rolling.
Inquiry Question: How do wheels, cups, and spheres roll? How are they the same and different? Share what you know with a classmate!
Word Knowledge
Fry Sight Words
high, every, near, add, food, between, own, below, country, plant, last, school, father
Sight Word Baseball
Materials: cards with sight words, baseball bases, scoreboard
Directions:
- Teachers divide students into two teams
- Teachers display a sight word
- Student reads a sight word
- Students reading accurately proceed on bases
- Strikes are given for missed words
- After three strikes the second team plays
(The team with the highest score facilitates the game the next day.)
Variation: Players use each sight word in a complete sentence.

Reading Workshop
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part One: Readers Figure Out How a Series Goes, Noticing Patterns and Predicting What Will Happen
“Readers, series books have predictable patterns. Today I want to teach you that when we read a series book, we are on the lookout for those patterns—for how a particular series goes. Does the character usually run into problems right away? Does she tend to act in similar ways? When we notice one, we ask ourselves, ‘Why is this pattern happening?’ ”

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 1: Writing Letters to Share Ideas about Characters
Review the purpose of the lesson from yesterday with additional examples. Send students off to write by reiterate the purpose of the lesson. Continue to confer with students as they write.

Day 3:
Message: Today is Wednesday, February 26, 2014. We will explore different strategies to subtract three-digit numbers
Inquiry Question: What strategies have you used to subtract two-digit numbers? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading Workshop
Main Idea & Details
“U.S. Coins”
1. Introduce the Skill
Ask students what they know about U.S. coins. Prompt a discussion with these questions: Whose face is on the front of the penny? What coin shows the history of the fifty states? As they read about U.S. coins, students should look for the following:
- The main idea, or the most important point of the topic.
- Supporting details, or information that tells more about the main idea.
2. Model
Model for students how to find the main idea and supporting details in “Coins in Your Pocket.”
- To find the main idea, I look for the most important point about the topic. The topic is U.S. coins. The main idea of this reading is that each coin has history stamped on its front and back. I’ll circle the first sentence as the main idea.
- To find supporting details, I’ll look for pieces of information that tells more about the main idea. One detail is that Abraham Lincoln is on the penny. I’ll underline that because it is a supporting detail. I’ll also underline the words that are on the back of many pennies.
3. Practice
Guide students to mark the main idea and details in “Jefferson’s Nickel” by asking the following questions.
Paragraph 1:
- What is the main idea about U.S. coins in this paragraph?
- What is a supporting detail about why a nickel is called a nickel?
- What were five-cent coins called before 1866?
Paragraph 2:
– What is the main idea about U.S. coins in this paragraph?
- How long has Jefferson been on the nickel?
- What do the backs of new nickel show?
4. Apply
Have students complete Reading 3 independently and then share their answers with partners or the group. Conclude by asking: If you could collect one kind of coin, which would it be? Explain why.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 2: Getting Energy for Writing by Talking
In this session, teach students that writers use conversations as rehearsals for writing, and they need to be mindful of their writing energy.
Interactive Read Aloud: Mercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo
Mini Lesson
Connection: Recount for students the conversations you’ve heard them have across the day about books. Give students some feedback on how often they talk but then don’t really get to write. Then invite them to think about how to get better at getting to writing. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Let students know that you want to help them get better at truly rehearsing for writing. Alert them to the trickiness of maximizing their energy for writing. Give an “antidemonstration,” in which you show what it looks like to lose energy by continuing to talk even after you come up with an idea for writing. Do a quick demonstration, or “fishbowl,” of talking through an idea with a partner, and then of being mindful of stopping while you have energy to write, using a student with whom you’ve rehearsed. Recap what happened in your fishbowl demonstration, emphasizing how writers often talk past bug ideas, and partners can help each other stop talking and start writing.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to rehearse for writing by talking in partnerships. Remind then to stop each other when it sounds like they have built up their writing energy.
Link: Send students off, reminding them of the various options they have for independent work time.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Turning to Familiar Strategies When Writing a New Genre

Day 4:
Message: Today is Thursday, February 27, 2014. We will identify and describe the physical characteristics of various bodies of water.
Inquiry Question: Describe some bodies of water you know with a partner. Explain how they are alike and different.

Word Knowledge
Fry Sight Words
high, every, near, add, food, between, own, below, country, plant, last, school, father
Sight Word Baseball
Materials: cards with sight words, baseball bases, scoreboard
Directions:
- Teachers divide students into two teams
- Teachers display a sight word
- Student reads a sight word
- Students reading accurately proceed on bases
- Strikes are given for missed words
- After three strikes the second team plays
(The team with the highest score facilitates the game the next day.)
Variation: Players use each sight word in a complete sentence.

Reading Workshop
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part One: Readers Figure Out How a Series Goes, Noticing Patterns and Predicting What Will Happen
“Today I want to teach you that as we read, we pay attention to certain things, like parts where the main character experiences trouble, seems to change, or experiences a big feeling. We can put Post-its on those parts in our books and ask ourselves, ‘Why is this happening?’ ”
Tip: “We can come up with theories about a character by noticing things like how the character acts, who the character surrounds himself with, and how he deals with trouble and change.”

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 2: Getting Energy for Writing by Talking
Review the purpose of the lesson from yesterday with additional examples. Send students off to write by reiterate the purpose of the lesson. Continue to confer with students as they write.

Day 5:
Message: Today is Friday, February 28, 2014. We will use models to subtract three-digit numbers with regrouping.
Inquiry Question: How can you regroup a hundred when you need to subtract more tens than are present in the tens place? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Muntu Dancers perform at 9:30.

Writing Workshop based on Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Students continue to compose letters.

Math
Lesson 11-3 Addition: Models for Adding Three-Digit Numbers
Objective: Children will use place value blocks to add three-digit numbers.
Essential Understanding: The standard addition algorithm for three-digit numbers breaks the calculation into simpler calculations using place-value starting with the ones, then the tens, and then hundreds.
Vocabulary:
1. Develop the concept:
- How can you model and record adding 2 three-digit numbers?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to use place-value blocks to add three-digit numbers with regrouping.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to use models to add 2 three-digit numbers with regrouping.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to use models to add 2 three-digit numbers with regrouping.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 11-4 Adding Three-Digit Numbers
Objective: Children will use paper and pencil to add 2 three-digit numbers with regrouping.
Essential Understanding: The standard addition algorithm for three-digit numbers breaks the calculation into simpler calculations using place-value starting with the ones, then the tens, and then hundreds.
Vocabulary:
1. Develop the concept:
- How can you do add 2 three-digit numbers using paper and pencil?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to add three-digit numbers and decide when to regroup.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to add using paper and pencil/models with or without regrouping.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to add using paper and pencil/models with or without regrouping.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 11-5 Exploring Subtracting Three-Digit Numbers
Objective: Children will explore different strategies to subtract three-digit numbers.
Essential Understanding: There is a variety of ways to subtract three-digit numbers.
Vocabulary:
1. Develop the concept:
- What strategies can you use to subtract three-digit numbers?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to add three-digit numbers and decide when to regroup.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to add using paper and pencil/models with or without regrouping.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to add using paper and pencil/models with or without regrouping.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 11-6 Mental Math: Ways to Find Missing Parts
Objective: Children will be given a quantity and one of its parts, and then will find the missing part by counting on or back.
Essential Understanding: There is a more than one way to do a mental calculation. Techniques for doing addition or subtraction calculations mentally involve changing numbers or the expression so the calculation is easy to do mentally.
Vocabulary:
1. Develop the concept:
- How can you count on or count back to find a missing part?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to count on or count back by 100s or 10s to find missing parts.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to count on or count back to find the missing part.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to count on or count back to find the missing part.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Lesson 11-7 Models for Subtracting with Three-Digit Numbers
Objective: Children will use models to subtract three-digit numbers with regrouping.
Essential Understanding: The standard subtraction algorithm for three-digit numbers breaks the calculation into simpler calculations using place-value starting with the ones, then the tens, and then hundreds.
Vocabulary:
1. Develop the concept:
- How can you regroup a hundred when you need to subtract more tens than are present in the tens place?
2. Develop the concept:
- Visual learning: Students will view an animated lesson to learn how to use place-value blocks to find the difference between 2 three-digit numbers.
- Guided practice: Teachers guide students to use models and place value workmats to subtract, regrouping when necessary.
- Partnered practice: Students work in assigned pairs to complete the Problem Solving section.
- Independent practice: Students work independently to use models and place value workmats to subtract, regrouping when necessary.
3. Close/Assess and Differentiate

Science
Rolling Spheres
Inquiry Question: How can we make a runway that will keep a marble rolling?
Investigation Summary
Students roll marbles in cups and down runways to observe spheres as rollers. They work with the flexible runways to make the rolling marbles do tricks. As a culminating experience, students work together as a class to connect the runway sections to make one long runway through which a marble can roll nonstop.
Science Content
- Spheres are round in all directions and roll in all directions.
- A runway must be high at the start and low at the finish for a sphere to roll the complete length.
- Spheres roll down a slope.
Teacher Observation
- Check understanding that a sphere rolls from a higher to lower position.
Guiding the Investigation (Day 2)
- Give advanced runway challenges.
- Make a long runway.
- Start construction.
- Troubleshoot the runway
- Work in larger teams.
- Monitor the projects.
- Show, tell, and return materials.
- Close the investigation.
- Assess progress.
Wrapping Up Part 2
Making word bank entries:
- Add the following words to the class word bank (sphere, runway, loop spiral).
Make content chart entries:
- Add these new concepts to the content chart: How are wheels, cups, and spheres the same? How are they different? What happens when you put a sphere on a slope? How do you set up a long runway to make sure that the marble will roll all the way down?
Lab Observation:
- Teacher models to students how they might write a lab observation.
- Students work with a partner to discuss how they would write their lab observations.
- Students write to explain the following question:
How can we make a runway that will keep a marble rolling?
Review for Unit Test
Students are guided to use tops, zoomers, twirlers, wheel-and-axle system, cups, marbles, and runways to review concepts learned in this unit.

Social Studies
Interactive Read Aloud: Tulip Sees America by Cynthia Rylant
Objectives:
- Obtain information about a topic using a variety of visual sources such as literature.
- Recognize that the geography of the earth varies from place to place.
- Identify different kinds of land and bodies of water.
Vocabulary: geography, desert, ocean

Read and Respond:
Point out the pictures while reading to help students make predictions as well as obtain information. Lead students to understand that the United States has many different kinds of land and bodies of water, that climate changes from one part of the country to another, and land and water can affect the way people work and play.
Lesson 1 Our Country’s Land
Objectives:
- Identify and describe the physical characteristics of various landforms.
- Compare the features of different kinds of land.
- Distinguish regions of the United States.
Vocabulary: landform, mountain, hill, peninsula, valley, plain, island
Read and Respond: Use photographs to help students compare landforms. Point out the rounded tops of the hills and the low, flat land that are characteristics of the plains. Discuss with students that there are few trees on a plain. Ask, “Suppose you were a farmer. Do you think that it would be better to farm and raise animals in a hilly area or on the plains? Why?”
Geography: Explain to the students that the physical features of an area place it in a certain physical region. Describe a region as an area with at least one feature that sets it a part from the other areas. Show students a map of the regions of the United States. Point out that the United States is divided into five regions: the Northeast, the Southeast, the Middle West, the Southwest, and the West. Note that the states that make up a particular region are from the same part of the United States. Ask, “ Why do you think dividing the country into regions is a good idea?”
Mountains and Valleys: Direct students’ attention to the picture of the mountain and valley. Point out that the mountains seem to rise sharply from the land to great heights. The valley seems far below. Tell students that people usually live in valleys. Have students recall what they know about temperatures on mountains. Ask, “From where does the water from the valley come?”
Island and Peninsula: Recall with students the landforms they have learned about thus far. Now introduce the words island and peninsula, and explain each landform to them. On a map of the United States, help students locate Hawaii and its many islands. Also have students locate Florida, which is a large peninsula.
Lesson 2: Our Country’s Water
Objectives:
- Identify and describe the physical characteristics of various bodies of water.
- Compare the features of different bodies of water.
- Name major bodies of water.
Anticipation Guide: Before the lesson, ask students to work in groups to decide whether they agree or disagree with the following statements. Students may look at the U.S map to decide on the answers.
1. The United States is near only one ocean.
2. There are many rivers in the United States.
3. The Mississippi River flows into the Gulf of Mexico.
4. Four lakes make up the Great Lakes.
Read and Respond: Emphasize that water from rain or melting snow flows from high places to low places. Point out that as the water flows downhill, trickles of water flow together to form streams that can become rivers. Explain that rivers flow into other rivers, lakes, or oceans. Help children trace on a map the flow of water from its source to a lake or ocean. Ask “Why do you think people might choose to live near a river?”
Explain that lakes are bodies of water surrounded by land and most lakes contain fresh water. Note that most lakes, such as Lake Itasca, have a stream that flows out of them. Ask “Why do you think the Mississippi River is much wider at its end than its source, or beginning?”
Explain that along the long course of the Mississippi River, many other streams and rivers flow into the river. Using a map that shows various lakes on it, have children identify lakes of many different sizes. Ask “How do you think the lives of people who live near the Gulf of Mexico are different from the lives of people who live in the area where the Mississippi River begins?”
Point to the Great Lakes on a map and explain that the five Great Lakes are so large that they hold nearly one-fifth of all the world’s fresh water. Canals built by the United States and Canada connect the lakes and make them part of a great water transportation system. Ships can carry goods from ports on the Great Lakes to any port in the world.
Read a Land and Water Map
Objectives:
- Use symbols, colors, and labels on maps.
- Use maps to describe land and bodies of water.
Have students look at the map key to match each color with what it shows on the map. Point out mountain areas, which are represented by a symbol and a color. At this point, help students understand that the word symbol can have more than one meaning. The patriotic symbols they‘ve already learned about stand for a belief or an idea. Tell them that symbols on a map stand for something on Earth. Ask “Which parts of the country have mountains?”
Review with students the different bodies of water, including ocean, lake, river, and gulf. Ask them to identify and compare the Pacific Ocean, the Great Lakes, the Mississippi River, and the Gulf of Mexico.
Distinguish between the coastal and interior plains. Help students see that in the East, land on the coastal plains is flat and near water. In the West, coastal lands are more mountainous.
Help students locate Alaska and Hawaii. Point out the peninsulas in Alaska. Also point out Hawaii’s many islands.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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