Week of February 18

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The African-American History Fair will take place on Friday, February 23 from 6:30 to 8:30. Students will perform at 6:45. We look forward to sharing our learning with you.

To celebrate African-American History Month, the second-grade students will attend a
screening of “Through My Eyes” on Tuesday, February 27, 2018. The field trip
permission slip and fee are due this Tuesday, February 20.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Middle of Year T.R.C. assessment
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Day 1
Presidents’ Day

Day 2
Poetry Unit
Reading
Interactive Read Aloud: “How to Talk to a Snowman” by Beverly McLoughland and “How to Eat a Poem” by Eve Merriam
Read, discuss and point out how the authors use structures to create their poems.
Students read independently.
Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Marian Anderson by James Meadows (pages 9-11)
Introduce the Vocabulary:
duet, enrolled, soloist,

Questions:
– When did Marian Anderson discover her love for music?
– How did seeing an African American pianist inspire Marian Anderson to be a musician?
– How did her father’s death affect Marian Anderson’s education?
– Who was Roland Hayes? How did he change her life?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Marian Anderson from the read aloud to contribute to the Marian Anderson graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 3
Poetry Unit
Reading
Interactive Read Aloud: Once I Ate a Pie by Patricia and Emily MacLachlan
Read, discuss and point out how to see poetry with the eye of a poet, which is noticing and paying a lot of attention to details.
Students read independently.
Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Marian Anderson by James Meadows (pages 12-15)
Introduce the Vocabulary:
precise, particular, incident, audition

Questions:
– What kind of racism did Marian Anderson experience?
– How did racism affect her education?
– Who was Marian Anderson’s most important teacher?
– How did he instill in her the confidence to be a professional singer?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Marian Anderson from the read aloud to contribute to the Marian Anderson graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 4
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Reading (106)
Poetry Unit
Interactive Read Aloud: “Blues Poem” and “The Cow’s Complaint” in A Kick In The Head by Paul B. Janeczko p. 26, 50
Read, discuss and point out how the authors match their feelings to the structures of their poems.
Students read independently.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Marian Anderson by James Meadows (pages 27-29)
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
disappointment, injustice, discrimination, segregation

Questions:
– Who was Sol Hurok?
– How did sol Hurok help Marian Anderson’s career?
– Why was Marian Anderson denied the opportunity to sing at Constitution Hall despite her talent and reputation in Europe?
– Who arranged for Marian Anderson to sing in front of the Lincoln Memorial? How did this event change the history of our country?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Marian Anderson from the read aloud to contribute to the Marian Anderson graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 5
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Phonemic Awareness Progress Check

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, March 2.)
thing, string, sing, bring, spring, ring, king, sting, wings, cling, sling, chart, wall, holiday, freedom, road

Reading (103)
Poetry Unit
Interactive Read Aloud: “Blues Poem” and “The Cow’s Complaint” in A Kick In The Head by Paul B. Janeczko p. 26, 50
Read, discuss and point out how the authors match their feelings to the structures of their poems.
Students read independently.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Marian Anderson by James Meadows (pages 30-33)

Introduce the Vocabulary:
extraordinary, ambition, establish

Questions:
– What was the high point of Marian Anderson’s career?
– How did Marian Anderson thank her neighbors and friends who helped her at the beginning of her career?
– How did Marian Anderson inspire younger singer?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Marian Anderson from the read aloud to contribute to the Marian Anderson graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Math
Lesson 6-5 Two-Step Number Stories
Students solve two-step number stories.

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 6-6 Recording Additions Strategies (2 Days)
Students make ballpark estimates and invent and record their own strategies for solving addition problems.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.

Lesson 6-7 Partial-Sums Addition, Part 1
Students use base-10 blocks to find partial sums and build readiness for partial-sum addition.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Science
1-1 Pre-Unit Assessment
Overview: Students’ Initial Explanations
Students are introduced to their role as geologists and the problem they will investigate throughout the Changing Landforms unit: how the edge of a particular cliff got to be closer to a flagpole than it used to be. Students write initial explanations of what they think ocean waves could do to a landform over many years. Students’ written explanations serve as a Pre-Unit Assessment for formative purposes, designed to reveal students’ initial understanding of the unit’s core content, both unit-specific science concepts and the crosscutting concept of Scale, Proportion, and Quantity, prior to instruction. As such, students’ explanations offer a baseline from which to measure growth of understanding over the course of the unit. These explanations can also provide the teacher with insight into students’ thinking as they begin this unit. This will allow the teacher to draw connections to students’ experiences and to watch for alternate conceptions that might get in the way of students’ understanding. After students write their initial explanations, they read the book Landform Postcards to become familiar with what a landform is and to learn about different types of landforms. The purpose of this lesson is to introduce the unit, to allow students to demonstrate their current understanding of how landforms change, and to provide a shared understanding of landforms.

Students learn:
• A landform is a feature of Earth’s surface, such as a mountain, a cliff, or a valley.
• A geologist is a scientist who studies the solid part of Earth.
• Reflecting on what you understand and don’t understand allows you to prepare for learning new things.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Introducing the Unit
Students are introduced to the unit and the central problem they will solve.
2: Writing Initial Explanations
Students complete a pre-unit writing assessment to demonstrate what they already know about how landforms change and to provide a baseline from which to measure growth in understanding over the course of the unit.
3: Partner Reading
Reading Landform Postcards builds students’ familiarity with different types of landforms.

1-2 Observations About Landforms
Overview
In order to understand how it’s possible for a landform such as the cliff to change, students must first gain a solid understanding of what landforms are and what they are made of. Students begin the lesson using an Anticipatory Chart to explore ideas and questions they have about what landforms are made of. Students use their initial ideas to create a diagram of a landform. They are then introduced to the unit’s reference book, Handbook of Land and Water, and preview the landforms and bodies of water included in the book. Students also use the reference book to gather evidence to support the idea that landforms are made of rock. At the end of the lesson, students return to the Anticipatory Chart and their diagrams to discuss how their ideas about landforms have changed based on evidence. The purpose of this lesson is for students to learn that landforms are made of rock.

Students learn:
• Landforms are made of rock.
• Water can be found in the ocean, rivers, lakes, and ponds.
• Evidence is information that supports an answer to a question.
• Observations can be used as evidence to answer a question.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Activating Prior Knowledge About Landforms
Students use an Anticipatory Chart to discuss and list their ideas about the Investigation Question: What are landforms made of? Students use their ideas to diagram a landform.
2: Previewing Handbook of Land and Water
Students preview the unit’s reference book, Handbook of Land and Water, familiarizing themselves with the different landforms and bodies of water included in the book.
3: Gathering Evidence from the Book
Students make observations of the different landforms in the book to use as evidence to support the idea that landforms are made of rock.
4: Reflecting on Landforms
Students return to the Anticipatory Chart to revise their initial ideas about and diagrams of what landforms are made of, based on new information they gathered from the books.

Social Studies
Interactive Read Aloud: “Tulip Sees America” by Cynthia Rylant
Objectives:
– Obtain information about a topic using a variety of visual sources such as literature.
– Recognize that the geography of the earth varies from place to place.
– Identify different kinds of land and bodies of water.
Vocabulary: geography, desert, ocean

Read and Respond

Lesson 1 Our Country’s Land (Day1)
Objectives:
– Identify and describe the physical characteristics of various landforms.
– Compare the features of different kinds of land.
– Distinguish regions of the United States.
Vocabulary: landform, mountain, hill, peninsula, valley, plain, island

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of February 11

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The second quarter report card will be sent home on Monday, February 12. Please sign and return only the report card envelope by Friday, February 16. If we requested a conference with you, kindly contact us in person, via email, or letter to arrange an appointment.

We will celebrate Valentine’s Day on Wednesday, February 14. Students are encouraged to wear red on Wednesday. If your child would like to bring in candy or cards for Valentine’s Day, they will need to bring in enough for 30 students for Ms. Charleston’s class and 29 for Mr. Hoang’s class.

To celebrate African-American History Month, the second-grade students will attend a
screening of “Through My Eyes” on Tuesday, February 27, 2018. The field trip
permission slip was sent home last week. Please return it with payment A.S.A.P

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Middle of Year T.R.C. assessment
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Day 1
Reading
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 7: Patterning through Repetition
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will find patterns in poems and to notice how repetition enhances the meaning of it.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Ella Fitzgerald The Tale of a Vocal Virtuosa by Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney (A Note from the Author and A note from the Illustrator)
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
tutelage, originated, phenomenon, citations, heritage

– Students compose their poems.

Day 2
Reading
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 8: Poem Are Moody
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will try saying a poem in different moods, using images and music that reflect the mood.

Students read independently and continue to discuss what they learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: A Horn for Louis by Eric A. Kimmel Chapter 1 & 2 “A New Orleans Morning, The Junkyard”
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
lokshen, knaidlach, grand marshal, levees, sabbath

Questions:
– How did Louis Armstrong’s humble beginnings inspire him to be a musician?
– What kind of a relationship did Louis Armstrong have with his family? What is the evidence?
– Why did Louis head down to Storyville?
– Who inspired the young Louis to be a horn player?
– How did the Karnofsky family support Louis?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Louis Armstrong from the read aloud to contribute to the Louis Armstrong graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 3
Reading
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 9: Using Comparisons to Clarify Feelings and Ideas
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Ask the students, with their partners, to revise the remaining ordinary phrases to include comparative language. Collect their ideas and use them to complete chart.
Link: Remind students that whenever they write, they can use comparisons to help readers get a clear image of what they are writing about.

Students read independently and continue to discuss what they learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: A Horn for Louis by Eric A. Kimmel Chapter 3 & 4 “The Alley, The Pawnshop”
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
beignets, kaput, pawnshop

Questions:
– How did Louis earn money to purchase a real horn?
– Who grabbed the tin horn from Louis?
– How did Louis mange to get it back?
– What happened to his tin horn?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Louis Armstrong from the read aloud to contribute to the Louis Armstrong graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 4
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Reading (106)
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 10: Stretching Out a Comparison
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will revise a prepared poem using a different comparison from the chart.
Students read independently and continue to discuss what they learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: A Horn for Louis by Eric A. Kimmel Chapter 5 & 6 “A Jar of Oil, A Talk with Rosie”
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
goniff, Yiddish, loan

Questions:
– What lesson did the story of Hanukkah teach Louis?
– How did Alex help him secure a new horn?
– How did Louis feel about the gift from Alex?
– What lesson did Pop Karnofsky try to teach Louis?
– Why did Louis insist on not accepting the gift?
– How did Louis solve the horn problem?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Louis Armstrong from the read aloud to contribute to the Louis Armstrong graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 5
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Phonemic Awareness Progress Check

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, February 23.)
boxes, foxes, messes, dishes, couches, brushes, bushes, rushes, wishes, washes, dashes, find, whole, fear, fair, flutter

Reading (103)
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 10: Stretching Out a Comparison
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will revise a prepared poem using a different comparison from the chart.

Students read independently and continue to discuss what they learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: A Horn for Louis by Eric A. Kimmel Chapter 7 & Author’s Note “Sweet Dream”
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.

Questions:
– Who did Louis meet in Storyville?
– What is the significance of this meeting?
– How did Louis’s dream come true?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Louis Armstrong from the read aloud to contribute to the Louis Armstrong graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Math
Lesson 6-1 Representing Data: Pockets
Students will review coin equivalencies and make different combinations of coins for the same amount of money.

Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: data, tally chart, picture graph, graph key, bar graph

Lesson 6-2 Comparison Number Stories
Students solve comparison number stories.

Goals:
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Choose appropriate tools.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.

Lesson 6-3 Interpreting Number Stories
Students choose diagrams to use for solving number stories.

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 6-4 (2 Days)
Animal Number Stories
Students solve animal number stories.

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Choose appropriate tools.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Science
4-3 Mystery Mixtures
Overview: Students practice vocabulary through a Word Relationships routine and then use the Properties of Materials Sorting Tool to apply what they’ve learned in two sorting activities, an Ingredient Properties sort and a Mystery Mixtures sort. Students begin by drawing from their prior knowledge to consider properties of common drink ingredients. Next, students match ingredients to drink mixtures based on the properties of the drink. The lesson closes with students reflecting on causes and effects in the context of discussing the likely results of adding various ingredients to drink mixtures. This lesson prepares students for the activities in Lesson 4.4 by providing them with an opportunity to apply their learning in a different context and to gain further experience thinking about cause and effect.

Students learn:
• One may b
e able to use the known properties of a mixture to make a conjecture about what ingredients are in the mixture.
• It is possible to make inferences about causes when one knows the effect.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Word Relationships Routine
Students work together to practice key vocabulary as they discuss their final glues.
2: Engaging in the Ingredient Property Sorts
The teacher demonstrates the first activity in the Properties of Materials Sorting Tool and models how to work with a partner to make sorting decisions.
3: Engaging in the Mystery Mixture Sorts
The teacher demonstrates the second activity in the Properties of Materials Sorting Tool.
4: Reviewing Cause and Effect with Mystery Mixtures
Students apply their understanding of cause and effect as they discuss the effect of various ingredients on the properties of mystery drink mixtures. This activity includes an On-the-Fly Assessment about how students are talking about cause and effect.

Review for our final design arguments

4-4 Culminating Design Arguments
Overview
Students’ Culminating Design Arguments
This culminating writing activity, in which students write a final design argument in the form of a letter to the principal, serves as the End-of-Unit Assessment. Students first have the opportunity to record observations of their final glue and reflect on the success of their final designs toward meeting the design goals. They then write their design argument in which they identify their design goals, making a claim about which glue mixture best meets those goals, and provide evidence to support their claim. The lesson and unit are concluded with students reflecting on their learning, answering the unit question, and thinking about ways in which they can apply their learning to new situations. The purpose of this lesson is for students to apply all they have learned about designing mixtures as they develop a final design argument, to engage in a culminating class discussion, and to serve as an assessment of students’ learning.

Students learn:
• Mixtures can be designed for different purposes by understanding the properties needed to fulfill those purposes and utilizing ingredients with the necessary properties.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Observing Final Glues
In preparation for writing their final design arguments, students observe their dried glues and picture frames and assess and record how successful their glues were at meeting the design goals. As a whole class, they discuss to what extent their glues met their design goals. They also discuss which ingredients helped them get the specific properties they wanted.
2: Writing a Design Argument for the Principal
The design arguments students write to the principal are in the form of a letter. This writing task provides an opportunity for students to muster all of the evidence they have learned over the course of the unit. Students’ writing from this lesson serves as an End-of-Unit Assessment.
3: Final Reflection
This activity provides students with an opportunity to reflect on their learning throughout the unit and to apply what they have learned about designing mixtures to answer the Unit Question: How can you design a mixture for a certain purpose?

Social Studies
Integrated with Language Arts

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of February 4

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

This is a reminder that the Unit 5 Progress Check and Open Response will take place on Tuesday, February 6 and Wednesday, February 7 respectively. Please refer to the graded homework to help your child review.
Please help your child review the graded homework. Students should be able to:
– Add and subtract 1-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 10 to two and three-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 100 to three-digit numbers
– Draw coins to show a given amount
– Use an open number line to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-More diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-Less diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Parts-and-Total diagram to solve a story problem
– Explain how to find a sum of two numbers in writing and by drawing tally marks, base-ten blocks, or bills and coins, etc.

To celebrate African-American History Month, the second grade students will attend a screening of “Through My Eyes” on Tuesday, February 27, 2018. The field trip permission slip was sent home last week. Please return it with payment A.S.A.P

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Middle of Year T.R.C. assessment
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Day 1
African-American History Unit
Reading and Writing Workshops
Reading
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 5: Editing Poetry
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will look at a poem as carefully, finding any words that don’t look quite right to them.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Ella Fitzgerald The Tale of a Vocal Virtuosa by Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney (Introduction and Track 1)
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
supreme, virtuosa, strut, impress

Questions:
– Why did Ella move to New York city?
– How did Harlem inspire Ella Fitzgerald?
– What kind of a person was the young Ella?

-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Ella Fitzgerald from their own reading to contribute to the Ella Fitzgerald graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 2
Reading
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 6: Searching for Honest, Precise Words
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will search for places in a poem where more precise words could be added.
Link: Remind students that they now have a repertoire of strategies for writing poetry, and invite them to use any of these strategies.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Ella Fitzgerald The Tale of a Vocal Virtuosa by Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney (Track 2)
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
eating out of her hand, featured

Questions:
– Who was Bardou Ali?
– What kind of the person was Bardou Ali?
-How did he help Ella?
– How did Ella inspire the sound of the Chick Webb Orchestra?

-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Ella Fitzgerald from their own reading to contribute to the Ella Fitzgerald graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 3
Reading
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 6: Searching for Honest, Precise Words
Minilesson
Students will choose honest precise words in their own writing.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Ella Fitzgerald The Tale of a Vocal Virtuosa by Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney (Track 3)
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
belted, bandstand, highfalutin

Questions:
– How did Ella show the audience that she never forgot where she came from?
– Who was Chick Webb?
– How did he help Ella to become a better singer?

-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Ella Fitzgerald from their own reading to contribute to the Ella Fitzgerald graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 4
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Reading (106)
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 7: Patterning through Repetition
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will find other patterns in a poem and to notice how repetition enhances the meaning of it.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Ella Fitzgerald The Tale of a Vocal Virtuosa by Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney (Track 4)
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
jitterbug, bebop, improvise

Questions:
– Which song did Ella and Al Feldman make famous? How was her version different form others’?
– Who was Dizzy Gillespie?
– What style of jazz did he introduce to Ella?
– How did his playing the trumpet influence Ella singing?

-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Ella Fitzgerald from their own reading to contribute to the Ella Fitzgerald graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 5
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Reading comprehension quiz

Reading (103)
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 7: Patterning through Repetition
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will find other patterns in a poem and to notice how repetition enhances the meaning of it.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Ella Fitzgerald The Tale of a Vocal Virtuosa by Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney (A Note from the Author and A note from the Illustrator)
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
tutelage, originated, phenomenon, citations, heritage

– Students compose their poems.

Math
Game Day and Review for Unit 5 Test

Lesson 5-12 (Day 1)
Unit 5 Progress Check
Day 1: Administer the Unit Assessments.

Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.

Subtract within 20 fluently.

Add within 20 fluently.

Add within 100 fluently.

Subtract within 100 fluently.

Subtract multidigit numbers using models or strategies.

Add multidigit numbers using models or strategies.

Mentally add 10 to and subtract 10 from a given number.

Mentally add 100 to and subtract 100 from a given number.

Represent sums and differences on a number line diagram.

Solve problems involving coins and bills.

Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.

Lesson 5-12 (Day 2) Unit 5 Progress Check
Day 2: Administer the Open Response Assessment.
2b. Assess
Solving the Open Response Problem
Solve problems involving coins and bills.

Read and write monetary amounts.

Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.

Pre-assessment MARS Tasks: “Peanuts and Ducks”

Lesson 6-1 Representing Data: Pockets
Students will review coin equivalencies and make different combinations of coins for the same amount of money.

Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: data, tally chart, picture graph, graph key, bar graph

Science
4-1 Evaluating Second Glues and Revising Recipes
Overview: Students experience the iterative nature of design as they move through a full design cycle during this lesson: They test glues, evaluate evidence to learn new information, and work with a partner to plan, make, and test a new glue. Students begin by completing a strength test and evaluating their two different glues to determine which recipe(s) make a glue with the desired properties. They then review their test results and think about how to refine their recipes to better achieve the desired glue design goals. Next, pairs choose a final design goal for their glue and work together to plan and make a glue recipe that meets all four of the design goals. Finally, students set up a new kind of test using the glue they created. This lesson provides students with the opportunity to apply their understanding of key concepts and engage in engineering practices as they evaluate, design, and test glues.

Students learn:
• Engineers typically go through the design cycle multiple times before landing on a design that works to meet the design goals.
• Engineers evaluate designs based on whether they meet the design goals.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Completing Tests and Evaluating Results of Second Glues
Pairs of students test and compare the two different glues they made—both designed to have the same properties. After reviewing their test results, pairs think about how to refine their recipes to better achieve the desired glue properties.
2: Discussing Results and Preparing to Modify Recipes
Pairs reflect on the evidence they gathered through testing their second glues. Then they decide how they will revise their recipes to better meet the design goals.
3: Writing Recipes for Third Glues
Students carefully consider and then choose a fourth and final design goal—an additional property that they think good school glue should have. Then they reflect on the effects that adding certain ingredients will have on the properties of their glue mixture.
4: Making Third Glues and Setting Up Tests
Students make their final glue according to their recipe and set up a new test—the Final Design Goals Test—to help them determine whether their new glue has all the desired properties.

4-2 Making Final Glues
Overview: Students evaluate test results from their third glues, share successful glue recipe ideas with each other, and have the opportunity to revise their glue designs one final time. Student pairs begin by completing tests, reviewing their results, and looking for evidence of whether or not the design goals were met. Next, the Thought Swap routine provides a forum through which students share successful design ideas with their classmates. Students then consider the evidence presented during the Thought Swap and revise their glue recipes one last time. After that, they make their final glues and use them to create a picture frame. Finally, as a class, they reflect briefly on the design process. Because students have planned, made, and tested glues several times during the unit, this lesson provides them with more independence and the cognitive space to focus on the effects of using specific substances as they reach their goal of making a glue with certain desired properties.

Students learn:
• Engineers share their ideas and accomplishments with others.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Completing Tests and Recording the Results
Student pairs gather test results from their third glue and assess how successful it was in meeting what are now their four design goals.
2: Engaging in a Thought Swap
Through a Thought Swap, students learn from one another’s design successes and gather ideas about how to improve their own glue designs.
3: Revising Glue Recipes and Making Picture Frames
Students consider the evidence presented as they revise their glue recipes one final time.

4-3 Mystery Mixtures
Overview: Students practice vocabulary through a Word Relationships routine and then use the Properties of Materials Sorting Tool to apply what they’ve learned in two sorting activities, an Ingredient Properties sort and a Mystery Mixtures sort. Students begin by drawing from their prior knowledge to consider properties of common drink ingredients. Next, students match ingredients to drink mixtures based on the properties of the drink. The lesson closes with students reflecting on causes and effects in the context of discussing the likely results of adding various ingredients to drink mixtures. This lesson prepares students for the activities in Lesson 4.4 by providing them with an opportunity to apply their learning in a different context and to gain further experience thinking about cause and effect.

Students learn:
• One may be able to use the known properties of a mixture to make a conjecture about what ingredients are in the mixture.
• It is possible to make inferences about causes when one knows the effect.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Word Relationships Routine
Students work together to practice key vocabulary as they discuss their final glues.
2: Engaging in the Ingredient Property Sorts
The teacher demonstrates the first activity in the Properties of Materials Sorting Tool and models how to work with a partner to make sorting decisions.

Social Studies
Leader in Me
More Ways to Lead
Perseverance
Perseverance is the ability to stick with something, even when it is difficult. Perseverance shows leadership and is an important skill for students to learn. In this lesson, students discover:
• The meaning of perseverance.
• Perseverance is a leadership skill.
• The value of perseverance.
Leaders keeping working on a task until it is finished. They persevere.

Compliments
Encouraging others through compliments shows confidence and leadership. This lesson encourages students to consider the feelings of others. Giving and receiving compliments is a leadership skill students will use throughout their lives. In this lesson, students discover:
• The definition of a compliment.
• How to give and receive compliments.
• Why it feels good to make others feel good.
Leaders look for good things other people do. They thank them and give them compliments.
A compliment is saying something nice to someone. Compliments make others feel good.

Integrated with Language Arts

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of January 28

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The second quarter ends on Thursday, February 1. Please look for your child’s report card on Friday, February 9th. Please contact your child’s teacher to schedule a parent/teacher conference if needed.
Friday, February 2 is a school improvement day for teachers and staff. It is a nonattendance day for students.
The Unit 5 Progress Check and Open Response will take place on Tuesday, February 6 and Wednesday, February 7 respectively. Please refer to the graded homework to help your child review.
Please help your child review the graded homework. Students should be able to:
– Add and subtract 1-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 10 to two and three-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 100 to three-digit numbers
– Draw coins to show a given amount
– Use an open number line to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-More diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-Less diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Parts-and-Total diagram to solve a story problem
– Explain how to find a sum of two numbers in writing and by drawing tally marks, base-ten blocks, or bills and coins, etc.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Middle of Year T.R.C. assessment
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on Units of Study for Teaching Reading and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1
African-American History Unit
Reading and Writing Workshops

Reading
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Interactive Read Aloud: Love That Dog by Sharon Creech
Minilesson
Session 3: Putting Powerful Thoughts in Tiny Packages
Active Engagement: Students will coauthor the start of a poem about a shared big feeling.
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: When Marian Sang: The True Recital of Marian Anderson by Pam Munos Ryan
Review Summarizing: Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
distinct, velvety, tuition, prejudice
Questions:
What genre of music did Marian Anderson sing?
How did she have to face racism?
How did that affect her life and career?
Why did she not give up?
How did her struggle benefit us today?

-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Marian Anderson from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 2
Reading
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Interactive Read Aloud: Love That Dog by Sharon Creech
Minilesson
Session 3: Putting Powerful Thoughts in Tiny Packages
Teaching: Students will understand that poets need to find a topic that is big and that is also small and specific.
Active Engagement: Students will coauthor the start of a poem about a shared big feeling.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Duke Ellington by Mike Venizia (pages 3 to 11)
Review Summarizing: Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
Composer, expressive, impressed, scholarship
Questions:
What were his interests as a child?
Why was he introduced to the piano?
How did he teach himself the piano?
How did his nickname “Duke” come about?

-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Duke Ellington from their own reading to contribute to the Duke Ellington graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 3
Reading
Poetry
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Interactive Read Aloud: Love That Dog by Sharon Creech
Minilesson
Session 4: Poet Find Poems in the Strong Feelings and Concrete Details of Life
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will mine their notepads, asking themselves, “Does this give me a big, strong feeling?” and “Have I found a specific moment or detail or object that holds that feeling for me?”
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Duke Ellington by Mike Venizia (pages 12 to 19)
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
Harlem Renaissance, ragtime, a mute
Questions:
– Why did Duke move to New York city?
– How did the Harlem Renaissance period inspire Duke Ellington?
– Who was Bubber Miley?
– How did he change the sound of the band?

-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Duke Ellington from their own reading to contribute to the Duke Ellington graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 4
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, February 9.)
letter, mother, ball, rich, study, much, such, patch, search, march, starch, rotate, tornado, funnel, group, six

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Duke Ellington by Mike Venizia (pages 20 to 32)
Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
Harlem Renaissance, ragtime, a mute
Questions:
– How was the Duke Ellington’s band different from other jazz band of the time?
– What daily activities did he incorporate into his music?
– What kind of racism did Duke and his band have to face?
– How did he handle being treated badly?
– What contributions did he made to jazz music?

-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Duke Ellington from their own reading to contribute to the Duke Ellington graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 5
School Improvement Day for Staff

Math
Lesson 5-10 Change Number Stories (Day 2)
Students solve change number stories involving temperature.
Vocabulary: thermometer, degrees Fahrenheit, change diagram, change-to-less number story

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Solving Change Number Stories

Lesson 5-11 Adding Multidigit Numbers (Day 1)
Students complete an open response problem by solving an addition problem using two different strategies.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary: open number line

Solving the Open Response Problem
Students model a shopping problem and show two different strategies for finding the sum of two prices.

Lesson 5-11 Adding Multidigit Numbers (Day 2)

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Setting Expectations
Students review the open response problem and discuss using pictures, numbers, and words to show their strategies. They also review how to respectfully discuss their own and others’ work.

Game Day

Buying and Selling
– Students practice counting money, children use their toolkit coins to buy fruit and vegetables using exact change.

Dime-Nickel-Penny Grab
Students count coins and determine the total value of various coin combinations. Students grab coins and count the amount.

Using Open Number Lines to Add
Students work with open number lines to solve number stories involving larger numbers.

Science
3-5 Making Our Second Glue
Overview: Students apply the evidence that they have collected about the properties of glue ingredients to create a recipe for glue that meets three design goals. Although students’ glues are designed to have the same properties, each student creates a recipe based on his own understanding of the evidence. Students discuss their recipe plans with a partner, make their glue mixtures, and set up a fair test that will allow them to compare the properties of each glue. Activity 4 includes a Critical Juncture in which students are presented with a small design challenge and write about their solutions. This will provide an opportunity for you to assess students’ grasp of Chapter 3 key concepts and their readiness to move on to Chapter 4.

Students learn:
● There may be different solutions to a design problem. Testing and comparing those solutions will help show which one better met the design goals.
● Mixtures can be designed for certain purposes by using ingredients with certain properties.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Writing a Glue Recipe
Pairs of students review the glue design arguments they wrote in the last lesson. Then students independently make plans for their own glue recipes based on all of the evidence gathered so far.
2: Making Glue and Setting Up Tests
Students follow their own glue recipes to make glues with the same desired properties: stickiness, strength, and the third property the class has decided upon. Then student pairs set up fair tests so that they may compare the properties of their two glue recipes.
3: Making and Discussing Predictions
Students make and discuss predictions of the number of washers their glue mixtures will hold in the strength test.
4: Critical Juncture: Reflecting on Designing Mixtures
Students are given a small design challenge—they are asked to write and provide evidence to support claims about which ingredients they would use in a toothpaste mixture with desired properties. This serves as a Critical Juncture Assessment.

Review for Unit 2 Progress Test

Unit 2 Progress Test

Social Studies
Integrated with Language Arts

Students use the research notes from previous lesson to continue the final drafts of their state research books. They will identify:
– Name of governor of the state
– The state’s capital
– The state’s population
– The state’s nickname
– The state’s motto
– The state’s date of admission to the union
– The state bird (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flower (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flag (include a drawing or picture)
Students use the Chrome Notebooks to search for:
– Additional interesting facts about the state

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of January 21

Dear Parent and Caregivers,

The second grade classes will begin this year’s African-American unit of study the week of January 22. We will be learning about the lives and contributions of Marian Anderson, Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald and Duke Ellington. Please support your child’s learning by assisting him/her to read age appropriate books, articles, and photos/images these famous Musicians.

Students will take the social studies unit test about the U.S. government on Thursday, January 25. A study guide was sent home on Friday, January 19. Please have your child complete the study guide and submit it Monday. We will grade the study guide and return it with the students for further reviewing for the test.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day)
Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Middle of Year T.R.C. assessment
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Word Study
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day1:
African-American History Unit
Reading
Teachers introduce poetry as genre of writing.

“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will think how they would write with poet’s eyes about another object.
Link: Students will study objects ie..feathers, shells, and so on and see them in fresh, new ways.
What is a poem?
Interactive Read Aloud:
– Students listen to a poem entitled “Things” read by Eloise Greenfield from Hip Hop Speaks to Children.
– Teachers and students read together “Things”.
– Students will discuss how their expression and patterns are different after listening to the author read the poem.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Share Reading: Jazz Greats by Linda Johns (pages 4 to 6) from Reading A to Z
Introduce the Vocabulary: melodic, quarters, plantation, improvised, unique
Before Reading: Build Background, Introduce the story
Reading Strategy: Summarizing

Questions:
What is jazz?
When and where was it invented?
What are some of the instruments used in jazz?
From where did the music take its inspiration?

Day 2:
Reading
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Interactive Read Aloud:
– Teachers and students begin reading Love That Dog by Sharon Creech.
– Classes take a Museum Poetry Walk reading selected poems from our read-aloud.
– Students will understand that there are ingredients in a recipe for writing a poem.
The first ingredients are: Use the eyes of a poet to look at the world closely and carefully, and use the eyes of a poet to look at ordinary things in fresh, new ways.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Share Reading: Jazz Greats by Linda Johns (pages 7 to 9) (Reading A to Z)
Introduce Comprehension Skill: Sequence Events (Model using signal words such as today, then, first, after, or time clues such as dates to describe the sequence of an average day in your life. Explain that we will be using a graphic organizer to help us recall the sequence of events in the text.)
Introduce the Vocabulary:
second-hand, syllables, session
Questions:
Where was Louis Armstrong born?
What did he do as a child?
How did this affect his musical career?
What is his contribution to jazz?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Armstrong from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students begin to discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 3:
Reading
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 2: Listening for Line Breaks
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Hearing More in the Music of Poetry
Share: Using Line Breaks to Highlight Meaning
Students will reflect on the line breaks in “Between Two Trees” by Kristine O’Connell George, particularly the lines with only one word.
Students will share possible new line breaks in their poems with their partners.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Share Reading: Jazz Greats by Linda Johns (pages 10 to 12) (Reading A to Z)
Review Summarizing: Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Questions:
Where was Ella born?
Why did she start singing?
What is her contribution to Jazz music?
How did her voice inspire others?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Ella Fitzgerald from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
– Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students begin to discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 4:
Reading (106)
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 2: Listening for Line Breaks
Ingredients/Pattern in Poetry
Interactive Read Aloud:
Read more Small Poems by Valerie Worth
Students will review the firs ingredients of a poem. The first ingredients are: Use the eyes of a poet to look at the world closely and carefully, and use the eyes of a poet to look at ordinary things in fresh and new ways.
They will review how “line breaks” make up a poetic form, that poetry has music, and the music of poetry comes from how words are put on a page.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Share Reading: Jazz Greats by Linda Johns (pages 13 to 15) (Reading A to Z)
Review Summarizing: Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
elegant, sophistication, melodic, exceptional, complicated
Questions:
Where was Duke born?
Why did he have to teach himself the piano?
As a composer how did he get his inspiration for writing?
What kind of music did he compose?
How did he inspire others?

– Distribute to students the graphic organizers for the chapter entitled “Who is Duke Ellington?”
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Duke Ellington from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students begin to discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 5:
Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Thursday, February 1.)
away, animal, house, point, spot, desk, mask, task, ask, tusk, disk, hero, able, monument, pair, multiply

Reading (103)
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 2: Listening for Line Breaks
Ingredients/Pattern in Poetry
Interactive Read Aloud:
Read more Small Poems by Valerie Worth
Students will review the firs ingredients of a poem. The first ingredients are: Use the eyes of a poet to look at the world closely and carefully, and use the eyes of a poet to look at ordinary things in fresh and new ways.
They will review how “line breaks” make up a poetic form, that poetry has music, and the music of poetry comes from how words are put on a page.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: When Marian Sang: The True Recital of Marian Anderson by Pam Munos Ryan
Review Summarizing: Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read.
Introduce the Vocabulary:
distinct, velvety, tuition, prejudice
Questions:
What genre of music did Marian Anderson sing?
How did she have to face racism?
How did that affect her life and career?
Why did she not give up?
How did her struggle benefit us today?

Model to students how to take notes by writing information on chart paper for students to use as support for their writing.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Marian Anderson from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students begin to discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American musicians.
– Students compose their poems.

Math
Lesson 5-7 Open Numbers Lines (2 Days)
Open Numbers Lines
Students use open number lines as a tool for solving number stories.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

Vocabulary: open number line

Lesson 5-8 Change-to-More Number Stories
Students solve change-to-more number stories.
Vocabulary: change-to-more number story, change diagram

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 5-9 Parts-and-Total Number Stories
Students solve parts-and-total number stories.
Vocabulary: parts-and-total diagram, total, parts-and-total number story

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Problem of the Month (POM):
First Rate
Overview:
In the Problem of the Month First Rate, students use measurement, rates of change, and algebraic thinking to solve problems involving proportional relationships, metrics, and multiplicative relationships. The mathematical topics that underlie this POM are repeated addition, multiplication, division, percents, linear measurement, proportional reasoning, rates, distance, time, velocity, change, functions, algebraic reasoning, and related rates.

Science
3-2 Adding Strength as A Design Goal
Overview: The class revisits the uses for their school glue, adds an additional design goal, and conducts a new test on both new and familiar glue ingredients. When reminded of an important use of school glue—to build structures—the class adds a new design goal—strength. The teacher adds this new design goal to the Design Goals poster, and the class begins investigating which ingredients might make a glue that is both sticky and strong. Students have the opportunity to observe some new wet ingredients—corn syrup and gelatin—as well as some familiar ones, and then they set up a strength test. This lesson catalyzes student thinking about how it might be possible to design mixtures with certain properties.

Students learn:
• Engineers usually have multiple design goals.
• Mixtures can be designed to have particular properties for specific uses.
• Mixtures may have a combination of properties of their ingredients.

Lesson at a Glance
3: Observing Ingredients and Setting Up the Tests
Students work independently to observe and record observations about each ingredient. Then they set up strength tests.
4: Discussing How Ingredients Affect Mixtures
Students review the idea of cause and effect and are formally introduced to the idea with which they have had a growing amount of experience—that mixtures may have a combination of the properties of their ingredients.

3-3 Evaluating Strength Test Evidence
By completing strength tests and conducting research using a reference book, students gather evidence about which ingredients might make a strong glue. Students complete strength tests on the new glue ingredients and come away with more evidence about which ingredients will make a glue that meets their design goals. Using the Properties of Materials Graphing Tool, students graph and evaluate their results and they make claims about which ingredients had the properties of being both sticky and strong. Then they search in the Handbook of Interesting Ingredients for evidence about which ingredients might give the property of strength to their glue mixtures. At the end of the lesson, the teacher records the class’ key evidence from the strength tests and the handbook. This lesson prepares students to make evidence-based plans that include the best ingredients to make a strong glue mixture.

Students learn:
• Some ingredients are better suited for making a strong glue than others.
• Engineers and scientists communicate their results using graphs.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Making Observations and Gathering Test Results
To ensure that students understand how to conduct the new glue test, the teacher provides detailed instruction on how the strength tests are to be conducted.
2: Graphing Test Results and Making Claims
The teacher reminds students how to use the Properties of Materials Graphing Tool, and pairs of students graph the results of their strength tests. Then student pairs work together to make claims about which ingredients were strongest.
3: Searching for Evidence in a Reference Book
Students gather evidence related to strength (and other relevant glue properties) in the Handbook of Interesting Ingredients.
4: Reporting Multiple Sources of Evidence
Students have the opportunity to share and hear others report the evidence they collected from their strength test findings and the reference book.

3-4 Writing Design Arguments
Overview: Using the substance table from Jess Makes Hair Gel as a model, the class works together to synthesize and evaluate all of their evidence. Students refer to findings from the strength tests they conducted and the information they gathered from the Handbook of Interesting Ingredients as the teacher guides them to complete a class table to organize their evidence. Using multiple sources of evidence, students write design arguments explaining what ingredients will make the glue that best meets the design goals. In addition, the class agrees upon another property they would like their glue to have and adds a new design goal to their list. This lesson prepares students to design a new glue based on evidence that has been thoroughly evaluated.

Students learn:
• Part of evaluating evidence involves considering how sure you are that the evidence is correct.
• Having multiple sources of evidence that are the same increases confidence that the evidence is accurate.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Adding a Third Design Goal
With new information in mind that they’ve gathered through testing and the reference book, students discuss what additional properties they would like their glue to have. Once they agree upon a third design goal, the class updates their Design Goals list.
2: Evaluating Evidence
Students have the opportunity to evaluate and synthesize all of the evidence collected in the previous lesson—observations, strength test results, and information from the Handbook of Interesting Ingredients reference book—and record it in a Class Substance Table.
3: Writing Design Arguments
Students write design arguments in which they provide evidence from multiple sources to support a claim about which glue ingredients will meet their three design goals.

Social Studies
Integrated with Language Arts

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of January 14

Dear Parent and Caregivers,

Students will take the social studies unit test about the U.S. government on Thursday, January 25. A study guide will be sent home on Friday, January 19. Please have your child complete the study guide and submit it on Monday. We will grade the study guide and return it with the students for further reviewing for the test.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day)
Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Middle of Year T.R.C. assessment
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Word Study
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1
Martin Luther Ling Jr. Day

Day 2
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Reading Across a Topic Session 14: Thinking and Rethinking about How Information Is Connected across Books (Day1)
Learning Activities
(Read Aloud Tigers by Valerie Bodden (Page 19) and Tigers by Laura Marsh (page 12) to compare
When reading many books on the same topic, strong readers use a variety of strategies to connect ideas.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.
Interactive Read Aloud: How Do They Work? Playgrounds by Wendy Sadler
Session 17 Introductions and Conclusions—
Students will craft introductions and conclusions that are fun and engaging for their audience.
Students begin writing their introductions and conclusions for their All about Books.

Day 3
NWEA M.O.Y Room 103

Reading Workshop (Room 106)
Bend 3: Reading Across a Topic Session 14: Thinking and Rethinking about How Information Is Connected across Books (Day 2)
Learning Activities
When reading many books on the same topic, strong readers use a variety of strategies to connect ideas.
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop (Room 106)
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Interactive Read Aloud: The Force of Water by Lacy Finn Borgo
Session 17 Introductions and Conclusions—Addressing and Audience
Students will share what they have written about introduction and/or conclusion.
Students continue writing their introductions and conclusions for their All about Books.

Day 4
NWEA M.O.Y Room 106

103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Writing Workshop (Room 103)
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Interactive Read Aloud: The Force of Water by Lacy Finn Borgo
Session 17 Introductions and Conclusions—Addressing and Audience
Students will share what they have written about introduction and/or conclusion.
Students continue writing their introductions and conclusions for their All about Books.

Day 5
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on January 26.)
feet, off, led, spell, air, bend, send, mind, offend, sand, land, wind, yes, week, share, fourth

Reading Workshop (Room 103)
Bend 3: Reading Across a Topic Session 14: Thinking and Rethinking about How Information Is Connected across Books (Day 2)
Learning Activities
When reading many books on the same topic, strong readers use a variety of strategies to connect ideas.
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 18 Editing – Aligning Expectations to the Common Core
Minilesson
Connection: Students will edit their writing so that it is ready for readers at tomorrow’ celebration using a checklist.
Active Engagement: Writers will practice this strategy on a shared text.
Link: Students begin editing their own information books.

Math
Lesson 5-4 (Day 2)
Coin Calculations
Students make purchases and practice making change.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make connections between representations.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Lesson 5-5 Exploring Arrays, Time, and Shapes (2 Days)
Students make arrays, match clock faces to digital notation, and construct shapes on Geoboards.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Vocabulary: array

Lesson 5-6 Mentally Adding and Subtracting 10 and 100
Students develop strategies for mentally adding and subtracting 10 and 100.

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Vocabulary: mental addition, mental subtraction

Science
3-1 Jess Makes Hair Gel
Overview: Students read Jess Makes Hair Gel, which follows a boy as he moves through the design cycle to create a mixture that meets his design goals. Before reading, students reflect on what they know about hair gel and make predictions about what they might read in the book. They then read the book with a partner, making and revising predictions as they read. Next, they engage in a second all-class shared read to focus on key elements of the text. Throughout the book, students have an opportunity to see the design process in action, complete with the obstacles Jess encounters, the missteps he takes, and the successes he achieves. After reading, the teacher engages students in discussing cause and effect and relates the concept to both the boy’s experience designing hair gel and students’ own experiences making glue. This lesson serves to foreground cause and effect for students and to provide an example of how one student designing mixtures moved through the design cycle.

Students learn:
• While each step in the design cycle is important, engineers don’t always follow the same exact steps in the same order.
• Engineers often need to revise their plans and repeat some steps over again as they go along, based on what they learn.
• Understanding cause and effect can help inform scientists, engineers, or students as they design mixtures.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Introduction to Jess Makes Hair Gel .
2: Reading: Jess Makes Hair Gel
Students partner read Jess Makes Hair Gel and make and refine predictions as they read. 3: Connecting to the Design Cycle
Students discuss how Jess worked to address his design problem by making, testing, refining, and testing his hair gel recipe again.
4: Reflecting on Cause and Effect
Students reflect on the concept of cause and effect as they relate it to the experiences of Jess designing hair gel and to their own experience designing glues.

3-2 Adding Strength As A design Goal
Overview: The class revisits the uses for their school glue, adds an additional design goal, and conducts a new test on both new and familiar glue ingredients. When reminded of an important use of school glue—to build structures—the class adds a new design goal—strength. The teacher adds this new design goal to the Design Goals poster, and the class begins investigating which ingredients might make a glue that is both sticky and strong. Students have the opportunity to observe some new wet ingredients—corn syrup and gelatin—as well as some familiar ones, and then they set up a strength test. This lesson catalyzes student thinking about how it might be possible to design mixtures with certain properties.

Students learn:
• Engineers usually have multiple design goals.
• Mixtures can be designed to have particular properties for specific uses.
• Mixtures may have a combination of properties of their ingredients.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Adding Strength as a Design Goal
In Jess Makes Hair Gel, Jess came up with several design goals because he wanted his hair gel to have more than one property.
2: Introducing Strength Tests
The teacher introduces how students are to set up the strength test for glue ingredients.
3: Observing Ingredients and Setting Up the Tests
Students work independently to observe and record observations about each ingredient. Then they set up strength tests.
4: Discussing How Ingredients Affect Mixtures
Students review the idea of cause and effect and are formally introduced to the idea with which they have had a growing amount of experience—that mixtures may have a combination of the properties of their ingredients.

Social Studies
Leader in Me
Greetings
When students initiate a greeting, they demonstrate the ability to Be Proactive and lead others. Greeting others is a leadership skill that will benefit students throughout their lives. In this lesson, students discover:
• Parts of a respectful greeting.
• Why a respectful greeting shows leadership.
• Being proactive and greeting others helps us feel good.

Leaders know how to greet people and make them feel welcome.

Symbol of the U.S.
The Bald Eagle
Students read and complete an exercise about the bald eagle.

Students use the research notes from previous lesson to continue the final drafts of their state research books. They will identify:
– Name of governor of the state
– The state’s capital
– The state’s population
– The state’s nickname
– The state’s motto
– The state’s date of admission to the union
– The state bird (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flower (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flag (include a drawing or picture)
Students use the Chrome Notebooks to search for:
– Additional interesting facts about the state

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of January 7

Dear Parent and Caregivers,

Happy New Year! We are looking forward to seeing everyone on Monday, January 8.

The midterm progress reports will be sent home on Monday, January 8. Please discuss the progress report with your child, sign the bottom portion and return it promptly. If a conference is requested by a teacher, please contact us via e-mail to schedule an appointment.

Students will take a science quiz on Friday, January 12. A study guide will be sent home on Monday, January 8. Please have your child complete the study guide and submit it the following day. We will grade the study guide and return it with the students for further reviewing for the quiz.

There will be no school on Monday, January 15 in observance of Dr. Martin Luther King Day.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day)
Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Middle of Year T.R.C. assessment
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Word Study
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1:
Reading Workshop
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg

Book Summary
Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the most important civil rights leaders in American history. He worked hard for equality and taught others how to stand up for what they believed in. This book tells the story of his courageous life from his birth in 1929 to his death in 1968.

Key Question
Why is Martin Luther King Jr. called a great leader?
Targeted Reading Strategy
Summarize
Objectives
Use the reading strategy of summarizing to understand text
Understand and identify cause-and-effect relationships
Identify and categorize r-controlled vowel sounds
Identify and use pronouns
Identify and find synonyms in a thesaurus

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 14 Studying Mentor Texts
Collecting Ideas from Mentor Texts
Collect students’ suggestions of ways to integrate scientific knowledge into their information writing
To Put More Information in Informational Writing…
– Add a new voice in a different size or color.
– Use arrows to show how something works.
– Use dashes to add definitions.
– Add captions to pictures.
Students continue to write about their experiments.
Students continue to write their information books.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
During Reading
Introduce and explain the cause-and-effect

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: All About Kites by Elizabeth Austin Chapter 1 and 2

Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 15 Using Comparisons to Teach Readers
Minilesson
Connection
Active Engagement: Students will try adding a comparison to a page from your teacher’s demonstration text.
Link: Remind writers of all the strategies they know how to teach readers.
Students continue to write their information books.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
Reflect on the Comprehension Skill
Independent practice
Students identify Cause & Effect. Students share their answers.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: All About Kites by Elizabeth Austin Chapter 3

Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 15 Using Comparisons to Teach Readers
Conferring and Small-Group Work—Conferring to Ensure Students Have Grasped the Essentials of the Unit
Students continue to write their information books.

Day 4:
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Reading Workshop
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
Build Skills
Phonics: Identify r-controlled vowels
Partnered practice: Students will work in pairs and locate additional examples of r-controlled vowel sounds.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: All About Kites by Elizabeth Austin Chapter 4

Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 16 Showing Hidden Worlds with Science Writing
Minilesson
Connection
Teaching and Active Engagement: Students will understand the importance of slowing things down, writing lots of steps for one moment. Students will find a spot in their tables of contents where that strategy might help, and then talk to a partner about how that part might go.

Students continue to write their information books.

Day 5:
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on January 19.)
try, rest, hand, seven, against, fast, past, last, cost, blast, cast, oral , box, data, record, full

Reading Workshop
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
Word Work: Synonyms
Independent practice: Introduce, explain, and have students complete the synonyms worksheet. Discuss answers aloud after they are finished.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 16 Showing Hidden Worlds with Science Writing
Minilesson
Reviews yesterday’s lesson and discuss examples of writing that are “hidden story” examples: one that is slowed down using a lot of steps, and another showing the inside of an object.
Students continue to write their information books.

Math
MARS Pre-Assessment “Pocket Money”
The task challenges a student to demonstrate fluency in adding and subtracting whole numbers. A student must understand whole numbers and represent and use them in flexible ways, including relating, composing, and decomposing numbers. A student must be able to communicate mathematical reasoning using words, numbers and/or pictures.

Lesson 5 – 1
Playing Beat the Calculator
Students play Beat the Calculator to develop fact power by using mental strategies to add two 1 – digit numbers.

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Vocabulary: addition fact, fact power

Lesson 5-2
Using Coins to Buy Things
Students will review coin equivalencies and make different combinations of coins for the same amount of money.

Goals:
– Solve problems more than one way.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary: equivalencies

Lesson 5-3
Counting Up with Money
Students will find coin combinations to pay for items and make change by counting up.

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Lesson 5-4 (Day 1)
Coin Calculations
Students make purchases and practice making change.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make connections between representations.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Science
2-3 Cause and Effect
Overview: Students are introduced to the crosscutting concept of Cause and Effect as they consider the effect that adding an ingredient can have on a glue mixture. To reinforce this concept, students explore and discuss examples of cause and effect from their own lives. Students then learn about the important features of a reference text and search in the Handbook of Interesting Ingredients for cause and effect relationships that provide evidence about which ingredients may be good for making a sticky glue. They record, share and discuss any evidence that they discover. Armed with an understanding of cause and effect and with more evidence about good glue ingredients, students are better prepared to design their next glue recipe after this lesson.

Students learn:
• Adding an ingredient to a mixture can cause an effect on the properties of the mixture.
• Engineers may search for evidence in reference books.

4: Cause and Effect in the Reference Book
Students gain experience navigating a reference text for information as they gather evidence about potential glue ingredients that they might use in their next glue recipe and record it in their notebook.
5: Discussing Evidence
Students discuss the evidence they gathered about various glue ingredients.

2-4 Writing about Heating Ingredients
Overview: Students reflect on what happens to substances after they’ve been heated or cooled and returned to their original temperature, and then they support a claim with evidence about whether a possible glue ingredient should be heated. As a prewriting activity, students participate in a Thought Swap, in which they have an opportunity to practice making and supporting claims about whether cornstarch that has or has not been heated will make stickier glue. Then the teacher models and students write. This lesson provides students with an opportunity to synthesize their learning and evidence-gathering throughout Chapter 2 into a written argument.

Students learn:
• Providing multiple sources of evidence makes a more convincing argument.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Reviewing Key Concepts
To prepare for discussing about and writing a claim supported by evidence, students review what they have learned about heating and cooling ingredients.
2: Evidence Thought Swap
Using a Thought Swap, students come up with evidence to support their claim about whether the cornstarch and water mixture should be heated.
3: Model Writing a Design Argument
The teacher models writing a design argument about whether a different glue ingredient mixed with water should be heated and shows how an argument with evidence from multiple sources is especially convincing.
4: Writing an Argument
This activity allows students to write another argument, applying the evidence they have gathered through testing, observation, and reading an informational reference text to support a written claim about a proposed design solution.

Review for Chapter 2 Quiz
Chapter 2 Quiz

Social Studies
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., integrated with language arts

Leader in Me
Leaders keep their brain sharpen by learning new things.
Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw reminds us of the need to renew our body, brain, heart, and soul. It reminds us to take care of ourselves so we can do everything else better. Sharpening the brain includes reading, watching educational television, playing word games, learning something new, and others. In this lesson, students discover:
• What it means to keep the brain sharp.
• Why keeping the brain sharp is important.
• Ways to keep the brain sharp.

Leaders keep their hearts sharp by having fun and spending time with those they love.
Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw reminds us of the need to renew our body, brain, heart, and soul. Cultivating an attitude of gratitude is an excellent way to continually sharpen the heart. In this lesson, students discover:
• The definition of gratitude.
• How gratitude can be shown.
• Why gratitude sharpens our heart.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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