Week of April 15

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

A conference time was sent home with each student on Thursday, April 12 to remind you of your conference time. We are looking forward to seeing you on Report-card Pickup day, which is Wednesday, April 18.

In order to be considerate to all, please keep your appointment time. Each conference is allotted for ten minutes. However, should you feel the need to discuss your child’s progress further, you can always request another appointment and we will be happy to accommodate.

Please submit the field trip permission slip and fee for the Lincoln Park Zoo as they are due on Monday, April 16.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 11: Holding On to Stories Even When Books Are Long (Day 1)
Learning Activities
Skillful readers pause at the end of each chapter to think, “What’s the main event that happened in this chapter” by using post it notes to remind them.

Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing Workshop
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Video: “Little Red Ridding Hood” You Tube by Fairy Stories and Songs for Kids
Students will understand that authors sometimes make deliberate choices about which characters in their book will take on which role. One character might be the good guy—the hero—while another is the bad guy—the villain. And then, of course, there’s the sidekick, the wise adviser, the trickster, to name just a few.
Some authors changed the characters—turning girls to boys or people to animals. Others have changed the setting—moving the story from a kingdom far away to the middle of a big city.

Students begin planning their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 11: Holding On to Stories Even When Books Are Long (Day 2)
Learning Activities
Skillful readers pause at the end of each chapter to think, “What’s the main event that happened in this chapter” by using post it notes to remind them.

Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing Workshop
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Interactive Read Aloud: Honestly Red Ridding Hood Was Rotten! as Told by the Wolf by Trisha Speed Shaskan

Writers ask ourselves, ‘Why am I rewriting this fairy tale?’ ‘Who am I writing it for?’ and ‘What is it, exactly, that I am trying to say?’ One thing that we can do to answer these questions as we plan and write our own is to reread, re-study, and re-think the fairy tales we’ve been studying with our partners. Students will study and talk about the choices the author made to change their version and how we might revise our plans or stories so that our adaptations are meaningful.”

Students begin planning their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Day 3:
Parent/Teacher Conferences

Day 4:
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Reading Workshop (106)
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 12: Staying on Track When Books Get Tricky

Learning Activities
Skillful readers use strategies to stay on track when books get tricky.

Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing Workshop
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Interactive Read Aloud: Trust Me, Jack’s Beanstalk Stinks! as Told by the Giant by Eric Braun
Students will pay attention to the characters in their books, they can think about the role the character plays to predict what’s going to happen. Is the character good or bad? Will she win or will she lose? They will pay attention to the pattern, to ask and answer, “Why is this happening? What will happen next?”

Students begin planning their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Day 5:
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55
Parent Read Aloud
Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, April 27.)
whale, when, where, what, why, which, whistle, whip, white, while, whirl, sun, woman, seasons, knew, himself

Reading Workshop (103)
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 12: Staying on Track When Books Get Tricky

Learning Activities
Skillful readers use strategies to stay on track when books get tricky.

Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing Workshop
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Interactive Read Aloud: Dear Peter Rabbit by Alma Flor Ada
Students will understand that fairy tales and folktales are archetypes for modern stories, that characters who play similar roles will pop up again and again, not only in these old tales but in more modern stories, too. The hope is that children take note of not just the magic in fairy tales and folktales (though of course, that’s part of the fun!), but also the ways in which archetypes from these genres repeat themselves again and again in modern literature, albeit in non-magical forms. This is the case not only with characters but also with plots, imagery, themes, but for now it’s enough that children come to recognize similar roles across books.

Students begin writing their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Math
Lesson 8-4 Drawing and Reasoning About Quadrilaterals
Day 1: Students draw quadrilaterals with given attributes.
Day 2: The class discusses solutions, and students revise their work.
Goals:
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Day 2: Reengagement
Reengaging in the Problem
Revising Work
Students add to their earlier work using colored pencils or make additional drawings on a new sheet of dot paper, instead of erasing their original work.

Lesson 8-5 Attributes of 3-Dimensional Shapes
Students sort and compare 3-dimensional shapes according to their attributes.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Lesson 8-6 Partitioning Rectangles, Part 1
Students use manipulatives to partition rectangles into same-size squares.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Lesson 8-7 Partitioning Rectangles, Part 2
Students partition rectangles into same-size squares.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.

Science
Review for Unit 5 Test

3-5 End-Of-Unit Assessment Part 1
Overview: Students’ Explanations and Diagrams
Students write scientific explanations and create diagrams, which together serve as the End-of-Unit Assessment Part 1. The End-of-Unit Assessment is designed to reveal students’ understanding of unit-specific science concepts, the crosscutting concept of Scale, Proportion, and Quantity, and the practice of constructing explanations. At the beginning of the lesson, students review evidence they have collected about how long it takes for small changes to landforms to add up to bigger changes that are easy to notice. Students work in pairs to complete an evidence chart to reflect on evidence they have collected from different activities throughout the chapter. The class discusses how the evidence from text, models, and maps has changed their ideas about erosion. Students write scientific explanations that detail their ideas about how a big change happened to Oceanside Recreation Center’s cliff without the director noticing it. Students also complete a diagram to show what they think the cliff will look like 1 year from now and 1 million years from now. The purpose of this lesson is for students to demonstrate in writing and in a diagram how small changes to a landform add up to a big change over a long period of time.

Students learn:
• Scientists use drawings, sketches, and models as a way to communicate ideas.
• Scientists revise their ideas based on evidence from investigations, models, and books in order to write scientific explanations.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Making Sense of Landform Change Over Time
Pairs discuss and record evidence to complete an evidence chart in their notebooks.
2: Writing Scientific Explanations
Students write scientific explanations to answer the Chapter 3 Question. Students’ explanations serve as an opportunity to assess students’ understanding of the unit content.
3: Diagramming Cliff Erosion
Students complete a diagram to demonstrate their understanding of erosion.

4-1 Exploring How Landforms Erode Quickly
Overview: Students are introduced to the final chapter of the unit. They will now consider the cliff near Oceanside Recreation Center that eroded significantly overnight. This fast change to the nearby cliff prompts students to begin investigating how landforms can erode quickly. Students share initial ideas and record them on a new Anticipatory Chart. Then students diagram what they think may have happened to the nearby cliff to cause it to erode so quickly. Students read Handbook of Land and Water to discover that landforms with cracks and landforms made of loose materials can erode quickly. The purpose of this lesson is for students to generate ideas about how landforms erode quickly.

Students learn:
• Some landforms are made of loose materials.
• Landforms with cracks and landforms made of loose materials are less stable than landforms made of solid rock.

Lesson at a Glance
1: How Landforms Erode Quickly Anticipatory Chart
Students discuss ideas about what could cause a landform to erode quickly.
2: Diagramming the Nearby Cliff
Students create diagrams to show how they think the nearby cliff eroded so quickly.
3: Reading About How Landforms Erode Quickly
Students read about examples of landforms that could erode quickly, in order to come to the understanding that landforms with cracks and landforms made of loose materials are less stable than landforms made of solid rock.
4: Discussing Landforms That Erode Quickly
Pairs use ideas from Handbook of Land and Water to discuss how landforms with cracks and landforms made of loose materials can erode quickly.

Social Studies
Interactive Read Alouds:
…If You Lived in Colonial Times by Ann McGovern
…If I Were a Kid in Ancient China by Cobblestone Publishing

Unit 5 Past and Present
Objectives:
– Use a visual to predict content.
– Interpret a quotation.
– Use a sequence chart to prepare for the unit.

Lesson 1
Objectives:
– Identify early uses of calendars and clocks as ways to measure time.
– Describe the order of events by using designations of time periods such as ancient times and modern times.
– Use vocabulary related to chronology, including past, present, and future.
Vocabulary: ancient, modern

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of April 8

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

There will be no school on Friday, April 13. Therefore, the weekly spelling test will take place on Thursday, April 12.

The field trip permission slip for Lincoln Park Zoo was sent home last week. Please return it with payment promptly.

Please visit IMPACT on a regular basis to be informed of grades and missing assignments. Missing assignments need to be submitted immediately.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 9: Reading as a Writer—Focusing on Special Language (day 1)

Learning Activities
Strong readers see when authors use writing strategies (comparisons/similes/metaphors, alliteration, time-passing words, repetition, idioms) to make their books come alive.

Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 14 Good. Better. Best

Minilesson

Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to practice comparing similar books using books from the teacher’s collection.

Link: Students will be reminded how making comparisons between books is another kind of evidence that can support their opinion.

Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 9: Reading as a Writer—Focusing on Special Language (day 2)

Learning Activities
Strong readers see when authors use writing strategies (comparisons/similes/metaphors, alliteration, time-passing words, repetition, idioms) to make their books come alive.

Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session15 Giving Readers Signposts and Rest Stops
Minilesson

Teaching and Active Engagement: Students will notice some rest stop punctuation in a few well-written sentences. They will be guided through the steps of first noticing the punctuation and then asking themselves what the purpose of the punctuation is.

Students will have a chance to try rest-stop punctuation in their own fabulous writing.

Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 10: Setting Up Routines for Same-Book Partners (day 1)

Learning Activities
When reading a longer book, skillful readers use strategies to keep hold of the whole story.

Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 16 Writing Introductions and Conclusions to Captivate

Minilesson

Teaching and Active Engagement: Students will investigate a mentor text by being guided through a series of steps that help students discover answers to the overarching question on how to make their pieces powerful and persuasive.

Link: Send writers off to work independently, reminding them to call on prior knowledge as well as what they have learned today about writing introductions and conclusions.

Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55
Reading Workshop (106)
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 10: Setting Up Routines for Same-Book Partners (day 2)

Learning Activities

When reading a longer book, skillful readers use strategies to keep hold of the whole story.

Spelling Test

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, April 20.)
bolt, jolt, colt, felt, belt, welt, built, stilt, wilt, melt, salt, face, edge, lay, arms, sound

Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 16 Writing Introductions and Conclusions to Captivate
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Motivating Students to Make Revisions when They Think that They’re All Done.

Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Lesson 8-1 Attributes of 2-Dimensional Shapes
Students describe the attributes of 2-demensional shapes.

Goals:
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 8-2 Playing Shape Capture
Students identify shapes that have certain attributes while playing the game Shape Capture.

Goals:
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 8-3 Comparing Triangles, Pentagons, and Hexagons
Students build and compare various polygons.

Goals:
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 8-4 Drawing and Reasoning About Quadrilaterals ( Day 1)
Day 1: Students draw quadrilaterals with given attributes.
Day 2: The class discusses solutions, and students revise their work.
Goals:
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Science
3-3 Accumulation of Small Changes
Overview: This lesson helps students to incorporate time into their understanding of scale. Students use Handbook of Land and Water to gather evidence to support the idea that big changes happen to landforms and bodies of water as small changes accumulate. Pairs research and record how different landforms and bodies of water change. Then, each pair shares what they have learned with another pair that read about different landforms and bodies of water. Students reflect on what they have learned by writing about how erosion can cause a big change to happen. Next, students begin to explore the idea that scale can refer to how slow or fast events happen. Students work in groups to sort descriptions of changes caused by erosion—in order from the change that occurs over the shortest amount of time to the change that occurs over the longest amount of time. The purpose of this lesson is for students to learn that many small changes that are hard to notice can add up to a bigger change that is easy to notice.

Students learn:
• Many small changes that are hard to notice can add up to a bigger change that is easy to notice.
• Geologists can think about the scale of erosion in terms of size and time.

2: Writing About Changes
Students write about what they have learned about how small changes to a landform add up to a big change.
3: Sorting Erosion Cards
Students continue to construct their understanding of erosion and scale by sorting descriptions of changes caused by erosion—in order from the change that occurs over the shortest amount of time to the change that occurs over the longest amount of time.

3-4 Landform Change over Time
Overview
This lesson provides additional opportunities for students to make sense of the concept of scale as it relates to how landforms change over time. At the beginning of this lesson, groups of students discuss four maps that show what the same landform looked like at different times in the past and what it looks like now. Students sort the maps of the landform—a fictional island—placing them in chronological order from oldest to most recent. The teacher then leads a class discussion about the relative age of the landform in each map. Then, students use the Changing Landforms Modeling Tool to show how much a landform changes over a short period of time versus how much a landform changes over a very long period of time. This lesson includes the third and final Critical Juncture Assessment of the unit, which allows the teacher to assess students’ understanding that many small changes to a landform can add up over a long period of time, causing the whole landform to change. The lesson concludes with pairs using the Building on Ideas discourse routine to reflect on their understanding that scale has to do with both time and size. The purpose of this lesson is for students to have more time to construct and apply the idea that when many small changes happen to a landform over a long time, the whole landform changes.

Students learn:
• When many small changes happen over a long time, the whole landform changes.
• Scale refers to how big or small something is, or how fast or slow events happen.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Observing Landform Changes on Maps
Students analyze a series of maps to construct an understanding of the time it takes for erosion to cause a noticeable change to a landform.
2: Critical Juncture: Modeling Changes Over Time
Students use the Changing Landforms Modeling Tool to show that small changes to a landform occur over a short period of time, and big changes occur over a long period of time.
3: Reflecting on Scale
Partners use the Building on Ideas routine to reflect on how scale relates to the way Oceanside Recreation Center’s cliff changed.

Social Studies
Read Aloud: “Wind Power” by David Neufeld
Who here has ever seen a windmill before?
Can some describe to me how these windmills look?
What does the environment where these windmills are located look like? Can someone infer why it is such barren land?
Can anyone infer how the windmill helps make energy?
How does soil help meet our need for food?

Review for the Land and Water Unit Test.
Land and Water Unit Test

Unit 5 Past and Present
Objectives:
– Use a visual to predict content.
– Interpret a quotation.
– Use a sequence chart to prepare for the unit.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of April 1

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

This is a reminder that the third-quarter-parent/teacher conferences will take place on Wednesday, April 18. If you haven’t signed up for the third quarter parent/teacher conferences, please do so. The sign-up schedules are posted outside the front door of rooms 103 and 106. Parents, who do not sign up by April 11, will be assigned the time slots available! We will be sending home the finalized schedule on April 12.

Students will take the social studies Land and Water unit test on Wednesday, April 11. We will send home the study guide on Friday, April 6 as homework. Please have your child complete and return it on Monday, April 9. Students should utilize the graded study guide to prepare for the assessment.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 7: Understanding Comparisons (day 1)
Learning Activities
Skillful readers notice when the author brings two distinct things together in ways that create a brand-new, made for the moment meaning (metaphor/simile).
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 11 Publishing Our Opinions for All to Read
Mini-lesson
Active Engagement: Students will find the extras in their books, asking why the author may have chosen to include them.
Students publish one of their letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 7: Understanding Comparisons (day 2)
Learning Activities
Skillful readers notice when the author brings two distinct things together in ways that create a brand-new, made for the moment meaning (metaphor/simile).
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 11 Publishing Our Opinions for All to Read
Students continue to publish one of their letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 8: Noticing When Authors Play with Words (day 1)
Learning Activities
Skillful readers notice when authors use language in creative ways (idiom) and think extra hard to understand what they mean.
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session12 And the Nominees Are…
Mini-lesson

Active Engagement: Students will have an opportunity to practice, first by choosing a book to nominate, and then by planning the reasons why their books deserve an award.
Students begin writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55
Reading Workshop (106)
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 8: Noticing When Authors Play with Words (day 2)
Learning Activities
Skillful readers notice when authors use language in creative ways (idiom) and think extra hard to understand what they mean.
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 12 And the Nominees Are…
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Getting Mileage Out of Any Learning Tools You Have at Hand

Day 5:
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Thursday, April 12.)
soft, lift shift, drift, gift, left, raft, craft, loft, swift, sift, apart, form, ride, greater, equal

Reading Workshop (103)
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 8: Noticing When Authors Play with Words (day 2)
Learning Activities
Skillful readers notice when authors use language in creative ways (idiom) and think extra hard to understand what they mean.
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session13 Prove it! Adding Quotes to support Opinions
Minilesson

Active Engagement: Students will have an opportunity to plan for their independent work. They will recall their writing and make a plan for how to make it stronger by quoting the books they are writing about.

Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Lesson 7-9 Explorations (2 Days)
Exploring Shape Attributes, Graphs, and Measurements
Students sort shapes, draw a picture graph, and measure body parts.

Goals:
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Exploration A: Sorting shapes
Exploration B: Drawing a Picture Graph
Exploration C: Measuring Body Parts

Lesson 7-10
Unit 7 Assessment (Day 1)
Administer the Open Response (Day 2)
Students decide if two different sets of base-10 blocks represent the same number and explain their thinking.

Unit 8 pre-assessment: MARS Task Making a Doll House

Science
3-1 Introduction to Maps
Overview: Students begin Chapter 3, which focuses on the crosscutting concept of Scale. The Chapter 3 Question is introduced: How did the recreation center’s cliff erode without the director noticing? Students learn that maps can serve as useful records of big changes to landforms. They use the reference book, Handbook of Land and Water, to explore landforms from different perspectives. Students discuss how to read and understand map keys that indicate where water, low land, and high land are found on a map. Then students practice shifting their perspective from a side view to a bird’s-eye view in order to match photos of landforms to the maps that represent them. Finally, students use the Changing Landforms Modeling Tool to create maps of a few landforms. The purpose of this lesson is to give students a foundation in reading maps, which will be useful as students use and create maps to show landform changes.

Students learn:
• Maps show where water and land are and where different landforms are.
• A map key identifies what the items on a map mean.
• Geologists can use maps to study landform changes over time.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Introduction to Maps
The Chapter 3 Question is presented, and students are introduced to maps as tools to study how landforms change over time.
2: Maps and Handbook of Land and Water
The class reads the introduction to the reference book, Handbook of Land and Water, in order to understand how to read a map, using a map key and different perspectives.
3: Visualizing Landforms from Above
Students match photos of landforms to maps that represent them, in order to practice visualizing a shift in perspective and make sense of how maps show features of Earth’s surface.
4: Creating Digital Maps
Students use the Changing Landforms Modeling Tool to create simple maps to represent the landforms shown in side-view photos.

3-2 Investigating Differences in Scales
Overview: Students begin thinking about scale in relation to maps; some landform changes are big enough to show on a map, while others are too small to show on a map. The teacher introduces a Mountain Model—the model includes a mountain made of many small pom-poms. This model helps students understand the idea that small changes that are hard to notice eventually add up to a bigger change that is easy to notice. Using what they learned about map features in the previous lesson, students create elevation maps of the mountain before pom-poms are removed to model erosion. The class erodes the mountain by removing pom-poms until there is a noticeable change in the shape of the mountain. Students redraw their elevation maps to show how the accumulation of small changes can, over a long period of time, lead to major landform changes. The purpose of this lesson is for students to discover that many small changes to a landform can eventually add up to a big change, to practice making maps, and to consider scale as an important crosscutting concept.

Students learn:
• Some processes can be observed over a long timescale but are hard to observe over a shorter timescale.
• Geologists and other scientists think about changes at a variety of scales—big changes and small changes.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Mapping the Mountain
Students apply what they have learned about map features to create maps of a mountain made of pom-poms.
2: Eroding the Mountain
Students remove pom-poms from the mountain one at a time and realize that a lot of very small changes can result in a big change. Students redraw their maps to show a noticeable change.
3: Considering Scale in the Mountain Maps
The teacher draws students’ attention to the importance of scale in maps by leading students in a discussion about why some small changes did not show up on their new maps.

3-3 Accumulation of Small Changes
Overview: This lesson helps students to incorporate time into their understanding of scale. Students use Handbook of Land and Water to gather evidence to support the idea that big changes happen to landforms and bodies of water as small changes accumulate. Pairs research and record how different landforms and bodies of water change. Then, each pair shares what they have learned with another pair that read about different landforms and bodies of water. Students reflect on what they have learned by writing about how erosion can cause a big change to happen. Next, students begin to explore the idea that scale can refer to how slow or fast events happen. Students work in groups to sort descriptions of changes caused by erosion—in order from the change that occurs over the shortest amount of time to the change that occurs over the longest amount of time. The purpose of this lesson is for students to learn that many small changes that are hard to notice can add up to a bigger change that is easy to notice.

Students learn:
• Many small changes that are hard to notice can add up to a bigger change that is easy to notice.
• Geologists can think about the scale of erosion in terms of size and time.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Reading About Changes Over Time
Students read about how landforms and bodies of water change slowly and record evidence to support the idea that many small changes can add up to a big change. Handbook of Land and Water exposes students to real-world examples of small changes adding up to big, observable changes over very long periods of time.

Social Studies
Using Map Scales
Objectives:
– Recognize that maps can be different sizes.
– Define map, scale
– Use a scale to find real distances.

Dessert and Rainforest
Objective: Students will be able to describe the environments of both the desert and rainforest. They will describe one similarity and one difference of these environments.
Rainforest: A wet environment that gets rain nearly every day.
Often there is less growth near the bottom of the rain forest.
Infer why there is less growth near the bottom of the rainforest.
The rainforest had very tall trees that reach for the sunlight. Therefore, other plants have adapted to grow near the top of these trees.
Desert: A dry environment that gets little rain. Few plants and animals can survive in this environment.
Plants that do survive have adapted in order to survive.

Read Aloud: What Can Live in a Desert? by Sheila Anderson

Students will continue working on and editing their map.

Map must have title
Map must have a map key
Map must have a compass rose
Map must have various landforms labeled on the key

Allow students to volunteer to present what they have already created on their map, and then discuss what that particular student is doing well, and what he/she should add.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of March 18

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The Unit 7 Math Written Assessment and Open Response will be given on Wednesday, April 4 and Thursday, April 5 respectively. Students will receive the study guide on Friday, March 23. Please help your child complete the study guide and review the graded homework to ensure success.

The third-quarter-parent/teacher conferences will take place on Wednesday, April 18. If you haven’t signed up for the third quarter parent/teacher conferences, please do so. The sign-up schedules are posted outside the front door of rooms 103 and 106. Parents, who do not sign up by April 11, will be assigned the time slots available! We will be sending home the finalized schedule on April 12.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 5: Reading at a Just-Right Pace (day 1)
Learning Activities
Strong readers read with expression, mood and the correct pacing.
• Model with Houndsley and Catina.

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud: Chester’s Way by Kevin Henkes
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 8: Reading Closely to Generate More Writing
Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will have the opportunity to practice using a touchstone text.
Link: Students should be working toward the goal of writing more about their opinions, and that close reading of their books can give them more ideas to write about. Students will think back to all the strategies they’ve learned to make their writing powerful.

Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 5: Reading at a Just-Right Pace (day 2)
Learning Activities
Strong readers read with expression, mood and the correct pacing.
• Model with Houndsley and Catina.

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud: Chester’s Way by Kevin Henkes
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 8: Reading Closely to Generate More Writing
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Linking Details and Ideas

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 6: Recognizing Literary Language (day 1)

Learning Activities
Skillful readers notice when an author has done something special (literary language) by thinking hard to make sure they understand what the author is trying to say.

1) notice when words are used in special ways
2) reread that part
3) remember what is going on in the story
4) think “What special meaning does the author want me to get?

• Mid-Workshop TP: Readers will use post it notes to notice when authors have done something special (literary language) and share with partners.

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud: Chester’s Way by Kevin Henkes
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 9: Gathering More Evidence to support Each of Our Opinions
Mini-lesson
Active Engagement: Students will work with the teacher supporting a new opinion.

Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55
Reading Workshop (106)
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 6: Recognizing Literary Language (day 2)

Learning Activities
Skillful readers notice when an author has done something special (literary language) by thinking hard to make sure they understand what the author is trying to say.

1) notice when words are used in special ways
2) reread that part
3) remember what is going on in the story
4) think “What special meaning does the author want me to get?

• Mid-Workshop TP: Readers use post it notes to notice when authors have done something special (literary language) and share with partners.

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud: Chester’s Way by Kevin Henkes
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 9: Gathering More Evidence to support Each of Our Opinions
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Using the Classroom Environment to Teach

Day 5:
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, April 6.)
drink, think, sink, stink, wink, thank, bank, drank, honk, blank, shrink, gone, lava, volcano, root, meet

Reading Workshop (103)
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 6: Recognizing Literary Language (day 2)

Learning Activities
Skillful readers notice when an author has done something special (literary language) by thinking hard to make sure they understand what the author is trying to say.

1) notice when words are used in special ways
2) reread that part
3) remember what is going on in the story
4) think “What special meaning does the author want me to get?

• Mid-Workshop TP: Readers use post it notes to notice when authors have done something special (literary language) and share with partners.

Add to anchor, “Partners Reread Together to” – Discuss literary language.

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 10: Why is the Author Using a Capital Here?
Mini-lesson
Connection: Students will understand that as their writing becomes more complex, so too does their use of capitals.

Guided Inquiry: Students will think about the different uses of capitals across their writing.

Link: Students will revise, edit, and work on their letters, keeping in mind all the strategies they have learned so far.

Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Lesson 7-6 (2 Days)
Generating Data: Standing Jumps and Arm Spans
Students measure lengths to the nearest centimeter and to the nearest inch.
Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.
Vocabulary: arm span

Lesson 7-7 Representing Data: Standing Jumps
Students discuss the shortest and longest standing jumps and create a line plot for the data.
Goals:
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
Vocabulary: line plot

Lesson7-8 Representing Data: Arm Spans
Students make a frequency table and a line plot for a set of data.
Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
Vocabulary: frequency table, line plot

Problem of the Month
Overview:
In the Problem of the Month Measuring Mammals, students use algebraic thinking to solve problems involving proportional relationships, measurement, variables, and simultaneous equations. The mathematical topics that underlie this POM are linear measurement, proportional reasoning, scale factors, scale, ratios, variables, functions, inverse variation, and algebraic reasoning.

Science
2-4 Diagramming How a Landform Erodes
Overview: Students return to the book What’s Stronger? to discuss the process of erosion. The teacher formally introduces the word erosion and asks students to visualize the process of pieces of rock breaking off a landform and moving to different places. Students reread a section of What’s Stronger? and visualize a landform eroding before diagramming the process. Students share their diagrams with partners, and then the teacher asks several students to share their diagrams with the class. The teacher points out the importance of including captions to explain ideas clearly. The lesson concludes with students returning to the Water Changes Landforms Anticipatory Chart from Lesson 2.2 to revise their ideas, based on evidence from What’s Stronger? and the Chalk Model. The purpose of this lesson is for students to consolidate their understanding that the shape of a landform changes when water hits it and causes pieces of rock to break off.

Students learn:
• Erosion is when rock, soil, or sand is worn down and moved from one place to another.
• Visualizing before creating a diagram helps you include parts of a process in your diagram that may not be easily observed.
• Including captions in a diagram helps explain a process more clearly.
• The shape of a landform changes when water hits it and causes pieces of rock to break off.

Lesson at a Glance
2: Sharing Diagrams
Students share their diagrams with the class, and the teacher points out specific features of diagrams.
3: Reflecting on Water Changing Landforms
Students return to the Water Changes Landforms Anticipatory Chart to add new ideas about how water can change the shape of a landform.

2-5 Scale of Erosion
Overview: Students return to the Chalk Model they investigated in Lesson 2.2 to add details to their understanding of how water changes landforms. They spray chalk with water as they did in Lesson 2.2, but this time, they pay close attention to the size of the pieces that break off the chalk. This leads students to discover that water causes tiny pieces to break off landforms. Then, students rub two pumice rocks together and observe how the pumice breaks down into very fine powder, or, very tiny pieces. This experience gives students a sense of the scale of the pieces that break off real landforms during erosion. At the end of the lesson, students reflect on some of the activities they’ve done in Chapter 2 and the evidence each of the activities has provided to support the idea that water erodes landforms. The teacher uses students’ ideas to populate the Evidence for How Water Erodes Landforms Chart. The purpose of this lesson is for students to learn that water hitting a landform causes tiny pieces of the landform to break off.

Students learn:
• Water hitting a landform causes tiny pieces of the landform to break off.
• Scientists often have to think about things at very different scales.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Scale of Erosion in the Chalk Model
Students revisit the Chalk Model to pay close attention to the size of the pieces of chalk that break off when water hits the models.
2: Investigating Pumice Rock
Students rub two pumice rocks together and observe what happens.
3: Making Sense of How Landforms Erode
The teacher leads students in reviewing what they have done in this unit to learn about how landforms erode.

2-6 Explaining How the Cliff Changes
Overview: Students are introduced to the Building on Ideas discourse routine. Building on Ideas helps students speak and listen to one another constructively. In this lesson, students use this routine to discuss their ideas about how the recreation center’s cliff changed. Students then diagram how the cliff changed. The class returns to the guidelines for writing scientific explanations that were introduced in Chapter 1, and the teacher introduces the final guideline: It uses science words. Students then write scientific explanations about how the cliff changed. This is the second Critical Juncture in the unit. Students’ diagrams and written explanations are used as a two-part Critical Juncture Assessment of students’ understanding about how water erodes a landform. The purpose of this lesson is for students to use ideas they have learned from investigations and books to construct diagrams and scientific explanations.

Students learn:
• Scientists make diagrams to show their ideas about how the world works, based on evidence from investigations, models, and books.
• Sharing ideas with others helps solidify an understanding of concepts before writing an explanation.
• A scientific explanation includes scientific vocabulary.
• Scientists support their explanations with ideas learned from investigations and books.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Building on Ideas
Students learn a routine in order to speak and listen to one another’s ideas and apply their understanding of erosion to the Chapter 2 Question: How did the recreation center’s cliff change?
2: Critical Juncture: Diagramming the Cliff
Students create diagrams to show how the recreation center’s cliff changed.
3: Critical Juncture: Writing a Scientific Explanation
Students write scientific explanations about how the cliff changed.

Social Studies
Leader in Me
More Ways to Lead:
Creativity
Creativity is an essential 21st-century leadership skill. The process of creativity develops whole-brain thinking skills, improves communication, and fosters an appreciation for diverse points of view. In this lesson, students discover:
• Everyone can be creative.
• New ideas can come from looking at things in a new way.
• There is no right way or wrong way to be creative.

Leaders think of new ways of doing things. Look at these creative foods. Creativity is fun!

Find Your Voice The 8th Habit: Find Your Voice and Inspire Others to Find Theirs is not about adding one more habit to the other seven—one that somehow got forgotten. “Finding your voice” is using your talents, passion, and conscience to fill a need. There is a deep, innate yearning within each of us to find our voice in life. In this lesson, students discover:
• What “find your voice” means. • How to find our voice.
• How we can help others find their voice.

Leaders use their talents and passion to make a difference in the world.

Students will continue working on and editing their map of their new town.

Map must have title
Map must have a map key
Map must have a compass rose
Map must have various landforms labeled on the key

Allow students to volunteer to present what they have already created on their map, and then discuss what that particular student is doing well, and what he/she should add.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of March 11

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The Mid-term Progress Reports was sent home with the students on Friday, March 9. Please discuss the report with your child and complete the bottom portion to return to us. If we have requested a conference with you, kindly email us to schedule an appointment.

The third-quarter-parent/teacher conferences will take place on Wednesday, April 18. The sign-up schedules are posted outside of the classroom doors of rooms 103 and 106. Please sign up.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 3: Noticing Dialogue Tags (day 1)
Interactive Read Aloud: Houndsley and Catina by James Howe
Learning Activities
Strong readers use dialog tags to help identify who is talking and change their voice to match the character talking.
• Students practice HOW they read the dialog (not just WHAT they said)

Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 3: Writers Generate More Letters (Developing New Opinions by Looking at Pictures)
Interactive Read-Aloud: The Day The Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt

Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will use pictures to develop and support a new opinion.

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Assessing and Teaching Your Writers Using the Opinion Writing Checklist.

Students continue to write letters to offer their opinions about characters, favorite parts, pictures, titles, and covers from books they’ve read.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 3: Noticing Dialogue Tags (day 2)

Learning Activities
Strong readers use dialog tags to help identify who is talking and change their voice to match the character talking.
• Students practice HOW they read the dialog (not just WHAT they said)

Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 4: Writers Make Their Letters about Books Even Better by Retelling Important Parts
Interactive Read-Aloud: The Day The Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt

Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will first plan the opinion they’ll write about today. Next, they will rehearse that part of the story they will retell, with a partner.

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Continuing to Teach from Information Gathered and Further Helping Writers with Retelling

Students continue to write letters to offer their opinions about characters, favorite parts, pictures, titles, and covers from books they’ve read.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 4: Using Meaning to Read Fluently (day 1)
Interactive Read Aloud: Houndsley and Catina by James Howe (pages 22-24)

Learning Activities
Strong readers make sure their reading voice matches what they are reading. (intonation)
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 5: Keeping Audience in Mind
Interactive Read-Aloud: The Day The Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt

Minilesson
Active Engagement: Students will think about what a letter might sound like to someone who has already read the book and work in pairs.

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Drawing on Three Teaching Resources for Strong Writers

Students continue to write letters to offer their opinions about characters, favorite parts, pictures, titles, and covers from books they’ve read.

Day 4:
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Reading Workshop (106)
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 4: Using Meaning to Read Fluently (day 2)
Learning Activities
Strong readers make sure their reading voice matches what they are reading. (intonation)
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 6: Using a Checklist to set Goals for Ourselves as Writers
Interactive Read-Aloud: The Day The Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt

Minilesson

– Students will review the Opinion Writing Checklist, giving students opportunity to turn, talk, and process the various criteria they’ll be self-

– Students will work with a partner to offer feedback and suggestions for revision.

– Confer with students in small groups or one-on-one to provide support for their revisions.

Students continue to write letters to offer their opinions about characters, favorite parts, pictures, titles, and covers from books they’ve read.

Day 5:
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, March 23.)
row, stack, pack, dock, lock, quack, rope, snack, quick, neck, check, circle, square, rectangle, scale, plane

Reading Workshop (103)
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 4: Using Meaning to Read Fluently (day 2)
Learning Activities
Strong readers make sure their reading voice matches what they are reading. (intonation)

Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop based on Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 7: Writing about More than One Part of a Book
Minilesson

Active Engagement: Students will keep going with the work they’ve started together, coming up with more opinions they might write about.

Link: Students will plan for the sections of their own letters before heading off to work independently.

Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Writers in Paragraphing

Students continue to write letters to offer their opinions about characters, favorite parts, pictures, titles, and covers from books they’ve read.

Math
Lesson 7-2 Four or More Addends (Day 1)
Students solve an open response problem by applying place-value concepts and addition properties.

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: addends, partial-sums addition

Day 1: Students solve an open response problem by applying place-value concepts and addition properties.
Day 2: Reengagement
The class discusses selected solutions, and students revise their work.

Lesson 7-3 Playing Basketball Addition
Students solve addition problems with three or more addends.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 7-4 Measuring with Yards Students explore U.S. customary length units and measure to the nearest yard.

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Choose appropriate tools.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Vocabulary: standard unit, yard (yd), personal reference

Lesson 7-5 Measuring Meters
Students find personal references for metric units of measure; they choose appropriate units and tools to estimate and measure lengths.

Goals:
– Choose appropriate tools.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Vocabulary: meter (m)
1. Warm Up

Science
2-2 Modeling Landform Changes
Overview: In this lesson, students explore whether water can change landforms. Using an Anticipatory Chart, the class brainstorms ideas about what water can do to a landform. Students then investigate a model; they observe what happens to chalk (which represents a landform) when it is sprayed with water. They record observations in their Investigation Notebooks before and after they spray the chalk. Students’ observations provide evidence that supports the idea that water can change landforms. The hands-on activity serves as a starting point for thinking about how erosion works. The purpose of this lesson is for students to learn that water can change landforms.

Students learn:
• Observations of models can provide evidence of processes that occur in the real world.
• Water can change landforms.
• Lesson at a Glance

1: Considering How Water Changes Landforms
Students discuss ideas about what water can do to a landform—in order to access prior knowledge and generate ideas—before constructing new knowledge through using models.
2: Modeling Landform Changes
Students spray water at chalk in order to explore whether water can change a landform. Students record observations of the Chalk Model in their notebooks. They are not expected to reach solid conclusions about the process of erosion, but they should begin to generate ideas about how water can change landforms.
3: Discussing Evidence
Students share evidence from the Chalk Model to support the idea that water can change landforms.

2-3 What’s Stronger?
Overview: Students build upon their understanding that water can change landforms, by reading about how this process occurs. Students are introduced to a new Investigation Question: How could water change a landform even though landforms are made of hard rock?, and they read the book What’s Stronger? How Water Causes Erosion to gather evidence about this question. At the beginning of the lesson, students preview the book and visualize how water might change the land in each of the examples in the book. Partners read the book and consider the ways in which liquid and solid water can erode landforms. At the end of the lesson, the class discusses different examples of landforms and how water can change them. The purpose of this lesson is for students to get explicit exposure to the idea that water breaks tiny pieces of rock off landforms.

Students learn:
• Visualizing is a useful strategy for making sense of things you cannot observe firsthand.
• Water can be solid or liquid in form.
• Liquid water and solid water can cause landforms to change shape.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Previewing What’s Stronger?
Previewing What’s Stronger? prepares students to read and gives them an opportunity to visualize how water can change landforms.
2: Partner Reading
Students gather evidence about how water can change the shape of a landform, and they get more practice visualizing.
3: Discussing Water
The class discusses how water can change the shape of landforms.

2-4 Diagramming How a Landform Erodes
Overview: Students return to the book What’s Stronger? to discuss the process of erosion. The teacher formally introduces the word erosion and asks students to visualize the process of pieces of rock breaking off a landform and moving to different places. Students reread a section of What’s Stronger? and visualize a landform eroding before diagramming the process. Students share their diagrams with partners, and then the teacher asks several students to share their diagrams with the class. The teacher points out the importance of including captions to explain ideas clearly. The lesson concludes with students returning to the Water Changes Landforms Anticipatory Chart from Lesson 2.2 to revise their ideas, based on evidence from What’s Stronger?and the Chalk Model. The purpose of this lesson is for students to consolidate their understanding that the shape of a landform changes when water hits it and causes pieces of rock to break off.

Students learn:
• Erosion is when rock, soil, or sand is worn down and moved from one place to another.
• Visualizing before creating a diagram helps you include parts of a process in your diagram that may not be easily observed.
• Including captions in a diagram helps explain a process more clearly.
• The shape of a landform changes when water hits it and causes pieces of rock to break off.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Rereading What’s Stronger?
Students choose a specific landform to read about in What’s Stronger? They visualize the erosion process and then create diagrams that show how water changes the landforms they selected.

Social Studies
Leader in Me
More Ways to Lead: Apologize
Apologizing is a leadership skill that is used throughout our lives. No one behaves perfectly all the time—we can all do better. Using the 7 Habits to take charge of our behavior and making a plan for fixing mistakes creates a class where everyone wins. In this lesson, students discover:
• When to apologize.
• The right way to apologize.
• How to express a sincere apology.

Leaders take responsibility for their mistakes by apologizing and saying, “I am sorry.”

More Ways to Lead: Quality Work
An often neglected leadership skill, quality work, is vital if we are going to be successful. Quality work requires not just thinking and planning, but actually doing the work. It’s about execution. It is driven by the understanding that nothing comes easy, and behind every success are hours of plain hard work. In this lesson, students discover:
• The value of quality work.
• The difference between best work and fast work.
• How to make work fun.
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Leaders know that doing quality work is important. They pay attention to important details.

Lesson 3: Maps and Globes
Objectives:
– Identify major landforms and bodies of water, including continents and oceans, on maps and globes.
– Compare maps and globes.
– Use a globe to find the poles, the cardinal directions, and the equator.
Vocabulary: continents, cardinal directions, equator, globe

Students will begin creating their own maps of their new town.

What are some of the key characteristics of a map?
Why do we need all of these parts to make our map effective?
Can anyone predict what might happen if someone did not have all of the parts of a map?
What if it lacked a compass?
A key?
A river, ocean, or, mountain?
Why do people use maps?

Students will map their own maps.

Map must have title
Map must have a map key
Map must have a compass rose
Map must have various landforms labeled on the key

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of March 4

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The vocabulary cards for social studies were sent home on Friday, March 2. Please have your child read and discuss the vocabulary to reinforce the content being taught in school. The vocabulary quiz will be administered Friday, March 9.

The Mid-term Progress Reports will be sent home with the students on Friday, March 9. Please discuss the report with your child and complete the bottom portion to return to us. If we have requested a conference with you, kindly email us to schedule an appointment.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Middle of Year T.R.C. assessment
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on Units of Study for Teaching Reading and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 1: Rehearsing Reading Voices (Day 1)

Learning Activities
Rereading out loud is the best way to change the voice inside a reader’s head.
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 1: Writing Letters to Share Ideas about Characters
Interactive Read Aloud: Chapters 1-5 of Mercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo
Mini Lesson
– Active Engagement: Students will share their opinions about characters in their own books as a way to plan their writing.
– Model Writing

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 1: Rehearsing Reading Voices (Day 2)

Learning Activities
Rereading out loud is the best way to change the voice inside a reader’s head.
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 1: Writing Letters to Share Ideas about Characters
Interactive Read Aloud: Chapters 6-12 of Mercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo
Shared Writing: Teacher and students work together to write an opinion letter to share ideas about characters.
Students compose letters.
Continue to confer with students as they write.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Spreading Writing Energy
Give a Mid-Workshop Re-teach the structure of a letter if necessary.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 2: Scooping Up Words into Phrase (Day 1)

Learning Activities
Strong readers use their singing voice by reading in longer phrases by scooping up more words at a time and by noticing punctuation.
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Interactive Read Aloud: Chapters 1-3 of Pinky and Rex and the Bully by James Howe
Session 2: Getting Energy for Writing by Talking
In this session, teach students that writers use conversations as rehearsals for writing, and they need to be mindful of their writing energy.
Mini Lesson
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Turning to Familiar Strategies When Writing a New Genre

Day 4:
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Reading Workshop (106)
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 2: Scooping Up Words into Phrase (Day 2)

Learning Activities
Strong readers use their singing voice by reading in longer phrases by scooping up more words at a time and by noticing punctuation.
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Interactive Read Aloud: Chapters 4-7 of Pinky and Rex and the Bully by James Howe
Session 2: Getting Energy for Writing by Talking
Send students off to write by reiterate the purpose of the lesson.

Day 5:
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, March 16.)
bath, math, moth, sloth, breath, mouth, path, cloth, tooth, death, month, hour, minute, second, year, mile

Reading Workshop (103)
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 1: Reading with Fluency
Session 2: Scooping Up Words into Phrase (Day 2)

Learning Activities
Strong readers use their singing voice by reading in longer phrases by scooping up more words at a time and by noticing punctuation.
Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Share: Explaining Reasons to Your Partner and Your Reader
Students continue to compose letters.

Math
Game Day and Review for Unit Assessment
Playing the Exchange Game
Playing Beat the Calculator

Observe
– Which facts do students know from memory?
– Which students need additional support to play the game?
Discuss
– What strategies did you use to solve the facts you did not know?
– Why is it helpful to know addition facts?

Lesson 6-11 Unit 6 Progress Check
– Use a picture graph to answer questions
– Use the Quantity-Quantity-Difference, Start-Change-End, and Parts-and-Total diagrams to write a number model with a ? and to find the value for the ?
– Solve comparison number stories (i.e. Fish A is 7 inches long. Fish B is 4 inches long. How much longer is Fish A than Fish B?)
– Make a ballpark estimate for an addition problem. Then find the exact answer.
– Solve 2 and 3-digit addition problem using partial-sums addition.

Cumulative Assessment
Skills:
Write a 2 and/or 3-digit number in expanded form.
Know place value.
Read and write monetary amounts.
Use , or = correctly.
Know how to exchange base-10 blocks.
Measure in inches and centimeters.
Add and subtract 10 and 100 to any 3-digit number.

MARS Task: Across the Bridge

Lesson 7-1
Playing Hit the Target
Students practice finding differences between 2-digit numbers and multiples of 10.

Goals:
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
Vocabulary: multiple of ten

Science
1-5 Making Sense of Sand Samples
Overview: Students further investigate the sand they chose in Lesson 1.3 in order to see what they can figure out about how that sand formed. First, students closely observe the sand on their Sand Sample Cards and discuss their observations with a partner. Then, pairs determine what their observations could be evidence of, using information presented in Gary’s Sand Journal. Students analyze their sand samples, using the same procedure they used in the previous lesson to analyze the mystery sand. Finally, pairs discuss observations of their sand samples with other pairs that have different sand samples. The purpose of this lesson is for students to use observations as evidence to explain processes they can’t observe.

Students learn:
• Observations and evidence can help scientists explain things that happened in the past.
• Scientists use information from books to help them answer their questions.

Lesson at a Glance
2: Writing About Sand Samples
Students practice making explanations of processes involving changes to sand that they can’t directly observe, because they happened in the past. Students’ explanations are based on evidence from their own observations and information from a book.
3: Sharing Sand Samples
Students share their ideas about their sand samples with another pair of students in order to practice supporting ideas with evidence and to learn more about sand.

1-6 Explaining Landform Changes
Overview: In this lesson, students are introduced to models as another way to gather evidence of processes that cannot easily be observed. The class uses a Hard Candy Model to further investigate how grains of sand can change shape. The model provides evidence to support the idea that rock can change shape. Then, the teacher introduces students to scientific explanations and their importance in science. As a class, students help the teacher write a scientific explanation to answer the Chapter 1 Question: How did the edge of the cliff get to be so close to the flagpole? This activity serves as a Critical Juncture through which students demonstrate their understanding of chapter content thus far. This Critical Juncture will reveal students’ readiness to move on to the next chapter by determining whether they have gained a foundational understanding that landforms are made of rock and that rock can change. This serves as the first of three Critical Juncture Assessments in the unit. The purpose of this lesson is to introduce students to models and the central elements of writing a scientific explanation.

Students learn:
• A model can help scientists answer questions about the real world.
• Even if geologists can’t see a change happening, they can use models to visualize how it may have happened.
• Even though rock is hard, it can change shape.
• Scientists write scientific explanations to explain how things work or why something happens.
• A scientific explanation answers a question, is based on science ideas, and is shared with someone.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Gathering Evidence from a Hard Candy Model
Students learn that models are another way geologists visualize how something changed when they can’t observe it changing. Then, students gather more evidence that rock can change.
2: Considering the Cliff
The class revisits the Hard Candy Model to conclude that rock can change shape.
3: Critical Juncture: Writing a Scientific Explanation
The teacher introduces guidelines for writing a scientific explanation and guides students in composing an explanation to answer the Chapter 1 Question.

2-1 Diagramming Landform Changes
Overview: Building on their conclusion that it is possible for landforms to change, students begin to investigate how this change happens. Students are introduced to diagrams as a way to communicate their ideas about how something happens. Then they discuss, visualize, and create their own diagrams to show their ideas about how the recreation center’s cliff changed. Students observe pictures of landforms before and after big changes to discuss what may have caused the change in each landform. Students realize that water is a common factor in each pair of landform pictures. The purpose of this lesson is to introduce students to the idea that water plays a role in causing landforms to change. This launches students into a chapter focused on how water changes landforms.

Students learn:
• Scientists use diagrams to communicate and share their ideas about how the world works.
• Diagrams often include captions to help explain ideas more clearly.
• Comparing landforms helps geologists determine what could cause landforms to change.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Returning to the Cliff
Visualizing and discussing their initial ideas of what may have caused the recreation center’s cliff to change prepares students to begin investigating causes of the change.
2: Diagramming Landform Changes
Students record their initial ideas about how landforms change, which they will later revise—allowing them to reflect on how their thinking has changed.
3: Observing Landform Changes
Students observe and discuss pictures of landforms that changed, leading them to identify water as a possible agent of landform change.

Social Studies
Shared Reading: The Force of Water by Lacy Finn Borgo
Book Summary
The Force of Water teaches the reader about earth’s most valuable resource—water. The book explains how water changes our planet’s surface, how it changes form as it moves through the water cycle, and how and why it is important to living things. Photos and other visual aids support the text.
Targeted Reading Strategy
– Ask and answer questions
Vocabulary
– Content words: deltas, floodplain, groundwater, irrigate, pollute, nutrients, recedes, sediment,
tributaries, watershed, water vapor, massive, transport

Lesson 3: Maps and Globes
Objectives:
– Identify major landforms and bodies of water, including continents and oceans, on maps and globes.
– Compare maps and globes.
– Use a globe to find the poles, the cardinal directions, and the equator.
Vocabulary: continents, cardinal directions, equator, globe

Review for Vocabulary Quiz
Vocabulary Quiz

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of February 25

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The field trip to the screening of “Through My Eyes” takes place this Tuesday, February 27. Please have students arrive at 8:40 a.m. as we are departing at 9 o’clock sharp. Please send a packed lunch with your child on that day.

The African-American History Assembly will take place on Wednesday, February 28 at 9:20 a.m. in the gym. Students are asked to wear red, green, black or yellow tops and black bottoms for our performance. We look forward to sharing our learning with you.

The Unit 6 Math Assessment and Cumulative Assessment will take place on Tuesday, March 6, and Wednesday March 7 respectively. Please refer to the graded homework to help your child review. Students are expected to be able to:
– Use a picture graph to answer questions
– Use the Quantity-Quantity-Difference, Start-Change-End, and Parts-and-Total diagrams to write a number model with a ? and to find the value for the ?
– Solve comparison number stories (i.e. Fish A is 7 inches long. Fish B is 4 inches long. How much longer is Fish A than Fish B?)
– Make a ballpark estimate for an addition problem. Then find the exact answer.
– Solve 2 and 3-digit addition problem using partial-sums addition.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Middle of Year T.R.C. assessment
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Day 1
Poetry Unit
Reading Workshop

Let’s review our charted steps.

1. Read through the poem at least twice.
2. Ask: Is there a title?
3. Read it aloud.
4. Pay attention to punctuation.
5. Ask: Who is the speaker?
6. Be open to interpretation, which is the act of explaining the meaning of something.

Vocabulary: ashamed

Read Aloud:
“I, Too” by Langston Hughes

Teachers guide students to follow the analyzing steps.
Teachers distribute copies of the poem.
As students read the poem with their reading partner, they will share their understanding of the meaning of the poem.
Students read independently and continue to discuss what they learned.

Writing
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 3: Trying Structures on for Size
Session 11: Studying Structure
Minilesson
Teaching and Active Engagement: Students will annotate a poem, one with contrasting and distinct structure, again thinking of this structure as a possibility for their intended poems.
Link: Students will consider different ways to build a poem around that topic, using different structures.
Students compose their poems.

Day 2
Field Trip to FACETS for African American films

Day 3
African American History Assembly (9:20)

Poetry Unit
Reading Workshop

Let’s review our charted steps.

1. Read through the poem at least twice.
2. Ask: Is there a title?
3. Read it aloud.
4. Pay attention to punctuation.
5. Ask: Who is the speaker?
6. Be open to interpretation, which is the act of explaining the meaning of something.

Shared Reading: “I Want to Write” by Margret Walker
Vocabulary: sob-torn throats

Teachers distribute copies of the poem.
Teachers guide students to follow the analyzing steps.
Teachers distribute copies of the poem.
As students read the poem with their reading partner, they will share their understanding of the meaning of the poem.
Students read independently and continue to discuss what they learned.

Day 4
Poetry Unit
Reading Workshop
Let’s review our charted steps.

1. Read through the poem at least twice.
2. Ask: Is there a title?
3. Read it aloud.
4. Pay attention to punctuation.
5. Ask: Who is the speaker?
6. Be open to interpretation, which is the act of explaining the meaning of something.

Shared Reading: “BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL” by Usemi Eugene Perkins

Teachers distribute copies of the poem.
Teachers guide students to follow the analyzing steps.
Teachers distribute copies of the poem.
As students read the poem with their reading partner, they will share their understanding of the meaning of the poem.
Students read independently and continue to discuss what they learned.

Writing (106)
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 3: Trying Structures on for Size
Session 12: Studying a Mentor Text with Poets’ Eyes
Minilesson
Active Engagement
Link: Students will continue studying and annotating a poem, and others, emulating what they notice as they revise the poems they wrote the previous day and write more.
Students revise their poems.

Day 5
Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Phonemic Awareness Progress Check

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, March 9.)
graph, laugh, paragraph, tough, rough, enough, triumph, dough, though, cough, force, feather, wide, store, gravity, model

Students read independently and continue to discuss what they learned.

Writing

“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 3: Trying Structures on for Size
Session 12: Studying a Mentor Text with Poets’ Eyes
Minilesson
Active Engagement
Link: Students will continue studying and annotating a poem, and others, emulating what they notice as they revise the poems they wrote the previous day and write more.
Students revise their poems.

Math
Lesson 6-8 Partial-Sums Addition, Part 2
Students are introduced to partial-sums addition.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Make connections between representations.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.

Lesson 6-9 Subtracting with Base-10 Blocks (2 Days)
Students are introduced to partial-sums addition.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Make connections between representations.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.

Lesson 6-10 Exploring Arrays, Length, and Shapes (2 Days)
Students build arrays on Geoboards, measure and compare lengths, and create shapes.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
Exploration A: Making Geoboard Arrays (Small Group/Partner)

Exploration B: Comparing Lengths (Small Group/Partner)

Exploration C: Making Shapes (Small Group/Partner)

Science
1-3 Observing Sand Samples
Overview: This lesson expands upon the previous lesson’s introduction to making observations. The teacher reminds students that the edge of the recreation center’s cliff is closer to the flagpole than it used to be even though no one has observed the change happening, which prompts the new Investigation Question: How do geologists figure out how something changed when they can’t observe it changing? Students are introduced to the idea that sand can be an accessible way to collect evidence about landforms, since both are made of rock. After a brief exploration of sand samples, students come up with a list of questions about sand, and the teacher guides students to recognize that some of their questions involve processes or events that cannot be observed. Then students observe the sand samples more closely and compare the samples to one another. Finally, students create Sand Sample Cards in preparation for a more focused sand investigation in Lesson 1.5. The purpose of this lesson is for students to explore and become familiar with sand in preparation for learning about how the recreation center’s cliff got to be the way it is today.

Students learn:
• Sand can be different sizes, shapes, and colors.
• Scientists compare what they have observed to help them see how things are alike and different.
• Something that is stable stays mostly the same.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Exploring Sand Samples
Students explore sand samples in order to generate questions about sand.
2: Comparing Sand Samples
Comparing sand samples familiarizes students with the sand and prepares them to use their observations as evidence in Lesson 1.5.
3: Making Sand Sample Cards
Students make Sand Sample Cards in preparation for further sand investigations in Lesson 1.5.

1-4 Gary’s Sand Journal
Overview: Students read Gary’s Sand Journal—a book about a real geologist and how he studies sand—and gather more information about how geologists figure out how something changed when they can’t observe it changing. The teacher introduces and models how to use the reading strategy of visualizing. Partners read the book together and practice visualizing during reading to help them better understand ideas in the book. At the end of the lesson, students record observations of a mystery sand in their notebooks, based on information provided in the book. This lesson reinforces the idea that observations can be evidence to help explain how something got to be the way it is.

Students learn:
• Scientists study the world in many different ways.
• Scientists start with questions and conduct investigations to find answers.
• Visualizing while reading helps readers better understand the ideas in a text.
• Scientists can make observations to help them visualize how something may have happened.
• Scientists look for patterns when they make observations about the world.
• Sand is formed when rock or other materials break into small pieces.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Setting a Purpose for Reading
Students are introduced to the visualization reading strategy, which students will employ throughout the unit.
2: Partner Reading
Reading Gary’s Sand Journal provides students with a model of how a real geologist gathers evidence of change from his observations.
3: Making Observations of Mystery Sand
This activity provides students with an opportunity to make observations and use them as evidence like Gary does.

1-5 Making Sense of Sand Samples
Overview: Students further investigate the sand they chose in Lesson 1.3 in order to see what they can figure out about how that sand formed. First, students closely observe the sand on their Sand Sample Cards and discuss their observations with a partner. Then, pairs determine what their observations could be evidence of, using information presented in Gary’s Sand Journal. Students analyze their sand samples, using the same procedure they used in the previous lesson to analyze the mystery sand. Finally, pairs discuss observations of their sand samples with other pairs that have different sand samples. The purpose of this lesson is for students to use observations as evidence to explain processes they can’t observe.

Students learn:
• Observations and evidence can help scientists explain things that happened in the past.
• Scientists use information from books to help them answer their questions.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Observing Sand Samples
Students make observations about the grains of sand on their Sand Sample Cards in preparation to explain how the sand got to be the way it is.

Social Studies
Lesson 2: Our Country’s Water
Objectives:
– Identify and describe the physical characteristics of various bodies of water.
– Compare the features of different bodies of water.
– Name major bodies of water.

Read a Land and Water Map
Objectives:
– Use symbols, colors, and labels on maps.
– Use maps to describe land and bodies of water.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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