Week of February 19

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The African-American History Fair will take place on Thursday, February 23 from 5:30 – 8:00. Students will perform their poems in the classroom from 6:00- 6:30. We look forward to sharing our learning with you.

The Unit 6 Math Assessment and Cumulative Assessment will take place on Wednesday, March 2, and Thursday March 3 respectively Please refer to the graded homework to help your child review. Students are expected to be able to:
– Use a picture graph to answer questions
– Use the Quantity-Quantity-Difference, Start-Change-End, and Parts-and-Total diagrams to write a number model with a? and to find the value for the ?
– Solve comparison number stories (i.e. Fish A is 7 inches long. Fish B is 4 inches long. How much longer is Fish A than Fish B?)
– Make a ballpark estimate for an addition problem. Then find the exact answer.
– Solve 2 and 3-digit addition problem using partial-sums addition.

Please replenish classroom materials such as pencils, colored pencils, wipes, zip lock bags and watercolors.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Time Repeated Reading

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on Units of Study for Teaching Reading and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1
Presidents’ Day

Day 2

Reading and Writing Workshops
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 8: Poem Are Moody
Students will try saying a poem in different moods, using images and music that reflect the mood.
Students read independently and continue to discuss what they learned.

Interactive Read Aloud: Elijah McCoy from Biography.com

– Students compose and edit their poems.

Day 3

Reading and Writing Workshops
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 9: Using Comparisons to Clarify Feelings and Ideas
Minilesson

Students will understand that one way poets see with poet’s eyes is to compare things, ideas, or feelings to something else.

Students, with their partners, will revise the remaining ordinary phrases to include comparative language.

Students read independently and continue to discuss what they learned.

Interactive Read Aloud: George Washington Carver by Kitson Jazynka

– Students compose and edit their poems.

Day 4

Reading and Writing Workshops
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 10: Stretching Out a Comparison

Students will celebrate earlier work with comparative language, and enrich that work. staining the metaphor and thinking aloud as you go. Debrief, quickly listing the steps you took to revise the poem.
Students will decide on the day’s work, and decide to find poems that have comparisons, and decide whether their comparisons should be stretched out.

Students read independently and continue to discuss what they learned.

Interactive Read Aloud: Bessie Coleman by Carol Alexander

– Students compose and edit their poems.

Day 5

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, March 3.)
boxes, foxes, churches, dishes, couches, brushes, bushes, rushes, wishes, washes, dashes, fraction, whole, part, fair, share

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Students read independently.

– Students compose and edit their poems.

Math
Lesson 6-6 Recording Additions Strategies (Day 2)
Students make ballpark estimates and invent and record their own strategies for solving addition problems.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.

Lesson 6-7 Partial-Sums Addition, Part 1
Students use base-10 blocks to find partial sums and build readiness for partial-sum addition.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Lesson 6-8 Partial-Sums Addition, Part 2
Students are introduced to partial-sums addition.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Make connections between representations.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.

Lesson 6-9 Subtracting with Base-10 Blocks (Day 1)
Students are introduced to partial-sums addition.

Goals:
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Science
Teacher Video: Rapid Changes to the Land Engage Introductory Discussion

• How can water and wind change the shape of the land?
• What kinds of landforms are formed by water or wind erosion?
• How long does it usually take water and wind to create or change the shape of these landforms?

Observing Quick Changes to Earth’s Surface
Students will become familiar with rapid events that occur on Earth and how these events can change the shape of the land.

Exploration Bottle Volcanoes Children are naturally curious about volcanoes.

Quiz

Social Studies
Integrated with Language Arts
Interactive Read Aloud: Mae Jemison by Jodie Shepherd

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of February 12

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The second quarter report card was distributed last week. Please sign and return only the report card envelope by Friday, February 19. If we requested a conference with you, kindly contact us in person, via email, or letter to arrange an appointment.

Valentine’s Day is Tuesday. Students are asked to wear red on that day. We will also celebrate the 100th day of school on Friday. If your child would like a T-shirt, please send in $6.00. A form will be sent home on Monday.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Time Repeated Reading

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on Units of Study for Teaching Reading and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1
Reading and Writing Workshops
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 5: Editing Poetry
Minilesson
Students will prepare their poems to share, they will need to edit their poems carefully.
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud: Mae Jemison by Elizabeth Raun
Questions:
Who is Mae Jemison?
Where did she grow up?
How did her family influence her education?

– Distribute to students the graphic organizers for the chapter entitled “Who is Mae Jemison?”
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Mae Jemison from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students begin to discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American scientists.

Day 2
Reading and Writing Workshops
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 6: Searching for Honest, Precise Words
Minilesson
Using a class poem, students will search for places where more precise words could be added.
Students now have a repertoire of strategies for writing poetry, and will use any of those strategies.
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud: Mae Jemison by Elizabeth Raun
Questions:
Which high school did she attend?
At what age did she attend?
What was her favorite subject?
How did her interest in different subjects help her become successful?

-Students continue to read, discuss and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students begin to discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American scientists.
– Students compose and edit their poems.

Day 3
Reading and Writing Workshops
Writing Workshops
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 6: Searching for Honest, Precise Words
Minilesson
Read to students “Lullaby” by Kristen O’Connell George and ask students to share what they are noticing about precise language.
Remind students later during writing time to choose honest precise words in their own writing.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud: Mae Jemison by Elizabeth Raun
Questions:
What colleges did she attend?
How did she follow her dream?
How did she prepare herself to go into space?

-Students continue to read, discuss and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students begin to discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American scientists.
– Students compose and edit their poems.

Day 4
Morning Message:
Good morning,
Today is Thursday, February 16, 2017. We will examine patterns in poetry.
Inquiry Question: Why is repetition an important kind of pattern in poetry? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading and Writing Workshops
Writing Workshops
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 7: Patterning through Repetition
Minilesson
Students will find patterns in a poem and to notice how repetition enhances the meaning of it.
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud: Mae Jemison by Elizabeth Raun
Questions:
What was her job in space?
How did her experiments help astronauts?
How does Mae Jemison continue to help people?
How does her love of science inspire others?

-Students continue to read, discuss and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students begin to discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American scientists.
– Students compose and edit their poems.

Day 5
Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, February 24.)
still, learn, should, America, world, hush, slush, dash, wash, wish, dish, money, coin, bill, cent, dollar
Students read independently.

Students compose and edit their poems.

Math
Lesson 6-3 Interpreting Number Stories
Students choose diagrams to use for solving number stories.

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 6-4 (2 Days)
Animal Number Stories
Students solve animal number stories.

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Choose appropriate tools.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Lesson 6-5 Two-Step Number Stories
Students solve two-step number stories.

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 6-6 Recording Additions Strategies (Day 1)
Students make ballpark estimates and invent and record their own strategies for solving addition problems.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.

Science
Read Aloud: Planet Earth by Robin Kerrod Pages 18 and 19
Active student’s knowledge about the effect of wind.
Chart students’ responses to support learning.

Science Notebooks
Students write inquiry question for their investigation of the wind.
Students write their hypothesis about how the wind can affect the landforms.

Students explore how wind can change the shape of the land. They observe what happens when wind blows across a mound of sand and speculate about what will happen if the wind continues blowing. Together they design and develop different ways to prevent a pile of sand from blowing away and test their ideas. During the process they discover there can be multiple solutions to a problem.

Erosion Quiz

Social Studies
Integrated with Language Arts
Read Aloud: Mae Jemison by Stephen Feinstein

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of February 5

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

This is a reminder that the Unit 5 Progress Check and Open Response will take place on Monday, February 6 and Tuesday, February 7 respectively. Please refer to the graded homework to help your child review.
Please help your child review the graded homework. Students should be able to:
– Add and subtract 1-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 10 to two and three-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 100 to three-digit numbers
– Draw coins to show a given amount
– Use an open number line to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-More diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-Less diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Parts-and-Total diagram to solve a story problem
– Explain how to find a sum of two numbers in writing and by drawing tally marks, base-ten blocks, or bills and coins, etc.

The second grade students will attend the field trip to Freedom Songs with Bill Brickey and Friends at the Old Town School of Folks Music this Friday, February 10, 2017. Please make sure your child has a lunch for school on this day.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Time Repeated Reading

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on Units of Study for Teaching Reading and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1
Reading and Writing Workshops
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 2: Listening for Line Breaks
Ingredients/Pattern in Poetry
Interactive Read Aloud: Read more Small Poems by Valerie Worth
– Teachers review the concept of recipes/ingredients for cooking to guide the students to understand that there are ingredients in our recipe for writing a poem.
The first ingredients are: Use the eyes of a poet to look at the world closely and carefully, and use the eyes of a poet to look at ordinary things in fresh and new ways.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud: All Aboard Elijah McCoy’s Steam Engine by Monica Kulling
(pages 1-13)
Questions:
Where was Elijah McCoy born?
Who helped Elijah McCoy’s parents escape to freedom?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Elijah McCoy from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students begin to discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American scientists.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 2

Reading and Writing Workshops
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Interactive Read Aloud: Love That Dog by Sharon Creech
Minilesson
Session 3: Putting Powerful Thoughts in Tiny Packages
Connection: Recall and celebrate what the students have been doing as poets. Tell them poets also choose their own topics.
Students coauthor the start of a poem about a shared big feeling.
Link: Remind students of the possibilities they have for reading and writing today.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud: All Aboard Elijah McCoy’s Steam Engine by Monica Kulling (pages 14-22)
Questions:
When did Elijah McCoy receive his first patent?
How many patents did Elijah McCoy receive?
Name something Elijah McCoy invented.

Model to students how to take notes by writing information on chart paper for students to use as support for their writing.

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Elijah McCoy from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American scientists.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 3

Reading and Writing Workshops
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Interactive Read Aloud: Love That Dog by Sharon Creech
Minilesson
Session 4: Poet Find Poems in the Strong Feelings and Concrete Details of Life
Minilesson

Students will mine their notepads, asking themselves, “Does this give me a big, strong feeling?” and “Have I found a specific moment or detail or object that holds that feeling for me?”.

Students read independently and write using skills they’ve learned.

Interactive Read Aloud: All Aboard Elijah McCoy’s Steam Engine by Monica Kulling
(pages 23- the end)
Questions:
How did Elijah McCoy gain recognition for his achievements?
How do his inventions benefit our society?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Elijah McCoy from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American scientists.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 4

Reading and Writing Workshops
Close Reading: All Aboard Elijah McCoy’s Steam Engine by Monica Kulling
Students will think about the question as we read and annotate together –Students annotate with this question in mind “How does Elijah solve his problem?”

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems about our African-American scientists.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 5

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, February 17.)
letter, mother, answer, found, study, much, such, church, search, march, starch, repeat, subtract, divide, group, remainder
Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Field Trip to Old Town School of Folk Music

Math
Lesson 5-12 (Day 1)
Unit 5 Progress Check
Day 1: Administer the Unit Assessments.

Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.

Subtract within 20 fluently.

Add within 20 fluently.

Add within 100 fluently.

Subtract within 100 fluently.

Subtract multidigit numbers using models or strategies.

Add multidigit numbers using models or strategies.

Mentally add 10 to and subtract 10 from a given number.

Mentally add 100 to and subtract 100 from a given number.

Represent sums and differences on a number line diagram.

Solve problems involving coins and bills.

Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.

Lesson 5-12 (Day 2) Unit 5 Progress Check
Day 2: Administer the Open Response Assessment.
2b. Assess
Solving the Open Response Problem
Solve problems involving coins and bills.

Read and write monetary amounts.

Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.

Pre-assessment MARS Tasks: “Peanuts and Ducks”

Lesson 6-1 Representing Data: Pockets
Students will review coin equivalencies and make different combinations of coins for the same amount of money.

Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: data, tally chart, picture graph, graph key, bar graph

Lesson 6-2 Comparison Number Stories
Students solve comparison number stories.

Goals:
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Choose appropriate tools.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.

Science
Water Can Change the Land
· What kinds of things could change the shape of the mountain or hill?
· Do they think the mountain or hill would get wet anytime if left outdoors for a very long time?
· What could cause the mountain or hill to get wet?
· Do they think water could change the mountain or hill in any way?

Explore
Modeling How Water Can Change a Mountain
Children build a model mountain and observe how it is affected by water.

Water Can Change the Land
TEACHING THE LESSON – SESSION 2
Observing Slow and Rapid Changes

Reflect and Discuss
· What kinds of things can moving water do to land?
· What are some examples of fast moving water?
· What kinds of changes to the land are caused by fast moving water?
· What are some examples of slow moving water? · What kinds of changes to the land are caused by slow moving water?
· How does the way water moves change the land in different ways? (

Landforms and Bodies of Water Quiz

Social Studies
Integrated with Language Arts
Read Aloud: The Real McCoy The Life of an African-American Inventor by Wendy Towle

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of January 29

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The second quarter ends on Thursday, February 2. Please look for your child’s report card the week of February 6. Please contact your child’s teacher to schedule a parent/teacher conference if needed.
Friday, February 3 is a furlough day for teachers and staff. It is a nonattendance day for students.
The Unit 5 Progress Check and Open Response will take place on Monday, February 6 and Tuesday, February 7 respectively. Please refer to the graded homework to help your child review.
Please help your child review the graded homework. Students should be able to:
– Add and subtract 1-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 10 to two and three-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 100 to three-digit numbers
– Draw coins to show a given amount
– Use an open number line to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-More diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-Less diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Parts-and-Total diagram to solve a story problem
– Explain how to find a sum of two numbers in writing and by drawing tally marks, base-ten blocks, or bills and coins, etc.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Time Repeated Reading

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 19 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and open their eyes if the words rhyme, or close their eyes if the words do not.
Onset Fluency: Thumbs up if the words begin with the same blend; thumbs down if the words do not begin with the same blend.
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher says the word. Students say the final sound found in the series. Ex. T: get, got, bet, S: /t/
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on Units of Study for Teaching Reading and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1
Morning Message:
Bonjour,
Today is Monday, January 30, 2017. We will begin our poetry unit in language arts. We will also write poems about the lives of African-American scientists: George Washington Carver, Bessie Coleman, Elijah McCoy, and Mae Jemison.
Inquiry Question: What is a poem? Discuss your answer with a classmate.

Reading
Teachers introduce poetry as genre of writing.
What is a poem?
Interactive Read Aloud:
– Students listen to a poem entitled “Things” read by Eloise Greenfield from Hip Hop Speaks to Children.
– Teachers and students read together “Things”.
– Teachers and students discuss how our expression and patterns are different after listening to the author read the poem.
– Teachers introduce the genre of poetry by creating a chart entitled “What Is A Poem?” based upon the students thinking.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Share Reading: Bessie Coleman by Jane Sellman (Reading A to Z)
Introduce the Vocabulary: barnstormer, biplane, Curtiss Jenny, enlisted, loop-the-loop, solo, cockpit, discrimination, international, manicurist, mechanic, sharecroppers
Before Reading: Build Background, Introduce the story
Reading Strategy: Connect to Prior Knowledge

Questions:
Who is Bessie Coleman?
When and where was she born?
Under what circumstance was she born?
How has her background inspired her to be a pilot?

– Review with students that, as part of this year African-American history month, for the next few weeks, we are writing poems focusing on George Washington Carver, Elijah McCoy, Bessie Coleman, and Mae Jemison as African-American scientists who had made significant contributions to our society.
Model to students how to take notes by writing information on chart paper for students to use as support for their writing.
– Distribute to students the graphic organizers for the chapter entitled “Who Was Bessie Coleman?” Refer to the reading to model to students how to take notes on the graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Bessie Coleman from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
– Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 2
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa,
Today is Tuesday, January 31, 2017. We will solve change number stories involving temperature.
Inquiry Question: How do you know when there is a “change for less” and when there is a “change for more” when you fill out you Start-Change-End diagram? Discuss your answer with a classmate.

Reading
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Interactive Read Aloud:
– Teachers and students begin reading Love That Dog by Sharon Creech.
– Classes take a Museum Poetry Walk reading selected poems from our read-aloud.
– Teachers revisit the “What is a poem?” chart and revise the chart based upon what was learned during the museum walk.
– Teachers introduce the concept of recipes/ingredients for cooking to guide the students to understand that there are ingredients in our recipe for writing a poem.
The first ingredients are: Use the eyes of a poet to look at the world closely and carefully, and use the eyes of a poet to look at ordinary things in fresh, new ways.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing:
Share Reading: Bessie Coleman by Jane Sellman (Reading A to Z)
Introduce Comprehension Skill: Sequence Events (Model using signal words such as today, then, first, after, or time clues such as dates to describe the sequence of an average day in your life. Explain that we will be using a graphic organizer to help us recall the sequence of events in the text.)
Questions:
Where did Bessie attend school?
How did she make money for school?
Why did she move to Chicago?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Bessie Coleman from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 3
Morning Message:
Buenos dias,
Today is Wednesday, February 1, 2017. We will examine line breaks in poetry.
Inquiry Question: How does line break influence your oral reading? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 2: Listening for Line Breaks
Minilesson
Connection: Share with the class some examples of fresh, new ways they’ve seen the world, and let them in on another element of poetry: sound. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Show a familiar poem, written as prose and as a poem, and channel students to listen as you read the prose version in a blah way. Contrast this with reading the same poem written with the line breaks the author intended. Discuss why the line breaks support the meaning and influence your reading. Discuss how “line breaks” make up a poetic form, that poetry has music, and the music of poetry comes from how words are put on a page.
Active Engagement: Ask the students to read the poem again, using line breaks as the author instructed them to do. Challenge them to reflect on how the line breaks influence their oral reading. Model to students how some poems would look written as prose. Then show students the poems the way they were originally written. Summarize what you want the students to learn.
Link: Remind the students that they have options, including to observe with poets’ eyes, to turn notes into poems, or to rewrite poems with line breaks.
Interactive Read Aloud: Small Poems by Valerie Worth
– Using word cards and pocket charts, let students experiment with making a poem with line breaks and patterns.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Share Reading: Bessie Coleman by Jane Sellman (Reading A to Z)
Review Summarizing: Ask students to summarize each paragraph as we read

Questions:
Who inspired Bessie to be a pilot?
Why did she want to become a pilot?
How was she able to go to France to become a pilot?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Bessie Coleman from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
– Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 4
Morning Message:
Today is Thursday, February 2, 2017. We will continue to read and discuss the life of Bessie Coleman.
Inquiry Question: How might Bessie Coleman inspire you as a student? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, February 10.)

away, animal, house, point, page, desk, mask, task, ask, tusk, disk, events, process, equal, array, multiply

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Reading
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 2: Listening for Line Breaks
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Hearing More in the Music of Poetry
Share: Using Line Breaks to Highlight Meaning
Introduce the idea that line breaks not only create music, but can also highlight special parts or words in poems. Set the students up to reflect on the line breaks in “Between Two Trees” by Kristine O’Connell George, particularly the lines with only one word. Ask students to reread their own poems today, considering if there might be one important word that deserves its very own line. Then, invite students to share these possible new line breaks with their partners.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Share Reading: Bessie Coleman by Jane Sellman (Reading A to Z

Questions:
How was Bessie received when she returned to the U.S?
Why did she want to start a flying school for African-Americans?
How did Bessie take steps to end discrimination?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Bessie Coleman from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 5
No School

Math
Lesson 5-10 Change Number Stories
Students solve change number stories involving temperature.
Vocabulary: thermometer, degrees Fahrenheit, change diagram, change-to-less number story

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Solving Change Number Stories

Lesson 5-11 Adding Multidigit Numbers (Day 1)
Students complete an open response problem by solving an addition problem using two different strategies.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary: open number line

Solving the Open Response Problem
Students model a shopping problem and show two different strategies for finding the sum of two prices.

Lesson 5-11 Adding Multidigit Numbers (Day 2)

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Setting Expectations
Students review the open response problem and discuss using pictures, numbers, and words to show their strategies. They also review how to respectfully discuss their own and others’ work.

Game Day

Buying and Selling
– Students practice counting money, children use their toolkit coins to buy fruit and vegetables using exact change.

Dime-Nickel-Penny Grab
Students count coins and determine the total value of various coin combinations. Students grab coins and count the amount. They record their work on Math Masters, p G22.

Using Open Number Lines to Add
Students work with open number lines to solve number stories involving larger numbers.

Science
Bodies of Water Day 2
Children learn about the different bodies of water found on Earth’s surface. They discover that water covers most of the planet and compare where it exists in liquid and solid form. Like the previous lesson, they take a virtual field trip to observe, describe and compare specific bodies of water. Observing and describing features of specific bodies of water helps them see patterns and identify phenomena, contributing to their understanding of the crosscutting concept of Patterns.

Big Idea: The shapes and kinds of landforms and bodies of water on Earth can be identified using maps and other models

Lesson Goals
Use observations from a globe to quantitatively describe how much of the Earth’s surface is covered in water.
Explain how the water that covers most of Earth’s surface and can be a liquid or solid.
Observe and describe the characteristics of various bodies of water.

3-D Models
Overview: In this three-session lesson, children use their prior knowledge about Earth’s surface to create a model to explain and represent different landforms and bodies of water. They discuss how models are useful in science and compare and contrast their models to real landforms and bodies of water.
Big Idea: The shapes and kinds of landforms and bodies of water on Earth can be identified using maps and other models.

Social Studies
Integrated with Language Arts
Interactive Read Aloud: Fly High! The Story of Bessie Coleman by Louise Borden and Mary Kay Kroeger

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of January 22

Dear Parent and Caregivers,

The second grade classes will begin this year’s African-American unit of study the week of January 23. We will be learning about the lives and contributions of George Washington Carver, Bessie Coleman, Mae Jemison, and Elijah McCoy. Please support your child’s learning by assisting him/her to read age appropriate books, articles, and photos/images these famous scientists.

Students will take the social studies unit test about the U.S. government on Thursday, January 26. A study guide will be sent home on Monday, January 23. Please have your child complete the study guide and submit it the following day. We will grade the study guide and return it with the students for further reviewing for the test.

We sent home a permission slip for the field trip to Freedom Songs with Bill Brickey and Friends at the Old Town School of Folks Music. Please return the slip with payment by Friday, January 27so that we can secure the visit.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on Units of Study for Teaching Reading and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Reading Across a Topic Session 15: Finding, Thinking, and Talking about What Is the Same and What Is Different
Learning Activities
When reading many books on the same topic, strong readers find similarities and differences.
Shared Reading: George Washington Carver by Cynthia Kennedy Henzel A-Z Reading Levels L and O
Targeted Reading Strategy
– Retell
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of retelling to understand and remember a timeline of events
– Identify elements of a biography
– Fluently read the diphthong /ou/ sound
– Recognize proper nouns: names of people
– Identify and create compound words

Content Words:
– agriculture (n.) the science of farming and raising livestock
– famous (adj.) well known
– fertilizer (n.) a natural or chemical substance that promotes plant growth
– inventor (n.) a person who creates, designs, or builds something that did not exist before
– professor (n.) a college or university teacher
– segregated (adj.) kept apart based on group differences, such as race

Enrichment
– Civil War (n.) a war between the citizens of the same country
– Congress (n.) the national legislative body of a country
– nutrients (n.) a substance that provides nourishment essential for growth and maintenance

Writing Workshop
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Reading Across a Topic
Session 16: Readers Retell Topics, Not Just Books
Learning Activities (Day 1)

Strong readers retell knowledge about the topic, using their own words and key words.
Shared Reading: George Washington Carver by Cynthia Kennedy Henzel
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Read Aloud: George Washington Carver An Innovative Life by Elizabeth MacLeod pages 4-7

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Reading Across a Topic
Session 16: Readers Retell Topics, Not Just Books
Learning Activities (Day 2)

Strong readers retell knowledge about the topic, using their own words and key words.
Shared Reading: George Washington Carver by Cynthia Kennedy Henzel

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Read Aloud: George Washington Carver An Innovative Life by Elizabeth MacLeod pages 8-13
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
– Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 4:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Reading Across a Topic
Session 17: Getting Ready for the Celebration
Learning Activities
Museum Celebration of Learning

Shared Reading: George Washington Carver by Cynthia Kennedy Henzel
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Read Aloud: George Washington Carver An Innovative Life by Elizabeth MacLeod pages 14-17
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.

Day 5:
Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Thursday, February 2.)
change, off, play, spell, air, bend, send, mind, offend, sand, land, draw, object, feature, label, steps

Shared Reading: George Washington Carver by Cynthia Kennedy Henzel
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Read Aloud: George Washington Carver An Innovative Life by Elizabeth MacLeod pages 18-21

Questions:
Where did George attend school?
What subjects did he most enjoy?
Why was his interest in plants so important?

– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.

Math
Lesson 5-7 Open Numbers Lines (2 Days)
Open Numbers Lines
Students use open number lines as a tool for solving number stories.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

Vocabulary: open number line

Lesson 5-8 Change-to-More Number Stories
Students solve change-to-more number stories.
Vocabulary: change-to-more number story, change diagram

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 5-9 Parts-and-Total Number Stories
Students solve parts-and-total number stories.
Vocabulary: parts-and-total diagram, total, parts-and-total number story

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Science
Interactive Read Aloud: Landforms by Rose Brooker from Reading A to Z
Read and discuss different types of landforms in United States.
Targeted Reading Skills: Summarize and Identify Main Idea and details

Looking at Earth’s Surface: Landforms

Lesson Goals
1. Record ideas about the features that make up Earth’s surface.
2. Observe, describe, and compare characteristics of various landforms.

Looking at Earth’s Surface: Bodies of Water

Lesson Goals
1. Use observations from a globe to quantitatively describe how much of the Earth’s surface is covered in water
2. Explain how the water that covers most of Earth’s surface and can be a liquid or solid.
3. Observe and describe the characteristics of various bodies of water.

Social Studies
Integrated with Language Arts

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of January 16

Dear Parent and Caregivers,

The science Rotational Unit Test is postponed until Friday, January 20 to allow students more time to review. A study guide, however, was sent home on Monday, January 9. Please have your child refer to the study guide to review for the test.

We sent home a permission slip for the field trip to Freedom Songs with Bill Brickey and Friends at the Old Town School of Folks Music. Please return the slip with payment A.S.A.P so that we can secure the visit.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on Units of Study for Teaching Reading and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1: Martin Luther Ling Jr. Day

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Reading Across a Topic Session 14: Thinking and Rethinking about How Information Is Connected across Books (Day1)
Learning Activities
When reading many books on the same topic, strong readers use a variety of strategies to connect ideas.
Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.
Interactive Read Aloud: How Do They Work? Playgrounds by Wendy Sadler
Session 17 Introductions and Conclusions—Addressing and Audience
Students will craft introductions and conclusions that are fun and engaging for their audience. Students begin writing their introductions and conclusions for their All about Books.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Reading Across a Topic Session 14: Thinking and Rethinking about How Information Is Connected across Books (Day 2)
Learning Activities
When reading many books on the same topic, strong readers use a variety of strategies to connect ideas.
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Interactive Read Aloud: The Force of Water by Lacy Finn Borgo
Session 17 Introductions and Conclusions—Addressing and Audience
Review yesterday’s lesson. Have a few students share what they have written about introduction and/or conclusion.
Students continue writing their introductions and conclusions for their All about Books.

Day 4:

Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Reading Across a Topic Session 15: Finding, Thinking, and Talking about What Is the Same and What Is Different
Learning Activities
When reading many books on the same topic, strong readers find similarities and differences.
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 18 Editing – Aligning Expectations to the Common Core
Minilesson
Students will use a checklist to edit a piece of writing. They will work in partnerships to discuss editing strategies.
Students begin editing their own information books.

Day 5:
Parent Read Aloud
Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on January 27.)
try, kind, hand, picture, again, fast, past, last, contrast, blast, cast, oral, science, data, record, magnify

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Phonemic Awareness Progress Check

Writing Workshop
Deeper, More Powerful and Thoughtful Revision
– Students reread their “All About Books” to check for errors.
– Students utilize the checklist to edit their “All About Books”.
– Explain to students that not only do writers edit their work, they also prepare it for publication. Model to students how to fancy up their writing.
– Students recopying their writing. They illustrate important parts of their “All About Books.”

Math
Lesson 5-4 (Day 2)
Coin Calculations
Students make purchases and practice making change.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make connections between representations.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Lesson 5-5 Exploring Arrays, Time, and Shapes (2 Days)
Students make arrays, match clock faces to digital notation, and construct shapes on Geoboards.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Vocabulary: array

Lesson 5-6 Mentally Adding and Subtracting 10 and 100
Students develop strategies for mentally adding and subtracting 10 and 100.

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Vocabulary: mental addition, mental subtraction

Science
Read Balance and Motion: Things That Spin, Rolling, and String in Motion

Students work in small groups to complete review worksheets from forces and motions.
Engineering Design
Balloon-Powered Cars
Inquiry Question:
Does the shape of the front of the car affect the distance the car travels?

Science Notebook:
Students jot down pertinent notes such as materials, procedure and inquiry question.
They illustrate the observation.
Students write to explain how the shape of the front of the car affects the distance the car travels?
They must incorporate the charted vocabulary and scientific terminology the writing.

Social Studies
Leader in Me Habit 3
Continue to point out examples of leadership in content areas and to reinforce appropriate leadership behavior.

Students use the research notes from previous lesson to continue the final drafts of their state research books. They will identify:
– Name of governor of the state
– The state’s capital
– The state’s population
– The state’s nickname
– The state’s motto
– The state’s date of admission to the union
– The state bird (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flower (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flag (include a drawing or picture)
Students use the Chrome Notebooks to search for:
– Additional interesting facts about the state

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of January 8

Dear Parent and Caregivers,

Happy New Year! We are looking forward to seeing everyone on Monday, January 9.

The midterm progress reports will be sent home on January 9. Please discuss the progress report with your child, sign the bottom portion and return it promptly. If a conference is requested by a teacher, please contact us via e-mail to schedule an appointment.

Students will take the science Rotational Unit Test on Tuesday, January 17. A study guide will be sent home on Monday, January 9. Please have your child complete the study guide and submit it the following day. We will grade the study guide and return it with the students for further reviewing for the test.

There will be no school on Monday, January 16 in observance of Dr. Martin Luther King Day.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Time Repeated Reading

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeedy Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on Units of Study for Teaching Reading and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1:
Reading Workshop
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg

Key Question
Why is Martin Luther King Jr. called a great leader?
Targeted Reading Strategy
Summarize

Vocabulary
Academic vocabulary
remember (v.), separate (v.)

Story words
• Civil War (n.), march (n.), minister (n.), refused (v.), rights (n.), separation (n.), slavery (n.)

During this unit students will:
Ask and answer questions
Summarize
Discuss cause and effect relationships
Read to find out more about Martin Luther King Jr.’s life.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 14 Studying Mentor Texts
Students will:
– Add a new voice in a different size or color.
– Use arrows to show how something works.
– Use dashes to add definitions.
– Add captions to pictures.

Students continue to write about their experiments.
Students continue to write their information books.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
Students will summarize important information in the book.
Students will make a question mark in their book beside any word they do not understand or cannot pronounce.
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: All About Kites by Elizabeth Austin Chapter 1 and 2

Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 15 Using Comparisons to Teach Readers
Minilesson
Students will understand how to tell a story that illustrates how using a comparison can help readers understand something that is unfamiliar to them.

Students continue to write their information books.

Day 3:

Reading Workshop
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
Reflect on the Comprehension Skill: Cause and Effect
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: All About Kites by Elizabeth Austin Chapter 3
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 15 Using Comparisons to Teach Readers
Conferring and Small-Group Work—Conferring to Ensure Students Have Grasped the Essentials of the Unit
Students continue to write their information books.

Day 4:

Reading Workshop
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
Build Skills
Phonics: Identify r-controlled vowels
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud:All About Kites by Elizabeth Austin Chapter 4

Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 16 Showing Hidden Worlds with Science Writing
Students will understand how to slow things down by writing lots of steps for one moment.
They will apply, from now on, these or any other invented strategies to help them convey information about their topic, and forces and motion, to their readers.
Students continue to write their information books.

Day 5:
Parent Read Aloud

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on January 20.)
try, kind, hand, picture, again, fast, past, last, contrast, blast, cast, oral, science, data, record, magnify

Reading Workshop
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
Word Work: Synonyms
Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 16 Showing Hidden Worlds with Science Writing
Students discuss examples of writing that are “hidden story”.
Students continue to write their information books.

Math
MARS Pre-Assessment “Pocket Money”
The task challenges a student to demonstrate fluency in adding and subtracting whole numbers. A student must understand whole numbers and represent and use them in flexible ways, including relating, composing, and decomposing numbers. A student must be able to communicate mathematical reasoning using words, numbers and/or pictures.

Lesson 5 – 1
Playing Beat the Calculator
Students play Beat the Calculator to develop fact power by using mental strategies to add two 1 – digit numbers.

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Vocabulary: addition fact, fact power

Lesson 5-2
Using Coins to Buy Things
Students will review coin equivalencies and make different combinations of coins for the same amount of money.

Goals:
– Solve problems more than one way.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary: equivalencies

Lesson 5-3
Counting Up with Money
Students will find coin combinations to pay for items and make change by counting up.

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

. They take turns being the customer and the clerk. Each child records a few transactions

Lesson 5-4 (Day 1)
Coin Calculations
Students make purchases and practice making change.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make connections between representations.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Science
Engineering Design

Review the five steps of the Engineering Design Process
ASK: What is the problem? How have others approached it? What are your constraints?
IMAGINE: What are some solutions? Brainstorm ideas. Choose the best one.
PLAN: Draw a diagram. Make lists of materials you will need.
CREATE: Follow your plan and create something. Test it out!
IMPROVE: What works? What doesn’t? What could work better? Modify your designs to make it better. Test it out!

Bridge challenge
Using only two sheets of paper, build a strong bridge that will reach across a 6-inch gap. The bridge must be at least 3 inches wide.

Social Studies
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., integrated with language arts

Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
– Students collaborate in small groups to discuss and present the following focus questions:
Compare and Contrast
How was life different for
African Americans before Martin Luther King worked to get unfair laws changed?
Analyze
Do you think that all people in the United States have equal rights today? Explain.
Evaluate
What changes do we see today, as a result of Martin Luther King Jr. working to make the laws fairer?
Fact or Opinion
Martin Luther King Jr. was a very brave person. Is this statement a fact or an opinion? How do you know?
Classify Information
How can you tell that this book is a biography?

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment