Picnic

Dear Parents,

If you have folding chairs, please bring them to the picnic.

Thank you,
Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of June 19

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

 

Our picnic will take place on Tuesday, June 21 from 10:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. right across the fence from Murray’s playground. If you are helping with setting up, please plan to arrive at 9:30 a.m. We will begin to clean up our areas outside at 1:30 p.m.

 

Report cards will be distributed to students on Tuesday, June 21 after 2:45 p.m.

 

It has been my pleasure working with you and your child this school year. I wish each family an exciting summer and a good 2016-17 school year.

 

Balanced Literacy

Day 1:

Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Poetry Unit

Reading

Interactive Read Aloud:

Life Doesn’t Frighten Me by Maya Angelou

Students read independently. Ask them to pay attention to how poets use comparisons in the poems they are reading.

 

Writing

“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”

Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning

Session 10: Stretching Out a Comparison

Minilesson

Connection: Celebrate students’ earlier work with comparative language, and motivate them to enrich that work. Name the teaching point.

Teaching: Return to the mentor poem “Lullaby” by Kristine O’Connel George and draw students’ attention to how she stretches out the comparison across the entire poem. Refer to the comparative language chart. Show the class a poem you wrote earlier in which the comparison exits in only one line, demonstrating how you can extend it. Write another version of this poem in front of the students, sustaining the metaphor and thinking aloud as you go. Debrief, quickly listing the steps you took to revise the poem.

Active Engagement: Involve the students in revising a poem you prepared using a different comparison from the chart.

Link: Invite students to decide on the day’s work, suggesting that some will decide to find poems that have comparisons, and decide whether their comparisons should be stretched out.

Students work on their poems.

 

Students organize classroom library and materials.

Students return school supplies and clean out lockers.

 

Day 2

K-4 Annual Picnic

 

Math:

Everyday Math End of Year Assessment

Goals:

– Model 1-step problems involving addition and subtraction.

– Use addition and subtraction to solve 2-step number stories.

– Model 2-step problems involving addition and subtraction.

– Find the total number of objects in a rectangular array.

– Express the number of objects in an array as a sum of equal addends.

– Understand 3-digit place value.

– Represent whole number as hundreds, tens, and ones.

– Understand exchanging tens and hundreds.

– Understand 100, 200, …, 900 as some hundreds, no tens, and no ones.

– Read and write numbers.

– Read and write numbers in expanded form.

– Compare and order numbers.

– Record comparisons using >, =, or, <.

– Add within 100 fluently.

– Subtract within 100 fluently.

– Add multiple numbers using models or strategies.

– Subtract multiple numbers using models or strategies.

– Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work.

– Measure the length of an object.

– Select appropriate tools to measure length.

– Measure an object using 2 different units of length.

– Estimate lengths.

– Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another.

– Solve number stories involving length.

– Model Number stories involving length.

– Represent sums and differences on a number-line diagram.

– Tell and write time using analog and digital clocks.

– Solve problems involving coins and bills.

– Read and write monetary amounts.

– Represent measurement data on a line plot.

– Organize and represent data on bar and picture graphs.

– Answer questions using information in graphs.

– Recognize and draw shapes with specified attributes.

– Identify 2- and 3-dimensional shapes.

– Partition a rectangular into rows and columns of same-size squares and count to find the total number of squares.

– Partition shapes into equal shares.

– Recognize that equal shares of a shape need not have the same shape.

– Check whether your answer makes sense.

– Solve your problems in more than one way.

– Compare the strategies you and others use.

– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.

– Make sense of the representations you and others use.

– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.

– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.

– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.

– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.

 

Science

Science Content:

– Insects need air, water, and space.

– Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.

– The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.

– The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.

Thinking Processes:

– Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.

– Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.

– Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.

– Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.

Insect Habitat Dioramas

– Students continue to design and create a habitat for their research insect. They will utilize a shoebox, white Model Magic, construction paper, glue, scissors, watercolors etc.

 

Thank you for your support.

Anh Tuan Hoang

 

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Week of June 12

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The end-of-the-year class picnic will take place on Tuesday, June 21 from 10:30 to 2:00. The form and fees are due Wednesday, June 15. Kindly consider volunteering before, during or after the picnic.

We need parent volunteers to organize and bind the students’ writing portfolios. Please let us know when you are available to assist with this task in class.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC E.O.Y Assessment
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Writing Center: Observing and writing descriptions of mealworms
Word Study: Identifying and using adjectives
Spelling Words
Technology Center: A.R. on iPads
Reader’s Theater: Ajani and the Talking Watermelon and Golden Goose
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level I (Tier 2)

Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Greeting: Students greet each other in a language of choice.
– Sharing: Students share what they have written about their insects or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Read “My Love for You” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 182

Day 1:
Reading:
Interactive Read Aloud: The Boy Who Loved Words by Ronnie Schotter
Students read independently. Ask them to pay attention to precise words in the poems they are reading.

Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 6: Searching for Honest, Precise Words
Minilesson
Connection: Tell a story about a person who searched for the exact right words, tried generalities, and settled on a fresh, metaphorical way to describe something. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Use your own poem to model rereading, checking to see if the words match the image you are trying to portray. Walk students through the steps you take to make your language more precise. Debrief, listing the replicable steps students can take to use more specific language in their poems.
Active Engagement: Using a class poem, channel students to search for places where more precise words could be added. Share some of what you heard, highlighting students’ ideas about where to add more precise words and citing those places in the poem. Collect precise words to replace the circled words.
Link: Remind students that they now have a repertoire of strategies for writing poetry, and invite them to use any of these strategies.
Students compose their poems.

Day 2:
Reading:
Interactive Rea Aloud: “To Feel” by Ariel Smith and “I’ll Be There” by Nubia Valle
Write the poems on chart paper. During the read aloud, ask students to look for repetitive phrases and repetitive lines within the two poems. Chart students’ responses to use for discussion.
Share: Reading Aloud to Find Places for Revision
Provide an opportunity for poets to say their poems out loud to each other, using reading aloud as a way to listen for opportunities for revision.
Students read independently. Ask them to pay attention to precise words in the poems they are reading.

Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 7: Patterning through Repetition
Minilesson
Connection: Show the students a pattern from the classroom. Remind them that patterns are important in the world. Explain that poets use patterns, too, and that repetition is an important kind of pattern in poetry. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Show an example of a poem with repetition. Point out one or two patterns, and show students how the poem might sound without them.
Active Engagement: Enlist students to find other patterns in the poem and to notice how repetition enhances the meaning of it.
Link: Explain to students how today teaching fits into the larger context of working with music, image, and meaning.
Students compose their poems.

Day 3:
9:00 – 11:00
Chicago Bulls Fire Safety Event
Students will participate in a variety of fun and exciting fire safety activities, including an obstacle course, coloring a fire safety image, lessons on planning an escape route, and “stop drop and roll” and “get low” practices.
Day 4:
Reading
Interactive Read Aloud: “ The Moon” by Robert Louis Stevenson
Read, discuss and point out the mood of the poem.
Students read independently. Ask them to pay attention to the mood in the poems they are reading.

Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 8: Poem Are Moody
Minilesson
Connection: Point out that the weather has moods, and so do, too, poems. Share an example of a poem that has a voice—for example, of awe or respect—and point out how the poet’s decisions reflect that voice. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Read aloud several poems with contrasting moods. Liken the poems to songs, suggesting there are different kinds of songs.
Active Engagement: Invite students to try saying a poem in different moods, using images and music that reflect the mood. Give them the topic, the content, and let them work on the mood.
Link: Remind poets that they have learned about many kinds of poetry decisions and that they can also make decisions to reflect the voice—or mood—they are trying to convey.
Students compose their poems.

Day 5:
Reading
Interactive Read Aloud: “Dream” by Langston Hughes
Read, discuss and point out how the author makes comparisons in the poem.
Students read independently. Ask them to pay attention to how poets use comparisons in the poems they are reading.

Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Last Spelling Test of the year

Writing
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 2: Delving Deeper: Experimenting with Language and Sound to Create Meaning
Session 9: Using Comparisons to Clarify Feelings and Ideas
Minilesson
Connection: Tell students that one way poets see with poet’s eyes is to compare things, ideas, or feelings to something else. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Show students how to revise ordinary phrases to include comparison (comparative language,) by picturing what the ordinary phrase seems like or reminds you of. Debrief, unpacking the word you have just done.
Active Engagement: Ask the students, with their partners, to revise the remaining ordinary phrases to include comparative language. Collect their ideas and use them to complete chart.
Link: Remind students that whenever they write, they can use comparisons to help readers get a clear image of what they are writing about.
Students compose their poems.

Math
Unit 9 Progress Check
Assessment (Room 103)
1. Warm Up
Self-Assessment
-Students complete the Self-Assessment to reflect on their progress in Unit 9.
2a. Assess
-Students complete the Unit 9 Assessment to demonstrate their progress on the Common Core State Standards covered in this unit.

Items reflect mastery expectations to this point.

-Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
-Model 1-step problems involving addition and subtraction.
-Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
-Express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
-Find the total number of objects in a rectangular array.
-Express the number of objects in an array as a sum of addends.
-Understand 3-digit place value.
-Represent whole numbers as hundreds, tens, and ones.
-Count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.
– Read and write number names.
Read and write numbers in expanded form.
-Record comparisons using > , < , or =.
-Add within 100 fluently.
-Subtract within 100 fluently.
-Add multi-digit numbers using models or strategies.
-Subtract multi-digit numbers using models or strategies.
-Measure the length of an object.
-Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another.
-Solve problems involving bills and coins.
-Partition shapes into equal shares.
-Describe equal shares using fraction words.
-Describe the whole as a number of shares.
-Recognize that equal shares of a shape need not have the same shape.

Unit 9 Open Response
2b. Assess
Solving the Open Response Problem
This open response problem requires students to apply skills and concepts from Unit 9 and earlier units to determine two 2-digit numbers that will produce the largest sum.
The focus of this task is GMP3.1: Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.

Teachers distribute p. 68-69 and read the directions aloud.
Teachers then model how to lay and rearrange the cut-out numbers on the empty squares.
Students should use whatever strategy they prefer to find the numbers that have the largest sum.
Students use the second page to show how they know they have found the numbers that have the largest sum.

Discussing the Problem
After students complete their work, invite a few students to explain how they knew they found the largest sum.

3. Look Ahead
Math Boxes 9-12
-Students complete the mixed practice on journal p. 249.

Making Equal Groups
Goals:
– Express the number of objects in an array as a sum of equal addends.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.

“Birds’ Nests Multiplication”
– Students work with a partner to make equal amounts of eggs (using cm cubes) on picture cards of birds nest. (“We do”, partners)
Directions:
Student “A” rolls a six-sided die to determine how many nests. They lay that number of nests on the desk.
Student “B” rolls a six-sided die to determine how many eggs are placed on each nest. They put that number of eggs on each nest.
The students write the corresponding multiplication number model on their worksheets.

Review for EOY Math Assessment.

Everyday Math End of Year Assessment
Goals:
– Model 1-step problems involving addition and subtraction.
– Use addition and subtraction to solve 2-step number stories.
– Model 2-step problems involving addition and subtraction.
– Find the total number of objects in a rectangular array.
– Express the number of objects in an array as a sum of equal addends.
– Understand 3-digit place value.
– Represent whole number as hundreds, tens, and ones.
– Understand exchanging tens and hundreds.
– Understand 100, 200, …, 900 as some hundreds, no tens, and no ones.
– Read and write numbers.
– Read and write numbers in expanded form.
– Compare and order numbers.
– Record comparisons using >, =, or, <.
– Add within 100 fluently.
– Subtract within 100 fluently.
– Add multiple numbers using models or strategies.
– Subtract multiple numbers using models or strategies.
– Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work.
– Measure the length of an object.
– Select appropriate tools to measure length.
– Measure an object using 2 different units of length.
– Estimate lengths.
– Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another.
– Solve number stories involving length.
– Model Number stories involving length.
– Represent sums and differences on a number-line diagram.
– Tell and write time using analog and digital clocks.
– Solve problems involving coins and bills.
– Read and write monetary amounts.
– Represent measurement data on a line plot.
– Organize and represent data on bar and picture graphs.
– Answer questions using information in graphs.
– Recognize and draw shapes with specified attributes.
– Identify 2- and 3-dimensional shapes.
– Partition a rectangular into rows and columns of same-size squares and count to find the total number of squares.
– Partition shapes into equal shares.
– Recognize that equal shares of a shape need not have the same shape.
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.

Science
Science Content:
– Insects need air, water, and space.
– Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
– The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
– The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.
Thinking Processes:
– Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
– Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.
Insect Habitat Dioramas
– Students will design and create a habitat for their research insect. They will utilize a shoebox, white Model Magic, construction paper, glue, scissors, watercolors etc.

Social Studies
Unit Test
Symbols of the U.S Government Project

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of June 5

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The Everyday Math Unit 9 Assessment will be administered on Monday, June 13. Students should review graded homework to prepare for the test.
Students must be able to:
-Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
-Model 1-step problems involving addition and subtraction.
-Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
-Express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
-Find the total number of objects in a rectangular array.
-Express the number of objects in an array as a sum of addends.
-Understand 3-digit place value.
-Represent whole numbers as hundreds, tens, and ones.
-Count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.
-Read and write number names.
-Read and write numbers in expanded form.
-Record comparisons using > , < , or =.
-Add within 100 fluently.
-Subtract within 100 fluently.
-Add multi-digit numbers using models or strategies.
-Subtract multi-digit numbers using models or strategies.
-Measure the length of an object.
-Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another.
-Solve problems involving bills and coins.
-Partition shapes into equal shares.
-Describe equal shares using fraction words.
-Describe the whole as a number of shares.
-Recognize that equal shares of a shape need not have the same shape.

Additionally, the Social Studies Past and Present Unit Test will be administered on Tuesday, June 14. The study guide will be sent home Thursday, June 9. Please refer to it to assist your child’s preparation for the test.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC E.O.Y Assessment
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Writing Center: Observing and writing descriptions of mealworms
Word Study: Identifying and using adjectives
Spelling Words
Technology Center: A.R. on iPads
Reader’s Theater: Ajani and the Talking Watermelon and Golden Goose
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level I (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 36
Rhyming (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the words. Students repeat the words. Students do mouth closed if the words rhyme, or mouth open if they do not rhyme.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the words. Students repeat the words. Students do hands together if the words begin with the same blend, hands apart if they do not begin with the same blend.
Blending (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the syllables. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Ex. T: /spu-ge-te/ S: spaghetti
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and say whether the blend is at the beginning, middle or end of the word.
Segmenting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and segment it into chunks or syllables.
Substituting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
– Teacher says word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning/end and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Greeting: Students greet each other in a language of choice.
– Sharing: Students share what they have written about their insects or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Read “Oh, How Lovely Is the Evening” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 196

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, June 6, 2016. We will discuss the importance of line breaks in poetry.
Inquiry Question: Why might a poet only write one word on a line? Share your answer with a partner.

Reading

Vocabulary: interpretation, souls

Today, readers, we begin an exciting journey into reading the genre of poetry. If you want to understand poetry, and maybe learn how to write it, you definitely want to learn how to analyze a poem using several important steps. Let’s read our charted steps.

1. Read through the poem at least twice.
2. Ask: Is there a title?
3. Read it aloud.
4. Pay attention to punctuation.
5. Ask: Who is the speaker?
6. Be open to interpretation, which is the act of explaining the meaning of something.

Analysis:

In our first poem, “My People”, Langston Hughes praises enthusiastically the beauty of his people, likening their faces to the night, their eyes to the stars, and their souls to the sun. This poem, like many of the most beloved of Hughes’ poems, is a vivid example to the beauty and dignity of African Americans.

Read Aloud:

“My People”

The night is beautiful,
So the faces of my people.

The stars are beautiful,
So the eyes of my people.

Beautiful, also, is the sun.
Beautiful, also, are the souls of my people.

Readers, let’s return to our list of steps in analyzing poetry.

Teachers reread step one above.

Now, let’s follow step one and chorally read “My People”.

Teachers guide students to follow the analyzing steps.

As you read today’s poem with your reading partner, remember to share your understanding of the meaning of the poem. Jot down any thoughts, questions, or wonderings on your copies of the poem.
We will share your collaborative notes during morning meeting tomorrow.

Teachers distribute copies of the poem.

Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Teachers introduce poetry as genre of writing.
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 2: Listening for Line Breaks
Ingredients/Pattern in Poetry
Interactive Read Aloud:
Read more Small Poems by Valerie Worth
– Teachers review the concept of recipes/ingredients for cooking to guide the students to understand that there are ingredients in our recipe for writing a poem.
The first ingredients are: Use the eyes of a poet to look at the world closely and carefully, and use the eyes of a poet to look at ordinary things in fresh and new ways.
– Review with students the idea of patterns in poetry. Discuss how “line breaks” make up a poetic form, that poetry has music, and the music of poetry comes from how words are put on a page.
– Students discuss with a partner how they might write their poems.
– Students compose their poems.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, June 7, 2016. We will explore how local people and events have influenced local community history.
Inquiry Question: How has your family influenced your community? Discuss your answer with a classmate.

Reading

Vocabulary: crystal stair, landings, ain’t

Teachers review the steps to analyzing poetry.

Today readers, we will review the steps to follow when analyzing poetry. As we read and discuss together, be ready to share your interpretation of the poem.

Analysis:
In our poem today, “Mother to Son”, the mother says to her son that life has not been a “crystal stair” – it has had tacks and splinters and torn boards on it, as well as places without carpet. The stair is bare. However, she still climbs on, reaching landings, turning corners, and persevering in the dark when there is no light. She commands him, “So boy, don’t you turn back.” She instructs him not to go back down the stairs even if he thinks climbing is hard. He should try not to fall because his mother is still going, still climbing, and her life “ain’t been no crystal stair.”

Read Aloud:
“Mother to Son” by Langston Hughes

Mother to Son
Well, son, I’ll tell you:
Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.
It’s had tacks in it,
And splinters,
And boards torn up,
And places with no carpet on the floor—
Bare.
But all the time
I’se been a-climbin’ on,
And reachin’ landin’s,
And turnin’ corners,
And sometimes goin’ in the dark
Where there ain’t been no light.
So boy, don’t you turn back.
Don’t you set down on the steps
’Cause you finds it’s kinder hard.
Don’t you fall now—
For I’se still goin’, honey,
I’se still climbin’,
And life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.

Now, let’s follow step one and chorally read “Mother to Son”.

Teachers guide students to follow the analyzing steps.

Teachers distribute copies of the poem.

As you read today’s poem with your reading partner, remember to share your understanding of the meaning of the poem. Jot down any thoughts, questions, or wonderings on your copies of the poem.
We will share your collaborative notes during morning meeting tomorrow.

Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Interactive Read Aloud: Love That Dog by Sharon Creech
Minilesson
Session 3: Putting Powerful Thoughts in Tiny Packages
Connection: Recall and celebrate what the students have been doing as poets. Tell them poets also choose their own topics. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Point out that poets need to find a topic that is big and that is also small and specific. Show how you generate such a topic. Show the students a chart on which you’ve listed some of the strategies you used to generate your idea for a poem.
Active Engagement: Help the students coauthor the start of a poem about a shared big feeling. Help students see the concrete detail with fresh eyes. Say the students’ own words back as a poem, and extrapolate the lesson you hope writers learn that pertains to another day and text.
Link: Remind students of the possibilities they have for writing today.
Students compose their poems.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, June 8, 2016.
We will continue to skip count and solve problems involving multiples of 10 and 5.
Inquiry Question: What relationship is there between the value of a dime and the value of a nickel? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading

Vocabulary: Dream Keeper

Today readers, we will review the steps to follow when analyzing poetry. As we read and discuss together, be ready to share your interpretation of the poem.

Analysis:
Today’s poem “The Dream Keeper”, details how people must invest in their dreams by always protecting the dreams and not letting harsh outside influences destroy the dreams. Langston Hughes wanted to call attention to the forces acting against the dreams of everyone, making life for the victims miserable.

Read Aloud:
“The Dream Keeper” by Langston Hughes

The Dream Keeper
Bring me all of your dreams,
You dreamers,
Bring me all your
Heart melodies
That I may wrap them
In a blue cloud-cloth
Away from the too-rough fingers
Of the world.

Now, let’s follow step one and chorally read “Dream Keeper”.

Teachers guide students to follow the analyzing steps.

Teachers distribute copies of the poem.

As you read today’s poem with your reading partner, remember to share your understanding of the meaning of the poem. Jot down any thoughts, questions, or wonderings on your copies of the poem.
We will share your collaborative notes during morning meeting tomorrow.

Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Interactive Read Aloud: Love That Dog by Sharon Creech
Minilesson
Session 4: Poet Find Poems in the Strong Feelings and Concrete Details of Life
Minilesson
Connection: Admire the way students have jotted down notes that promise to become poems—and tell them you’ll soon teach them how to sift to these and make decisions. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Remind students of strategies they have learned for crafting poems. Demonstrate reading jottings from your Tiny Topics notes for both strong feelings and concrete details. Debrief, reiterating the two questions that help students decide if an idea could become a poem.
Active Engagement: Invite the students to mine their notepads, asking themselves, “Does this give me a big, strong feeling?” and “Have I found a specific moment or detail or object that holds that feeling for me?”
Link: Briefly restate today’s teaching before sending students off to write.
Students compose their poems.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, June 9, 2016. We will discuss the importance of using the first-person voice in poetry.
Inquiry Question: What does it mean when someone declares “I, too, Am America”? Discuss your answer with a classmate.

Reading

Vocabulary: ashamed

Today readers, we will review the steps to follow when analyzing poetry. As we read and discuss together, be ready to share your interpretation of the poem.

Analysis:
The speaker in the poem “I, Too”, begins by declaring that he too can “sing America,” meaning that he is claiming his right to feel patriotic towards America, even though he is the “darker” brother who cannot sit at the table and must eat in the kitchen. This suggests the common practice of racial segregation during the early 20th century, when African Americans faced discrimination in nearly every aspect, or characteristic, of their lives. They were forced to live, work, eat and travel separately from Caucasians, had few civil or legal rights, were often victims of racial violence, and faced economic hardships in both the North and the South.

Read Aloud:
“I, Too” by Langston Hughes

I, Too

I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed—

I, too, am America.

Now, let’s follow step one and chorally read “I, Too”.

Teachers guide students to follow the analyzing steps.

Teachers distribute copies of the poem.

As you read today’s poem with your reading partner, remember to share your understanding of the meaning of the poem. Jot down any thoughts, questions, or wonderings on your copies of the poem.
We will share your collaborative notes during morning meeting tomorrow.

Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 5: Editing Poetry
Minilesson
Connection: Remind students that to prepare their poems to share, they will need to edit their poems carefully. Point out that students have reached for words they have never tried to spell before, and because of this, they’ll need to pay careful attention to how they’ve spelled these words. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Pretend to be a student and recruit the class to join you in checking whether the words in your poem look right or not, in which case you’ll circle them (and return to them later). Demonstrate spelling each word two different ways, highlighting that you use what you know about spelling patterns to help.
Active Engagement: Ask the class to look at the next two lines of your poem as carefully as you looked at the first ones, finding any words that don’t look quite right to them.
Link: Send the students off to edit their own poems, reminding them to use the writing checklist to know what to check for in their writing.
Students edit their poems.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, June 10, 2016. We will read about Cesar Chavez, whose contributions have influenced the community, state, and nation.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important for citizens to contribute to our society? Discuss your answer with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
(The following words will be tested on Friday, June 17.)
addition, subtraction, fiction, compassion, distraction, recreation, confusion, vacation, election, completion, direction, conflict, solve, summary, sensible, support

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Reading

Readers, today we will continue to read, discuss and analyze poetry.
Later today in writer’s workshop, we will utilize what we have learned from our mentor poets to compose our original poems.

We will review the steps to follow when analyzing poetry. As we read and discuss together, be ready to share your interpretation of the poem.

1. Read through the poem at least twice.
2. Ask: Is there a title?
3. Read it aloud.
4. Pay attention to punctuation.
5. Ask: Who is the speaker?
6. Be open to interpretation, which is the act of explaining the meaning of something.

Today’s poem is entitled “For Peace Sake” by Cedric McClester

Vocabulary; harmony, bigotry

Fellow poets, be mindful of Mr. McClester’s use of repetition in his poem.

“For Peace Sake” by Cedric McClester

For peace sake
we need to do our best.
For peace sake
let’s put our hate to rest.
For peace sake
it never too late.
For peace sake
let’s rid ourselves with hate.

I believe that we can
build a bridge to understand.
we’re all in this together.
It never too late,
Together let’s rid ourselves of hate.
Let’s do it for peace sake.

For peace sake
we need to do our best
For peace sake
let’s put love to the test.

Love is really what we need;
Together we can plant the seed.
For peace sake let’s work in harmony.
For peace sake,
for love and happiness,
for peace sake
and for all the rest.

I believe we can
build a bridge to understand,
we’re all in this together.
It’s never too late,
together let’s rid our lives of hate.
Let’s do it, let’s do it
for peace sake.

For peace sake
we can make it right.
For peace sake
it can happen overnight.
It’s time to take a break
from bigotry and hate—
we have an equal place
within the human race.
Love is what we really need,
together we can plant the seed.
For peace sake let’s work in harmony.

For peace sake
examine how you feel.
For peace sake
how much of it is real?
For peace sake
if you only knew
what hate can do to you.

I believe we can
build a bridge to understand,
we’re all in this together.
It’s never too late,
together let’s rid our lives of hate.
Let’s do it, let’s do it
for peace sake.

Teachers guide students to follow the analyzing steps.

Teachers distribute copies of the poem.

As you read today’s poem with your reading partner, remember to share your understanding of the meaning of the poem. Jot down any thoughts, questions, or wonderings on your copies of the poem.
We will share your collaborative notes during morning meeting tomorrow.

Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
“Big Thoughts in Small Packages”
Bend 1: Seeing with Poet’s Eyes
Session 5: Editing Poetry
Students continue to compose and edit their poems.

Math
Lesson 9-10 Connecting Doubles Facts, even Numbers, and Equal Groups (Day 2)

Goals:
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

1. Warm-Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers display various arrays. Students count by 2s to find the total number of dots in each array. Then they write addition number models on their slates to represent the arrays. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
“You have 2 rows of tomato plants with 8 plants in each row. How many plants do you have?”
Teachers invite volunteers to sketch an array that matches the math problem. Ask students to describe the array.
Expect the following observations.
– It shows 2 rows of plants with 8 plants in each row.
– It is a 2-by-8 array.
– It has 2 rows and 8 columns.
– It has 16 objects in all.

Invite students to write a number model for this problem. (“We do”, whole class)

Connecting Doubles and Equal Groups
Teachers distribute 20-centimeter cubes to each partnership.
Teachers explain to the students:
There is enough space in the garden for only 2 rows of plants with up to 10 plants in each row.
There should always be 2 equal rows, but each row may have less than 10 plants. (“We do”, whole class)

Students build at least three possible arrays with their centimeter cubes.
Then students record their arrays on centimeter grid paper and write addition or multiplication number models to match each array. (“We do”, partners)

Teachers invite volunteers to share their arrays while making an ordered list of the arrays and the number models on chart paper.

After all 10 possible arrays have been recorded, teachers have students examine the list.
Ask: What patterns do you notice?

Referring to the two lists of possible number models, discuss the idea that when the students need to find the total number of objects in 2 equal groups (or multiply by 2), they can use addition doubles.
Ask: How can we use doubles facts to help us solve number stories about 2 equal groups? (“We do”, whole class)

Connecting Even Numbers and Equal Groups
Teachers refer to the list of arrays and number models from the previous activity. Ask the students to look at the totals for each array and determine whether they are even or odd.
Ask:
– Can the total number of 2 equal groups or rows be an odd or even number?
– How do you know?
– If I have 14 cubes and I want to put them into 2 equal groups, what doubles fact could help me?
– Why?

Teachers guide students to see that they can also use doubles facts to help them put an even number of objects into 2 equal groups. (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers pose number stories involving 2 equal groups or rows of objects. Encourage students to use their knowledge of doubles facts to help them solve the problems.
Students can use cubes or draw pictures to model the problems.
Students write addition and multiplication number models for the problems and share them with the class.

Suggestions:
– You have 2 apples. Each apple is cut into 8 slices. How many slices are there now?
– Your friend has 2 fish tanks with 6 fish in each tank. How many fish does your friend have in all?
– There are 10 pencils in all. You want to put an equal number of pencils in each of your 2 pencil cups. How many pencils should you put in each cup? (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Equal Shares with different Shapes
Students partition rectilinear figures into same-size shapes that are different shapes on journal p. 243. (“You do”, independent)

Math Boxes
Students complete the mixed practice on journal p. 244.

Lesson 9-11 (2 Days)
Multiples of 10 and 5
Students skip count and add to solve problems involving multiples of 10 and 5.

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers pose addition problems involving multiples of 10.
50 + 50
50 + 60
60 + 70
90 + 80

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
Teachers pose the following problem:
-You have 6 boxes of markers with 10 markers in each box. How many markers do you have in all?

Teachers invite volunteers to share their strategies and solutions. (“We do”, whole class)

Using Tools to Show Groups of 10
Teachers guide discussion of strategies and tools which can be utilized to solve story problems with multiples of 10.

Suggestions:
-On a number line.
-On a number grid.
-With base-10 blocks.

Ask: What do all these strategies/tools have in common?

Tell the students that they will solve more problems by skip counting and adding 10s. (“We do”, whole class)

Relating 10s and 5s
Teachers display a dime and a nickel.
Ask: What is the value of each coin?

Students work in partnerships to determine the values of sets of dimes and nickels in Problem 1 on journal p. 245.

When most students have completed the problem, have each pair of students compare their answers with another partnership and resolve any discrepancies. (“We do”, partners)

Ask:
-How did you find the values of the sets of dimes?
-How did you find the values of the sets of nickels?

Teachers have students complete Problem 2 on their journal page by examining the values of dimes and nickels in each row and looking for a pattern. (“You do”, independent)

Teachers invite volunteers to share their thoughts with the class. (“We do”, whole class)

Applying Strategies
Teachers display a table (Multiplying by 2; Multiplying by 5; Multiplying by 10)

Teachers have students practice using the strategies as they complete journal p. 246. (“You do”, independent)

3. Practice
Partitioning a Rectangle
Students complete journal p. 247. (“You do”, independent)

Math Boxes 9-11
Students complete the mixed practice on journal p. 248. (“You do”, independent)

TG 846-851

Game Day: Using > , , =, or, <.
– Check whether your answer makes sense.

– Students work with partners to make two 2-digit numbers to compare using relational signs. (“We do”, partners)
Materials:
Using , and =, p. 19
4 each of number cards 1-9
Class Number Line
Directions:
Each partner picks two cards from the deck.
Use your cards to make 2-digit numbers.
Write your numbers in the boxes on the page.
Compare your numbers in the boxes and write , or = on the line.
Use the Class Number Line to check your answer.
Repeat Steps 1-5 three more times.
For Problem 5, you each pick three cards and make 3-digit numbers.
Talk About It
How did you know which number was larger?
Review for Unit 9 Math Assessment.

Problem of the Month
Part and Whole

Overview:
In the Problem of the Month Part and Whole, students explore rational numbers and solve problems involving symmetry, congruence, determining equal area, subdividing area models, reasoning about measurements, and generalizing about fractions. The mathematical topics that underlie this POM are understanding rational numbers through different representations. Students explore fractions through area models using symmetry, congruence, measurement, and mathematical notation.
In the first level of the POM, students view different geometric figures and determine whether they can divide the figure into two identical pieces. Their task is to use symmetry to answer question of same shape and equal area parts. In level B, students are given a picture of flat geometric shapes made out of clay. Then students are asked to find a way to make a straight line cut in order to divide the figure into two parts of equal amounts of clay.
This task challenges a student to reason about subdividing shapes into two parts with equal areas, but not necessarily equal shapes using one line. Students need to develop arguments to show that the areas are the same without calculating the areas.

Science
Science Content:
– Insects need air, water, and space.
– Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
– The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
– The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.
Thinking Processes:
– Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
– Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.
Insect Habitat Dioramas
-Students will design and create a habitat for their research insect. They will utilize a shoe box, white Model Magic, construction paper, glue, scissors, watercolors, etc.

Social Studies
Tracing A Community History
Objectives:
– Trace the history of El Paso, Texas.
– Explain how local people and events have influenced local community history.
– Describe changes in a community over time.
Vocabulary:
museum, settler
Activate Prior Knowledge:
Display a map of the United States and point out the city of El Paso. Have students note its location-on the boarder of Mexico and on the Rio Grande.
Tell students that El Paso is Spanish for, “The pass or the passage,” a passage is a narrow road or opening. Ask students why they think the city got its name.
Read and respond: Read out loud the pages 228 and 229 from the teacher guide. Tell students that after Spanish explorers arrived in America, they began to spread out and claim new lands for Spain. Explain that some of the earliest Spanish colonies were in what is now Mexico. Later, explorers moved northward to the areas we know today as Texas and New Mexico. Point out the influence of early Spanish settlements can be seen today in places names, building styles, music, foods, and crafts. Question: Why might people decide to stay or settle in a place?
Read and Respond: Share with students the background of the Tiguas. Explain that they are the only Native American group that has continued to live in the El Paso area. Tell students that in the 1960s Texas gave the Tiguas enough land to establish a reservation where today they proudly display their heritage.
Cultural and Society:
Tell students that when the Spanish arrived, the priests wanted to convert the Native Americans to Christianity. For this purpose, they built missions, like the one named Ysleta in El Paso. There the priests taught the Native Americans about Christianity; they also taught them trades and introduced them to the Spanish way of life.
How do you think the Native Americans felt when the priests tried to get them to change their way of life?
How are both Spanish and Native American cultures a part of El Paso’s history.
History: Tell children that during the time that Spain was settling parts of America, individuals could ask the Spanish government for land if they agreed to live on and use the land. Point out that the land given to Juan Maria Ponce de Leon was 215 acres of riverside land called mudflats. De Leon dug irrigation ditches from the river to his gardens and orchards so that the trees and other plants would grow during the many dry months.
Why do you think the Spanish government gave land to the settlers instead of making them pay for it?
Link History and Economics:
Discuss the fact that railroads opened areas to settlement and growth. Point out that El Paso was hard to reach on horseback or by horse-drawn wagons. Miles of dry, rugged land separated El Paso from other settlements in the Southwest. Explain that once the railroad arrived, businesses began to grow and jobs were created.
What events in your community have caused to grow and change?

Past and Present
Objectives:
– Identify historical figures whose contributions have influenced the community, state, and nation.
– Describe ways people honor their heroes.
– Give examples of places in the community where individuals are remembered.
Vocabulary: monument, memorial, hero
Interactive Alouds: American Heroes by Marfe Ferguson Delano, and
Read about heroes: Jane Addams: Halsted Street around 1890 Chicago Historical Museum, Encyclopedia of Chicago
– Ask students to name someone who they think of as a hero. Tell children they will learn about ways Americans remember their heroes.
– Show pictures of several famous national monuments.
– Ask if they know about the accomplishments of these heroes, e.g. Lincoln, Washington, Jefferson.
– Ask students whey they think the monuments and memorials honoring heroes are located in Washington, D.C.
– Ask them why they are made of stone or metal.
– Ask about monuments, statues, and memorials that they know of in Chicago or Illinois.
– Ask why we name buildings, parks and streets for people.
– Ask if they can name any of these in their neighborhood or in Chicago.

Interactive Read Aloud:
Read about heroes: Cesar Chavez, and way he is memorialized.
http://chavez.cde.ca.gov/
ModelCurriculum/Teachers/
Lessons/Resources/
Biographies/K-2_Bio.aspx
Focus Questions:
Why are these workers called migrant workers?
Why do farm workers move so often?
Who provides the land, money, and seed to grow crops we need?
Who harvests the crops grown on large farms?
Who was Cesar E. Chavez?
Many farm workers are called migrant workers because they move from farm to farm as the crops need to be harvested.
Moving from one place to another is a difficult thing for a family. Many times children attend more than five different schools in one year because their parents must follow the crops.
Cesar Chavez and his family also moved many times, traveling throughout California during the harvest season.
César attended over 36 different schools.
As a young boy, Cesar E. Chavez worked in the fields with his father, mother, brother, and sister. Later in life, he would work in the fields with his wife, Helen, and some of his children too. Cesar and his family worked hard like the other farm workers and often felt that they were treated more like animals or farm tools than like human beings. Cesar thought this was wrong and dedicated his adult life to winning farm workers and their families the respect and dignity they deserved.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of May 29

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

There is no school for students, teachers and staff on Monday, May 30 in observance of Memorial Day.

The second grade annual picnic will take place the last day of student attendance, June 21. We will send home additional information regarding the picnic on a slip of paper. If you are interested in assisting, please return the slip by June 10.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC E.O.Y Assessment
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Writing Center: Observing and writing descriptions of mealworms
Word Study: Identifying and using adjectives
Spelling Words
Technology Center: A.R. on iPads
Reader’s Theater: Ajani and the Talking Watermelon
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level I (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 35
Rhyming (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the words. Students repeat the words. Students do mouth closed if the words rhyme, or mouth open if they do not rhyme.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the words. Students repeat the words. Students do hands together if the words begin with the same blend, hands apart if they do not begin with the same blend.
Blending (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the syllables. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Ex. T: /spu-ge-te/ S: spaghetti
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and say whether the blend is at the beginning, middle or end of the word.
Segmenting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and segment it into chunks or syllables.
Substituting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
– Teacher says word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning/end and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Greeting: Students greet each other in a language of choice.
– Sharing: Students share what they have written about their insects or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Read “The Orchestra” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 207

Day 1:
Memorial Day (No School)

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, May 31, 2016. In writing, we will examine how scientists talk about the subjects they study using specialized words.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to utilize specific terms when writing about your insect? Share your answer with a classmate.

Poetry Unit
“Powerful Thoughts in Tiny Packages”
What is a poem?
Interactive Read Aloud:
– Students listen to a poem entitled “Things” read by Eloise Greenfield from Hip Hop Speaks to Children.
– Teachers and students read together “Things”.
– Teachers and students discuss how our expression and patterns are different after listening to the author read the poem.
– Teachers introduce the genre of poetry by creating a chart entitled “What Is A Poem?” based upon the students thinking.
– Revisit “Things” by Eloise Greenfield and ask students to write a paragraph about why they like the poem.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: The Big Bug Book “Giant Water Bug” by Margery Facklam
Specific Language
Minilesson
Connection: Liken the particular ways in which students talk about things they know well to how scientists talk about the subjects they study using specialized words. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Teach the concept of technical language, inviting students to brainstorm domain-specific terms they know on topics they know well.
Active Engagement: Redirect students’ attention to the shared class topic, insects, and together, generate a list of domain-specific words. Suggest that the class come up with a system for recording technical language.
Link: Suggest that students view their work to be sure it includes insect lingo—and if not, to incorporate it in clear, thoughtful ways.
Students edit their writing.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, June 1, 2016. In math, we will use mental math to estimate the total cost.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to utilize mental math to estimate the total cost? Share your answer with a classmate.

R.E.A.C.H. End of Year Performance Test Math

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: The Big Bug Book “Atlas Moth” by Margery Facklam

Editing
Review the lesson on Reread During Editing
– Using a writing sample, teachers model the focus point (After I finish a piece of writing, I will reread even more carefully! I am going to reread to check carefully for mistakes in spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar. This kind of rereading is called proofreading. Proofreading is a time when we read to edit or fix mistakes.)
– Students utilize the checklist to edit their research papers.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, June 2, 2016. We will compare and contrast how different groups of Native American use natural resources to meet their needs.
Inquiry Question: How might Native Americans use natural resources to meet their needs? Share your answer with a classmate.

R.E.A.C.H. End of Year Performance Test Literacy

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: The Big Bug Book “Madagascar Hissing Cockroach” by Margery Facklam

– Students continue to publish their insect books.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, June 3, 2016. We will skip count and add to solve problems involving multiples of 10.
Inquiry Question: What strategies do you know to help you solve problems involving multiples of 10? Share your answer with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
(The following words will be tested on Friday, June 10.)
capable, acceptable, adorable, excited, agreeable, bearable, desirable, comfortable, disposable, irritable, valuable, prefix, suffix, narrative, expository, contents

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Poetry Unit
“Powerful Thoughts in Tiny Packages”
Interactive Read Aloud:
– Teachers and students begin reading Love That Dog by Sharon Creech.
– Classes take a Museum Poetry Walk reading selected poems from our read-aloud.
– Teachers revisit the “What is a poem?” chart and revise the chart based upon what was learned during the museum walk.
– Teachers introduce the concept of recipes/ingredients for cooking to guide the students to understand that there are ingredients in our recipe for writing a poem.
The first ingredients are: Use the eyes of a poet to look at the world closely and carefully, and use the eyes of a poet to look at ordinary things in fresh a, new ways.
– Students to select a favorite poem and write a short essay about why they like the poem.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: The Big Bug Book “Giant Wetapunga” by Margery Facklam

– Students finish publishing their insect books.

Math
Lesson 9-8 Equivalent Money Amounts (Day 2)

Students practice finding coin and bill combinations with equivalent values and using cents and dollars – and – cents notation.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers pose problems involving money.
How much money is 2 dimes and 6 pennies?
How much money is 1 quarter, 1 dime, and 3 pennies?

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Ask: How much money is 2 quarters, 5 dimes, 4 nickels, and 7 pennies.
Have volunteers share their strategies they used to find the total of the coins above. (“We do”, whole class)

Reviewing Values of Coins and Bills
Teachers review coin values posing the following questions:

How many pennies are in a nickel? In a dime?
How many pennies are in a quarter? In 50 cents?
How many pennies are in one dollar? In 2 dollars? In 10 dollars?
How many dimes are in a dollar? In 60 cents?
How many nickels are in a quarter? In a dollar? In half a dollar?
How many quarters are in a dollar? In a half dollar?

Tell students they will solve more problems involving money. (“We do”, whole class)

Using Dollars – and – Cents Notation
Ask: What is one way to write one dollar and twenty-seven cents (127 cents)?
What is another way?

Teachers say that an amount with a 0 before the decimal point, such as $0.74, is less than one dollar. It can be written with a cents symbol or dollar-and-cents notation.
Have volunteers scribe the following amounts:
275 cents
305 cents
89 cents

Teachers invite volunteers to share how they knew where to put the decimal point in 3-digit money amounts. (“We do”, whole class)

Making Equivalent Amounts with Coins and Bills
Teachers guide students to examine the Good Buys Poster in journal, p. 238.
Students read money amounts on the poster chorally.

Students complete journal p. 239. (“We do”, partners, small group)

3. Practice
Playing Hit the Target
Students play Hit the Target, using Math Masters p. G25. (“We do”, partners)

Observe
Which students seem to have a strategy for hitting the target number?
Which students need additional support to understand and play the game?

Discuss
How did you decide which number to add or subtract?
If you didn’t hit the target number on your first try, how did you decide what to do next? (“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes 9-8
Students complete Math Boxes 9-8 in journal p. 237. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 9-9 Estimating Costs
Day 1: Students select items from a store poster and use mental math to estimate the total cost.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students make ballpark estimates and record them as number models on erasable boards.
76 + 188 = ?
85 + 165 = ?
183 + 211 = ?
296 + 373 = ?

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2a. Focus
Math Talk
Students identify if the student in the story problem makes an accurate estimate, and discuss their thinking about the student’s answer.
Then students make estimates using their ballpark estimate. (“You do”, independent)
Comparing Estimation Strategies

Students explain to their partners when they might use ballpark estimates. (“We do”, partners)

Student volunteers explain the estimation strategy of the student in the story problem.

Teachers highlight the close-but-easier numbers used in the story problem.
Ask: When you shared your strategy with your partner, were you able to explain it so that your partner could solve a similar problem using your strategy?
Teachers briefly discuss how both estimates are reasonable. (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers explain that today the students will pretend they are in a store, and they have $100 to spend. They are going to make estimates in their head to decide what items they can buy and explain their thinking. (“We do”, whole class)

Solving the Open Response Problem
Teachers distribute Math Masters, p. 272 and Moran’s Market Poster on Math Masters, p. 274.
Students will use scissors and glue (no pencils).
The class choral reads the problem.
Students work in partnerships to discuss what they understand from the problem. (“We do”, partners)

Teachers invite volunteers to explain the task, asking questions such as:
What do you need to figure out?
How much money do you have?
Do you have to spend all of the money?
Do you need an exact answer to decide what to buy?
How will you show what items you plan to buy?
Can you use a pencil? (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers review the prices on Moran’s Market Poster. Encourage students to complete the first part of the problem mentally, or in their head. (“You do”, independent)

Once students have chosen their items and glued them down, distribute Math Masters, p. 273. In the thought bubble, students should show their mental math strategies and write down clear explanation of their thinking. Ask students to write down how they chose their items and how they know the total cost is close to $100, but not more than.

Allow students time to complete the page. Partners can talk about the task, but each student should write an explanation. (“You do”, independent)

Teachers circulate and assist. If students try to find an exact answer using the paper and pencils, ask: How can you find the total cost of the items in your head?

Teachers note students’ strategies.

Summarize
Ask: When is it helpful to estimate or use mental math?

Teachers collect students’ work to evaluate and prepare for Day 2.

Lesson 9-9 Day 2: Reengagement
The students discuss selected students’ estimates, and the students revise their work.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.

2b. Focus
Setting Expectations
Teachers briefly review the Open Response Problem from Day 1. Remind the students that their job was to find at least three items to buy so the total cost was close to, but less than $100. They also needed to explain the strategies they used to estimate the total cost.
Ask: What do you think a good explanation would include?

Remind students that a goal of their work is to explain their thinking clearly and precisely. Discuss the word precisely. Tell students that a precise explanation is one that gives details and is accurate and complete.

Remind students that if they think someone else’s work is unclear or incomplete, they should still be respectful when they explain why. Refer to your list of discussion guidelines and encourage students to use these sentence frames.

– I think this is a clear and complete explanation because ______________.
– I think this explanation needs to include ______________________. (“We do”, whole class)

Reengaging in the Problem
Students reengage the problem by analyzing and critiquing other students’ work in pairs and whole-group discussion. Have students discuss in partners before sharing with the whole class. Guide this discussion based on the decisions you made in Getting Ready for Day 2. (“We do”, partners; whole class)

Revising Work
Pass back the students’ work from Day 1. Before students revise anything, ask them to examine their own explanations and decide how to improve them. Ask the following questions one at a time. Have partners discuss their responses and give a thumbs-up or thumbs-down based on their own work.
– Did you choose at least three items and show the prices for each?
– Is your total close, but less than $100? Did you tell how you know?
– Did you show all the steps in your thinking? Did you show any close-but-easier numbers you chose?
– Did you show how you added the numbers? (“We do”, partners; whole class)

Students revise their work. (“You do”, independent)

Summarize
Ask students to reflect on their work and revisions.
Ask: How did you make your explanation clearer?

3. Practice
Math Boxes 9-9
Students practice and maintain skills completing Math Boxes 9-9, p. 241.

Lesson 9-10 Connecting Doubles Facts, even Numbers, and Equal Groups

Goals:
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

1. Warm-Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers display various arrays. Students count by 2s to find the total number of dots in each array. Then they write addition number models on their slates to represent the arrays. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
“You have 2 rows of tomato plants with 8 plants in each row. How many plants do you have?”
Teachers invite volunteers to sketch an array that matches the math problem. Ask students to describe the array.
Expect the following observations.
– It shows 2 rows of plants with 8 plants in each row.
– It is a 2-by-8 array.
– It has 2 rows and 8 columns.
– It has 16 objects in all.

Invite students to write a number model for this problem. (“We do”, whole class)

Connecting Doubles and Equal Groups
Teachers distribute 20-centimeter cubes to each partnership.
Teachers explain to the students:
There is enough space in the garden for only 2 rows of plants with up to 10 plants in each row.
There should always be 2 equal rows, but each row may have less than 10 plants. (“We do”, whole class)

Students build at least three possible arrays with their centimeter cubes.
Then students record their arrays on centimeter grid paper and write addition or multiplication number models to match each array. (“We do”, partners)

Teachers invite volunteers to share their arrays while making an ordered list of the arrays and the number models on chart paper.

After all 10 possible arrays have been recorded, teachers have students examine the list.
Ask: What patterns do you notice?

Referring to the two lists of possible number models, discuss the idea that when the students need to find the total number of objects in 2 equal groups (or multiply by 2), they can use addition doubles.
Ask: How can we use doubles facts to help us solve number stories about 2 equal groups? (“We do”, whole class)

Connecting Even Numbers and Equal Groups
Teachers refer to the list of arrays and number models from the previous activity. Ask the students to look at the totals for each array and determine whether they are even or odd.
Ask:
– Can the total number of 2 equal groups or rows be an odd or even number?
– How do you know?
– If I have 14 cubes and I want to put them into 2 equal groups, what doubles fact could help me?
– Why?

Teachers guide students to see that they can also use doubles facts to help them put an even number of objects into 2 equal groups. (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers pose number stories involving 2 equal groups or rows of objects. Encourage students to use their knowledge of doubles facts to help them solve the problems.
Students can use cubes or draw pictures to model the problems.
Students write addition and multiplication number models for the problems and share them with the class.

Suggestions:
– You have 2 apples. Each apple is cut into 8 slices. How many slices are there now?
– Your friend has 2 fish tanks with 6 fish in each tank. How many fish does your friend have in all?
– There are 10 pencils in all. You want to put an equal number of pencils in each of your 2 pencil cups. How many pencils should you put in each cup? (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Equal Shares with different Shapes
Students partition rectilinear figures into same-size shapes that are different shapes on journal p. 243. (“You do”, independent)

Math Boxes
Students complete the mixed practice on journal p. 244.

Science
Integrated with language arts for the whole week
Science Content:
– Insects need air, water, and space.
– Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
– The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
– The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.
Thinking Processes:
– Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
– Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.
Insect Habitat
-Students will design and create a habitat for their research insect. They will utilize a shoe box, white Model Magic, construction paper, glue, scissors, watercolors, etc.

Social Studies
Comparing Groups of Native Americans
Objectives:
– Compare Native American groups.
– Sequence early American history.
Interactive Read Alouds (on the Smart Board): Ancient Cliff Dwellers by Kira Freed and The Inuit: Northern Living by David Meissner from Reading A to Z
– Read about two different Native American groups.
Compare and contrast their food, clothing, and shelter with a Venn diagram.
How did they use the natural resources around them?
– Point out that many names for places, food, animals, and things originated from Native Americans such as squash, potato, pumpkin, moose, skunk, raccoon, chipmunk, moccasin, Michigan – great river, Nebraska – flat river, and Chicago – place of the smelly onion.

Students work in pairs to review the Past and Present Study Guide.

Past and Present Quiz

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of May 22

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Thank you parents and caregivers for coming to class to support our cricket races. What an exciting day! We hope you enjoyed the events.

I apologize for forgetting to send home the mid-term progress reports last Friday. The reports will go home Monday, May 23. Please review the report with your child and sign the bottom portion and return it to me the following week. If you desire to meet with any of your child’s teachers, please fill in the request on the bottom of the form.

There is no school for students, teachers and staff on Monday, May 30 in observance of Memorial Day.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC E.O.Y Assessment
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Writing Center: Observing and writing descriptions of mealworms
Word Study: Identifying and using adjectives
Spelling Words
Technology Center: A.R. on iPads
Reader’s Theater: Ajani and the Talking Watermelon
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level I (Tier 2)

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 34
Rhyming (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the words. Students repeat the words. Students do mouth closed if the words rhyme, or mouth open if they do not rhyme.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the words. Students repeat the words. Students do hands together if the words begin with the same blend, hands apart if they do not begin with the same blend.
Blending (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the syllables. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Ex. T: /spu-ge-te/ S: spaghetti
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and say whether the blend is at the beginning, middle or end of the word.
Segmenting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and segment it into chunks or syllables.
Substituting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
– Teacher says word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning/end and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Greeting: Students greet each other in a language of choice.
– Sharing: Students share what they have written about their insects or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Read “I Hear Thunder” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 128

Day 1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Today is Monday, May 23, 2016. We will elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about our insect’s interesting facts.
Inquiry Question: What is the most interesting fact you have learned during the insect research project? Share what you know with a classmate!

N.W.E.A. Math End of Year Assessment

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Chirping Crickets by Melvin Berger

Discuss amazing facts about crickets: How they listen, chirp, lay eggs, etc., as well as how to build a habitat for your pet cricket.

– Students share what they have written about the uniqueness and/or interesting facts about their insects to their assigned partner.
– Students continue to compose the chapter about the uniqueness or interesting facts of their insects.

Day 2
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, May 24, 2016. We will read and discuss national holiday, the Fourth of July.
Inquiry Question: Why do Americans celebrate the Fourth of July? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Shared Reading: The Beekeeper Interview with Buzz Riopelle, conducted by Kathie Lester (A-Z Reading)
Before Reading
Build Background
Reading Strategy: Connect to Prior Knowledge
Introduce the Vocabulary
Set the Purpose
During Reading
Ask Question: How can you tell who is asking the questions? Who is answering the questions? How do you know when Buzz stopped talking?
Model making connections using prior knowledge.

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Read Aloud: Insect Life Cycle by Chuck Garofano (A-Z Reading)
Focusing on Writing an Introduction

Introductions—Addressing and Audience
Ask students to recall the beginning of a favorite movie, book, or even a poem or song. Tell them that the writer did his or her very best to make that introduction memorable and powerful for the audience. Tell students that today is the day they will do the same. Today is the day they will craft introductions that are fun and engaging for their audience. “Today I want to teach you that writers give their information books an introduction. When writing introductions, writers try to get the reader’s attention so they can highlight important information about a topic.” Project samples of introduction pages and explicitly model to students how to write them.
Students begin writing their introductions for their Insect Books.

Day 3
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, May 25, 2016. We will use expand-and-trade subtraction to subtract multi-digit numbers.
Inquiry Question: How can writing a multi-digit subtraction problem in expanded form help you solve the problem? Share what you know with a classmate!

N.W.E.A. Reading End of Year Assessment

Students, who finish the N.W.E.A. assessment early, will continue to write the introductions to their insect books.

Day 4
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, May 26, 2016. We will examine how an author organized a sequence of event.
Inquiry Question: How does knowing the order of events help you understand the text better? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Shared Reading: The Beekeeper Interview with Buzz Riopelle, conducted by Kathie Lester (A-Z Reading)
After Reading
Reflect on Reading Strategy
Teach Comprehension Skill: Sequence of Events
What’s the author’s purpose?
Check for understanding

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Read Aloud: Butterflies and Moths by Kira Freed (A-Z Reading)
Focusing on Writing a Conclusion

Conclusions—Addressing and Audience
Ask students to recall the ending of a favorite movie, book, or even a poem or song. Tell them that the writer did his or her very best to make that conclusion memorable and powerful for the audience. Tell students that today is the day they will do the same. Today is the day they will craft conclusions that are fun and engaging for their audience. “Today I want to teach you that writers give their information books a conclusion. When writing conclusions, writers try to get the reader’s attention so they can highlight important information about a topic.”
– Explain to students that the conclusion paragraph is much like a conclusion sentence; it ends your exposition by summing up the points you made earlier.
Project samples of conclusion pages and explicitly model to students how to write them.
Students begin writing their conclusions for their Insect Books.

Day 5
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Today is Friday, May 27, 2016. We will practice finding coin and bill combinations with equivalent values and using cents and dollars-and-cents notation.
Inquiry Question: How do you show 86 cents two different ways? Which way takes up less space and why? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
(The following words will be tested on Friday, June 3.)
happiness, thankfulness, usefulness, thoughtfulness, forgetfulness, helpfulness, cheerfulness, brightness, carelessness, childishness, craziness, listen, speak, read, write, apply

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Conferencing
– Review Peer Conferencing (revising) – What it is and steps for conferencing: Review the “TAG” method: Tell 1 thing you like about the story, Ask 1 question, Give 1 suggestion
1. Read and listen
2. Compliment author
3. Question and suggestion (“W” questions written on sticky notes – who, what, when, where, why questions), students make their writing better by answering those questions and adding more details to the writing in red revising pen.
– Students confer with peers.

Math
Lesson 9-6 (Day 2)
Expand-and-Trade Subtraction, Part 1

Students use base-10 blocks to solve subtraction problems. This prepares them to learn expand-and-trade subtraction in the next lesson.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students write numbers in expanded form.
508; 876; 1,090; 2,007

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
How can you utilize base-10 blocks to show 221 in at least three different ways?
What base-10 symbols would you write?

Representing Trades with Base-10 Blocks
Have students share their different representations.
Teachers record several examples, making sure to include the following representations.
2 flats, 2 longs, 1 cube
1 flat, 12 longs, 1 cube

Teachers guide a discussion about how students might translate from one representation to the other. For example, if they started with 2 flats, 2 longs, and 1 cube, they could trade 1 flat for 10 longs.
The students could also start with 12 longs, and 1 cube, and then trade 10 longs for 1 flat.

Ask: Which uses the fewest blocks? How do you know?

Have students model the trades with their base-10 blocks.

How could we use expanded form to show the representation with the smallest number of blocks?

Teachers display 200 + 20 + 1 and point out that each number in the expanded form shows the value of one type of block.
Ask: What number model could we write for the other representation?
Teachers display 100 + 120 + 1 and make the connection between the addends and each type of block. (“We do”, whole class)

Representing Subtraction without Trades
Teachers remind students that although there are many different ways to represent a number using base-10 blocks, they can use the fewest possible blocks by matching the number of each type of block to the digits in the number. Have students use the fewest possible base-10 blocks to represent the number 45. Record 4 longs and 5 cubes in base-10 shorthand for the class.
Ask: Are there enough longs and cubes for me to remove 2 longs and 2 cubes? How do you know?
Then ask students how they would use their blocks to show 45 – 22. As they respond, record these steps on the Class Data Pad.

Repeat this process with other subtraction problems that do not require a trade, such as 65 – 31 and 138 – 17. Discuss students’ representations as a class as you record the steps on the Class Data Pad.

Representing Subtraction with Trades
Teachers tell students they will now use their base-10 blocks to solve 53 – 37. Ask the students to represent 53 with base-10 blocks. When they have finished, record a sketch of 5 longs and 3 cubes.
Ask: Are there enough longs and cubes for me to remove 3 longs and 7 cubes?
How can I get more cubes so that I can remove 7 cubes? Teachers have the students trade with their base-10 blocks. Represent this trade on your sketch by crossing out 1 ling and adding 10 cubes.
Ask: Do our blocks still show the number 53?
Do we have enough blocks so we can remove 3 longs and 7 cubes (37) now? Complete the subtraction of 37 removing 3 longs and 7 cubes.
Count the remaining blocks with students. Record the number sentence 53 – 37 = 16.

Repeat this process with other subtraction problems that require trades, such as 72 – 38 and 114 – 86. Discuss the students’ representations as a class while recording the steps on the Class Data Pad. (“We do”, whole class)

Subtracting with Base-10 Blocks
Teachers have students recall how they can check their answers for reasonableness. Remind them that making ballpark estimates can be helpful when they use any addition or subtraction method. If their estimates are not close to their ballpark estimates, then students know they need to look back at their work and fix something. (“We do”, whole class)

Students complete the problems in journal, p. 232. (“We do”, partner; small groups)

3. Practice
Drawing a Line Plot
Teachers have students turn to journal, p. 193 and record their head-size measurements on a sticky-note. Remind them to write large. Teachers guide students to display the sticky-notes in order from smallest to largest. Tell students they will draw line plots to show class head-size measurements. (“We do”, whole class; partners)

Distribute Math Master, p. TA32 or draw a line plot. Have students suggest a label for the horizontal axis and write it below the line. Then have them suggest a title for the line plot and record it. (“We do”, whole class)
Next discuss the horizontal scale for the line plot. The head-size data include measurements to the nearest centimeter. The scale should start with the smallest head size in the class. Teachers model writing the scale while students do the same. Have students draw Xs to represent the class data on their line plots. (“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes 9-6
Students complete the mixed practice with Math Boxes 9-6 in journal, p. 233. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Lesson 9-7 Expand-and-Trade Subtraction, Part 2 (2 Days)

Students use expand-and-trade subtraction to subtract multi-digit numbers.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

Vocabulary: expand-and-trade subtraction

1. Warm Up

Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers pose the following subtraction problems involving multiples of 10 for students to solve.
70 – 20
65 -10
81 – 30
75 – 25
82 – 42
91 – 41

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
What is a ballpark estimate for 93 – 68 = ?

Have students share their ballpark estimates and invite students to demonstrate his or her solution using base-10 shorthand.
Display the problem in vertical form and list the students’ suggested base-10 shorthand.
Ask: How can we write each number in expanded form?
79 70 + 9
– 34 30 + 4

Ask: Do we need to make any trades?
Teachers guide students through subtracting the tens and then the ones.
Record the steps.

Repeat the process for other problems that do not need subtraction trades.

Introducing Expand-and-Trade Subtraction
Next teachers pose the problem
84 80 + 4 – 56 50 + 6

Have students trade one long for 10 ones.

Solve

Tell students that the subtraction method is called expand – and – trade subtraction because students use expanded form to think about whether they need to make trades.

Solve 160 100 + 60 + 0
– 77 70 + 7

Teachers record the following number sentence to summarize: 160 – 77 = 83 (“We do”, whole class)

Practicing Expand-and-Trade Subtraction
Students complete p. 234 – 235 to practice expand – and – trade subtraction. (“We do”, partners)

3. Practice
Playing Beat the Calculator
Student play Beat the Calculator as taught during Lesson 5-1.

Math Boxes 9-7
Students complete the mixed practice on p. 236. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 9-8 Equivalent Money Amounts (Day 1)

Students practice finding coin and bill combinations with equivalent values and using cents and dollars – and – cents notation.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers pose problems involving money.
How much money is 2 dimes and 6 pennies?
How much money is 1 quarter, 1 dime, and 3 pennies?

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Ask: How much money is 2 quarters, 5 dimes, 4 nickels, and 7 pennies.
Have volunteers share their strategies they used to find the total of the coins above. (“We do”, whole class)

Reviewing Values of Coins and Bills
Teachers review coin values posing the following questions:

How many pennies are in a nickel? In a dime?
How many pennies are in a quarter? In 50 cents?
How many pennies are in one dollar? In 2 dollars? In 10 dollars?
How many dimes are in a dollar? In 60 cents?
How many nickels are in a quarter? In a dollar? In half a dollar?
How many quarters are in a dollar? In a half dollar?

Tell students they will solve more problems involving money. (“We do”, whole class)

Using Dollars-and-Cents Notation
Ask: What is one way to write one dollar and twenty-seven cents (127 cents)?
What is another way?

Teachers say that an amount with a 0 before the decimal point, such as $0.74, is less than one dollar. It can be written with a cents symbol or dollar-and-cents notation.
Have volunteers scribe the following amounts:
275 cents
305 cents
89 cents

Teachers invite volunteers to share how they knew where to put the decimal point in 3-digit money amounts. (“We do”, whole class)

Making Equivalent Amounts with Coins and Bills
Teachers guide students to examine the Good Buys Poster in journal, p. 238.
Students read money amounts on the poster chorally.

Students complete journal p. 239. (“We do”, partners, small group)

3. Practice
Playing Hit the Target
Students play Hit the Target, using Math Masters p. G25. (“We do”, partners)

Observe
Which students seem to have a strategy for hitting the target number?
Which students need additional support to understand and play the game?

Discuss
How did you decide which number to add or subtract?
If you didn’t hit the target number on your first try, how did you decide what to do next? (“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes 9-8
Students complete Math Boxes 9-8 in journal p. 237. (“You do”, independent)

Science
Integrated with language arts
Science Content:
– Insects need air, water, and space.
– Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
– The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
– The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.
Thinking Processes:
– Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
– Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.

Social Studies
Independence and Memorial Days
Interactive Read Aloud: Fourth of July by Alan M. Ruben
Objectives:
– Explain the significance of various national celebrations.
– Sequence early American history.
– Identify places that remind us of our history.
– Review that a colony is a place ruled by another country.
– Show the 13 colonies on a map and recall that they were ruled by England and that the colonists had to obey English laws.
– Explain to students that the colonists were not always happy about this and so they signed the Declaration of Independence. Independence is being free from rule by another country.
– Colonists said that they should have freedom, or the right to make their own choices, but the English King did not agree.
– Discuss the American Revolution (fought for six years).
– Discuss important landmarks of the American Revolution such as Independence Hall.

Students attend the Chicago Children Choir Performance on Thursday, May 26, from 2:45 to 3:30.

Skills: Predict a Likely Outcome
Objectives:
– Recognize the importance of knowing the past to predict the future.
– Follow steps for making a prediction.
Vocabulary: predict
Ask students to imagine they are on the playground. They hear a rumbling noise and look up to see dark clouds in the sky. Lightning flashes, thunder claps, and a teacher carrying an umbrella comes outside and begins rushing them indoors. Ask students what they think will happen next. Explain that they have just predicted an outcome.
Why It Matters
People can use what they learn from the past to predict the future, or tell what they think will happen.
What You Need to Know
List the following steps on the Smart Board for students to follow to predict a likely outcome.
Step1: Think about what you already know.
Step 2: Find new information.
Step 3: Tell what you think will most likely happen next.
Step 4: Check whether what you predicted does happen.
Read aloud Step 1 through 4. Illustrate the steps by reminding students of the prediction they made earlier. “First, we thought about what we already knew about rainstorms. We identified a pattern – dark clouds roll in; lighting flashes and there is thunder. Next, we found new information – a teacher carrying an umbrella rushed the children indoors. Finally, we made a prediction about what would happen next.”
Explain that in this case, we could not check our prediction because the story was make-believe. Ask students to give the kinds of prediction we can check.
Explain that not all predictions turn out to be correct. Sometimes there are clouds but it doesn’t rain. Still it is a good idea to use what you know about clouds causing rain and take your umbrella just in case. Many stories have surprise endings and your prediction doesn’t come true. Still, making predictions as you read helps you pay attention and think about what you are reading.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of May 15

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

On Thursday, May 19, students will take a science quiz about insects. A study guide will be sent home on Monday. Please refer to it to help your child review for the quiz.

The mid-term progress reports will go home on Friday, May 20. Please review the report with your child and sign the bottom portion and return it to me the following week. If you desire to meet with any of your child’s teachers, please fill in the request on the bottom of the form.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC E.O.Y Assessment
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Writing Center: Observing and writing descriptions of mealworms
Word Study: Identifying and using adjectives
Spelling Words
Technology Center: A.R. on iPads
Reader’s Theater: Rapunzel
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level I (Tier 2)

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 33
Rhyming (Words change daily)
– Teacher gives the rhyme. Students make rhyming words ending with the given rime.
Ex. T: ack S: black, knack, etc.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word pair. Students open their eyes if the word pair begins with the same vowel sound. Students close their eyes if the word pair do not begin with the same vowel sound.
Blending (Words change daily)
– Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Ex. T: /b-a-k-e-r/ S: baker
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Ex. T:/yawn/ S: yAWn
Segmenting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, T: winner S: winner /w-i-n-er/
Substituting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
– Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Greeting: Students greet each other in a language of choice.
– Sharing: Students share what they have written about their insects or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Read “Caterpillar Crawled” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 65

Day 1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, May 16, 2016. We will review our open responses and discuss how Ann and Sammy share three muffins equally.
Inquiry Question: How did you develop a strategy to show how Ann and Sammy share three muffins equally? Share what you have done with a classmate.

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Interactive Read Aloud: Thinking About Ants by Barbara Brenner

Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can make our own captions or add to existing captions in the book. We can put together what the author tells us, what the picture tells us, and our own thoughts.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: My Ladybug Collection by Tricky Smarty on YouTube
– Students share and discuss what they have written about the How To chapter with a partner for advice or feedback.
– Students continue composing the chapter about the “How To” and illustrate each step of the “How To” of their All About Insect Book.

Day 2
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, May 17, 2016. In math, we will learn how to measure lengths to the nearest half-inch.
Inquiry Question: How do you determine the halfway point between two numbers? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading: Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Interactive Read Aloud: Goliath Beeles : Giant Insects (Pages 1-9) by Ryan James from Reading A to Z

Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can make plans alone or with our club members to take action based on the ideas in our books and our reactions to them. We can think about how we can make a real-world difference based on what we’re learning.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing:
Science Fair:
The Scientific Method
Ask a Question
Formulate a Hypothesis
Make a Prediction
Conduct an Experiment
(Three Trials)
State a Conclusion

Students work in assigned groups to spin the Inquiry Wheel for the following inquiry questions:

How does gender affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does temperature affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does scent affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does size affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does surface affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
Students work within their group to decide a responsibility (e.g. presenter, recorder, note taker, illustrator, time keeper, etc.) Students discuss and formulate and agree on a hypothesis for their inquiry question.
Each group conducts an experiment, gathers the data, and records the observation from the experiment. Students discuss their findings and complete a short report with illustrations to present to the class.

Day 3
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, May 18, 2016. In science, we will conduct the cricket race experiments to see if our hypotheses are correct.
Inquiry Question: How can your group collect data correctly and effectively? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading: Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Interactive Read Aloud: Goliath Beetles: Giant Insects (Pages 10-16) by Ryan James from Reading A to Z

Part Three: In Nonfiction Clubs We Can Compare and Contrast Information about Our Topics
“Club members can compare information in our nonfiction books to what we know in our own lives. Today I want to teach you that we can think about what the book says, and compare it with something similar in our own lives. By comparing these two bits of information, we can come to a new conclusion about the topic we’re studying.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing:
Science Fair:
The Scientific Method
Ask a Question
Formulate a Hypothesis
Make a Prediction
Conduct an Experiment
(Three Trials)
State a Conclusion

Students work in assigned groups to spin the Inquiry Wheel for the following inquiry questions:

How does gender affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does temperature affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does scent affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does size affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does surface affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
Students work within their group to decide a responsibility (e.g. presenter, recorder, note taker, illustrator, time keeper, etc.) Students discuss and formulate and agree on a hypothesis for their inquiry question.
Each group conducts an experiment, gathers the data, and records the observation from the experiment. Students discuss their findings and complete a short report with illustrations to present to the class.

Day 4
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, May 19 2016. We will write multi-digit numbers in expanded form and compare them.
Inquiry Question: How can seeing numbers in expanded form help you compare the numbers? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading: Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Interactive Read Aloud: Butterflies and Moths by Kira Freed from Reading A to Z

Part Three: In Nonfiction Clubs We Can Compare and Contrast Information about Our Topics
“Today I want to teach you that club members can talk about differences in the information we’re learning. We can think about why they are different and then what might explain those differences. This can help us come to new understandings about our topics.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing:
Science Fair:
The Scientific Method
Ask a Question
Formulate a Hypothesis
Make a Prediction
Conduct an Experiment
(Three Trials)
State a Conclusion

Students work in assigned groups to spin the Inquiry Wheel for the following inquiry questions:

How does gender affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does temperature affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does scent affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does size affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does surface affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
Students work within their group to decide a responsibility (e.g. presenter, recorder, note taker, illustrator, time keeper, etc.) Students discuss and formulate and agree on a hypothesis for their inquiry question.
Each group conducts an experiment, gathers the data, and records the observation from the experiment. Students discuss their findings and complete a short report with illustrations to present to the class.

Day 5
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, May 20, 2016. We will read and discuss the significance of Memorial Day.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to observe Memorial Day? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, May 27.)
thankful, cheerful, hopeful, grateful, thoughtful, useful, forgetful, painful, joyful, careful, helpful, connect, self, text, world, meaning

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing:
Science Fair:
The Scientific Method
Ask a Question
Formulate a Hypothesis
Make a Prediction
Conduct an Experiment
(Three Trials)
State a Conclusion

Students work in assigned groups to spin the Inquiry Wheel for the following inquiry questions:

How does gender affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does temperature affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does scent affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does size affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does surface affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
Students work within their group to decide a responsibility (e.g. presenter, recorder, note taker, illustrator, time keeper, etc.) Students discuss and formulate and agree on a hypothesis for their inquiry question.
Each group conducts an experiment, gathers the data, and records the observation from the experiment. Students discuss their findings and complete a short report with illustrations to present to the class.
Students present their science projects to visitors.

Math
Lesson 9-3 Sharing Muffins (Day 2)

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Day 2: Open Response
Review student work, teacher notes, and the rubric on p. 795 to plan ways to help students meet expectations on both the content and practice standards. Look for misconceptions in students’ description so of the as well as different correct ways children choose to share muffins and name the shares

2b. Focus
Display responses to Problem 1 that show different strategies for sharing muffins and describing one child’s share.
Ask:
How do you think student A shared the muffins?
Does student B have the same strategy for sharing the muffins?
How does the drawing for student A show how many show how much muffin Anna or Sammy get?
How does the drawing for student B show how many show how much muffin Anna or Sammy get?
Do student A and student B agree or disagree about how much muffin goes to Anna or Sammy?
For student A, do the words about a child’s share match the drawing?
For student B, do the words about a child’s share match the drawing?

Display responses to Problem 2. Discuss the strategies students use to share muffins and how they describe one child’s share. Have students interpret and compare the strategies.
What do you think this student is trying to show with this drawing?
Do you have suggestions for how the drawing can be improved?
What do you think this student is trying to say with the words?
Do you have suggestions for how the words can be improved?
Have students improve the clarity and completeness of their drawings and descriptions of each child’s share.

3. Practice
Math Boxes 9-3
Students practice and maintain skills.

Lesson 9-4 Fractional Units of Length (2 Days)
Students measure lengths to the nearest half-inch.

Vocabulary: half-inch, fourth-inch, precise, quarter-inch

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers display addition problems with four addends. Encourage students to look for combinations that will make adding easier.
13 + 27 + 21 + 19 =
12 + 18 + 23 + 17 =
26 + 24 + 32 + 18 =

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
What is the length of your pinky finger? Is it about 1 inch or 2 inches long? (“We do”, whole class)

Discussing the Need for Precise Measurements
Have students measure their pinky fingers and label the sticky note in inches.
Students stand in the area of the classroom with the label that corresponds to their pinky finger measurement.
Ask: Can we tell from the measurements which child has the longest pinky finger? The shortest? Why?

Explain that precise measurements can help determine which child has the shortest and which child has the longest pinky finger, regardless of where the students are located. Tell students that a measurement is more precise when it is made using a smaller unit. For example, a measurement to the nearest inch is more precise than a measurement to the nearest foot.
Ask students to measure the length of their journals (from top to bottom, not side to side) to the nearest foot and the nearest inch.
Say: Imagine that a child from another school tells you that their math book is about 1 foot tall, and another child from the same school tells you the same math books are about 10 inches tall. Can you tell from the measurements from the nearest foot whether our math books taller than their math books? Can you tell from the measurements whether our math books are taller than their math books?

Teachers point out that measurement tools are made by people. There is a limit to what people can observe and what tools can do, so all measurements are approximate—close to the measurement but not exact. However, some tools are better than others for making more-precise measurements because they are marked with smaller units, and measurements that are more precise tell us more about the “exact” measurement of an object the less-precise measurements do.

Tell the students that they will explore a measurement unit that will allow them to make more-precise measurements. (“We do”, whole class)

Introducing Half-Inches
Teachers explain that measuring in half-inches rather than in inches or feet, produces more-precise measurements.
Display Math Masters, p. TA33 and have students examine the inch ruler shown on it. Ask a volunteer to point to the mark that divides an inch on the ruler into 2 equal parts. Point out that this mark is called the “half-inch mark”.
Ask: How long is the part between the zero mark and the half-inch mark? The part between the half-inch mark and the 1-inch mark?
Use your fingers to trace the spaces between the 0 and half-inch mark and between the half-inch and the 1-inch mark as the students count chorally: 1-half, 2-halves. Ask: How many half-inches make 1 whole inch?
Next ask: How many spaces are marked between 0 and 1-inch marks? Are these spaces equal in length? Have the students look for the marks that divide the inch into 4 equal parts. Ask: How long is the space between two such marks? Use your fingers to trace the quarter-inch space between the o and 1-inch marks and count the divisions of each inch in unison: 1-fourth, 2-fourths, 3-fourths, 4-fourths. (“We do”, whole class)
Ask: How many fourths-inches make 1 whole inch?
Teachers add a ruler divided into quarter-inches to the 4 Equal Shares poster.

Measuring to the Nearest Half-Inch
Students cut out the 12-inch ruler on Math Masters, p. 259.
Students measure the objects in journal 2, p. 227, and measure their desks.

3. Practice
Partitioning Shapes Into Equal Shares
Have the students partition circles into halves, thirds and fourths in journal, p. 228). (We do”, partners)

Math Boxes 9-4
Students complete the mixed practice in journal, p. 229. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 9-5 Reviewing Place Value
Students write multi-digit numbers in expanded form and compare them.

Vocabulary: thousand cube

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers will read-aloud the following descriptions of numbers. Have students write the numbers on erasable boards.
Write a number with 7 in the hundreds place, 0 in the tens place, and 4 in the ones place.

Daily Routines
The students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
How would you fill in the blanks below?
In 573, the 5 is worth ______, the 7 is worth ______, and the 3 is worth _______.

Reviewing Place Value and Expanded Form

What is the value of the 5?
What is the value of the 7?
What is the value of the 3?

Representing Multi-Digit Numbers
Distribute a Place-Value Mat (Math Masters, p. 262) to each child. Hold up a base-10 cube.
Ask: What is this base-10 block called? What is its value? Repeat with the long and flat.
Ask three volunteers to come to the front of the room. The first child, on the left as viewed by the class, holds 3 flats for all to see. The child in the middle holds up 5 longs, and the child on the right holds up 2 cubes.
Ask: What number do these blocks represent?
Have the students say the number aloud in unison and show it with number cards on their Place-Value Mats.
Next ask: How can these base-10 blocks help us write the expanded form for this number?
Have students write the expanded form.
Repeat this activity with several 3-digit numbers.

Reverse the procedure by displaying a 3-digit number and asking three volunteers to come to the front of the room and show the number with base-10 blocks. Then have all the students show the number with cards on their Place-Value Mats and write the number in expanded form. Include examples with 0 as a digit.

Teachers display the thousands cube. Ask: What do you think this block is worth?
How do you know?

Continue with additional volunteers to display the base-10 thousand cubes, flats, longs and cubes into four-digit numbers. Continue to write the numbers in expanded form. (“We do”, whole class)

Comparing Multi-Digit Numbers
Display the numbers 292 and 289.
Ask: to write the expanded form for each number, with the hundreds, tens and ones for each number aligned vertically.
Ask: How can we use expanded form of each number to help us compare them?
Teachers have students write a number sentence using > , < , =. (“We do”, whole class)

Then, students complete journal, p. 230 using expanded form to compare 3 and 4-digit numbers. (“We do”, partners; small groups)

3. Practice
Playing Shape Capture
Students identify attributes in shapes by playing Shape Capture. (“We do”, partners, teams)
Observe:
Which students can correctly find shapes with specified attributes?
Which students are checking other team’s or player’s selections?
Discuss
How did you make sure the other team or player was capturing shapes that matched the Attributes Cards?
Which shapes were easy to capture? Which were harder to capture? Why?

Math Boxes 9-5
Students complete Math Boxes 9-5 in journal, p. 231. (“You do”, independent)

3. Practice
Playing Shape Capture

Math Boxes 9-5

Lesson 9-6 (Day 1)
Expand-and-Trade Subtraction, Part 1
Students use base-10 blocks to solve subtraction problems. This prepares them to learn expand-and-trade subtraction in the next lesson.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students write numbers in expanded form.
508; 876; 1,090; 2,007

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
How can you utilize base-10 blocks to show 221 in at least three different ways?
What base-10 symbols would you write?

Representing Trades with Base-10 Blocks
Have students share their different representations.
Teachers record several examples, making sure to include the following representations.
2 flats, 2 longs, 1 cube
1 flat, 12 longs, 1 cube

Teachers guide a discussion about how students might translate from one representation to the other. For example, if they started with 2 flats, 2 longs, and 1 cube, they could trade 1 flat for 10 longs.
The students could also start with 12 longs, and 1 cube, and then trade 10 longs for 1 flat.

Ask: Which uses the fewest blocks? How do you know?

Have students model the trades with their base-10 blocks.

How could we use expanded form to show the representation with the smallest number of blocks?

Teachers display 200 + 20 + 1 and point out that each number in the expanded form shows the value of one type of block.
Ask: What number model could we write for the other representation?
Teachers display 100 + 120 + 1 and make the connection between the addends and each type of block. (“We do”, whole class)

Representing Subtraction without Trades
Teachers remind students that although there are many different ways to represent a number using base-10 blocks, they can use the fewest possible blocks by matching the number of each type of block to the digits in the number. Have students use the fewest possible base-10 blocks to represent the number 45. Record 4 longs and 5 cubes in base-10 shorthand for the class.
Ask: Are there enough longs and cubes for me to remove 2 longs and 2 cubes? How do you know?
Then ask students how they would use their blocks to show 45 – 22. As they respond, record these steps on the Class Data Pad.

Repeat this process with other subtraction problems that do not require a trade, such as 65 – 31 and 138 – 17. Discuss students’ representations as a class as you record the steps on the Class Data Pad.

Representing Subtraction with Trades
Teachers tell students they will now use their base-10 blocks to solve 53 – 37. Ask the students to represent 53 with base-10 blocks. When they have finished, record a sketch of 5 longs and 3 cubes.
Ask: Are there enough longs and cubes for me to remove 3 longs and 7 cubes?
How can I get more cubes so that I can remove 7 cubes? Teachers have the students trade with their base-10 blocks. Represent this trade on your sketch by crossing out 1 ling and adding 10 cubes.
Ask: Do our blocks still show the number 53?
Do we have enough blocks so we can remove 3 longs and 7 cubes (37) now? Complete the subtraction of 37 removing 3 longs and 7 cubes.
Count the remaining blocks with students. Record the number sentence 53 – 37 = 16.

Repeat this process with other subtraction problems that require trades, such as 72 – 38 and 114 – 86. Discuss the students’ representations as a class while recording the steps on the Class Data Pad. (“We do”, whole class)

Subtracting with Base-10 Blocks
Teachers have students recall how they can check their answers for reasonableness. Remind them that making ballpark estimates can be helpful when they use any addition or subtraction method. If their estimates are not close to their ballpark estimates, then students know they need to look back at their work and fix something. (“We do”, whole class)

Students complete the problems in journal, p. 232. (“We do”, partner; small groups)

3. Practice
Drawing a Line Plot
Teachers have students turn to journal, p. 193 and record their head-size measurements on a sticky-note. Remind them to write large. Teachers guide students to display the sticky-notes in order from smallest to largest. Tell students they will draw line plots to show class head-size measurements. (“We do”, whole class; partners)

Distribute Math Master, p. TA32 or draw a line plot. Have students suggest a label for the horizontal axis and write it below the line. Then have them suggest a title for the line plot and record it. (“We do”, whole class)
Next discuss the horizontal scale for the line plot. The head-size data include measurements to the nearest centimeter. The scale should start with the smallest head size in the class. Teachers model writing the scale while students do the same. Have students draw Xs to represent the class data on their line plots. (“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes 9-6
Students complete the mixed practice with Math Boxes 9-6 in journal, p. 233. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Science
Integrated with language arts
Science Content:
– Insects need air, water, and space.
– Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
– The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
– The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.
Thinking Processes:
– Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
– Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.

Social Studies
Skills Read a Time Line
Objectives Trace the history of space exploration on a time line.
Create and interpret time lines.
Sequence and categorize information.
Ask a volunteer to tell what day of the week it is and then to write it on the board. Ask children what day comes next. Have volunteers write the remaining days in horizontal line across the board. Draw a long line under the words and short vertical lines between them. Tell children that together you have created a simple time line.
What You Need to Know Review the concepts of left and right. Ask children to point to the left-hand page and then to the right-hand page in their books. Emphasize that when they read a time line, just as when they read a sentence, they move from left to right. Point out that each mark on this time line represents a period of ten years.
Discuss the people and events included on the time line. Ask children to tell what they know about space flight exploration. If children have visited one of the space centers, encourage them to tell about their experiences.

Examine Primary Sources Learning About the Past
Objectives:
– Name sources of information, such as people, places, and artifacts.
– Obtain information about a topic using a variety of sources.
– Compare sources of information about the past.
Vocabulary: history, source, artifact
Motivate: Remind children that Earnest says to look for the story in history. Explain that history is the story of what happened in the past. Historians- or people who study history- look at things from long ago to learn about the way people lived. Historians also find out about the past by talking with people, reading what people have written, and visiting places such as museums or monuments.
History: Read aloud the text on pages 222-223. Be sure children understand that a source is where something comes from. The source of milk is a cow; the source of rain is from clouds; the source of a story is a person’s memory or imagination. Stress that a story about the past is called history. Then direct attention to the pictures on page 222. Ask volunteers to tell what they might learn about the past from people like those shown in each picture.
Visual Learning Ask volunteers to suggest who the people shown in the pictures might be. Have children point out visual clues that might help them identify who each person is.
Read and Respond: Discuss ways children can use places to help them learn about the past. Point out that some places, such as libraries and history museums, are built specially to house materials that show or tell how people before us have lived. Other places, such as monuments or historical markers, remind us of special people or events from history. In cemeteries, names, dates, and other information carved into tombstones can provide historical information. Buildings can help us learn how people lived and worked in the past, while the names of streets can tell us the names of important people and places of the past.
History: Explain that an artifact is an object from another time or place. Point out that letters and notes can help us learn about people’s everyday lives, and that newspapers and ticket stubs can give information about important events at a certain place and time.
Learning About the Past
– Small group activity
– Students work cooperatively to observe, discuss, and write the characteristics of artifacts and explain how technology has developed over time to replace these artifacts.

Independence and Memorial Days
Interactive Read Aloud (on the Smart Board): Memorial Day by Ann Weil
Objectives:
* Explain the significance of various national celebrations.
* Sequence early American history.
* Identify places that remind us of our history.
– Ask students what other national holiday is coming up?
– Explain to students that Memorial Day was held to honor people who died in the Civil War. The Civil War was fought between two parts of the United States. Some of the states of the South wanted to start their own country. The states in the North fought to keep the country together. The North won, but many soldiers on both sides died.
– On Memorial Day, we remember men and women who fought in all of the wars for this country. People visit cemeteries and leave flowers and flags.
– Ask students to share with each other what they and their family might do on Memorial Day.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang

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