Week of May 24

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

There is no school for students, teachers and staff on Monday, May 25 in observance of Memorial Day.

The second grade annual picnic will take place the last day of student attendance, June 19. We will send home additional information regarding the picnic on a slip of paper. If you are interested in assisting, please return the slip by June 9.

The World Language Assembly will be held Friday, June 12 at 9:15a.m. in the Murray gym. Please join us as we celebrate a year of learning in World Languages.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 34
Rhyming (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the words. Students repeat the words. Students do mouth closed if the words rhyme, or mouth open if they do not rhyme.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the words. Students repeat the words. Students do hands together if the words begin with the same blend, hands apart if they do not begin with the same blend.
Blending (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the syllables. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Ex. T: /spu-ge-te/ S: spaghetti
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and say whether the blend is at the beginning, middle or end of the word.
Segmenting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and segment it into chunks or syllables.
Substituting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
– Teacher says word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning/end and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Greeting: Students greet each other in a language of choice.
– Sharing: Students share what they have written about their insects or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Read “I Hear Thunder” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 128

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC EOY Assessment
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Reading Centers: Kindle books about insects
Science Center: Observing and noting mealworms’ and crickets’ behavior
Technology Center: A.R. on mini-iPads

Day 1:
Memorial Day (No School)

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, May 26, 2015. We will read and discuss the importance of Memorial Day.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to honor our soldiers? Share your answer with a classmate.

R.E.A.C.H End of Year Assessment for Reading

Shared Reading
Awesome Ants by Rus Buyok (A-Z Reading)
Focusing on Writing Interesting Facts

Writing Workshops
– Students share what they have written about the uniqueness and/or interesting facts about their insects to their assigned partner.
– Students continue to compose the chapter about the uniqueness or interesting facts of their insects.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, May 27, 2015. We will read and discuss national holiday, the Fourth of July.
Inquiry Question: Why do Americans celebrate the Fourth of July? Share what you know with a classmate!

NWEA Math Room 103 (9-12)

Shared Reading
Insect Life Cycle by Chuck Garofano (A-Z Reading)
Focusing on Writing an Introduction

Writing Workshops
Introductions—Addressing and Audience
Ask students to recall the beginning of a favorite movie, book, or even a poem or song. Tell them that the writer did his or her very best to make that introduction memorable and powerful for the audience. Tell students that today is the day they will do the same. Today is the day they will craft introductions that are fun and engaging for their audience. “Today I want to teach you that writers give their information books an introduction. When writing introductions, writers try to get the reader’s attention so they can highlight important information about a topic.” Project samples of introduction pages and explicitly model to students how to write them.
Students begin writing their introductions for their Insect Books.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, May 28, 2015. We will brainstorm and discuss making a prediction based upon a familiar scenario.
Inquiry Question: How do you make a prediction? Share what you know with a classmate!

NWEA Math Room 106 (9-12)

Shared Reading
Butterflies and Moths by Kira Freed (A-Z Reading)
Focusing on Writing a Conclusion

Writing Workshops
Conclusions—Addressing and Audience
Ask students to recall the ending of a favorite movie, book, or even a poem or song. Tell them that the writer did his or her very best to make that conclusion memorable and powerful for the audience. Tell students that today is the day they will do the same. Today is the day they will craft conclusions that are fun and engaging for their audience. “Today I want to teach you that writers give their information books a conclusion. When writing conclusions, writers try to get the reader’s attention so they can highlight important information about a topic.”
– Explain to students that the conclusion paragraph is much like a conclusion sentence; it ends your exposition by summing up the points you made earlier.
Project samples of conclusion pages and explicitly model to students how to write them.
Students begin writing their conclusions for their Insect Books.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, May 29, 2015. We will use prior knowledge to predict an outcome.
Inquiry Question: If you hear a rumbling noise and look up to see dark clouds in the sky, what can you predict will happen? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
happiness, thankfulness, usefulness, thoughtfulness, forgetfulness, helpfulness, cheerfulness, brightness, carelessness, childishness, craziness, listen, speak, read, write, apply

The above words will be tested on Friday, June 5.

Writing Workshops
Conferencing and Editing
– Review Peer Conferencing (revising) – What it is and steps for conferencing: Review the “TAG” method: Tell 1 thing you like about the story, Ask 1 question, Give 1 suggestion
1. Read and listen
2. Compliment author
3. Question and suggestion (“W” questions written on sticky notes – who, what, when, where, why questions), students make their writing better by answering those questions and adding more details to the writing in red revising pen.
– Students confer with peers.
Editing
Review the lesson on Reread During Editing
– Using a writing sample, teachers model the focus point (After I finish a piece of writing, I will reread even more carefully! I am going to reread to check carefully for mistakes in spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar. This kind of rereading is called proofreading. Proofreading is a time when we read to edit or fix mistakes.)
– Students utilize the checklist to edit their research papers.

Math
Timelines
“Emily’s Day at the Beach”
– Students work in partnerships to complete a timeline of events from 9:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M.

Progress Check
Assessment

1. Warm Up
Self-Assessment
– Students complete the Self-Assessment to reflect on their progress in Unit 9.
2a. Assess
– Students complete the Unit 9 Assessment to demonstrate their progress on the Common Core State Standards covered in this unit.

Items reflect mastery expectations to this point.

– Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
– Model 1-step problems involving addition and subtraction.
– Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
– Express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
– Find the total number of objects in a rectangular array.
– Express the number of objects in an array as a sum of addends.
– Understand 3-digit place value.
– Represent whole numbers as hundreds, tens, and ones.
– Count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.
– Read and write number names.
– Read and write numbers in expanded form.
– Record comparisons using >, <, or =.
– Add within 100 fluently.
– Subtract within 100 fluently.
– Add multi-digit numbers using models or strategies.
– Subtract multi-digit numbers using models or strategies.
– Measure the length of an object.
– Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another.
– Solve problems involving bills and coins.
– Partition shapes into equal shares.
– Describe equal shares using fraction words.
– Describe the whole as a number of shares.
– Recognize that equal shares of a shape need not have the same shape.

Unit 9
Open Response
2b. Assess
Solving the Open Response Problem
This open response problem requires students to apply skills and concepts from Unit 9 and earlier units to determine two 2-digit numbers that will produce the largest sum.
The focus of this task is GMP3.1: Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.

Teachers distribute p. 68-69 and read the directions aloud.
Teachers then model how to lay and rearrange the cut-out numbers on the empty squares.
Students should use whatever strategy they prefer to find the numbers that have the largest sum.
Students use the second page to show how they know they have found the numbers that have the largest sum.

Discussing the Problem
After students complete their work, invite a few students to explain how they knew they found the largest sum.

3. Look Ahead
Math Boxes 9-12
– Students complete the mixed practice on journal p. 249.

Science
Integrated with language arts for the whole week
Science Content:
– Insects need air, water, and space.
– Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
– The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
– The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.
Thinking Processes:
– Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
– Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.
Insect Habitat
-Students will design and create a habitat for their research insect. They will utilize a shoe box, white Model Magic, construction paper, glue, scissors, watercolors, etc.

Social Studies
Independence and Memorial Days
Interactive Read Aloud (on the Smart Board): Memorial Day by Ann Weil
Objectives:
* Explain the significance of various national celebrations.
* Sequence early American history.
* Identify places that remind us of our history.
– Ask students what other national holiday is coming up?
– Explain to students that Memorial Day was held to honor people who died in the Civil War. The Civil War was fought between two parts of the United States. Some of the states of the South wanted to start their own country. The states in the North fought to keep the country together. The North won, but many soldiers on both sides died.
– On Memorial Day, we remember men and women who fought in all of the wars for this country. People visit cemeteries and leave flowers and flags.
– Ask students to share with each other what they and their family might do on Memorial Day.

Interactive Read Aloud: Fourth of July by Alan M. Ruben
Objectives:
* Explain the significance of various national celebrations.
* Sequence early American history.
* Identify places that remind us of our history.
– Review that a colony is a place ruled by another country.
– Show the 13 colonies on a map and recall that they were ruled by the England and that the colonists had to obey English laws.
– Explain to students that the colonists were not always happy about this and so they signed the Declaration of Independence. Independence is being free from rule by another country.
– Colonists said that they should have freedom, or the right to make their own choices, but the English King did not agree.
– Discuss the American Revolution (fought for six years).
– Discuss important landmarks of the American Revolution such as Independence Hall.

Skills: Predict a Likely Outcome
Objectives:
– Recognize the importance of knowing the past to predict the future.
– Follow steps for making a prediction.
Vocabulary: predict
Ask students to imagine they are on the playground. They hear a rumbling noise and look up to see dark clouds in the sky. Lightning flashes, thunder claps, and a teacher carrying an umbrella comes outside and begins rushing them indoors. Ask students what they think will happen next. Explain that they have just predicted an outcome.
Why It Matters
People can use what they learn from the past to predict the future, or tell what they think will happen.
What You Need to Know
List the following steps on the Smart Board for students to follow to predict a likely outcome.
Step 1: Think about what you already know.
Step 2: Find new information.
Step 3: Tell what you think will most likely happen next.
Step 4: Check whether what you predicted does happen.
Read aloud Step 1 through 4. Illustrate the steps by reminding students of the prediction they made earlier. “First, We thought about what we already knew about rainstorms. We identified a pattern – dark clouds roll in; lighting flashes and there is thunder. Next, we found new information – a teacher carrying an umbrella rushed the children indoors. Finally, we made a prediction about what would happen next.”
Explain that in this case, we could not check our prediction because the story was make-believe. Ask students to give the kinds of prediction we can check.
Explain that not all predictions turn out to be correct. Sometimes there are clouds but it doesn’t rain. Still it is a good idea to use what you know about clouds causing rain and take your umbrella just in case. Many stories have surprise endings and your prediction doesn’t come true. Still, making predictions as you read helps you pay attention and think about what you are reading.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of May 17

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

On Friday, May 22, students will take a science quiz about insects. The study guide will be sent home on Monday. Please help your child study for it.

The Everyday Math Unit 9 Assessment will be administered on Wednesday, May 27. Students should review graded homework to prepare the test.

Murray Wildcats Walkathon is scheduled for Friday, June 5. Packets for the fundraising were sent home last Thursday. The funds raised by this event will support special programs at Murray Language Academy. If you return the fundraising packet by Friday, May 29, 2015, your child will be eligible for one raffle ticket for each $25 you raise. The packets cannot be submitted after Friday, June 5.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 34
Rhyming (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the words. Students repeat the words. Students do mouth closed if the words rhyme, or mouth open if they do not rhyme.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the words. Students repeat the words. Students do hands together if the words begin with the same blend, hands apart if they do not begin with the same blend.
Blending (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the syllables. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Ex. T: /spu-ge-te/ S: spaghetti
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and say whether the blend is at the beginning, middle or end of the word.
Segmenting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and segment it into chunks or syllables.
Substituting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
– Teacher says word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning/end and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Greeting: Students greet each other in a language of choice.
– Sharing: Students share what they have written about their insects or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Read “The Butterfly” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 60

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC EOY Assessment
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Reading Centers: Kindle books about insects
Science Center: Observing and noting mealworms’ and crickets’ behavior
Technology Center: A.R. on mini-iPads

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, May 18, 2015. We will begin writing a “how to” for our insect research papers.
Inquiry Question: How might you arrange information in your “how to” to help readers understand clearly what you are writing? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading
Interactive Read Aloud:Chirping Crickets by Melvin Berger

Discuss amazing facts about crickets: How they listen, chirp, lay eggs, etc., as well as how to build a habitat for your pet cricket.

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
– Using the notes, teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph for the “How To” of their All About Insect Book.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a chapter about the “How To” and illustrate each step of the “How To” of their All About Insect Book.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, May 19, 2015. We will read and discuss early uses of calendars and clocks as ways to measure time.
Inquiry Question: How do you measure time? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Shared Reading: The Beekeeper Interview with Buzz Riopelle, conducted by Kathie Lester (A-Z Reading)
Before Reading
Build Background
Reading Strategy: Connect to Prior Knowledge
Introduce the Vocabulary
Set the Purpose
During Reading
Ask Question: How can you tell who is asking the questions? Who is answering the questions? How do you know when Buzz stopped talking?
Model making connections using prior knowledge.

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: “How to Care for Painted Lady Butterflies” on YouTube by Carolina Biological
– Teacher reviews with students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph for the “How To” of their All About Insect Book.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a chapter about the “How To” and illustrate each step of the “How To” of their All About Insect Book.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, May 20, 2015. We will skip count and add to solve problems involving multiples of 10.
Inquiry Question: What strategies do you know to help you solve problems involving multiples of 10? Share your answer with a classmate.

Reading
Shared Reading: The Beekeeper Interview with Buzz Riopelle, conducted by Kathie Lester (A-Z Reading)
After Reading
Reflect on Reading Strategy
Teach Comprehension Skill: Sequence of Events
What’s the author’s purpose?
Check for understanding

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: “My Ladybug Collection” by Tricky Smarty on YouTube
– Students share and discuss what they have written about the How To chapter with a partner for advice or feedback.
– Students continue composing the chapter about the “How To” and illustrate each step of the “How To” of their All About Insect Book.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, May 21, 2015. We will observe, discuss, and write the characteristics of artifacts.
Inquiry Question: How can an old photograph tell us about the past? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Shared Reading: The Beekeeper Interview with Buzz Riopelle, conducted by Kathie Lester (A-Z Reading)
Grammar and Mechanics: Contractions
Word Work: Suffixes –y and –ly

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: “How To Care for a Praying Mantis” YouTube by Carolina Biological
– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter six, which is the insect’s uniqueness or interesting facts about the insect.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the uniqueness or interesting facts about the insect for the All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the uniqueness or interesting facts about their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter Six: Uniqueness or Interesting Facts)
– Students work independently to take notes on the uniqueness or interesting facts about their insects.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, May 22, 2015.
We will skip count and solve problems involving multiples of 10 and 5.
Inquiry Question: What relationship is there between the value of a dime and the value of a nickel? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
thankful, cheerful, hopeful, grateful, thoughtful, useful, forgetful, painful, joyful, careful, helpful, connect, self, text, world, meaning

The above words will be tested on Friday, May 29.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Focus on Uniqueness: Discover Ants Fun Facts for Kids by Rose Alden (Kindle Book) p.17 (Male Weevils’ mating habits), p. 19 (no insects in oceans), p. 20 (Ant Strength), p. 21 (Mosquito wing flapping), p. 22 (Insects taste with feet), p. 23 (Wasps hang from their teeth), p. 26 (Bees’ Honey), p. 27 (Housefly life span), p. 27 (Silkworms), p. 28 (without insects we would….)
– Using the notes teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about the uniqueness or interesting facts of the insect.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a chapter about the uniqueness or interesting facts their insects their insects.

Math
Lesson 9-9 Estimating Costs
Day 1: Students select items from a store poster and use mental math to estimate the total cost.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students make ballpark estimates and record them as number models on erasable boards.
76 + 188 = ?
85 + 165 = ?
183 + 211 = ?
296 + 373 = ?

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2a. Focus
Math Talk
Students identify if the student in the story problem makes an accurate estimate, and discuss their thinking about the student’s answer.
Then students make estimates using their ballpark estimate. (“You do”, independent)
Comparing Estimation Strategies

Students explain to their partners when they might use ballpark estimates. (“We do”, partners)

Student volunteers explain the estimation strategy of the student in the story problem.

Teachers highlight the close-but-easier numbers used in the story problem.
Ask: When you shared your strategy with your partner, were you able to explain it so that your partner could solve a similar problem using your strategy?
Teachers briefly discuss how both estimates are reasonable. (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers explain that today the students will pretend they are in a store, and they have $100 to spend. They are going to make estimates in their head to decide what items they can buy and explain their thinking. (“We do”, whole class)

Solving the Open Response Problem
Teachers distribute Math Masters, p. 272 and Moran’s Market Poster on Math Masters, p. 274.
Students will use scissors and glue (no pencils).
The class choral reads the problem.
Students work in partnerships to discuss what they understand from the problem. (“We do”, partners)

Teachers invite volunteers to explain the task, asking questions such as:
What do you need to figure out?
How much money do you have?
Do you have to spend all of the money?
Do you need an exact answer to decide what to buy?
How will you show what items you plan to buy?
Can you use a pencil? (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers review the prices on Moran’s Market Poster. Encourage students to complete the first part of the problem mentally, or in their head. (“You do”, independent)

Once students have chosen their items and glued them down, distribute Math Masters, p. 273. In the thought bubble, students should show their mental math strategies and write down clear explanation of their thinking. Ask students to write down how they chose their items and how they know the total cost is close to $100, but not more than.

Allow students time to complete the page. Partners can talk about the task, but each student should write an explanation. (“You do”, independent)

Teachers circulate and assist. If students try to find an exact answer using the paper and pencils, ask: How can you find the total cost of the items in your head?

Teachers note students’ strategies.

Summarize
Ask: When is it helpful to estimate or use mental math?

Teachers collect students’ work to evaluate and prepare for Day 2.

Day 2: Reengagement
The students discuss selected students’ estimates, and the students revise their work.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.

2b. Focus
Setting Expectations
Teachers briefly review the Open Response Problem from Day 1. Remind the students that their job was to find at least three items to buy so the total cost was close to, but less than $100. They also needed to explain the strategies they used to estimate the total cost.
Ask: What do you think a good explanation would include?

Remind students that a goal of their work is to explain their thinking clearly and precisely. Discuss the word precisely. Tell students that a precise explanation is one that gives details and is accurate and complete.

Remind students that if they think someone else’s work is unclear or incomplete, they should still be respectful when they explain why. Refer to your list of discussion guidelines and encourage students to use these sentence frames.

-I think this is a clear and complete explanation because ______________.
-I think this explanation needs to include ______________________. (“We do”, whole class)

Reengaging in the Problem
Students reengage the problem by analyzing and critiquing other students’ work in pairs and whole-group discussion. Have students discuss in partners before sharing with the whole class. Guide this discussion based on the decisions you made in Getting Ready for Day 2. (“We do”, partners; whole class)

Revising Work
Pass back the students’ work from Day 1. Before students revise anything, ask them to examine their own explanations and decide how to improve them. Ask the following questions one at a time. Have partners discuss their responses and give a thumbs-up or thumbs-down based on their own work.
-Did you choose at least three items and show the prices for each?
-Is your total close, but less than $100? Did you tell how you know?
-Did you show all the steps in your thinking? Did you show any close-but-easier numbers you chose?
-Did you show how you added the numbers? (“We do”, partners; whole class)

Students revise their work. (“You do”, independent)

Summarize
Ask students to reflect on their work and revisions.
Ask: How did you make your explanation clearer?

3. Practice
Math Boxes 9-9
Students practice and maintain skills completing Math Boxes 9-9, p. 241.

Lesson 9-10 Connecting Doubles Facts, even Numbers, and Equal Groups

Goals:
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

1. Warm-Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers display various arrays. Students count by 2s to find the total number of dots in each array. Then they write addition number models on their slates to represent the arrays. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
“You have 2 rows of tomato plants with 8 plants in each row. How many plants do you have?”
Teachers invite volunteers to sketch an array that matches the math problem. Ask students to describe the array.
Expect the following observations.
-It shows 2 rows of plants with 8 plants in each row.
-It is a 2-by-8 array.
-It has 2 rows and 8 columns.
-It has 16 objects in all.

Invite students to write a number model for this problem. (“We do”, whole class)

Connecting Doubles and Equal Groups
Teachers distribute 20-centimeter cubes to each partnership.
Teachers explain to the students:
There is enough space in the garden for only 2 rows of plants with up to 10 plants in each row.
There should always be 2 equal rows, but each row may have less than 10 plants. (“We do”, whole class)

Students build at least three possible arrays with their centimeter cubes.
Then students record their arrays on centimeter grid paper and write addition or multiplication number models to match each array. (“We do”, partners)

Teachers invite volunteers to share their arrays while making an ordered list of the arrays and the number models on chart paper.

After all 10 possible arrays have been recorded, teachers have students examine the list.
Ask: What patterns do you notice?

Referring to the two lists of possible number models, discuss the idea that when the students need to find the total number of objects in 2 equal groups (or multiply by 2), they can use addition doubles.
Ask: How can we use doubles facts to help us solve number stories about 2 equal groups? (“We do”, whole class)

Connecting Even Numbers and Equal Groups
Teachers refer to the list of arrays and number models from the previous activity. Ask the students to look at the totals for each array and determine whether they are even or odd.
Ask:
-Can the total number of 2 equal groups or rows be an odd or even number?
-How do you know?
-If I have 14 cubes and I want to put them into 2 equal groups, what doubles fact could help me?
-Why?

Teachers guide students to see that they can also use doubles facts to help them put an even number of objects into 2 equal groups. (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers pose number stories involving 2 equal groups or rows of objects. Encourage students to use their knowledge of doubles facts to help them solve the problems.
Students can use cubes or draw pictures to model the problems.
Students write addition and multiplication number models for the problems and share them with the class.

Suggestions:
-You have 2 apples. Each apple is cut into 8 slices. How many slices are there now?
-Your friend has 2 fish tanks with 6 fish in each tank. How many fish does your friend have in all?
-There are 10 pencils in all. You want to put an equal number of pencils in each of your 2 pencil cups. How many pencils should you put in each cup? (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Equal Shares with different Shapes
Students partition rectilinear figures into same-size shapes that are different shapes on journal p. 243. (“You do”, independent)

Math Boxes
Students complete the mixed practice on journal p. 244.

Lesson 9-11 Multiples of 10 and 5 (2 Days)
Students skip count and add to solve problems involving multiples of 10 and 5.

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers pose addition problems involving multiples of 10.
50 + 50
50 + 60
60 + 70
90 + 80

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
Teachers pose the following problem:
-You have 6 boxes of markers with 10 markers in each box. How many markers do you have in all?

Teachers invite volunteers to share their strategies and solutions. (“We do”, whole class)

Using Tools to Show Groups of 10
Teachers guide discussion of strategies and tools that can be utilized to solve story problems with multiples of 10.

Suggestions:
-On a number line.
-On a number grid.
-With base-10 blocks.

Ask: What do all these strategies/tools have in common?

Tell the students that they will solve more problems by skip counting and adding 10s. (“We do”, whole class)

Relating 10s and 5s
Teachers display a dime and a nickel.
Ask: What is the value of each coin?

Students work in partnerships to determine the values of sets of dimes and nickels in Problem 1 on journal p. 245.

When most students have completed the problem, have each pair of students compare their answers with another partnership and resolve any discrepancies. (“We do”, partners)

Ask:
-How did you find the values of the sets of dimes?
-How did you find the values of the sets of nickels?

Teachers have students complete Problem 2 on their journal page by examining the values of dimes and nickels in each row and looking for a pattern. (“You do”, independent)

Teachers invite volunteers to share their thoughts with the class. (“We do”, whole class)

Applying Strategies
Teachers display a table (Multiplying by 2; Multiplying by 5; Multiplying by 10)

Teachers have students practice using the strategies as they complete journal p. 246. (“You do”, independent)

3. Practice
Partitioning a Rectangle
Students complete journal p. 247. (“You do”, independent)

Math Boxes 9-11
Students complete the mixed practice on journal p. 248. (“You do”, independent)

Science
Integrated with language arts for the whole week
Science Content:
– Insects need air, water, and space.
– Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
– The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
– The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.
Thinking Processes:
– Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
– Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.
Insect Habitat
-Students will design and create a habitat for their research insect. They will utilize a shoe box, white Model Magic, construction paper, glue, scissors, watercolors, etc.

Social Studies
Interactive Read Aloud:
…If You Lived in Colonial Times by Ann McGovern
Unit 5 Past and Present
Objectives:
– Use a visual to predict content.
– Interpret a quotation.
– Use a sequence chart to prepare for the unit.
Access Prior Knowledge:
– Ask children to name activities they do in school every day. Record the activities they mention on separate sentence strips and display the activities on the board in random order. Then call on volunteers to arrange the activities in time order.
Visual learning:
– Present picture and ask questions to guide students to discover time line. Point out that time is always passing. Over time, some things change and some stay the same. Have children predict what changes they might learn about in this unit.
Interpreting Quotations:
– Read aloud the quotation “The present was an egg laid by the past that had the future inside its shell.” –Zora Neale Hurston
Tell children that Zora Neale Hurston was a famous African American writer. Then draw a hen, an egg, and a baby chick on the board. Explain that when Hurston wrote the quotation, she made a comparison between time, which readers cannot picture, and a simple process that is familiar to most people. Use questions to guide students to understand the significance of the quotation.
Explain that the quotation shows that the present, past, and future are all connected.
Vocabulary: history, settler, landmark, colony, artifact
Access Prior Knowledge:
– Discuss the idea that one way we learn about the past is by studying objects that give clues about how people lived long ago. Ask children to consider items in their homes that might give clues about the past, such as photographs, old clothing, artworks, antique furniture, or old-fashioned cooking utensils.
Mark Connections:
– Have volunteers read the word history and its definition. Remind children that when they are reading, looking at the pictures can help them understand the words. Ask how the pictures help them understand what history means.
Visual Learning:
– Ask children to look at the pictures used to illustrate the words settler and colony. Have volunteers read the definitions aloud. Ask children what they can tell about the place the people are settling from details in the picture. (There are trees for building.) Discuss how the clothes people wore, the kinds of houses they built, and the kinds of food they ate all depended on the place where they settled.
– Explain that when the Pilgrims and other people came to America, America was a colony of England. Even though the colonists lived here, they were still English citizens and had to obey English laws.
– Review questions.
Unit 5 Social Studies: Past and Present
Lesson 1
Objectives:
– Identify early uses of calendars and clocks as ways to measure time.
– Describe the order of events by using designations of time periods such as ancient times and modern times.
– Use vocabulary related to chronology, including past, present, and future.
Vocabulary: ancient, modern
Interactive Read Aloud: If I Were a Kid in Ancient China by Cobblestone Publishing
Culture and Society: Explain that early people recognized that a day was the period from sunrise to sunrise, a month was the length of time it took the moon to change from full to new to full again, and a year was the time it took for Earth to move through all four seasons. Ask children to explain how we break these larger periods of time into much smaller ones. For example we know that there are 24 hours in a day, 60 minutes in an hour, and 60 seconds in a minute
Visual Learning: Calendars Ask volunteers to describe what they see in the pictures. Tell children that the symbols at the bottom of this page represent the first five months of the year on the Mayan calendar. Ask children to compare the ancient calendars to modern calendars.
History: Help children locate China and Central America on a map. Tell children that the Mayas and Aztecs both developed great civilizations in the area of present-day Mexico and that they remained powerful for hundreds of years. Explain that even though China and Central America are in different parts of the world, the peoples who lived in both places long ago needed to record and measure time. Have children locate Italy on a map. Tell children that this is where Aloysius Lilius, the man who developed the calendar we use today, lived and worked. Stress that he came up with the idea for this calendar long after the Mayas and ancient Chinese developed theirs.
Skills Read a Time Line
Objectives Trace the history of space exploration on a time line.
Create and interpret time lines.
Sequence and categorize information.
Ask a volunteer to tell what day of the week it is and then to write it on the board. Ask children what day comes next. Have volunteers write the remaining days in horizontal line across the board. Draw a long line under the words and short vertical lines between them. Tell children that together you have created a simple time line.
What You Need to Know Review the concepts of left and right. Ask children to point to the left-hand page and then to the right-hand page in their books. Emphasize that when they read a time line, just as when they read a sentence, they move from left to right. Point out that each mark on this time line represents a period of ten years.
Discuss the people and events included on the time line. Ask children to tell what they know about space flight exploration. If children have visited one of the space centers, encourage them to tell about their experiences.
Examine Primary Sources Learning About the Past
Objectives:
– Name sources of information, such as people, places, and artifacts.
– Obtain information about a topic using a variety of sources.
– Compare sources of information about the past.
Vocabulary: history, source, artifact
Motivate: Remind children that Earnest says to look for the story in history. Explain that history is the story of what happened in the past. Historians-or people who study history- look at things from long ago to learn about the way people lived. Historians also find out about the past by talking with people, reading what people have written, and visiting places such as museums or monuments.
History: Read aloud the text on pages 222-223. Be sure children understand that a source is where something comes from. The source of milk is a cow; the source of rain is from clouds; the source of a story is a person’s memory or imagination. Stress that a story about the past is called history. Then direct attention to the pictures on page 222. Ask volunteers to tell what they might learn about the past from people like those shown in each picture.
Visual Learning Ask volunteers to suggest who the people shown in the pictures might be. Have children point out visual clues that might help them identify who each person is.
Read and Respond: Discuss ways children can use places to help them learn about the past. Point out that some places, such as libraries and history museums, are built specially to house materials that show or tell how people before us have lived. Other places, such as monuments or historical markers, remind us of special people or events from history. In cemeteries, names, dates, and other information carved into tombstones can provide historical information. Buildings can help us learn how people lived and worked in the past, while the names of streets can tell us the names of important people and places of the past.
History: Explain that an artifact is an object from another time or place. Point out that letters and notes can help us learn about people’s everyday lives, and that newspapers and ticket stubs can give information about important events at a certain place and time.
Learning About the Past
– Small group activity
– Students work cooperatively to observe, discuss, and write the characteristics of artifacts and explain how technology has developed over time to replace these artifacts.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of May 10

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Sincere thanks to the parent/guardian chaperones last Friday for the field trip! Your presence ensured a safe and engaging learning experience.

Students will take the social studies Land and Water Unit Test on Thursday, May 14. Please refer to the study guide we are sending home on Monday to help your child prepare.

The mid-term progress reports will go home on Friday, May 15. Please review the report with your child and sign the bottom portion and return it by May 20. If you desire to meet with any of your child’s teachers, please fill in the request on the bottom of the form.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 33
Rhyming (Words change daily)
– Teacher gives the rhyme. Students make rhyming words ending with the given rime.
Ex. T: ack S: black, knack, etc.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word pair. Students open their eyes if the word pair begins with the same vowel sound. Students close their eyes if the word pair do not begin with the same vowel sound.
Blending (Words change daily)
– Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Ex. T: /b-a-k-e-r/ S: baker
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Ex. T:/yawn/ S: yAWn
Segmenting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, T: winner S: winner /w-i-n-er/
Substituting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
– Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Greeting: Students greet each other in a language of choice.
– Sharing: Students share what they have written about their insects or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Read “Caterpillar Crawled” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 65

Differentiated Instruction:
– Teachers administer the end-of-year TRC (Text Reading and Comprehension)
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Reading Centers: Kindle books about insects
Science Center: Observing and noting mealworms’ and crickets’ behavior
Technology Center: A.R. and research on mini-iPads

Day 1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, May 11, 2015. In social studies, we will use a scale on a map to find the real distances.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to be able to use a scale on a map to find the real distances? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading: Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Three: In Nonfiction Clubs We Can Compare and Contrast Information about Our Topics
“Today I want to teach you that club members can use prompts to push our thinking as we compare and contrast. We can say, ‘On this page . . . but on this page…’ or ‘In this book…but in this book…’; ‘The difference between…and…is…’; ‘What’s the same about these two is…’; and ‘Unlike the . . . in this book, the . . . in that book does [doesn’t]. . . .’”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing:
Science Fair
The Scientific Method
Ask a Question
Formulate a Hypothesis
Make a Prediction
Conduct an Experiment
(Three Trials)
State a Conclusion

Students work in assigned groups to spin the Inquiry Wheel for the following inquiry questions:

How does gender affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does temperature affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does scent affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does size affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does surface affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?

Students work within their group to decide a responsibility (e.g. presenter, recorder, note taker, illustrator, time keeper, etc.) Students discuss and formulate and agree on a hypothesis for their inquiry question.
Each group conducts an experiment, gathers the data, and records the observation from the experiment. Students discuss their findings and complete a short report with illustrations to present to the class.

Day 2
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, May 12, 2015. In science, we will conduct the cricket race experiments to see if our hypotheses are correct.
Inquiry Question: How can your group collect data correctly and effectively? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading: Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Three: In Nonfiction Clubs We Can Compare and Contrast Information about Our Topics
“Today I want to teach you that club members can compare and contrast two different kinds or parts of the same larger topic.”
Example: “We can think about what’s the same and what’s different about two different kinds of mammals or fish or plants. We can think about the parts of our topic and how parts are the same and different.”
Tip: “Sometimes we find these parts and kinds within a single book, and sometimes we look at two or more books.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing:
Science Fair
The Scientific Method
Ask a Question
Formulate a Hypothesis
Make a Prediction
Conduct an Experiment
(Three Trials)
State a Conclusion

Students work in assigned groups to spin the Inquiry Wheel for the following inquiry questions:

How does gender affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does temperature affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does scent affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does size affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does surface affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?

Students work within their group to decide a responsibility (e.g. presenter, recorder, note taker, illustrator, time keeper, etc.) Students discuss and formulate and agree on a hypothesis for their inquiry question.
Each group conducts an experiment, gathers the data, and records the observation from the experiment. Students discuss their findings and complete a short report with illustrations to present to the class.

Day 3
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Today is Wednesday, May 13, 2015. We will discuss ways to protect and conserve our natural resources.
Inquiry Question: How can you influence people in helping you protect and conserve natural resources? Share what you know with a classmate!

Shared Reading: Life in the Desert Night by Fay Robinson

Writing:
Science Fair
The Scientific Method
Ask a Question
Formulate a Hypothesis
Make a Prediction
Conduct an Experiment
(Three Trials)
State a Conclusion

Students work in assigned groups to spin the Inquiry Wheel for the following inquiry questions:

How does gender affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does temperature affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does scent affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does size affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does surface affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?

Students work within their group to decide a responsibility (e.g. presenter, recorder, note taker, illustrator, time keeper, etc.) Students discuss and formulate and agree on a hypothesis for their inquiry question.
Each group conducts an experiment, gathers the data, and records the observation from the experiment. Students discuss their findings and complete a short report with illustrations to present to the class.

Day 4
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, May 14, 2015. We will create arrays for square numbers.
Inquiry Question: What is the relationship between a square number and an array? Share what you think with a classmate!

Close Reading: Life in the Desert by A-Z Reading

Writing:
Science Fair
The Scientific Method
Ask a Question
Formulate a Hypothesis
Make a Prediction
Conduct an Experiment
(Three Trials)
State a Conclusion

Students work in assigned groups to spin the Inquiry Wheel for the following inquiry questions:

How does gender affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does temperature affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does scent affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does size affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?
How does surface affect the distance the crickets travel in one minute?

Students work within their group to decide a responsibility (e.g. presenter, recorder, note taker, illustrator, time keeper, etc.) Students discuss and formulate and agree on a hypothesis for their inquiry question.
Each group conducts an experiment, gathers the data, and records the observation from the experiment. Students discuss their findings and complete a short report with illustrations to present to the class.

Day 5
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, May 15, 2015.
We will lead and present “Cricket Races” with kindergarten and first grade students.
Inquiry Question: What steps must we follow during the “Cricket Races”? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Spelling Words:
fastest, slowest, biggest, shortest, loudest, softest, smartest, silliest, brightest, funniest, bravest, result, context, valid, select, revise

The above words will be tested on Friday, May 22.

Writing:
Science Fair:
The Scientific Method
Ask a Question
Formulate a Hypothesis
Make a Prediction
Conduct an Experiment
(Three Trials)
State a Conclusion

Students present their science projects to kindergarten and first grade students.

Math
Problem of the Month
Diminishing Return

Goal:
– Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Overview:
In the Problem of the Month Diminishing Return, students use number operations, organized lists, and probability to solve problems. The mathematical topics that underlie this POM are knowledge of number sense, comparison, subtraction, division, rates, rational numbers, and conditional probability. The mathematics in this POM includes converting repeating decimals to fractions and using algebraic reasoning.

Some classes are going out for a picnic lunch. The teachers bought drinks in packs for their classes.
Thirty-three students are in Mrs. Browne’s class. Mrs. Browne bought six-packs for her class. She needs helpers, so she picks students to carry one six-pack each.
Twenty-two students are in Mrs. Robinson’s class. Mrs. Robinson bought four-packs for her class. She needs helpers, so she picks students to carry one four-pack each.
Which teacher had to pick more helpers?
Show how you found your answer.

Math Games:
Finding Differences
Goals:
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Students will work with a partner to find the difference between a partner’s number and a multiple of 10.

Materials:
Number Grid, page TA3
4 each of number cards 1-9
Directions:
Shuffle the cards and place them face down on the table.
Pick two cards and use them to make a 2-digit number.
Point to your number on the number grid.
The partner points to a multiple of 10 that is higher than your number.
Find the difference between the number and the multiple of 10.
Trade jobs. Repeat 5 times.
Discuss what helped you to find the difference between the number and the multiple of 10.

Adding Four Numbers
Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Students write and solve addition problems using four addends.

Materials:
Egg carton with numbers labeled
4 counters
paper
pencil

Put 4 counters in the egg carton.
Close and shake.
Write an addition problem using the numbers where the counters landed.
Solve the addition problem.
Repeat 3 more times.
Discuss which numbers you added first and why with your partner.

Exploring Square Numbers
Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Students work with partners to create arrays for square numbers (1, 4, 9, and 16) and write the appropriate number model.

Materials:
Centimeter Grid Paper, page TA25
Centimeter cubes

The numbers 1, 4, 9, and 16 are square numbers.
Use centimeters cubes to make as many different arrays as you can for each square number.
Record the arrays on grid paper.
Write the number model for each array.
Discuss with your partner about what you notice in the arrays for square numbers.
Try to find the next 2 or 3 square numbers.

Naming Equal Parts Found in Literature
Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Students work with partners to create various sizes and colors of circles to divide into equal parts and make a design.

Materials:
Ed Emberley’s Picture Pie: A Cut and Paste Drawing Book
Construction paper of various colors
Scissors
circle templates
pencils

Teachers read the book.
Use templates to trace several circles of different colors.
Cut out the circles.
Fold the circles into equal parts such as halves and fourths.
Use the folds to help you cut the circles into equal parts.
Make a design with the equal parts.
Discuss with your partner how you made your design with equal parts.

Science
Integrated with language arts
Science Content:
– Insects need air, water, and space.
– Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
– The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
– The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.
Thinking Processes:
– Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
– Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.

Social Studies
Using Map Scales
Objectives:
– Recognize that maps can be different sizes.
– Define map, scale
– Use a scale to find real distances.
Display two United States maps that are different sizes. Ask children to describe the differences between the maps. Then have them tell how maps are different from the actual areas that they show.
Why It Matters:
Explain that maps not only show where places are located, they also can tell the distances between places. Ask children why it would not be practical to make a map that is as large as the area it shows. Explain that distances and places on maps are smaller than their real sizes and that a map scale can tell you how much smaller.
What You Need to Know:
Explain to children that once they know how far apart two places are on a map, they can find out how far apart they are in real life. Emphasize that a map scale can show them that a certain distance on the map stands for longer, real distance on Earth. For example, 1 inch on a map might stand for 1 mile on land. Point out that not all map scales are the same size. You can use the scales on the two United States maps you displayed as an example.
Why might 1 inch stand for 10 miles on one map and for 100 miles on another map?
Emphasize the importance of marking accurately when using a scale strip. Remind children to distinguish between miles and kilometers on the map scale.

Caring for Natural Resources
Objective: Students will learn about conservation through recycling.
There are over six billion people in the world today. Therefore, the natural resources need to be protected.
Conservation is one way of preserving earth’s natural resources.
When you conserve you use less of an item, or use it more effectively.
Examples could include turning off water when brushing teeth or using both sides of a paper when writing.
Recycling is another way to help the world.
Describe to me what it means to recycle.
When you recycle you take something and use it again.
What are some ways to encourage their communities to recycle?
Pollution can negatively affect out natural resources.
Can someone describe to me what pollution is?
Pollution is when natural resources are polluted. Garbage can cause pollution in communities.
What are some of the causes of pollution? Describe these causes. What can you do to reduce pollution?

Unit Test

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of May 3

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The second grade classrooms will take their annual field trip to the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum on Friday, May 8. Students will participate in a workshop entitled “Metamorphosing Monarchs” and visit the butterfly atrium. Students will need to bring a bag lunch from home on the day of the field trip as we will be eating lunch at the museum.

As your child continues to research their selected insect, the sources he/she is using may need to be renewed at the library. Parents have reported being able to renew library books on-line. Please ensure your child has the sources available until the end of the research project.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 32 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming
– Teacher gives the rime. Students make rhyming words ending with the given rime.
Ex. T: ack S: black, knack, etc.
Onset Fluency
– Teacher says the word pair. Students open their eyes if the word pair begins with the same vowel sound. Students close their eyes if the word pair do not begin with the same vowel sound.
Blending
– Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Ex. T: /b-a-k-e-r/ S: baker
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Ex. T:/yawn/ S: yAWn
Segmenting
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, T: winner S: winner /w-i-n-er/
Substituting
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes
– Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Reading Centers: Kindle books about insects
Science Center: Observing and noting mealworms’ and crickets’ behavior
Technology Center: A.R. on mini- IPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Sing “Hungry Caterpillar” by TheLearningStation You Tube

Day 1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, May 4, 2015. We will discuss an insect’s incomplete life cycle.
Inquiry Question: Why might some insects’ life cycles undergo only three stages? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can make our own captions or add to existing captions in the book. We can put together what the author tells us, what the picture tells us, and our own thoughts.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: My Life As A Cicada by M. Eigh (Kindle Book, Cloud Reader)
Questions to Guide Discussion:
– What are the life cycle stages of cicadas?
– What is this type of metamorphosis named?
– Using the notes teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s life cycle.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a chapter about their insect’s life cycle.

Day 2
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, May 5, 2015. In social studies, we will learn how to read an information table.
Inquiry Question: How is information easier to understand in table form? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading: Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can make plans alone or with our club members to take action based on the ideas in our books and our reactions to them. We can think about how we can make a real-world difference based on what we’re learning.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
– Interactive Read Aloud: Fireflies by Sally M. Walker Questions to Guide Discussion:
– What are the life cycle stages of fireflies?
– What is this type of metamorphosis named?
– Students continue to write the chapter about their insect’s life cycle.
– Students illustrate the life cycle of their insects.
– Students share their work-in-progress with their partners.

Day 3
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Today is Wednesday, May 6, 2015. We will practice finding coin and bill combinations with equivalent values and using cents and dollars – and – cents notation.
Inquiry Question: How do you show 86 cents two different ways? Which way takes up less space and why? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading: Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Three: In Nonfiction Clubs We Can Compare and Contrast Information about Our Topics
“Club members can compare information in our nonfiction books to what we know in our own lives. Today I want to teach you that we can think about what the book says, and compare it with something similar in our own lives. By comparing these two bits of information, we can come to a new conclusion about the topic we’re studying.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
– Interactive Read Aloud: Bring Home the Butterflies by Tony Gomez
– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter five, which is a “How To”
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the “How To” of insects for their All-About Books.
– Teachers provide, explain, and discuss examples of the How-To chapter on the Smart Board.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss a “How To” and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter Five: “How To”).
– Students work independently to take notes on the “How To” of their insects.

Day 4
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, May 7, 2015. We will begin writing a “how to” for our insect research papers.
Inquiry Question: How might you arrange information in your “how to” to help readers understand clearly what you are writing? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading: Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Three: In Nonfiction Clubs We Can Compare and Contrast Information about Our Topics
“Today I want to teach you that club members can talk about differences in the information we’re learning. We can think about why they are different and then what might explain those differences. This can help us come to new understandings about our topics.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
– Interactive Read Aloud: Mrs.Carter’s Butterfly Garden by Steve Rich
– Using the notes, teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph for the “How To” of their All About Insect Book.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a chapter about the “How To” and illustrate each step of the “How To” of their All About Insect Book.

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 103 (10:00 – 10:45)

Day 5
Spelling Test

Spelling Words:
painter, washer, dryer, flyer, server, worker, singer, teacher, speaker, thinker, dreamer, reason, sketch, problem, justify, check

The above words will be tested on Friday, May 15.

Field Trip to Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum

Math
Lesson 9-7 Expand-and-Trade Subtraction, Part 2 (2 Days)
Students use expand-and-trade subtraction to subtract multi-digit numbers.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

Vocabulary: expand-and-trade subtraction

1. Warm Up

Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers pose the following subtraction problems involving multiples of 10 for students to solve.
70 – 20
65 -10
81 – 30
75 – 25
82 – 42
91 – 41

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
What is a ballpark estimate for 93 – 68 = ?

Have students share their ballpark estimates and invite students to demonstrate his or her solution using base-10 shorthand.
Display the problem in vertical form and list the students’ suggested base-10 shorthand.
Ask: How can we write each number in expanded form?

79
– 34

70 + 9
30 + 4

Ask: Do we need to make any trades?
Teachers guide students through subtracting the tens and then the ones.
Record the steps.

Repeat the process for other problems that do not need subtraction trades.

Introducing Expand-and-Trade Subtraction
Next teachers pose the problem

84
– 56

80 + 4
50 + 6

Have students trade one long for 10 ones.

Tell students that the subtraction method is called expand – and – trade subtraction because students use expanded form to think about whether they need to make trades.

160
– 77

100 + 60 + 0
70 + 7

Teachers record the following number sentence to summarize: 160 – 77 = 83 (“We do”, whole class)

Practicing Expand-and-Trade Subtraction
Students complete p. 234 – 235 to practice expand – and – trade subtraction. (“We do”, partners)

3. Practice
Playing Beat the Calculator
Student play Beat the Calculator as taught during Lesson 5-1.

Math Boxes 9-7
Students complete the mixed practice on p. 236. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 9-8 Equivalent Money Amounts (2 Days)
Students practice finding coin and bill combinations with equivalent values and using cents and dollars – and – cents notation.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers pose problems involving money.
How much money is 2 dimes and 6 pennies?
How much money is 1 quarter, 1 dime, and 3 pennies?

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Ask: How much money is 2 quarters, 5 dimes, 4 nickels, and 7 pennies.
Have volunteers share their strategies they used to find the total of the coins above. (“We do”, whole class)

Reviewing Values of Coins and Bills
Teachers review coin values posing the following questions:

How many pennies are in a nickel? In a dime?
How many pennies are in a quarter? In 50 cents?
How many pennies are in one dollar? In 2 dollars? In 10 dollars?
How many dimes are in a dollar? In 60 cents?
How many nickels are in a quarter? In a dollar? In half a dollar?
How many quarters are in a dollar? In a half dollar?

Tell students they will solve more problems involving money. (“We do”, whole class)

Using Dollars – and – Cents Notation
Ask: What is one way to write one dollar and twenty-seven cents (127 cents)?
What is another way?

Teachers say that an amount with a 0 before the decimal point, such as $0.74, is less than one dollar. It can be written with a cents symbol or dollar-and-cents notation.
Have volunteers scribe the following amounts:
275 cents
305 cents
89 cents

Teachers invite volunteers to share how they knew where to put the decimal point in 3-digit money amounts. (“We do”, whole class)

Making Equivalent Amounts with Coins and Bills
Teachers guide students to examine the Good Buys Poster in journal, p. 238.
Students read money amounts on the poster chorally.

Students complete journal p. 239. (“We do”, partners, small group)

3. Practice
Playing Hit the Target
Students play Hit the Target, using Math Masters p. G25. (“We do”, partners)

Observe
Which students seem to have a strategy for hitting the target number?
Which students need additional support to understand and play the game?

Discuss
How did you decide which number to add or subtract?
If you didn’t hit the target number on your first try, how did you decide what to do next? (“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes 9-8
Students complete Math Boxes 9-8 in journal p. 237. (“You do”, independent)

Science
Food Web
Objective: Students will know that a food web is many food chains linked together.
In a web all the parts are connected, which makes it strong and work effectively.
Picture a spider’s web. All the parts work together to make the web an effective way for the spider to catch prey.
Have note cards created with numerous animals and plants. Then read a teacher created story. As the story continues the students will toss the yarn to their peer. The students will continue until they have created a web. Now the teacher will discuss how in a web the animals rely on one another.
Sometimes an animal may become extinct or have a reduced number. Cut a few connecting strings. Look what happens to our web then. Often animals can adapt their food choice.
The food web we just created is not as complex or complete as the food webs in nature. This is because many times animals can eat more than one type of prey.
Guiding Questions:
Why is it called a food web?
What could happen if part of the food web is somehow disrupted?
Interactive Read-Aloud: Who Eats What? Food Chains and Food Webs by Patricia Lauber
Review
What are the characteristics of an environment? What are the characteristics of a habitat? Review how animals adapt for their environments.
Review the various geographical areas including, tundra, desert, rainforest, grassland, ocean, and freshwater.
Review the similarities and difference of food chains and food webs.
Unit Assessment: Animals and Their Environments

Social Studies
Using Tables:
Objective: Students will understand the characteristics of tables. Also, students will create their own table.
A table is a chart that is used in many non-fiction texts to organize information.
It is important to know how to read these tables.
Tables have many characteristics! Show a chart on the Smart Board. Begin teaching about the characteristics of the chart.
The title shows what information can be found on a table. It is important to look at all of the titles on charts because sometimes a chart can tell more than one thing.
To read a chart you must down the column and across the row.
Have students go back and work with their learning partners to work with a chart. They must answer these questions:
What is the title of the table?
What does the table show?
How is the information organized?
Write something you learned from the table.

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 106 (1:40 – 2:25)

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of April 26

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The Science Chapter 4 Test will be administered Thursday, May 7. Throughout this week, students will be reviewing by rereading the chapter and completing homework assignments. Please monitor your child’s homework by referring to the textbook pages listed at the bottom of each assignment.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 31 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming
– Teacher gives the rime. Students make rhyming words ending with the given rime.
Ex. T: ack S: black, knack, etc.
Onset Fluency
– Teacher says the word pair. Students open their eyes if the word pair begins with the same vowel sound. Students close their eyes if the word pair do not begin with the same vowel sound.
Blending
– Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Ex. T: /b-a-k-e-r/ S: baker
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Ex. T:/yawn/ S: yAWn
Segmenting
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, T: winner S: winner /w-i-n-er/
Substituting
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes
– Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Reading Centers: Kindle books about insects
Science Center: Observing and noting mealworms’ and crickets’ behavior
Technology Center: A.R. on mini- IPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Sing “What is an Insect Song” by Dove Whisper on You Tube

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, April 27, 2015. We will learn how to measure lengths to the nearest half-inch.
Inquiry Question: How do you determine the halfway point between two numbers? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can use our skills of envisioning what the author is saying to really think about the information being presented. We can read a fact on the page and look at the picture. Then we can make the picture move like a movie by reading more facts on that same page. As we see what the author says, we can say what we think about what we see.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: The Big Book of Bugs Damselflies and Dragonflies by DK Publishing p.18-19
Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What are the characteristics of the habitats of damselflies and dragonflies?
-What elements of the habitat are essential to the insects’ survival?
– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter two, which is the insect’s habitat.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the habitat of insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the habitats of their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter two: Habitat(s) of the Insect).
-Students work independently to take notes on the habitat(s) of their insects.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 28, 2015. We will discuss ways in which people respond to natural disasters.
Inquiry Question: How can one be safe during a tornado? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“To get ideas, readers don’t just let the facts fly over our heads. Today I want to teach you that we really try to understand and imagine what we’re learning.
When we do this, we can think about why this information matters, and what our own thoughts about the information are.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: The Big Book of Bugs Stick and Leaf Insects by DK Publishing p. 26-27
Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What are the characteristics of the habitat of stick and leaf insects?
-What elements of the habitat are essential to the insects’ survival?
Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s habitat(s).
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s habitat(s).

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Today is Wednesday, April 29 2015. We will write multi-digit numbers in expanded form and compare them.
Inquiry Question: How can seeing numbers in expanded form help you compare the numbers? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can use sentence starters with question words to help us get ideas. We can ask a question and then push ourselves to answer it. We can use words like, ‘How do. . . ?’ and ‘Why do. . . ?’ and ‘How come. . . ?’”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Ants, Facts and Cool Pictures by James Mayrose (Kindle)
Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What and how do aphids produce food for ants?
-What is the reciprocal relationship between ants and aphids?
– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter three, which is the insect’s diet.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the diet of the insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the diet of their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter two: The Insect’s Diet).
-Students work independently to take notes on the diet of their insects.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, April 30, 2015. We will read and discuss food chain.
Inquiry Question: How does a food chain work? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can share our revised thinking with our club members. We can take a fact that we have in the ‘I think I know’ column of our RAN chart and move it based on what we’re now learning. This new information can also help us have an idea.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Sneaker The Praying Mantis Watch Me and Learn by Maura Kempa
Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What is the diet of the praying mantis?
-What is the diet of larger praying mantis?
Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s diet.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s diet.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, May 1, 2015. We will observe and record our mealworms’ activities.
Inquiry Question: How does your mealworm grow? How can you tell if your mealworm has just gotten bigger? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
badly, madly, quickly, weekly, daily, sadly, gladly, proudly, softly, loudly, bravely, pattern, describe, extend, simple, determine

The above words will be tested on Friday, May 8.

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Complete Life Cycle of the Monarch Butterfly on You Tube (dscotprod)
Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What are the life cycle stages of butterflies?
-What is this type of metamorphosis named?

– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter four, which is the insect’s life cycle.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the life cycle of insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the life cycle of their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter Four: Life Cycle of the Insect).
-Students work independently to take notes on the life cycle of their insects.

Math
Lesson 9-4 Fractional Units of Length (2 Days)
Students measure lengths to the nearest half-inch.

Vocabulary: half-inch, fourth-inch, precise, quarter-inch

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers display addition problems with four addends. Encourage students to look for combinations that will make adding easier.
13 + 27 + 21 + 19 =
12 + 18 + 23 + 17 =
26 + 24 + 32 + 18 =

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
What is the length of your pinky finger? Is it about 1 inch or 2 inches long? (“We do”, whole class)

Discussing the Need for Precise Measurements
Have students measure their pinky fingers and label the sticky note in inches.
Students stand in the area of the classroom with the label that corresponds to their pinky finger measurement.
Ask: Can we tell from the measurements which child has the longest pinky finger? The shortest? Why?

Explain that precise measurements can help determine which child has the shortest and which child has the longest pinky finger, regardless of where the students are located. Tell students that a measurement is more precise when it is made using a smaller unit. For example, a measurement to the nearest inch is more precise than a measurement to the nearest foot.
Ask students to measure the length of their journals (from top to bottom, not side to side) to the nearest foot and the nearest inch.
Say: Imagine that a child from another school tells you that their math book is about 1 foot tall, and another child from the same school tells you the same math books are about 10 inches tall. Can you tell from the measurements from the nearest foot whether our math books taller than their math books? Can you tell from the measurements whether our math books are taller than their math books?

Teachers point out that measurement tools are made by people. There is a limit to what people can observe and what tools can do, so all measurements are approximate—close to the measurement but not exact. However, some tools are better than others for making more-precise measurements because they are marked with smaller units, and measurements that are more precise tell us more about the “exact” measurement of an object the less-precise measurements do.

Tell the students that they will explore a measurement unit that will allow them to make more-precise measurements. (“We do”, whole class)

Introducing Half-Inches
Teachers explain that measuring in half-inches rather than in inches or feet, produces more-precise measurements.
Display Math Masters, p. TA33 and have students examine the inch ruler shown on it. Ask a volunteer to point to the mark that divides an inch on the ruler into 2 equal parts. Point out that this mark is called the “half-inch mark”.
Ask: How long is the part between the zero mark and the half-inch mark? The part between the half-inch mark and the 1-inch mark?
Use your fingers to trace the spaces between the 0 and half-inch mark and between the half-inch and the 1-inch mark as the students count chorally: 1-half, 2-halves. Ask: How many half-inches make 1 whole inch?
Next ask: How many spaces are marked between 0 and 1-inch marks? Are these spaces equal in length? Have the students look for the marks that divide the inch into 4 equal parts. Ask: How long is the space between two such marks? Use your fingers to trace the quarter-inch space between the o and 1-inch marks and count the divisions of each inch in unison: 1-fourth, 2-fourths, 3-fourths, 4-fourths. (“We do”, whole class)
Ask: How many fourths-inches make 1 whole inch?
Teachers add a ruler divided into quarter-inches to the 4 Equal Shares poster.

Measuring to the Nearest Half-Inch
Students cut out the 12-inch ruler on Math Masters, p. 259.
Students measure the objects in journal 2, p. 227, and measure their desks.

3. Practice
Partitioning Shapes Into Equal Shares
Have the students partition circles into halves, thirds and fourths in journal, p. 228). (We do”, partners)

Math Boxes 9-4
Students complete the mixed practice in journal, p. 229. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 9-5 Reviewing Place Value
Students write multi-digit numbers in expanded form and compare them.

Vocabulary: thousand cube

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers will read-aloud the following descriptions of numbers. Have students write the numbers on erasable boards.
Write a number with 7 in the hundreds place, 0 in the tens place, and 4 in the ones place.

Daily Routines
The students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
How would you fill in the blanks below?
In 573, the 5 is worth ______, the 7 is worth ______, and the 3 is worth _______.

Reviewing Place Value and Expanded Form

What is the value of the 5?
What is the value of the 7?
What is the value of the 3?

Representing Multi-Digit Numbers
Distribute a Place-Value Mat (Math Masters, p. 262) to each child. Hold up a base-10 cube.
Ask: What is this base-10 block called? What is its value? Repeat with the long and flat.
Ask three volunteers to come to the front of the room. The first child, on the left as viewed by the class, holds 3 flats for all to see. The child in the middle holds up 5 longs, and the child on the right holds up 2 cubes.
Ask: What number do these blocks represent?
Have the students say the number aloud in unison and show it with number cards on their Place-Value Mats.
Next ask: How can these base-10 blocks help us write the expanded form for this number?
Have students write the expanded form.
Repeat this activity with several 3-digit numbers.

Reverse the procedure by displaying a 3-digit number and asking three volunteers to come to the front of the room and show the number with base-10 blocks. Then have all the students show the number with cards on their Place-Value Mats and write the number in expanded form. Include examples with 0 as a digit.

Teachers display the thousands cube. Ask: What do you think this block is worth?
How do you know?

Continue with additional volunteers to display the base-10 thousand cubes, flats, longs and cubes into four-digit numbers. Continue to write the numbers in expanded form. (“We do”, whole class)

Comparing Multi-Digit Numbers
Display the numbers 292 and 289.
Ask: to write the expanded form for each number, with the hundreds, tens and ones for each number aligned vertically.
Ask: How can we use expanded form of each number to help us compare them?
Teachers have students write a number sentence using > , < , =. (“We do”, whole class)

Then, students complete journal, p. 230 using expanded form to compare 3 and 4-digit numbers. (“We do”, partners; small groups)

3. Practice
Playing Shape Capture
Students identify attributes in shapes by playing Shape Capture. (“We do”, partners, teams)
Observe:
Which students can correctly find shapes with specified attributes?
Which students are checking other team’s or player’s selections?
Discuss
How did you make sure the other team or player was capturing shapes that matched the Attributes Cards?
Which shapes were easy to capture? Which were harder to capture? Why?

Math Boxes 9-5
Students complete Math Boxes 9-5 in journal, p. 231. (“You do”, independent)

3. Practice
Playing Shape Capture

Math Boxes 9-5

Lesson 9-6 (2 Days)
Expand-and-Trade Subtraction, Part 1
Students use base-10 blocks to solve subtraction problems. This prepares them to learn expand-and-trade subtraction in the next lesson.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students write numbers in expanded form.
508; 876; 1,090; 2,007

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
How can you utilize base-10 blocks to show 221 in at least three different ways?
What base-10 symbols would you write?

Representing Trades with Base-10 Blocks
Have students share their different representations.
Teachers record several examples, making sure to include the following representations.
2 flats, 2 longs, 1 cube
1 flat, 12 longs, 1 cube

Teachers guide a discussion about how students might translate from one representation to the other. For example, if they started with 2 flats, 2 longs, and 1 cube, they could trade 1 flat for 10 longs.
The students could also start with 12 longs, and 1 cube, and then trade 10 longs for 1 flat.

Ask: Which uses the fewest blocks? How do you know?

Have students model the trades with their base-10 blocks.

How could we use expanded form to show the representation with the smallest number of blocks?

Teachers display 200 + 20 + 1 and point out that each number in the expanded form shows the value of one type of block.
Ask: What number model could we write for the other representation?
Teachers display 100 + 120 + 1 and make the connection between the addends and each type of block. (“We do”, whole class)

Representing Subtraction without Trades
Teachers remind students that although there are many different ways to represent a number using base-10 blocks, they can use the fewest possible blocks by matching the number of each type of block to the digits in the number. Have students use the fewest possible base-10 blocks to represent the number 45. Record 4 longs and 5 cubes in base-10 shorthand for the class.
Ask: Are there enough longs and cubes for me to remove 2 longs and 2 cubes? How do you know?
Then ask students how they would use their blocks to show 45 – 22. As they respond, record these steps on the Class Data Pad.

Repeat this process with other subtraction problems that do not require a trade, such as 65 – 31 and 138 – 17. Discuss students’ representations as a class as you record the steps on the Class Data Pad.

Representing Subtraction with Trades
Teachers tell students they will now use their base-10 blocks to solve 53 – 37. Ask the students to represent 53 with base-10 blocks. When they have finished, record a sketch of 5 longs and 3 cubes.
Ask: Are there enough longs and cubes for me to remove 3 longs and 7 cubes?
How can I get more cubes so that I can remove 7 cubes? Teachers have the students trade with their base-10 blocks. Represent this trade on your sketch by crossing out 1 ling and adding 10 cubes.
Ask: Do our blocks still show the number 53?
Do we have enough blocks so we can remove 3 longs and 7 cubes (37) now? Complete the subtraction of 37 removing 3 longs and 7 cubes.
Count the remaining blocks with students. Record the number sentence 53 – 37 = 16.

Repeat this process with other subtraction problems that require trades, such as 72 – 38 and 114 – 86. Discuss the students’ representations as a class while recording the steps on the Class Data Pad. (“We do”, whole class)

Subtracting with Base-10 Blocks
Teachers have students recall how they can check their answers for reasonableness. Remind them that making ballpark estimates can be helpful when they use any addition or subtraction method. If their estimates are not close to their ballpark estimates, then students know they need to look back at their work and fix something. (“We do”, whole class)

Students complete the problems in journal, p. 232. (“We do”, partner; small groups)

3. Practice
Drawing a Line Plot
Teachers have students turn to journal, p. 193 and record their head-size measurements on a sticky-note. Remind them to write large. Teachers guide students to display the sticky-notes in order from smallest to largest. Tell students they will draw line plots to show class head-size measurements. (“We do”, whole class; partners)

Distribute Math Master, p. TA32 or draw a line plot. Have students suggest a label for the horizontal axis and write it below the line. Then have them suggest a title for the line plot and record it. (“We do”, whole class)
Next discuss the horizontal scale for the line plot. The head-size data include measurements to the nearest centimeter. The scale should start with the smallest head size in the class. Teachers model writing the scale while students do the same. Have students draw Xs to represent the class data on their line plots. (“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes 9-6
Students complete the mixed practice with Math Boxes 9-6 in journal, p. 233. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Science
Objective: Students will learn about the environment and habitats in the grassland and tundra.
Grassland:
Grassland is an open area covered with grass. There are few trees. This makes it difficult for large animals to hide anywhere.
What could be one issue for large animals in the grassland?
Often animals travel in groups to stay more protected from predators.
Read Aloud: What Can Live in a Grassland by Sheila Anderson
Tundra: A cold and snowy environment. The plants grow low to the ground to help protect them from the harsh cold environments. They also grow close together.
Animals in this area have thick fur and fat. Both of these help animals in the frigid tundra stay alive.
How have plants and animals adapted to living in the tundra.
Why do plants on the tundra grow close together?
Complete the fat science exploration.

Place shortening in a Ziploc bag. Have the students put one hand in another Ziploc bag and then put that hand in the shortening bag. Leave the other hand bare. Students will then place their hands in cold water to see how much warmer the bag with shortening (fat) is than the hand without.
Food Chain
Read Aloud:Who Eats What? Food Chains and Food Webs by Patricia Lauber
Objective: Students will be able to describe how a food chain works.
A food chain is the order in which living things eat one another.
Begin by showing a basic food chain.
A human eats a hamburger. The hamburger is a cow. The cow ate grass. We just created a simple food chain.
A food chain transfers energy from living thing to living thing.
The grass has received energy from the sun. The cow then ate that grass so the energy was transferred to the cow. The human then received the energy when he/she ate the cow meat.
In the food chain there are two types of animals; they are either predators or prey.
A predator is an animal that hunts for food. The prey is the animal that is being hunted.
Often an animal can be both a predator and the prey.
A snake can be the predator of mice, but will be the prey for an owl.
Have students go back to their seat. Each cluster will have a set of animals and plants. They will be given time to put themselves in an order they believe to be accurate.
The students will the go to the front of the class and say for example.
I am a snake. I am the predator for the mouse and the prey for an owl.
Guiding Questions:
Describe why an animal can be the predator and the prey.
What is transferred in the food chain?

Students observe and record their mealworms’ activities.

Social Studies
Engage prior knowledge through read aloud: Poem That Kind of Day by Eloise Greenfield
Discuss two more Natural Hazards.
How can the weather affect the moods of people?
Well there are sometimes events in the weather that change the lives of people.
Can someone tell me a natural hazard that would affect humans?
There are many natural hazards that can affect people.
These powerful hazards will change the lives of humans.
Also, humans must adapt to survive the storms, and every storm takes a different way of surviving.
Blizzards: Wind drives stow in a heavy snowstorm called a blizzard.
http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=ACxRt5WhY_c
What safety measures do humans need to take because of a blizzard?
Floods: When snow melts or there is a lot of rain, creeks and rivers may flood or leave their banks.
Continue guided note page
Hurricanes are created in the Ocean. They are high wind and rain storms of the coasts. It creates a circular motion with center called the eye.
Watch: http://www.youtube
.com/watch?v=zP4rgvu4xDE
Describe how a human would have to react to a hurricane to stay safe.
Tornado: A strong, whirling wind that causes great damage to land and buildings.
http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=ad5lj876UP0
How do humans need to react to the natural hazard called a tornado?

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 106 (Tuesday1:40 – 2:25) and room 103 (Friday 1:40 – 2:25)

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of April 19

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We had a good turnout for report card pick-up and parent-teacher conferences. Thank you, parents, guardians, and family members. All of you had to take time out of your busy schedules to come to the conferences, and we sincerely applaud you for your dedication. Without your support for your child’s education, our jobs would not be as exciting and enriching as they are.

Students will take a social studies quiz on Friday, April 24. For this quiz, students will need to be able to identify oceans and continents from a given map. This link may be useful in helping your child review for the quiz: http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/World_Continents.htm .

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 30 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming
– Teacher gives the rime. Students make rhyming words ending with the given rime.
Ex. T: ack S: black, knack, etc.
Onset Fluency
– Teacher says the word pair. Students open their eyes if the word pair begins with the same vowel sound. Students close their eyes if the word pair do not begin with the same vowel sound.
Blending
– Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Ex. T: /b-a-k-e-r/ S: baker
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Ex. T:/yawn/ S: yAWn
Segmenting
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, T: winner S: winner /w-i-n-er/
Substituting
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes
– Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Sing “Icky Insects” by Silly Bus YouTube

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Reading Centers: Reading A to Z Awesome Ants by Rus Buyok
Word Study: Word Sorts: Adding –ing to Words With VC and VCC Patterns
Spelling Words
Math Center: Making Equal Parts
Students use pattern blocks to make equal parts
Technology Center: A.R. on mini- IPads

Day1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, April 20, 2015. We will read and discuss about insects.
Inquiry Question: How are insects important to our environment? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that club members don’t just ‘read’ information to one another. We explain and discuss it. Careful nonfiction readers always try to put what we’ve read into our own words. We might read a bit, then put the text down and say, ‘What the author is saying is that . . .’ or ‘What this means is . . . .’ This will help us prepare to talk in our clubs later.”

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
– Teachers guide students utilizing a KWL chart.
– Teachers chart what the students Know, followed by What the students would like to learn.

Interactive Read-Aloud: Insects National Geographic by Robin Bernard
Questions to guide the read-aloud
– What are the characteristics of an insect?
– What is unique about an insect?
– How do insects travel?
– Are insects important to our environment? Why?
– Teachers present the rubric to explain expectations for the insect All-About Books.

(Discussion points used the following day to model note taking for insect research projects.)
– Students work in pairs to view books on insects.

Day 2
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 21, 2015. We will explore equal shares in Math.
Inquiry Question: How do you share 2 brownies equally with 3 people? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that nonfiction readers have read closely to find the main ideas in the text. We read the first sentence of a paragraph and ask, ‘What is this saying?’ Then we read on, sentence by sentence, asking, ‘How does this fit with what’s been said so far?’ to help us find the main idea. Readers take the sentences we’ve read and say what we learned in one short statement.”
Tip: “Readers of nonfiction can think about the topic of the whole book and the subtopic of the section. Then, as we read the sentences on the page, we can think, ‘What’s the part of the larger topic this section is dealing with? What does the author want me to think, know, or understand about that subtopic?’ ”

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
Interactive Read-Aloud: Bugs Are Insects by Anne Rockwell p.1-15

– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter one, which is what is an insect and its characteristics.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing the characteristics of insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the characteristics of insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter One: Characteristics of Insects).
– Students work independently to take notes on the characteristics of insects.

Day 3
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Today is Wednesday, April 22 2015. We will read and discuss taking notes about your chosen insect.
Inquiry Question: What are the characteristics of your chosen insect? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Mid-Workshop Teaching Point: “Readers are on the lookout for when our book switches topics. We know that sometimes there isn’t a heading that will alert us to the change, and instead we should think, ‘What part of the main topic is this dealing with? Is it the same or different from the last page?’”
Teaching Share: “Sometimes the author is being clever with the section heading and we need to figure out what the section is really about. We can read each sentence and think, ‘How does this fact fit with the heading?’ Then, at the end of the page or section, we can retitle that section with a heading that makes sense.”

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
– Interactive Read Aloud: Bugs Are Insects by Anne Rockwell p.16-33

– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter one; what are the specific characteristics of each student’s chosen insect.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing the characteristics of insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the characteristics of each student’s chosen insect, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter One: Characteristics of each student’s chosen insect).
– Students work independently to take notes on the characteristics of their chosen insects.

Day 4
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, April 23, 2015. We will read and discuss the characteristics of fresh water and saltwater environments.
Inquiry Question: What are the similarities of and differences of fresh water and saltwater environments? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that we can come to our clubs with confusions or misunderstandings and talk to the other members of the club to clarify them. We may start by saying what we read in our book and explaining what’s confusing. Then, the other members in the club can talk back to the questioning member to explain or ask further questions to help fix up the confusion.”

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
Interactive Read-Aloud: Bugs and Other Insects by Bobbie Kalman and Tammy Everts p. 4-5

– Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.

Day 5
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, April 24, 2015. We will clarify our Open Response drawings and words to explain and revise our thinking.
Inquiry Question: How can examining and discussing a student’s Open Response help you clarify your thinking? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
whale, when, where, what, why, which, whistle, whip, whiff, while, whirl, represent, show, display, know, count

The above words will be tested on Friday, May 1.

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Readers can have reactions to the information presented in our books. We can think about how we feel when we read a section or part of our book, and make a statement about what our response is. We can say, ‘That is really important because . . . ’ ‘This part makes me feel . . . ,’ or ‘This seems really surprising because. . . .’”

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
Teachers re-demonstrate to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.
– Using their notes, students continue composing a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Math
Lesson 9-1 Creating and Naming Equal Parts
Students divide shapes and use fraction vocabulary to name the shares.

Vocabulary: equal share, one-half (1-half), two-halves (2-halves), one-fourth (1-fourth), one-quarter (1-quarter), four-fourths (4-fourths), one-third (1-third), three-thirds (3-thirds)

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency/Math talk
Students write numbers in expanded from. They explain their answers.

2. Focus
Math Message
Take 8 squares.
Two students want to share a sandwich equally. Fold a paper square to show how to divide the sandwich into 2 equal shares. Draw a line on the fold. Talk with a partner. Did you both fold the square the same way?

Folding Squares into Equal Shares (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Math Message Follow-Up: Invite students to share the different ways they folded the squares. Expect students to fold a square into 2 equal shares in two ways: from side to side and diagonally.
Ask: How can you show your partner that you have equal shares?
Explain that students will divide squares into different numbers of equal shares and name the shares.

Naming 2, 4 and 3 Equal Shares (Whole Class/Small Group/ Partner)
Begin a 2 Equal Shares poster on the Class Data Pad or chart paper. Have students refer to their paper squares from the previous activity. Ask the following questions. Record students’ answers on the poster.
How can you name one student’s share?
How can you name both shares together?
If students do not mention all of the names shown on the same poster, write one of the missing names and ask students why it should be on the poster. Repeat with any other missing names. As students share the names of one-half and two-halves, point out that these can be written as number-and-word combinations: 1-half and 2-halves.

To complete the poster, attach examples of students’ squares showing equal shares two different ways. As the unit progress, add examples of other shapes partitioned into halves.

Draw a square divided into 2 unequal parts. Tell students it is a piece of toast. Ask: Did I divide the toast into halves?
Why or why not?

Next, have students take another square. Ask: How can 4 students share a sandwich equally? Have partners fold several squares of paper to show as many different ways as possible to divide a sandwich into 4 equal parts. Tell them to draw lines along the folds to show the equal shares.

Observe partners as they work. If they do not suggest all of the solutions, prompt them to look for other solutions.

Ask students how they can show that the shares of each paper square are equal.

Begin a 4 Equal Shares poster on the Class Data Pad. Ask the following questions. Record students’ answer on the poster.
How can you name on student’s share?
How can you name all of the shares together?

If students do not mention all of the names shown on the same poster, write one of the missing names and ask students why this name should be include on the poster. Repeat with any other missing names.

To complete the poster, attach examples of student’s squares showing 4 equal shares three different ways. As the unit progresses, add examples of other shapes partitioned into fourths.

Then discuss the idea of 3 equal shares. Ask: How can 3 students share a sandwich equally? Have partners use paper squares to show as many different ways as possible to divide a sandwich into 3 equal shares. Before they begin, suggest that they think about what the 3 equal parts should look like.

Begin a 3 Equal Shares poster. Ask the following questions and record students’ answer on the poster.
How can you name one student’s share?
How can you name all of the shares together?

If students do not mention all of the names shown on the poster, write one of the missing names and ask students why it should
Be included on the poster. Repeat with any other missing names.

To complete the poster, trace a square and ask a volunteer to draw on it to show 3 equal shares. As the unit progresses, add examples of other shapes partitioned into thirds.

Next, have students sort their squares into piles according to whether they show 2, 3, or 4 equal parts. Ask:
Is the whole the same for all of the squares you folded? How do you know?
Are the shares the same for all of the squares you folded? How do you know?

Partitioning Shapes (Whole Class/ Small Group/ Partner)
Students partition shapes and, for each shape, name a single part and the whole. Some students may benefit from folding 8.5-by-11” sheets of paper to help them partition the shapes.

Assessment Check-In (Math Journal2, pp. 220-221)
Expect most students to be able to show one way to partition the rectangles on journal pages 220-221 into halves, fourths, and thirds and write one name for a part and one name for all of the parts together. Some students may be able to partition the rectangles in multiple ways and write more than one name for a part or for all of the parts together.

Summarize
Refer to the 2 Equal Shares, 4 Equal Shares, and 3 Equal Shares posters. Review the names on each poster for 1 share and for all shares together. Emphasize that these names can be used only for figures divided into parts that are equal. Have volunteers add rectangle drawings with appropriate partitions to each poster.

3. Practice
Playing Array Concentration (partner)
Math Masters, p. G31
Students play Array Concentration to practice finding how many objects are in arrays and writing number models.
Observe
– Do students have efficient strategies for finding the total number of dots in an array? Which students need additional support?
Discuss
– How did you find the total? Is there a faster way?
– How do you know that your number model matches the array?

Students complete Math Boxes 9-1 independently.

Lesson 9-2 Exploring Equal Shares, Pattern-Block Fractions, and Number Lines (2 Days)
Students explore equal shares of different shapes, use pattern blocks to divide shapes, and make a number line.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency/Math talk
Display addition problems with three or four addends. Ask students to look for combinations to make adding easier. Students explain their reasoning.

13 + 17 + 12 + 20 =
14 + 23 + 21 + 27=

2. Focus
Math Message
Solve the problem on journal page 223. Explain your thinking to a partner.

Explaining Equal Shares
(Whole Class/ Small Group/ Partner)
Math Message Follow-Up:
Invite student to share their thinking about whether Juan shared the cracker equally.

Some students may think that Juan didn’t share the cracker equally because the pieces are different shapes. Guide the discussion so that students see that the 3 shares are equal in size. If no one mentions that each piece is composed of 3 smaller squares, display Math Masters, page 248 and use shading to show students the 3 small squares that make up each share.

After explaining the Explorations activities, assign groups to each one. Plan to spend most of your time with students working on

Exploration A: Sharing Crackers
Students divide crackers into equal parts and explain how they know the parts are equal.

Teachers explain that they can draw horizontal or vertical (but not diagonal) line segments to connect the dots on the crackers. (“We do”, whole class)

After students divide the crackers, have them write fraction words to name parts of each cracker. (“We do”, partners)

Exploration B: Making Equal Parts
Students use pattern blocks to divide shapes into equal parts.
Have students cover shapes with pattern blocks on Math Masters, p. 215-252 and use their Pattern Block Template to record their work. (“We do”, partners, small groups)

Exploration C: Making a Number Line
Students make number lines and label their halfway marks.
Students use paper strips to make number lines and label them with whole numbers. They discuss names for the number represented by tick marks between whole numbers. (“We do”, partners, small groups)

Summarize
Invite volunteers to discuss how they know that the crackers from Exploration A were divided into equal shares. (“We do”, whole class)
3. Practice
Practicing with Fact Triangles

Math Boxes 9-2
Students complete Math Boxes 9-2 to reinforce and maintain previously taught concepts.

Lesson 9-3 Sharing Muffins (2 Days)
Day 1: Open Response
Students decide how to share muffins equally and use words to name the shares.

Vocabulary: equal shares, one-half, two-halves, one-fourth, four-fourths, one-quarter

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students solve addition problems with 3 or more addends.
Teachers display addition problems with four addends. Encourage students to look for combinations that make the addition easier.

13 + 17 + 12 + 20 =
14 + 23 + 21 + 27=
13 + 17 + 22 + 18=

2. Focus
Math Talk
Students share their thinking about ways of naming all the shares in a shape partitioned into thirds. Discuss how both Jaylan and Leila had correct ways of naming the partitioned paper.

An Art Project
Students discuss their ideas about ways of naming all the shares of a shape partitioned into thirds. Use this discussion to review the representations and vocabulary on the Class Equal Shares Poster. (“We do”, whole class)

Solving the Open Response Problem
Students show how to divide muffins equally among two and four students, describing each student’s share.

Distribute Math Masters, p. 254-255. Read the problem as a class and ask partners to discuss what the problem asks them to do.
Encourage students to refer to the Equal Shares Posters and use fraction vocabulary like that on the posters as they talk about and write responses to the problem. Review the terms one-half, two-halves, one-fourth, four fourths. Tell students that an important part of the task is to write how much a muffin is in one student’s share.

Circulate as the students work. Ask students to explain their drawings and descriptions of one student’s share, and encourage them to add details to clarify responses.

Assessment Opportunity
Note students’ strategies.

Summarize
Ask: How did you show your work and thinking for this problem? Did you use words, symbols, or anything else?

Collect Students’ work to evaluate and prepare for Day 2

Day 2: Open Response
Review student work, teacher notes, and the rubric on p. 795 to plan ways to help students meet expectations on both the content and practice standards. Look for misconceptions in students’ description so of the as well as different correct ways children choose to share muffins and name the shares

2b. Focus
Display responses to Problem 1 that show different strategies for sharing muffins and describing one child’s share.
Ask:
How do you think student A shared the muffins?
Does student B have the same strategy for sharing the muffins?
How does the drawing for student A show how many show how much muffin Anna or Sammy get?
How does the drawing for student B show how many show how much muffin Anna or Sammy get?
Do student A and student B agree or disagree about how much muffin goes to Anna or Sammy?
For student A, do the words about a child’s share match the drawing?
For student B, do the words about a child’s share match the drawing?

Display responses to Problem 2. Discuss the strategies students use to share muffins and how they describe one child’s share. Have students interpret and compare the strategies.
What do you think this student is trying to show with this drawing?
Do you have suggestions for how the drawing can be improved?
What do you think this student is trying to say with the words?
Do you have suggestions for how the words can be improved?
Have students improve the clarity and completeness of their drawings and descriptions of each child’s share.

3. Practice
Math Boxes 9-3
Students practice and maintain skills.

Science
Objective: Students will be able to describe the characteristics of a freshwater habitat.
A pond, lake, river, creek are often freshwater.
Describe to me what a pond is.
A pond is a small freshwater environment.
Many animals and plants call ponds and other freshwater environments their habitats.
Show pictures of some of these animals including fish, beaver, water lilies, and the water strider.
Fish have gills to breathe underwater.
The beaver has webbed feet so it can swim more easily through water. The beaver also has extremely sharp teeth to cut down trees and build homes.
The water lilies grow on the top of the water to get the needed sunlight for survival.
The water strider’s legs help it walk on water without ever sinking.
What do we notice about the legs of the water strider?
Pretend you are a fresh water animal or plant. Draw yourself with the adaptations that would help you survive. Or write about the adaptations you would have and why. Be sure to label your adaptations.
Objective: Students will be able to describe the environments of both the desert and rainforest. They will describe one similarity and one difference of these environments.
Rainforest: A wet environment that gets rain nearly every day.
Often there is less growth near the bottom of the rain forest.
Infer why there is less growth near the bottom of the rainforest.
The rainforest had very tall trees that reach for the sunlight. Therefore other plants have adapted to grow near the top of these trees.
Desert: A dry environment that gets little rain. Few plants and animals can survive in this environment.
Plants that do survive have adapted in order to survive.
A cactus stores water to use when needed.
Other animals have adapted the way they find food.
On a Chicago summer is it cooler or hotter at night?
It is also cooler in the desert. Therefore, many animals, like the lizard, hide in the shade all day and search for food at night when it is much cooler.
Read Aloud: What Can Live in a Desert? by Sheila Anderson
Students will be able to describe the life in an ocean and the differences between salt water and fresh water.

The students view short videos, which introduce oceans. One of the videos is an introduction to the types of animals in the ocean environment.
Students will also watch Why the oceans are salty from


25 Most Terrifying Sea Creatures

Social Studies
Read Aloud: Ox Cart Man by Donald Hall
This book is about the past and farming in the past.
Before reading:
What is the past?
This book is about how farming was in the past.
Can anyone predict what may be the same and what may be different than the read-aloud that was on Friday?
What may be different?
After Reading:
Chart Ox Cart Man on the Venn diagram.

Oceans and Continents Quiz

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 106 Tuesday (1:40 – 2:25)

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 103 Friday (1:40 – 2:25)

Thank you for your support,

Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of April 12

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We hope you and your family had a good spring break.

As part of the FOSS science program, second grade students are observing and feeding mealworms (beetle larvae stage), Painted Lady butterflies (pupae stage), and crickets (nymph stage). These experiences are providing a path to develop scientific thinking, including formulating inquiry questions essential for the insect research project.
Therefore, students will be writing insect-themed research papers as well as designing and creating an insect habitat. Please provide your child with a cardboard shoebox. If your child did not bring Crayola Model Magic last fall, please submit one package this week.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 29
Rhyming (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the nonsense word. Students produce real rhyming words.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and then isolate the onset from the rime, as written. Ex: T: pouch, S: pouch /p-ouch/
Blending (Words change daily)
– Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Segmenting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, Teacher: found, Students: found; /f-ou-n-d/
Substituting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
– Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Sing “A Hole in the Bottom of the Sea” (food chain) from YouTube, Barefoot Books

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Word Study: Word Sorts: Adding –ing to Words With VC and VCC Patterns
Spelling Words
Math Center: Building pyramids.
Students build pyramids from straws and twist ties.
Technology Center:
A.R. on mini- IPads

Day1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, April 13, 2015. We will read and discuss about wind power during social studies.
Inquiry Question: How can we utilize wind as a power source? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Interactive Read-Aloud: Dear Mrs. LaRue Letters from Obedience School by Mark Teague

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Launching The Unit
This part is all about reminding children that they already know a lot about how to read nonfiction and that it’s time to switch from thinking about characters to reactivating that nonfiction mindset. Bring out your old nonfiction charts. Remind children of all they know.
Explain to students about book clubs:
– A reading club is formed around a basket of books that has been collected because the books relate to one another in some way.
– A reading club doesn’t involve a particular task, other than reading and talking about books.
– Reading clubs aren’t a permanent daily structure of every reading workshop period all year, but instead are used a couple times a year for two to four weeks at a time.
– In a reading club, readers partner with other children who are reading at about the same reading level and have the same or similar interests.
– Partners read and talk about texts in their reading clubs, and then they ponder questions, develop ideas, develop theories, celebrate discoveries, and so on.
– The work that students do in reading clubs allows them to become experts on their topics and increases their comfort and familiarity with different kinds of texts and reading strategies.
– Club and partnership work are teacher-supported as the teacher confers with individuals, partners, and club members.
– Reading clubs are in addition to, not instead of, daily independent reading.
Assign students into clubs.
During conversations, mentor children in the kind of independent talk they will initiate in their club. When mentoring students’ conversations, exemplify the kind of independent thinking that students are expected to do as they read.
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session13 Prove it! Adding Quotes to support Opinions
Minilesson
Connection: Share your observations about the impressive work students have been doing in this unit. Recall prior learning about quotation marks and hint at the new work they can do. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate how you use direct quotes from the touchtone text to support your opinion. Reread your writing, thinking about your opinion. Then go back to the text to find evidence to support your opinion. Finally, add in the direct quote, using revision strips and quotation marks. Restate the entire teaching point, recapping your process, to reinforce the demonstration.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to plan for their independent work. Ask students to recall their writing and make a plan for how to make it stronger by quoting the books they are writing about.
Link: Remind students to call upon all they know to make their writing strong and powerful. Give them an opportunity to get started on their revision work, right in the meeting area, before sending them off to work independently.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 14, 2015. We will continue to write letters of nominations of favorite books.
Inquiry Question: How can you persuade readers to read your nominated book? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Reading
– Interactive Read Aloud: Insects What Does It Take To Be An Insect? P. 4-5 by Molly Marr

Using the read aloud to review with students that when we read nonfiction texts independently, we don’t just roar on, tearing through the text at the speed of a Ferrari. We pause quickly and often to collect our understanding. We think, “What have we learned so far?” or “What was this part about?” and hold this information in our mind as we move forward in the book. Of course, when readers stop to recollect what we’ve just read, we are likely to be more mindful, also, of what ought to come next. Tell students they need to learn to categorize text into sections to make sense of the sections, and teach them how to make mental containers as they read and drop the information they learn into the various categories.
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
– Interactive Read Aloud: LaRue Across America Postcards From America by Mark Teague
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 14 Good. Better. Best.

Have a student share his or her writing with the whole class.
Students also share their writing with a partner.
Review vocabulary words by having students get up to stretch and say out loud what the words mean: introduction, opinion, persuade, conclusion, evidence

Minilesson
Connection: Tell students a story about watching movies and then comparing them in a discussion with friends. Relate this to the kind of thinking and writing they can do across books. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Show students how you compare similar books. Model your thinking closely about what aspects of the book you are comparing, and then include this thinking in your writing. Debrief, reviewing the steps you went through to compare books and think closely about the comparison.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to practice this work using books from your collection.
Link: Remind students how making comparisons between books is another kind of evidence that can support their opinion. Give them an opportunity to come up with some possible books to compare.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 3
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, April 15, 2015. We will read and discuss environmental factors which require animals and plants to adapt in order to survive.
Inquiry Question: What are some ways animals and plants adapt? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Interactive Read Aloud: Detective LaRue Letters from the Investigation by Mark Teague

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
This part is all about reminding children that they already know a lot about how to read nonfiction and that it’s time to switch from thinking about characters to reactivating that nonfiction mindset. Bring out your old nonfiction charts. Remind children of all they know.
“Today I want to teach you that we need to come to our clubs prepared to talk about our topics. One way we can do this is to really listen to the text. We don’t just read with explaining voices; nonfiction readers, in fact, actually explain the text to ourselves as we go along—we pause after a few words and explain whatever we’ve read to ourselves, using our own words if we can. It’s almost like the explaining voice in our head is a real teacher who makes sure we understand each section before moving on. Then we will be ready to explain and talk in our clubs about our topic.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session15 Giving Readers Signposts and Rest Stops
Minilesson
Connection: Gather your writers and explain how longer sentences need some rest stops. Name the teaching point.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Invite your writers to notice some rest stop punctuation in a few well-written sentences. Guide them through the steps of first noticing the punctuation and then asking themselves what the purpose of the punctuation is. Record punctuation observations in a class chart.
Link: Before sending students off, give them a chance to try rest-stop punctuation in their own fabulous writing. Remind the class that punctuation is one way of taking care of your readers.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4
Parent/Teacher Conferences
No Class for Students

Day 5
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, April 17, 2015. We will write about the lab observations from the Duck Feather experiments.
Inquiry Question: What additional animal can you identify that has a similar characteristic like the duck’s feather? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
bolt, jolt, colt, felt, belt, welt, built, stilt, wilt, melt, salt, face, edge, vertices, set, tally

The above words will be tested on Friday, April 24.

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that we need to come to our club ready to talk about the main ideas about our topic. We can figure out the main idea by noticing the who and what of the page or part. This helps us name the subject and the action as we read. To find the main idea, we can think, ‘What’s the relationship between the who and the what?’ and ‘How can I say this main idea as a sentence?’ ”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 16 Writing Introductions and Conclusions to Captivate
Minilesson
Connection: Tell students that you are impressed with their nomination writing and all of the strategies that they are using to make their pieces powerful and persuasive. Explain that opinion writers have the challenge of catching the attention of their audience and communicating their claims, before releasing them. Name the inquiry question.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Set writers up to investigate a mentor text by guiding then through a series of steps that help students discover answers to the overarching question. Then listen in and coach, to elicit and collect their comments. Coach students to study structure, voice, word choice, and craft as they work in pairs. Listen in and highlight observations that students make. Reconvene the group to elicit students’ observations. Repeat their observations using more precise language, and record these on sticky notes to add to a Venn diagram chart.
Link: Send writers off to work independently, reminding them to call on prior knowledge as well as what they have learned today about writing introductions and conclusions.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Review/Games
(Day 1)
Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Exploring Arrays
What You Need
Exploring Arrays Record Sheet, page 112
cubes
paper clip

What to Do
Work with a partner
1. Spin the paper clip. Take the number of cubes that matches the number on which the paper clip lands.
2. Build an array using your cubes. The array should have the same number of cubes in each row. No cubes should be left over.
3. Record the number and draw the array on Exploring Arrays Record Sheet, page 112.
4. Build a different array with your cubes and record your work. The array should have the same number of cubes in each row with no cubes left over.
5. Repeat Step 1-4.

Talk About It
Describe your arrays to your partner.
My array has ___ rows. There are ___ cubes in each row.
My array has ___ columns. There are ___ cubes in each column.

(Day 2)
Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Adding Four 2-Digit Numbers

What You Need
spinner
paper clip
paper
pencil

What to Do
Work with a partner or by yourself.
1. Spin the spinner 4 times.
2. Write an addition problem using the numbers from the spinner.
3. Solve your addition problem.
4. Repeat 3 more times.

Talk About It
Tell someone which numbers you added first and why.

Unit 8 Assessment (Wednesday, April 15)
Skills:
– Draw a 3 or 4-sided shape with or without a right angle.
– Name and explain polygons (triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons).
– Recognize parallel sides in a polygon.
– Name attributes of 3-dimensonal shapes, such as cube, rectangular prism, pyramid, cylinder, cone, etc.) For example, a rectangular prism has 6 faces, the faces are rectangles, a rectangular prism has 12 sides and 8 vertices.
– Partition a rectangle into same-size squares.
– Draw an array with given rows and columns. Write a number model for the array.

Cumulative Assessment (Friday, April 17)
Skills:
– Tell time to the nearest 5 minutes.
– Estimate and measure lengths to the nearest inch and centimeter.
– Make friendly numbers to add four 2-digit numbers (e.g.13 + 12 + 17 + 28 = ? Add 13 and 17 first. Then add 12 and 28, etc.)
– Solve comparison number stories (e.g. Taylor is 54 inches tall. Gracie is 48 inches tall. How much taller is Taylor?)
– Read and interpret a bar graph.
– Use given data to create a bar graph.

Science
Switch the students thinking about the use of natural resources from the perspective of a human to a prospective of a living item in that environment.
Yesterday we talked about how humans use the natural resources.
How do other living species use the same natural resources?
What happens when there are no natural resources for these animals and plants to use?
Often because of humans or other environmental factors animals are forced to adapt in order to survive.
Some of these adaptations include extra blubber on ocean animals or how ducks have oily skin. These small adaptations happen over time. Often animals slowly change with the environment. The environment is constantly changing and animals and plants are a part of the environment.
Duck feather experiment:
Students will have two duck feathers, one they will cover in grease and the other they will not. The students will then dip each feather into water and notice the differences. The plain feather is before an animal like a duck adapted.
Vocabulary quiz (Friday, April 17) on the following words: habitat, adapt, rain forest, grassland, desert, ocean, pond, food chain, food web, and environment

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 103 (Friday 1:40 – 2:25)

Social Studies
Natural Resources continued:
Students will begin discussing the use of air and soil.
Read Aloud: Wind Power by David Neufeld
Who here has ever seen a windmill before?
Can some describe to me how these windmills look?
What does the environment where these windmills are located look like? Can someone infer why it is such barren land?
Can anyone infer how the windmill helps make energy?
How does soil help meet our need for food?
Have a discussion about some of the pros and cons of using natural resources to help humans.

Introduce the multi- level independent read aloud to support students of all reading levels.

Students will compare the tools people used in the past to the tools used today.
Discuss how technology has adapted in just the students’ lives.
Read-Aloud: Heartland by Diane Siebert
Teacher questions throughout reading.
Predict which tools we believe the characters in Heartland had that people from long ago also had.
Teacher and students will fill in a time line on the Smart Board. The time line will be focused on the time period of Heartland in comparison to the students’ birthdate, and approximate birth of parents, and grandparents
On Monday we will be reading Ox Cart Man by Donald Hall, which is a similar story, but from long, long ago.

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 106 (Tuesday 1:40 – 2:25)

Thank you for your support,

Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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