Week of April 24

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We had a good turnout for report card pick-up and parent-teacher conferences. Thank you, parents, guardians, and family members. All of you had to take time out of your busy schedules to come to the conferences, and we sincerely applaud you for your dedication. Without your support for your child’s education, our jobs would not be as exciting and enriching as they are.

Spring break begins Monday, April 18, for students and staff members. Classes resume Monday, April 25.

The science Living Things in Their Environment test will be administered Thursday, April 28. Throughout the week of April 24, students will be reviewing by viewing videos, rereading the chapter and completing homework assignments. Please help your child review by referring to the pages RS 26 – RS 30 that students have completed in class and taken home. Pages RS 31 and 32 will be completed in class on Monday.

The second grade classrooms will take their annual field trip to the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum on Friday, April 29. The field trip permission slip and payment are overdue. Please return them immediately upon returning from spring break if you haven’t already done so. At the museum, students will participate in a workshop entitled “Metamorphosing Monarchs” and visit the butterfly atrium. Students will need to bring a bag lunch from home on the day of the field trip, as we will be eating lunch at the museum. Please label the lunch bag with your child’s name.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Reading Centers: Reading A to Z Awesome Ants by Rus Buyok
Word Study: Word Sorts: Adding –ing to Words With VC and VCC Patterns
Spelling Words
Math Center: Making Equal Parts
Students use pattern blocks to make equal parts
Technology Center: A.R. on IPads
Reader’s Theater: Rapunzel
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level I (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 30
Rhyming (Words change daily)
– Teacher gives the rime. Students make rhyming words ending with the given rime.
Ex. T: ack S: black, knack, etc.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word pair. Students open their eyes if the word pair begins with the same vowel sound. Students close their eyes if the word pair do not begin with the same vowel sound.
Blending (Words change daily)
– Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Ex. T: /b-a-k-e-r/ S: baker
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Ex. T:/yawn/ S: yAWn
Segmenting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, T: winner S: winner /w-i-n-er/
Substituting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
– Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Greeting: Students greet each other in a language of choice.
– Sharing: Students share what they have written or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Sing “Icky Insects” by Silly Bus You Tube

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, April 25, 2016. We will read and discuss about insects.
Inquiry Question: How are insects important to our environment? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Launching The Unit
This part is all about reminding children that they already know a lot about how to read nonfiction and that it’s time to switch from thinking about characters to reactivating that nonfiction mindset. Bring out your old nonfiction charts. Remind children of all they know.
Explain to students about book clubs:
– A reading club is formed around a basket of books that has been collected because the books relate to one another in some way.
– A reading club doesn’t involve a particular task, other than reading and talking about books.
– Reading clubs aren’t a permanent daily structure of every reading workshop period all year, but instead are used a couple times a year for two to four weeks at a time.
– In a reading club, readers partner with other children who are reading at about the same reading level and have the same or similar interests.
– Partners read and talk about texts in their reading clubs, and then they ponder questions, develop ideas, develop theories, celebrate discoveries, and so on.
– The work that students do in reading clubs allows them to become experts on their topics and increases their comfort and familiarity with different kinds of texts and reading strategies.
– Club and partnership work are teacher-supported as the teacher confers with individuals, partners, and club members.
– Reading clubs are in addition to, not instead of, daily independent reading.
Assign students into clubs.
During conversations, mentor children in the kind of independent talk they will initiate in their club. When mentoring students’ conversations, exemplify the kind of independent thinking that students are expected to do as they read.
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Interactive Read-Aloud: Insects by Melissa Stewart

Questions to guide the read-aloud
– What are the characteristics of an insect?
– What is unique about an insect?
– How do insects travel?
– Are insects important to our environment? Why?
– Teachers present the rubric to explain expectations for the insect All-About Books.

(Discussion points used the following day to model note taking for insect research projects.)
– Students work in pairs to view books on insects.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 26, 2016. We will continue to discuss animal adaptation.
Inquiry Question: How do animals survive in the desert? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Using the read aloud to review with students that when we read nonfiction texts independently, we don’t just roar on, tearing through the text at the speed of a Ferrari. We pause quickly and often to collect our understanding. We think, “What have we learned so far?” or “What was this part about?” and hold this information in our mind as we move forward in the book. Of course, when readers stop to recollect what we’ve just read, we are likely to be more mindful, also, of what ought to come next. Tell students they need to learn to categorize text into sections to make sense of the sections, and teach them how to make mental containers as they read and drop the information they learn into the various categories.
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
Interactive Read-Aloud: Bugs Are Insects by Anne Rockwell p.1-15

– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter one, which is what is an insect and its characteristics.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing the characteristics of insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the characteristics of insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter One: Characteristics of Insects).
-Students work independently to take notes on the characteristics of insects.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, April 27, 2016. We will build equal groups and arrays and write number models for them.
Inquiry Question: How does making equal groups or arrays help you write addition models?
Share your thinking with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
This part is all about reminding children that they already know a lot about how to read nonfiction and that it’s time to switch from thinking about characters to reactivating that nonfiction mindset. Bring out your old nonfiction charts. Remind children of all they know.
“Today I want to teach you that we need to come to our clubs prepared to talk about our topics. One way we can do this is to really listen to the text. We don’t just read with explaining voices; nonfiction readers, in fact, actually explain the text to ourselves as we go along—we pause after a few words and explain whatever we’ve read to ourselves, using our own words if we can. It’s almost like the explaining voice in our head is a real teacher who makes sure we understand each section before moving on. Then we will be ready to explain and talk in our clubs about our topic.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
Interactive Read Aloud: Bugs Are Insects by Anne Rockwell p.16-33

– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter one; what are the specific characteristics of each student’s chosen insect.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing the characteristics of insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the characteristics of each student’s chosen insect, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter One: Characteristics of each student’s chosen insect).
– Students work independently to take notes on the characteristics of their chosen insects.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Today is Thursday, April 28, 2016. We will continue to read, discuss and take notes about the insect we’ve chosen for our research.
Inquiry Question: How do the characteristics of your chosen insect help the insect survive and thrive in its environment? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that we need to come to our club ready to talk about the main ideas about our topic. We can figure out the main idea by noticing the who and what of the page or part. This helps us name the subject and the action as we read. To find the main idea, we can think, ‘What’s the relationship between the who and the what?’ and ‘How can I say this main idea as a sentence?’ ”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
Interactive Read-Aloud: Bugs and Other Insects by Bobbie Kalman and Tammy Everts p. 4-5

– Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.

Day 5
Today is Friday, April 29, 2016.
Spelling Words:
(The following words will be tested on Friday, May 6.)
badly, madly, quickly, weekly, daily, sadly, gladly, proudly, softly, loudly, bravely, pattern, describe, extend, simple, determine

Field Trip to Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum

Math
Lesson 8-7 Partitioning Rectangles, Part 2
Students partition rectangles into same-size squares.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Pose one fact at a time. Students explain how they find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Take one square pattern block. Complete Problem 1 on journal page 206.

Partitioning Strategies (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner/Independent)
Math Message Follow-Up: Have students share their strategies for partitioning the rectangle in problem 1 on journal page 206 into same-sized squares. Display a drawing that shows equal rows with equal numbers of close-to-same-size squares in each row.
Have students run a finger along each row on their rectangles. Ask:
– How many rows does your drawing have?
– How many squares are in each row? Have students check that they have the same number of squares in each row.
– Where are the columns? Point to them.
– How many columns are there?
– Why does this rectangle have 2 columns? Count the squares in the first row aloud while pointing to each square: 1, 2. Point out that each square in the first row is at the top of a new column. Count the columns aloud as you run your finger down the columns from top to bottom: 1, 2.
– How many squares are in each column?
– Why does this rectangle have 3 squares in each column? Count the squares in the first column. Point out that each square is at the beginning of a row.

Draw students’ attention to the picture of the square to the right of the rectangle in Problem 2 on journal page 206. Explain that they will use the picture to help them figure out how many squares of that size are needed to cover the rectangle. Have students imagine that they are picking up the square and using it to partition the rectangle the same way they used the square block to partition the rectangle in Problem 1. As students work, check to make sure that they are drawing the same number of squares in each row and that the squares are about the same size.

Ask students to share their strategies for determining how many squares are needed to cover the rectangle. Some students may have visually estimated how many squares will fit in one row and one column, while others may have used their fingers or marks on paper to help them estimate. Ask: How were you able to make sure that your squares were the same size?
Invite volunteers who drew equal rows of close-to-same-size squares to demonstrate how they drew their size squares.
Have students complete Problem 3. Bring the class together to share their strategies.

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
If students struggle drawing the same number of squares in each row in Problem 3, suggest that they draw one row of squares at the top of the rectangle and then the first square on the left in each of the other rows. Then have them place their fingers on the first square in each row and run their fingers across the rectangle to help visualize each row. Ask: How many rows are there? How many squares should there be in each row?

Partitioning into Same-Size Squares (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner/Independent)
Draw students’ attention to journal page 207. Point out that there are no pictures to show the size of the squares that are supposed to cover each rectangle. Instead, students are given the number of rows and the number of squares in each row.

Display a rectangle and say: I have to partition this rectangle into 2 rows with the same-size squares in each row. Suppose I make each row this tall. (Make a mark too low.) Will two rows fill up the rectangle? What about here? (Make a mark too high.) Where should the mark be? Make a mark halfway between the top and bottom edges of the rectangle and draw a line to partition it into 2 equal rows. Say: Now I have to draw 3 squares in each row. Invite a volunteer to make marks for the squares in the top row. Ask: How can we check to make sure that these squares are the same size?
Before students begin work on journal page 207, ask them what they should think about as they partition the rectangles. Expect responses to include the following ideas:
– All the squares should be the same size.
– There should be the same number of squares in each row.
– There should be the same number of squares in each column.
Circulate as students complete journal page and check that they are drawing the correct number of rows with the same number of squares in each row. Encourage them to help each other check whether their squares are the same size.

Differentiate: Common Misconception
Watch for students who partition their rectangles into too many rows or one too many columns. Suggest that they run their fingers along each row or column as they count. As they adjust their drawings, have them check that the squares are the same size.

Assessment Check-In
Expect that most students will be able to partition the square in Problem 1 into two rows with two same-sized squares in each row and count the total number of squares. If students struggle making the same-size squares, suggest that they use a square pattern block as a reference.

Summarize
Have students discuss their strategies for partitioning the rectangles in on journal page 207 into same-size squares.

3. Practice
Solving Addition Problems (Partner/Independent)
Math Journal 2, p. 208
Students add 2-and 3-digit numbers. As needed, encourage them to draw open number lines, use base-10 blocks, or use the number grids or number lines on the inside back covers of their journals.
Students complete Math Boxes 8-7 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-8 Equal-Groups and Array Number Stories
Students solve number stories about equal groups and arrays.

Goals:
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Pose one fact at a time. Students explain how they find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Jermaine bought 3 packs of gum. There are 5 sticks of gum in each pack. How many sticks of gum did he buy? Draw pictures to help find the answer.

Discussing Equal Groups and Arrays (Whole Class/Small Group)
Math Message Follow-Up: Ask students to share their drawings and solution strategies. Expect a variety of representations, including drawings of groups, arrays, or tallies. Strategies may include counting the objects in the picture by 1s, counting by 5s, adding 5s, or doubling 5 and then adding 5 more.
Ask: What do these drawings have in common? Tell student that groups with the same number of objects in them are called equal groups. Stories that involve finding the total number of objects in sets of equal groups are called equal-groups number stories. Ask volunteers to explain how their drawings show the equal groups from the story.

Ask students to suggest number models for the Math Message problem. Some students may suggest 5 + 5 + 5 = 15. Ask: How does this number model show what is happening in our drawings?
Some students may suggest the number model 3 x 5 = 15 to represent the story. If so, explain that this is a multiplication number model and that multiplication as an operation involves finding the number of objects in equal groups or rows. Explain that when students solve equal-groups number stories, they are doing multiplication.

Write 5 + 5 + 5 = 15 and, if someone suggest it, 3 x 5 = 15. Have students practice reading the number models as “3 groups of 5 each is 15 in all.”

Look for students who drew arrays to represent the Math Message problem. Ask them to share their drawings, or, if no one drew and array, sketch one yourself. Remind the class that a rectangular array is an arrangement of objects or symbols in rows and columns. Point out that an array is one way to represent equal groups because all of the rows have the same number of objects and all of the columns have the same number of objects. Ask: How are the equal groups from the gum problem represented in this array? The equal groups in this problem could be represented by either the rows or the columns n an array, depending on whether students drew 3 rows of 5 or 3 columns of 5. But students should recognize that the number story calls for 3 groups of 5 each, not 5 groups of 3 each. The number model 5 + 5+ 5= 15 is more appropriate for this problem than 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 =15.
Explain that many real-life objects are arranged in arrays. Pose the following number story: There are 2 rows of eggs in a carton. There are 6 eggs in each row. How many eggs are there in all? Ask student to draw a picture and solve.

Ask volunteers to share their drawings and answers. Expect most students to draw an array like the one shown in the margin. Ask: What number model could we write for this story and drawing? How could we read this number model?

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
Have students sketch the array, circle each row, and write 6 at the end of each row. This may help students see how 6 + 6 = 12 represents the array.

Tell students that the egg problem is an example of an array number story, which is one kind of equal-groups number story. In an array story the equal groups can be either the rows or the columns.

Tell students that they will solve and write number models for more equal-groups and array number stories. Although it is not important for students to be able to distinguish between equal-groups and array number stories, it is important that they have experience with both.

Solving Equal-Groups and Array Number Stories (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Pose number stories involving equal groups or arrays of objects. Tell students to work with their partners and use drawings to model and solve each problem. After each number story, have volunteers share their strategies. Then work as a class to write an addition (and, if appropriate, a multiplication) number model to represent the number story. As students share number models, guide them to practice reading the number models aloud. They should use language such as the following:
– 3 equal groups of 2 is 6.
– 2 columns of 4 each is 8 all together.
– 3 rows of 7 each makes 21 in all.
Suggested number stories:
– Your family has 3 bicycles. Each bicycle has 2 wheels. How many wheels are there in all?
Sample Strategies:
– Make or draw 3 groups of 2 and count the objects by 1s.
– Skip count by 2s, moving from group to group: 2, 4, 6.
Provide additional samples. After the class has solved them, have students work in partnerships or small groups to complete journal page 210. Students should draw a picture or an array to model each number story. Encourage them to make quick, simple sketches using dots or Xs. Then find the total number of objects and write a number model.

Assessment Check-In
Expect that most students will be able to correctly solve the number stories on journal page 210 using drawings and be able to write addition number models. If students struggle finding the totals, suggest that they use counters to model number stories before drawing their pictures.

Summarize
Have students share with a partner one strategy they can use to find the total number of objects in equal groups or arrays.

3. Practice
Playing Beat the Calculator (Small Group)
Observe:
– Which facts do students know from memory?
– Which students need additional support to play the game?
Discuss:
– What strategies did you use to solve the facts you did not know?
– Why is it helpful to know addition facts?

Students complete Math Boxes 8-8 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-9 More Equal Groups and Arrays
Students build equal groups and arrays and write number models for them.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Pose subtraction problems. Students explain how they use ballpark estimates to help them find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Complete Problem 1 on journal page 212. Share your number story with a partner.

Sharing Number Stories (Whole Class/Small Group)
Math Message Follow-Up: Invite students to share their number stories and drawings. Some students may have written equal-groups stories and others may have written arrays stories. For example:
– Amy has 3 bags of apples. There are 4 apples in each bag. How many apples does Amy have in all? She has 12 apples.
Make sure a variety of stories and drawings are shared. If no one drew an array to represent their story, choose one story and ask students how they might represent it with an array.

Ask students to compare a drawing showing equal groups that are not represented in an array (such as the drawing for the apple story) with a drawing of an array. Ask: How are these drawings similar? Do both pictures match the number model? How can you tell?

If your class used multiplication number model in Lesson 8-8, ask students to suggest a multiplication number model that matches the drawings. Ask: How can we read the number model in words?

Tell students that solving number stories like these depends on being able to think about equal groups. For more practice with this, they will use counters to build equal groups and arrays and then write number models to represent them.

Building Equal Groups and Arrays (Whole Class/Small Group)
Math Journal 2, p. 212
Distribute 36 counters to each student and one die and one slate to each partnership. Explain the following directions:
1. Partner A rolls the die. This is the number of groups, rows, or columns.
2. Partner B rolls the die. This is the number in each group, row, or column.
3. Partner A uses counters to make equal groups (not arranged in an array) to match the numbers. Partner B uses counters to make an array to match the numbers.
4. Partner A find the total number of counters in the equal groups, and Partner B finds the total number of counters in the array. Partners compare their totals to make sure they are the same.
5. Partner A writes a number model on the slate to match the counters. Partner B reads the number model in words.
6. Partners switch roles and repeat the activity.
Model a sample round for the class.

Sample Round
– Partner A rolls a 2. Partner B rolls a 3.
– Partner A makes 2 groups of 3 counters each. Partner B makes an array with 2 rows of 3 counters each.

Partner A writes 3 + 3 = 6 or 2 x 3 = 6 on the slate. Partner B reads the number model aloud as “2 groups of 3 is 6 all together.” Circulate and observe as students build equal groups and arrays and write and read the number models. As appropriate, guide them to skip count or add to find the total number of counters rather than counting by 1s. Encourage students to read the number models using language about equal groups (or rows or columns). They should say “2 groups of 3 is 6 all together” rather than “3 plus 3 is 6” or “2 times 3 is 6.” Using equal groups language helps students build a conceptual foundation for multiplication.

When students have several chances to practice both roles, tell them to each record their final set of equal groups, their final array, and the matching number model on the bottom of journal page 212. If students write multiplication number models, ask them to also write addition number models and discuss the connections between the two number models with their partners.

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
If students struggle to build the arrays, provide a 6-by-6 grid with rows and columns labeled. After the first roll, students place the first counter in each row. After the second roll, they fill in each row with the correct number of counters.

Assessment Check-In
Expect that most students will be able to use counters to create arrays, draw them on journal page 212, and record addition number models. If students struggle to write addition number models, encourage them to circle each row or each column in their arrays to highlight the idea of equal groups. Then help them connect the groups to the equal addends in their number models.

Summarize
Have students use counters to solve the following problem and share their answers. Ask: Which will have more counters – an array with 3 rows and 5 in each row or an array with 5 rows and 3 in each row?

3. Practice
Playing Basketball Addition (Small Group)
Observe:
– Which students can add the numbers to find the total score?
– Which students need additional support to play the game?
Discuss:
– Which numbers did you choose to add first? Why?
– Can you use another strategy to add the numbers?

Students complete Math Boxes 8-9 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-10 Playing Array Concentration
Students play Array Concentration to practice finding the total number of objects in arrays and writing corresponding number models.

Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Pose addition and subtraction facts one at a time. Students answer orally and explain how they find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Work with a partner. Suppose there are 12 desks in a classroom. Use your counters to find at least two ways to put the desks in rows with the same number of desks in each row. Draw your arrays on journal page 214. Write an addition number model for each array.

Arranging Desks (Whole Class/Small Group)
Math Message Follow-Up: Remind students that when they arrange things in equal rows, they are making arrays. Ask volunteers to share their arrays and number models. If students wrote multiplication number models, ask them to suggest addition models as well.

Record student’s arrays and number models. Ask students to continue sharing answers until no one has a different answer to share. Then have students look at all the number models. Ask: How are these number models alike? Focus the discussion on the idea that there are several different ways to arrange the 12 desks in equal rows.

Have students use their counters to arrange the desks in equal rows of 5. Ask: Can we make equal rows of 5? Why or why not? What would a number model for this arrangement look like? Does this number model have addends that are all equal? Is this arrangement an array? Ask: Did we find all the different ways to arrange 12 desks in equal rows? How could we check? If no one mentions it, suggest the following strategy: check whether we can make rows of 1, then rows of 2, then rows of 3, and so on, until we have all possible arrays for 12.

Work together as a class to find any missing arrays and add them to the class list. Students can record additional arrays on journal page 214. Remind them to check that in each array, all the rows have the same number of desks. They should also check that in each number model, all the addends are equal.

Tell students that they will play a game to practice finding how many objects are in arrays and writing corresponding number models.

Discussing the Array Cards (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Have each partnership cut out one set of Array Connection Number Cards and one set of Array Concentration Array Cards. Tell students to write an N on the back of each number card and an A on the back of each array card to help them keep the two decks separate.

Have students find the array card that says “2 by 3” at the bottom. Ask them what they think “2 by 3” might mean. If no one suggests it, explain that this is a short way to describe and array that has 2 rows and 3 columns.

Academic Language Development: To reinforce students’ understanding and use of the phrase ___ by ___ (for example, 3 by 2) to describe the rows and columns in an array, have them work in pairs to label everyday objects laid out in arrays. For example, give students different-size muffin pans that they might label 3 by 2, 3 by 4, or 4 by 6 (depending on the size.) Provide sentence frames that students can use to describe their arrays: “My ___ has an array of ___ by ___. My ___ has ___ rows and ___ columns.”

Next, have students find the 4-by-5 array card. Ask students to share strategies for finding the total number of dots in the array.
Sample strategies:
– Count all the dots by 1s to get 20.
– Skip count by 5s as you point to each row: 5, 10, 15, 20. Or add 5s as you point to each row: 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 = 20.
– Add 4s as you point to each column: 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = 20.

Ask: Which strategies might help you find the total fastest? Why?

Introducing and Playing Array Concentration (whole Class/Partner)
Playing Array Concentration provides practice finding the total number of objects in arrays and writing corresponding addition number models. Play a few sample rounds to introduce the game. Students play the game in partnerships.

Observe:
– What strategies are students using to find the total number of dots in each array? Which students have efficient strategies?
– Which students need support to understand and play the game?
Discuss:
– How did you find the number of dots? Is there a faster way?
– How do you know your number model matches the array?

Assessment Check-In
Expect that most students correctly match number cards add array cards and write correct addition number models for the arrays on Math Masters, page G13. If students struggle matching the arrays to the number cards or writing number models, have them copy the array onto a sheet of paper and mark rows, columns, or individual dots as they count to help them keep track.

Summarize
Have students share the arrays for which they easily found the total numbers of dots and the arrays for which they had to use strategies to find the totals.

3. Practice
Solving Subtraction Problems (Partner/Independent)
Students complete Math Journal 2, p. 215. Students use strategies to subtract. As needed, encourage them to choose and use tools such as base-10 blocks or the number grids or the number lines on the inside back covers of their journals.
Math Boxes 8-9 (Independent/Partner)

Science
Review for Unit Test
What are Food Chain and Food Webs?
Students work with a partner to read pages 172 to 179 from their Science Book and complete the Lesson Quick Study RS 31 – RS 32.
Questions:
What is always at the beginning of the food chain?
What is a producer?
What is a consumer?
How might a food web be disrupted if one species in the food web is removed? What would happen?

Student watch and discuss “Desert Adaptations” from You Tube by MesquiteScience
“How do animals survive in the desert?” by You Tube BBC Earth Unplugged
Questions:
What are the characteristics of a desert?
How have plants and animals adapted to living in deserts?

Student watch and discuss
“Exploring the Coral Reef: Learn about Oceans for Kids” by You Tube by Free School
“Food Chain and Food Web Lesson” from You Tube Turtlediary
Questions:
How do ocean animals stay safe?
How have plants and animals adapted to living in the ocean?
How do coral reefs help fish to survive?

Living Things in Their Environment Test

Social Studies
Using Tables:
Objective: Students will understand the characteristics of tables. Also, students will create their own table.
A table is a chart that is used in many non-fiction texts to organize information.
It is important to know how to read these tables.
Tables have many characteristics! Show a chart on the Smart Board. Begin teaching about the characteristics of the chart.
The title shows what information can be found on a table. It is important to look at all of the titles on charts because sometimes a chart can tell more than one thing.
To read a chart you must down the column and across the row.
Have students go back and work with their learning partners to work with a chart. They must answer these questions:
What is the title of the table?
What does the table show?
How is the information organized?
Write something you learned from the table.

Using Map Scales
Objectives:
– Recognize that maps can be different sizes.
– Define map, scale
– Use a scale to find real distances.
Display two United States maps that are different sizes. Ask children to describe the differences between the maps. Then have them tell how maps are different from the actual areas that they show.
Why It Matters:
Explain that maps not only show where places are located, they also can tell the distances between places. Ask children why it would not be practical to make a map that is as large as the area it shows. Explain that distances and places on maps are smaller than their real sizes and that a map scale can tell you how much smaller.
What You Need to Know:
Explain to children that once they know how far apart two places are on a map, they can find out how far apart they are in real life. Emphasize that a map scale can show them that a certain distance on the map stands for longer, real distance on Earth. For example, 1 inch on a map might stand for 1 mile on land. Point out that not all map scales are the same size. You can use the scales on the two United States maps you displayed as an example.
Why might 1 inch stand for 10 miles on one map and for 100 miles on another map?
Emphasize the importance of marking accurately when using a scale strip. Remind children to distinguish between miles and kilometers on the map scale.

Students play continents and oceans games from http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/World_Continents.htm

Oceans and Continents Quiz
Students identify names of oceans and continents from a given map.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of April 17

Happy Spring Break!

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Week of April 10

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

A copy of the conference schedule was sent home with students on Wednesday, April 6 to remind you of your conference time. We are looking forward to seeing you on Report-card Pickup day, which is Wednesday, April 13.

In order to be considerate to all, please keep your appointment time. Each conference is allotted for ten minutes. However, should you feel the need to discuss your child’s progress further, you can always request another appointment and we will be happy to accommodate.

Spring break begins Monday, April 18, for students and staff members. Classes resume Monday, April 25.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the NSP student from the University of Chicago
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
Word Study
Literature Circle: Animorphs: The Message by K. A. Applegate
Reader’s Theater: The Shoemaker and the Elves
IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level I (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 29 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming: Teacher says a real word. Students make nonsense rhyming words from it.
Onset Fluency: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word, and then isolate the beginning onset.
Ex: T: kite S: /k/
Blending: Basic sight word review
Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher reads the word series. Students say the requested sound (varies by day).
Tues & Wed: Final Sound, Thurs & Fri: Medial Sound
Segmenting: Basic sight word review
Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: too, S: too; t-oo
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ (underlined word) to /*/ and the word is?
Ex. T: waterfall, S: waterfall, T: change the/fall/ to /melon/ and the word is? S: watermelon
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Greeting: Students greet each other in a language of choice.
– Sharing: Students share what they have written or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Sing “A Hole in the Bottom of the Sea” (food chain) from You Tube, Barefoot Books

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, April 11, 2016. We will continue writing adaptations of familiar tales.
Inquiry Question: Why does an author rewrite a familiar tale in the point of view of a different character? Share what you think with a classmate.

Reading and Writing
Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

“Writing Adaptations of Familiar Fairy Tales and Folk Tales, and Perhaps Writing Original Fantasy Stories as Well” from the Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop by Lucy Calkins and colleagues from the Reading and Writing Project
Interactive Read Aloud: Honestly Red Ridding Hood Was Rotten! as Told by the Wolf by Trisha Speed Shaskan

“Writers, we have been writing some great adaptations to our fairy tales. Today, I want to teach you that one way to adapt a story is by writing a whole new version of the fairy tale, that is told from a different character’s point of view (like The True Story of the Three Little Pigs).”
Tip: “Writers, we are storytellers, not summarizers! We need to use everything we know from Small Moments and realistic fiction, including to show not tell as we write our story. We use action, dialogue, and internal thoughts. So, imagine that you are the character. Act out the first scene, say what the character would say, think like you are the character and use lots of action. Then, add it to your writing.”
“Writers, as you have been reading and rereading fairy tales like a writer, you might have noticed that the structure to the tales is similar. Today I want to teach you that as we rewrite or revise our fairy tales, we try to use a similar structure. We introduce the main character and then create a wish or a problem for that character. We may include a bit of magic or trickery that either complicates things or helps to solve matters. The trouble grows for the character, getting worse until the end, when it is resolved and then, we tell our reader, the main character lives ‘happily ever after.’”
Tip: “Writers, as you are revising, remember to stretch out the problem and build tension—use lots of action, dialogue and show-not-tell to keep the reader nervous and on the edge of her seat.”
“Writers, as you stretch out your stories and write scene after scene, remember to make each one like a Small Moment story. Act it out with your partner, notice how the characters walk and talk, and use precise language to storytell.”

Students begin writing their adaptations.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 12, 2016. We will begin to explore 3D shapes?
Inquiry Question: What are the characteristics of 3D shapes? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading and Writing
Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

“Writing Adaptations of Familiar Fairy Tales and Folk Tales, and Perhaps Writing Original Fantasy Stories as Well” from the Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop by Lucy Calkins and colleagues from the Reading and Writing Project
Interactive Read Aloud: Trust Me, Jack’s Beanstalk Stinks! as Told by the Giant by Eric Braun

“Writers, just like before, during, and after we read books we often think, ‘What is the author trying to teach me? What am I supposed to learn?’ When we write, we set out to teach our readers something. Today, I want to teach you that fairy tale writers also teach readers a lesson. We can think, ‘What do I want my reader to learn?’ Maybe we want to teach that intelligence wins over force, or that kindness and generosity can make anyone a princess. We can read our stories with our partners and give each other advice on how to make sure each of our stories has a lesson.”

Students continue writing their adaptations.

Day 3:
Report Card Pickup/Parent Teacher Conferences

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, April 14, 2016. We will read and discuss food chain.
Inquiry Question: How does a food chain work? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading and Writing
Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

“Writing Adaptations of Familiar Fairy Tales and Folk Tales, and Perhaps Writing Original Fantasy Stories as Well” from the Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop by Lucy Calkins and colleagues from the Reading and Writing Project
Interactive Read Aloud: Snow White Was So Forgetful! as Told by The Dwarves by Nancy Loewen

“Writers, it is important to reread what you have done and make a plan for what you will do next. Today I want to teach you that we reread and decide if we should rewrite the same story again, trying to make it stronger. We can think about craft that we have learned from other authors in other units and we can even go back to our fairy tale books to look for things that those authors have done that we may want to try out as well.”
Tip: “Writers, as we continue to notice the language in fairy tales, pay close attention to the sentences. Notice that they are not short and simple sentences, rather, they are longer. They might sound like two sentences linked by words like and, so, but, and because.”

Students continue writing their adaptations.

Day 5:
Morning Message: Today is Friday, April 15, 2016. We will learn how rectangles can be partitioned into equal squares.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to divide a rectangle into square? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
(The following words will be tested on Friday, April 29.)

whale, when, where, what, why, which, whistle, whip, whiff, while, whirl, represent, show, display, know, count

Reading and Writing
Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

“Writing Adaptations of Familiar Fairy Tales and Folk Tales, and Perhaps Writing Original Fantasy Stories as Well” from the Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop by Lucy Calkins and colleagues from the Reading and Writing Project
Interactive Read Aloud: Really, Rapunzel Needed a Haircut! As Told by Dame Gothel by Jessica Gunderson
Reading and Writing
“Writing Adaptations of Familiar Fairy Tales and Folk Tales, and Perhaps Writing Original Fantasy Stories as Well” from the Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop by Lucy Calkins and colleagues from the Reading and Writing Project
“Writers, as we continue to notice the fairy tale language, also notice that sentences begin by telling when or where or under what conditions, or with what sorts of feelings, someone did something.” (For example, “Just after the little goat reached the other side of the bridge, the middle goat took a step towards the bridge.” Another example: “Worrying that the troll would appear again, the middle goat walked quickly across the bridge.”)

Students continue writing their adaptations.

Math
Lesson 8-4
Day 2: Reengagement

2b. Focus
Setting Expectations (Whole Class)
Review the open response problem from Day 1. Ask: What do you think a complete answer to this problem needs to include?
Tell students that they are going to look at others’ work, decide if the shapes work for Juan’s and Linda’s gardens, and think about the explanations. Point out that shapes and explanations will be different. Some explanations will be correct and complete, and others will need more work. Remind students that they should help each other draw shapes that work and write explanations. That shape works because ___. I would add ___.

Reengaging in the Problem (Whole Class/Partner)
Students reengage in the problem by analyzing and critiquing other students’ work in pairs and in whole group discussion. Have students discuss with partners before sharing with the whole group. Guide this discussion based on the decisions you made in Getting Ready for Day 2.

Revising Work (Partner/Independent)
Pass back students’ work from Day 1. Before students revise anything, ask them to examine their drawings and arguments and decide how to improve them. Ask the following questions one at a time. Have partners discuss their responses and give a thumbs-up or thumbs-down based on their own work.
– Did you try to draw several shapes that will work for Juan’s plan?
– Did you circle one shape that worked for Juan’s garden?
– Did you try to draw several shapes that will work for Linda’s plan?
– Did you circle one shape that worked for Linda’s garden?
– Did you write how you know your circled shape for Problem 2 works for Linda’s plan?
– Is your explanation clear enough that your partner can understand it?

Tell students they now have a chance to revise their work. Tell them to add to their earlier work using colored pencils or make additional drawings on a new sheet of dot paper, instead of erasing their original work.

Assessment Check-In
Collect and review students’ revised work. Expect students to improve their drawings and explanations based on the class discussion.

Summarize: Ask students to reflect on their work and revisions. Ask: What did you do to improve your work?

3. Practice

Students complete Math Boxes 8-4, Math Journal 2, p. 200 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-5 Attributes of 3-Dimensional Shapes (2Days)
Students sort and compare 3-dimensional shapes according to their attributes.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Pose facts one at a time. Students explain how they find the sum or difference.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Turn to journal page 193. Record the measurement of your wrist size in centimeters on a stick-on note. Then look at the base-10 thousand cube. Find examples of other cubes around the room.

Describing Cubes (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Math Message Follow-Up: On the Class Data Pad, list examples of cubes that students found.
Distribute a centimeter cube to each partnership. Have students share with their partners what they notice about the cube. After a few minutes, bring the class together to discuss students’ observations. Expect them to note the following:
– There are six flat surfaces, or faces.
– All the faces are the same size.
– Each face is a square.
Ask students to point to each of the six faces on their cubes. Revisit the examples of cubes listed on the Class Data Pad, asking volunteers to confirm that each item fits description of a cube.

Discussing Attributes of 3-dimensional Shapes (Whole Class/Small Group)
Use your models of 3-dimensional shapes to point out the following attributes:
– Cylinders, cones, and spheres all have curve surfaces.
– Rectangular prisms, cubes, pyramids, cylinders, and cones all have flat surfaces called faces.
– An edge of a cube, a prism, or a pyramid is a line segment where two faces meet.
– An edge of a cone or a cylinder is a curve where a flat face meets a curved surface.
– A vertex on a 3-dimensional shape such as a cube, a prism, or a pyramid is a point at which at least 3 edges meet. (The plural of vertex is vertices.)
– The apex of a cone is the point that is opposite the flat face.
Draw students attention to the faces, edges, and vertices on the base-10 thousand cube. Have partners take turns running their fingers along the edges of their centimeter cubes and pointing out the faces and the vertices.

Comparing 3-dimensional Shapes (Whole Class/Small Group)
Explain to students that they are going to make a Shape Museum so they can examine different kinds of shapes. Help them set up the museum by placing the items they brought from home near the corresponding name cards. Shapes that do not fit into any of the six categories are placed near the “other” card. Add some of your own items to the museum.

Display models of pairs of shapes as specified below. As you display each pair, ask: How are these alike? How are they different? Samples observations that students might have include the following:
Cube and Rectangular Prism
– They have the same number of faces, vertices, and edges.
– Each face on both shapes has 4 sides and 4 angles.
– All of the faces of the cube are squares.
– The faces of the rectangular prism can be squares or rectangles.
– Rectangular prisms that have all square faces are called cubes. A cube is a special kind of rectangular prism.
Cube and Cylinder
– The cylinder can roll when push. The cube can’t.
– The cylinder has a curved surface. The cube doesn’t.
– The cylinder has 2 flat faces. The cube has 6 flat faces.
– The cube’s faces are squares. The flat faces on the cylinder are circles.
Cube and Pyramid
– Most of the faces of a pyramid are triangles. (Sometimes one of the faces is not a triangle.) All of the faces of a cube are square.
– A cube and pyramid both have vertices where edges come together. A pyramid has a special vertex called an apex where the triangle faces come together.
Cube and Cone
– The cone can roll when pushed. The cube can’t.
– The cone has a curved surface and 1 flat face in the shape of a circle. The cube has 6 flat faces that are all squares.
– The cone has a point, or apex, opposite the circular face. The cube has 8 vertices.
As time allows, compare and contrast other pairs of shapes.

Differentiate: Adjust the Activity
To help students describe the faces of 3-dimensional shapes, have them select a 3-dimensional shape and trace all of its flat faces on paper. They identify the shapes of the faces, record the names on the paper, and then use that information to describe the 3-dimensional shape. For example, a cube has 6 faces that are all squares.
Over the next several days, allow small groups of students to visit the Shapes Museum. Have them examine the shapes and describe them in terms of their attributes.

Assessment Check-In
Expect most students to be able to describe a cube as having 6 equal-size square faces. If students struggle describing a cube by its attributes, have them trace the faces of a cube on paper as suggested in the Adjusting the Activity note.

Summarize
Have students share one or two things they learned about 3-dimensional shapes.

3. Practice
Drawing a Line Plot (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
With the class, organize and display the stick-on notes wrist measurements in order from smallest to largest. Explain that students will draw line plots to show all the wrist measurements for the class.
Distribute copies of Math Masters, page TA32 to students. Discuss the horizontal scale. The wrist-size data are measurements to the nearest centimeter. The scale should begin with the smallest wrist size in the class, increase in 1-centimeter increments, and end with the measurement of the largest wrist size in the class.
Ask students to suggest a label for the horizontal axis and write it on the same line. Then ask the students to suggest a title for the line plot.
Have students draw Xs on their line plots to represent the class data. Remind them that each X represents one child. Model how to draw Xs one above the other for stick-on notes with the same measurements.

Students complete Math Boxes 8-5, Math Journal 2, p. 201 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-6 Partitioning Rectangles, Part 1
Students use manipulatives to partition rectangles into same-size squares.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Display place value exercises. Have students explain how they found the answers.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Take 20 centimeter cubes. Complete Problem 1 on journal page 202.

Introducing Partitioning (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Math Message Follow-Up: Display Math Masters, page 225 and have a volunteer cover Rectangle A with centimeter cubes. Ask students to share what they notice about the cubes covering the rectangle.
They may observe that it took 15 cubes to completely cover the rectangle and that the cubes are arranged in rows and columns. Remind students that a rectangle is a 2-dimensional (flat) shape and a cube is a 3-dimensional shape. Ask: What part of each cube actually covers the rectangle? What shape is the face?
Tell students to complete Problem 2 on journal page 202 by drawing squares on Rectangle B to show how they covered Rectangle A with centimeter cubes. Explain that when students draw same-size shapes to cover a shape, they are partitioning, or dividing, the shape into smaller shapes. Have volunteers share their drawings. Identify a drawing that has 3 rows with 5 close-to-same-size squares in each row and ask students what they notice. Guide students to connect the equal rows of squares on Rectangle B to the equal rows of centimeter cubes that covered rectangle A. Have students check that the squares they drew on Rectangle B match the arrangement of centimeter cubes that covered Rectangle A.
Discuss the challenges students faced in Problem 2. Ask: How could you tell if you made a mistake? How did you fix your mistake?

Academic Language Development: Have students activate prior knowledge of the word part to help them understand the terms partition and partitioning. Point out that when they partition a figure, they are dividing it into equal-size parts. This is also called partitioning.

Partitioning Rectangles (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Display a 1-inch square pattern block and Math Masters, page 226. Point to Problem 3. Ask students to think about how they might use a single square pattern block to find the total number of square pattern blocks needed to completely cover Rectangle C. Invite students to share their ideas with a partner and encourage them to make sense of their partner’s ideas.
Distribute a square pattern block to each child. Have them place the pattern block flat on the rectangle. Ask: What part of the pattern block is actually on the rectangle? Tell students to partition the rectangle, they need to draw squares to show where all of the square faces of the blocks would be if they covered the rectangle completely. Explain that their drawings should show where they put their square each time they move it. Demonstrate drawing two or three squares on the display of Math Masters, page 226. Have partners use a single square pattern block to partition Rectangle C into same-size squares.
When they are finished, tell them to count the squares and answer the questions below Rectangle C. Bring the class together. Ask: Into how many squares did you partition Rectangle C? How did you use the square block to help partition the rectangle? Expect strategies to include the following:
– I traced the pattern block multiple times to cover the rectangle.
– I traced a complete row or column of square pattern blocks and then filled in the other rows and columns.
– I traced the square pattern block to fill the space along all four edges of the rectangle and then filled in the middle.
Explain that one way to make partitioning easier is to first draw one row and one column of squares. Demonstrate by placing a square pattern block in the upper-left corner of Rectangle C and tracing a mark along its right edge. Then move the block to align its left with your mark. Continue making marks and moving the block to complete the row, pointing out that there are no gaps or overlaps between the squares. Ask: How many squares will be in each row? Count the spaces to verify that 7 blocks will fit in a row.
Repeat the process for a column, staring in the upper-left corner and tracing marks along the bottom edge of the block. Ask: How many rows will there be? Extend the lines for each row and column until the rectangle is completely partitioned into squares. Ask: How many rows are there? How many squares are in each row? Point out that the number of squares per row is the same as the number of columns. Ask: How many same-sized squares cover the rectangle?

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
For students who struggle with partitioning, provide enough square pattern blocks to completely cover the rectangle in Problem 1 on journal page 204. Students count and record the number of pattern blocks they used and then remove the blocks. They then use their recorded numbers as a guideline to partition the rectangle.

Assessment Check-In
Because this is their first exposure to partitioning, do not expect students to accurately partition the rectangles on journal page 204 into same-size squares. Expect their attempts to show evidence of a strategy, such as tracing the pattern block multiple times, drawing rows or columns of squares, or drawing squares along the edges of rectangles. The “squares” each student draws may vary in size and shape. Some students will have a harder time drawing squares in the middle of the rectangle than on the edges.

Summarize
Have students share their strategies for partitioning the rectangles in Problem 1 and 2 into same-size squares.

3. Practice
Playing the Number-Grid Difference Game (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Observe:
– How are students using the number grid to calculate differences?
– Which students are using the calculators to add their five scores?
Discuss:
– How did you decide on the order of the digits in your 2-digit numbers?
– What did you find easy about this game? Challenging?
Students complete Math Boxes 8-6, Math Journal 2, p. 205 (Independent/Partner)

Science
Students will be able to describe the life in an ocean and the differences between salt water and fresh water.

The students view short videos, which introduce oceans. One of the videos is an introduction to the types of animals in the ocean environment.
Students will also watch Why the Oceans Are Salty from
http://www.youtube.com/watch
?v=aFXn1d5baCo
http://www.youtube.com/watch
?v=xQP5yV9yxFc
25 Most Terrifying Sea Creatures

v=xtsZyTB4D08

Objective: Students will learn about the environment and habitats in the grassland and tundra.
Grassland:
Grassland is an open area covered with grass. There are few trees. This makes it difficult for large animals to hide anywhere.
What could be one issue for large animals in the grassland?
Often animals travel in groups to stay more protected from predators.
Read Aloud: What Can Live in a Grassland by Sheila Anderson
Tundra: A cold and snowy environment. The plants grow low to the ground to help protect them from the harsh cold environments. They also grow close together.
Animals in this area have thick fur and fat. Both of these help animals in the frigid tundra stay alive.
How have plants and animals adapted to living in the tundra.
Why do plants on the tundra grow close together?
Complete the fat science exploration.

Place shortening in a Ziploc bag. Have the students put one hand in another Ziploc bag and then put that hand in the shortening bag. Leave the other hand bare. Students will then place their hands in cold water to see how much warmer the bag with shortening (fat) is than the hand without.

Food Chain
Who Eats What? Food Chains and Food Webs by Patricia Lauber
Objective: Students will be able to describe how a food chain works.
A food chain is the order in which living things eat one another.
Begin by showing a basic food chain.
A human eats a hamburger. The hamburger is a cow. The cow ate grass. We just created a simple food chain.
A food chain transfers energy from living thing to living thing.
The grass has received energy from the sun. The cow then ate that grass so the energy was transferred to the cow. The human then received the energy when he/she ate the cow meat.
In the food chain there are two types of animals; they are either predators or prey.
A predator is an animal that hunts for food. The prey is the animal that is being hunted.
Often an animal can be both a predator and the prey.
A snake can be the predator of mice, but will be the prey for an owl.
Have students go back to their seat. Each cluster will have a set of animals and plants. They will be given time to put themselves in an order they believe to be accurate.
The students will the go to the front of the class and say for example.
I am a snake. I am the predator for the mouse and the prey for an owl.
Guiding Questions:
Describe why an animal can be the predator and the prey.
What is transferred in the food chain?

Food Web
Objective: Students will know that a food web is many food chains linked together.
In a web all the parts are connected, which makes it strong and work effectively.
Picture a spider’s web. All the parts work together to make the web an effective way for the spider to catch prey.
Have note cards created with numerous animals and plants. Then read a teacher created story. As the story continues the students will toss the yarn to their peer. The students will continue until they have created a web. Now the teacher will discuss how in a web the animals rely on one another.
Sometimes an animal may become extinct or have a reduced number. Cut a few connecting strings. Look what happens to our web then. Often animals can adapt their food choice.
The food web we just created is not as complex or complete as the food webs in nature. This is because many times animals can eat more than one type of prey.
Guiding Questions:
Why is it called a food web?
What could happen if part of the food web is somehow disrupted?

Social Studies
Natural Resources continued:
Students will begin discussing the use of air and soil.
Read Aloud: Wind Power by David Neufeld
Who here has ever seen a windmill before?
Can some describe to me how these windmills look?
What does the environment where these windmills are located look like? Can someone infer why it is such barren land?
Can anyone infer how the windmill helps make energy?
How does soil help meet our need for food?
Have a discussion about some of the pros and cons of using natural resources to help humans.

Introduce the multi- level independent read aloud to support students of all reading levels.

Students will compare the tools people used in the past to the tools used today.
Discuss how technology has adapted in just the students’ lives.
Predict which tools we believe the characters in Ox Cart Man had that people from long ago also had.

Read Aloud: Ox Cart Man by Donald Hall
This book is about the past and farming in the past.
Before reading:
What is the past?
This book is about how farming was in the past.
Can anyone predict what may be the same and what may be different than the read-aloud that was on Friday?
What may be different?
After Reading:
Chart Ox Cart Man on the Venn diagram.

Using Tables:
Objective: Students will understand the characteristics of tables. Also, students will create their own table.
A table is a chart that is used in many non-fiction texts to organize information.
It is important to know how to read these tables.
Tables have many characteristics! Show a chart on the Smart Board. Begin teaching about the characteristics of the chart.
The title shows what information can be found on a table. It is important to look at all of the titles on charts because sometimes a chart can tell more than one thing.
To read a chart you must down the column and across the row.
Have students go back and work with their learning partners to work with a chart. They must answer these questions:
What is the title of the table?
What does the table show?
How is the information organized?
Write something you learned from the table.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of April 3

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Please be reminded that:

Due to the teachers strike last Friday April 1. The spelling test will take place on Monday, April 4. The words will be tested are: drink, think, sink, stink, wink, thank, bank, drank, honk, blank, shrink, sphere, cube, pyramid, prism, rectangular

The third-quarter-parent/teacher conferences will take place on Wednesday, April 13. If you haven’t signed up for the third quarter parent/teacher conferences, please do so. The sign-up schedules are posted outside the front door of rooms 103 and 106. Parents who do not sign up by April 5 will be assigned the time slots available! We will be sending home the finalized schedule on April 6.

Please review with you child the directions on the compass rose such as North (N), East (E), South (S), West(W) and Northeast (NE), Southeast (SE), Northwest (NW), and Southwest (SW). Students will need to be able to identify the directions on Tuesday, April 5 social studies quiz.

Moreover, the definitions for these vocabulary words: habitat, adapt, rain forest, grassland, desert, ocean, pond, food chain, food web, and environment, will be quizzed on Thursday, April 7. A study guide will be sent home on Monday to help students review for the quiz.

Friday, April 8 is a School Improvement Day for teachers and staff. It is a nonattendance day for students.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the NSP student from the University of Chicago
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
Word Study
Literature Circle: Animorphs: The Message by K. A. Applegate
Reader’s Theater: The Shoemaker and the Elves
IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level I (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 28 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming: Teacher says a real word. Students make nonsense rhyming words from it.
Onset Fluency: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word, and then isolate the beginning onset.
Ex: T: kite S: /k/
Blending: Basic sight word review
Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher reads the word series. Students say the requested sound (varies by day).
Tues & Wed: Final Sound, Thurs & Fri: Medial Sound
Segmenting: Basic sight word review
Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: too, S: too; t-oo
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ (underlined word) to /*/ and the word is?
Ex. T: waterfall, S: waterfall, T: change the/fall/ to /melon/ and the word is? S: watermelon
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Greeting: Students greet each other in a language of choice.
– Sharing: Students share what they have written or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Read “The Orchestra” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 207

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, April 4, 2016. We will read and discuss elements of a folktale and fairytale.
Inquiry Question: What classic folktales are you familiar with? Share your answer with a classmate.

Spelling Test

Reading
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Video: “Little Red Ridding Hood” You Tube by Fairy Stories and Songs for Kids
Explain to students that as readers get to know characters better, we discover predictable roles they play: we understanding the villain, the hero, and everyone in between
In this part of the unit, we’ll move from stepping into the shoes of a particular character to thinking more categorically about characters. Teach students that just as there are different personality types in the world, there are different character types in stories. Teach students that authors sometimes make deliberate choices about which characters in their book will take on which role. One character might be the good guy—the hero—while another is the bad guy—the villain. And then, of course, there’s the sidekick, the wise adviser, the trickster, to name just a few.
Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing
“Writers, we have been reading many different adaptations of fairy/folk tales and we have noticed that each author has given the story their own spin. Some authors changed the characters—turning girls to boys or people to animals. Others have changed the setting—moving the story from a kingdom far away to the middle of a big city. Well, today I’m going to teach how you can get started planning your very own adaptation. One thing that writers do is think, ‘What would I like to change?’ and ‘How will the change affect all the parts of my story?’ We then plan out our stories, either in a booklet or storyboard.”
Tip: “We may do quick sketches or jottings to remember all the parts of the story that we want to include.”

Students begin planning their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 5, 2016. We will read and discuss the characteristics of fresh water environments.
Inquiry Question: If you were a fresh water animal or plant, what adaptations would you need in order to survive? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Interactive Read Aloud: Little Red A Fizzingly Good Yarn Retold by Lynn Roberts
Explain to students that as they read, they need to think about what it means to be one kind of character or another. Are there typical patterns of behavior they observe in one type or another? They might, for example, notice that the main character’s sidekick is sometimes funny—that that person’s role is to crack jokes. Or maybe the sidekick (or one of a pair of friends) tends to get the main character into trouble over and over, so he is a troublemaker. Tell students that earlier in the year, they learned that characters go on journeys and encounter trouble along the way. Now they might notice that friends sometimes contribute to that trouble. Alternatively, the person who creates obstacles for the main character may be someone with a much more deliberate villainous intent—the class bully, for example, or the mean kid next door. As children think about how these roles play out in their books, partners—or two sets of partners—can act out scenes in their books that spotlight the bully or the sidekick or the quirky adviser.

Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing
“Writers, today I want to teach you that you have to make many important decisions as you are writing your fairy/folk tale. Writers ask ourselves, ‘Why am I rewriting this fairy tale?’ ‘Who am I writing it for?’ and ‘What is it, exactly, that I am trying to say?’ One thing that we can do to answer these questions as we plan and write our own is to reread, re-study, and re-think the fairy tales we’ve been studying with our partners. We study and talk about the choices the author made to change their version and how we might revise our plans or stories so that our adaptations are meaningful.”
Example: “Sometimes, we rewrite a familiar tale because we disagree with the way the tale has stereotyped girls, with the good ones always being beautiful and the bad ones always being ugly, or authors may disagree with the way wolves, foxes, or stepmothers are stereotyped as nasty, evil, and mean. Sometimes authors rewrite a tale so that it makes more sense to readers who live in different places or in other cultures.”
Tip: “Writers, remember, as we are exploring ways our adaptations could be tweaked, stretched, or twisted, we can come up with a few different story ideas. Once we imagine other ways the story could go, we can create other mini-booklets to plan through our ideas—we may even need many pages! If this happens, begin with two sheets of paper folded in half, and in half again, creating eight (or more) page-long planning books.”

Students begin planning their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 6, 2016. We will read and discuss the characteristics both the desert and rainforest environments.
Inquiry Question: How are desert and rainforest environments alike? How are they different? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Interactive Read Aloud: Be ware of the Storybook Wolves by Lauren Child
Remind children that as they pay attention to the characters in their books, they can think about the role the character plays to predict what’s going to happen. Is the character good or bad? Will she win or will she lose? Teach children to pay attention to the pattern, to ask and answer, “Why is this happening? What will happen next?” Teach children to think about whether a character in the story is the one who is teaching a lesson or learning a lesson.
Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing
Tip: ”Writers, we revise our plans or plan another adaptation, then another, playing with different ideas before we get started in writing. As we revise our plans, we think ‘Where exactly will my story begin?’ and ‘What will my character be saying and doing?’ so that we can begin our stories close to the main action.”

Students begin planning their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, April 7, 2016. We will identify and discuss attributes of quadrilaterals.
Inquiry Question: What are parallel sides of quadrilaterals? Share what you know with a classmate!

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
(The following words will be tested on Friday, April 15.)

bolt, jolt, colt, felt, belt, welt, built, stilt, wilt, melt, salt, face, edge, vertices, set, tally

Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Reading
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Interactive Read Aloud: With Love, Little Red Hen by Alma Flor Ada
After students have heard several tales, they may start to notice that the books they have been reading have similar characters—a bad wolf, a wise old man, an evil step relation—and that these characters have similar traits. The wise old man has all the answers but makes the main character work to get them; the stepmother in these tales is often evil and goes out of her way to harm the heroine. Readers may also notice that these archetypes sometimes differ somewhat from story to story. For example, the wolf in Little Red Riding Hood and The Three Little Pigs is the villain in both stories, but the wolf in the first story seems smarter than the wolf in the latter. Teach students that fairy tales and folktales are archetypes for modern stories, that characters who play similar roles will pop up again and again, not only in these old tales but in more modern stories, too. Students might notice, “Instead of a wolf, this book has a mean old dragon! Reminds me a little bit of Mean Jean the Recess Queen.” The hope is that children take note of not just the magic in fairy tales and folktales (though of course, that’s part of the fun!), but also the ways in which archetypes from these genres repeat themselves again and again in modern literature, albeit in non-magical forms. This is the case not only with characters but also with plots, imagery, themes, but for now it’s enough that children come to recognize similar roles across books.
Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing
“Writers, we have come up with lots of plans for our adaptations and we are ready to get started in our writing. Today I want to teach you that we choose one of our plans, take the number of pages we need to make a book, transfer our ideas from our planning booklets by jotting a note in the margin or sketching a quick picture on each page, and begin writing using everything we know about storytelling and fairy/folk tale language.”
Tip: “Writers we can act out the scenes to our tale and then story tell it again and again, both to ourselves and to our partners. After we have retold our stories many times, we have a clearer idea of what to put onto the page when we go to write.”

Students begin writing their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Math
Lesson 8-1 Attributes of 2-Dimensional Shapes
Students describe the attributes of 2-demensional shapes.

Goals:
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Post facts one at a time. Students explain how they find sum or difference.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Look at your Shape Cards. Pick one shape with 3 sides and another shape with 4 sides. Be prepared to describe the shapes.

Describing Shapes (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: First discuss the 3-sided shapes. Ask:
– Which Shape Cards have 3 sides?
– Describe a 3-sided shape.
Display Shape A and point to the sides and the angles.
– What do we call 3-sided shapes?
Next discuss the 4-sided shapes. Ask:
– Which Shape Cards have 4 sides?
– Describe a 4-sided shape.

Have students look at the Two-Dimensional Shapes poster and locate the 4-sided shapes. Explain that all 4-sided shapes belong to a family of shapes called quadrilaterals.
Have students find the Shape Cards that have 5 sides. Have students describe a 5-sided shape. Have students look at the Two-Dimensional Shapes poster and locate the 5-sided shapes. Explain that all 5-sided shapes are called pentagons. Repeat with the 6-sided shapes. Have students locate the 6-sided shapes and explain that they are called hexagons. Tell students that they will explore other shape attributes.

Discussing Attributes (Whole Class)
Ask students to examine their Shape Cards to find things that are the same about all the shapes. Expect answers such as:
– All the shapes are made up of straight sides (line segments).
– Any two sides that meet form an angle. All the shapes have angles.
– The point at which two sides of a shape meet is called the vertex.

Explain that another attribute some shapes have is parallel sides. Have students place a ruler on blank paper and draw lines along its top edge and its bottom edge. Explain that the two line segments are parallel because they are the same distance apart.
Tell students to place a pencil on the top line segment. Have them slowly slide it down toward the bottom line segment without turning or angling it at all. Have them repeat the action starting at the bottom segment and sliding the pencil to the top segment. Explain that because the pencil can be slid from one segment to the other without any turning or angling, they are parallel.
Display Shape G and have students practice to see if the sides are parallel.
Discuss real-world examples of parallel line segments, such as railroad tracks, shelves on bookcases, and so on. Ask students to identify examples of parallel lines or parallel line segments from the classroom or the hallway.
Display shape K. Ask volunteers to point the sides that are parallel. Have students work as partners to examine all of the 4-sided shapes and sort the shapes into two piles: shapes that have parallel sides and shapes that do not have parallel sides. Students share their results.
Display Shape K. Ask students to look at all of the angles and point out the angles that form a square corner. Explain that the name for this type of angles is a right angle.

Working in partnerships, students find and then sort all of the 3- and 4-sided shapes into two piles: shapes with right angles and shapes that have no right angles. Students share their results. Have students point to all of the right angles on each shape.

Assessment Check-In
Observe as students sort shapes according to whether or not they have parallel sides and whether or not they have right angles. Expect that most students will be able to sort the shapes according to whether or not they have right angles. Some may need to use an index card.

3. Practice
Playing Subtraction Top-It (Small Group)
Math Reference Book, pp. 170-172
Differentiated: Make counters or a number line available for students as needed.

Observe
– Which students automatically know the differences?
– What strategies are the remaining students using to determine the differences?
Discuss
– How did you figure out the differences?
– How did you know which comparison symbol to write on the record sheet?

Students complete Math Boxes 8-1, Math Journal 2, p. 195 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-2 Playing Shape Capture
Students identify shapes that have certain attributes while playing the game Shape Capture.

Goals:
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Post facts one at a time. Students explain how they find sum or difference.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Display Shape Cards A and K
In your journal, describe the shapes using the following words: side, angle, vertex, parallel, and right angle.

Identifying Attributes (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: Ask students to share their descriptions of Shape A, making sure they use the words side, vertex, angle, parallel, and right angle as suggested in the Math Message.
If no students mention the lengths of Shape A’s side, ask: What do you notice about the lengths of the sides? You or a volunteer can measure the lengths of the sides to show that they are the same length. Ask: What is the name of the shape?

Have students share their descriptions of Shape K. Ask: What is the name of the shape?
Explain that today students will identify shapes that have specified attributes.

Academic Language Development
Provide sentence frames for students to use to describe shapes:
– This is a ______.
– It has ___ sides.
– It has ___ vertices.
– It has ___ angles.
– It has ___ pair(s) of parallel sides.
– It has ___ right angle(s)

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
To support students who struggle to identify shapes with specified attributes, provide cards that illustrate each attribute.

Demonstrating and Playing Shape Capture (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Math Journal 2, Activity Sheet 13

Have students carefully cut apart the Attribute Cards from Activity Sheet 13 in their journals. Students will identify attributes of shapes as they play Shape Capture. The game is played with two players or two teams of two players each. Each partnership or group will use one set of Shape Cards and one set of Attribute Cards.
Play several rounds of Shape Capture with the class to help students learn the rules. Consider displaying a set of Shape Cards while the students arrange their shapes on their desks.

Observe
– Which students can correctly find the shapes with specified attributes?
– Which students are checking the other team or player’s selections?

Discuss
– How did you check to be sure the other team or player was capturing shapes that matched the Attribute Cards?
– Which shapes were easier to capture? Why? Which shapes were harder to capture? Why?

Summarize
Using their Shape Capture record sheet for reference, have students choose one Attribute Card and name the shape(s) they captured.

Assessment Check-In
Have students draw three shapes on an Exit Slip – one with 3 sides, 3 vertices, and 3 angles; one with at least 1 right angle; and one with at least 1 pair of parallel sides.

3. Practice
Practicing with Fact Triangles (Small Group/Partner)
Math Journal 2, pp. 250-253

Students complete Math Boxes 8-2, Math Journal 2, p. 196 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-3 Comparing Triangles, Pentagons, and Hexagons
Students build and compare various polygons.

Goals:
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Students make a ballpark estimate for each sum and explain how they find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Using your straws and twist ties, make at least two different 3-sided shapes.

Comparing Triangles (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: Display some examples of students’ triangles. Ask: What do these shapes have in common? What name describes all of these shapes?

Compare some of the different triangles, focusing on the sides and the angles. Be sure to display one triangle with a right angle and one with all equal-length sides and discuss these attributes Have students describe each triangle’s attributes and then discuss the differences between the triangles.

Explain to students that another attribute all the triangles share is that they are all polygons. As you discuss these traits of polygons, point them out on one or more straw triangles:
– Polygons are made up of all straight sides (line segments).
– The sides of the polygon do not cross.
– Polygons are “closed” figures: you can trace their sides and come back to where you started without retracing or crossing any part.

Ask students to trace their straw-and-twist-tie triangles and confirm that they meet all the criteria to be polygons. Display some examples of nonpolygons and discuss why these shapes are not polygons.

Students should be able to determine why these shapes are not polygons. Have a volunteer trace some of the shapes with a finger. For shapes made up of two polygons, ask: Can you return to the starting point without retracing or crossing any part of the shape? Is this a polygon?

Comparing Pentagons and Hexagons (Whole Class/Small Group)
Math Journal 2, p. 197
Students work with partners to use their straws and twist ties to build 5- and 6-sided polygons as directed on journal page 197. Then each student draws his/her polygons on the page.
When students have finished drawing the polygon, ask: What is the name for any 5-sided polygon? What is the name for any 6-sided polygon? Which of the shapes you drew are polygons? How do you know? Have students trace the sides of each shape on their journal page with their fingers to be sure that all their polygons are closed, have straight sides, and have sides that do not cross.
Display two different straw-and-twist-tie pentagons made by students, making sure to choose examples that have different attributes. As a class, compare and contrast the shapes based on their attributes. Encourage students to examine the number of angles, the number of vertices, the number of sides, side lengths, the number of right angles, and the number of parallel sides.
Guide students to notice the attributes by asking the following questions:
– How are these two pentagons alike?
– How are they different?
Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
If students struggle comparing and contrasting polygons, provide them with sentence frames in which they fill in the attributes that the shapes do or do not share:
– These two shapes are alike because they both have ___.
– They are different because ___.
Allow students to practice in small groups before the large-group discussion.

Assessment Check-In
Expect that students can build 5- and 6-sided polygons and draw them on journal p. 197. Some students may be able to compare and contrast the polygons. If students struggle building or drawing pentagons and hexagons, refer them to My Reference Book, page 123.

Summarize
Students describe the attributes of various polygons.

3. Practice
Playing Target to 200 (Small Group)
Math Masters, pp. G19-G20
Have students play Target to 200 to apply their understanding of place value.

Observe
– Which students are correctly representing their numbers with base-10 blocks?
– Which students seem to have a strategy for deciding whether to make 1 1- or 2-digit number? To add or subtract their numbers?
Discuss
– How did you decide what number to make? Whether to add or subtract?
– How did you know when to make an exchange?

Students complete Math Boxes 8-3, Math Journal 2, p. 198 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-4 Drawing and Reasoning About Quadrilaterals (Day 1)
Day 1: Students draw quadrilaterals with given attributes.
Day 2: The class discusses solutions, and students revise their work.
Goals:
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Students make a ballpark estimate for each sum and explain how they find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Look at journal page 199. Discuss the questions with a partner.

What Is a Quadrilateral? (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: As partners discuss their ideas about the shapes, suggest they look for attributes that are common to all of the quadrilaterals. Have students share their ideas about/check for attributes of quadrilaterals (four sides, four angles, and four corners, etc.)
Have students examine the shapes to identify more attributes of quadrilaterals such as four straight sides, figures must be closed. Add these attributes to chart.
When you are satisfied with your list of attributes, help students see that all the quadrilaterals have all (and not just some) of the attributes. Review each of the shapes in the second group and ask students to explain why each of these shapes is not a quadrilateral.
Give each partnership a square pattern block. Ask: What is the name of the angles in this shape? Review how to use the square pattern block or the corner of a sheet of paper to decide whether and angle is a right angle.
Tell students that they are going to draw their own quadrilaterals and write about their attributes.

Academic Language Development
As you use the vocabulary, regularly use gestures and point to diagrams, objects, and written words that are connected with the vocabulary.

Solving the Open Response Problem (Independent)
Distribute the problem and a sheet of dot paper. Read Problem 1 as a class. Tell students to make drawings for Juan’s garden on the dot paper. Remind students to use their square pattern block or the corner of a piece of paper to check their drawings for the number of right angles.
When most students have created drawings for Juan’s garden, hand out a second copy of dot paper. Read Problem 2 as a class. Have students make drawings for Linda’s garden on the second page of dot paper. Tell students that they should expect to make several drawings before they find one that may work for Linda. Provide extra dot paper to students who need it. Read Problem 3 as a class. Tell students that they should move on to Problem 3 only after they have created one or more successful drawings for Linda. Remind students that they may use the list of quadrilateral attributes from the Math Message as they write their explanations for Problem 3.
Observe students as they work. Encourage them to create multiple drawings that fit Juan’s or Linda’s plan. Expect on Day 1 that only some students will successfully create shapes that satisfy Problem 2. During the reengagement discussion on Day 2, students will discuss successful examples and have time to complete a drawing and write an argument for Problem 3.

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
Students who have difficulties writing their explanations may need more structure. Consider using one or more of these sentence frames: “My shape is right for Linda because it is a ___.” “It is a ___ because it has ___ sides” “It has ___ vertices.” “It has ___ right angles.”
Partners can work together to examine each other’s shapes and share ideas, but students should complete their own drawings and arguments.

Summarize
Ask: Why do you think it is important to keep trying and not give up when your problem is hard?

Science
Oreo experiment
Students are each given one Oreo. The students must open the cookie and eat the cream out of the middle before they eat the cookie. Then you say that because humans harmed their environment they no longer have arms. They must complete the same task as above without using their hands. They must adapt.
Guiding questions:
How did you feel when you could not use your hands to get the white part out of the cookie?
How did you adapt?
Was your adaption effective?
If you had another cookie how would you adapt you original method?

Objective: Students will be able to describe the characteristics of a freshwater habitat.
A pond, lake, river, creek are often freshwater.
Describe to me what a pond is.
A pond is a small freshwater environment.
Many animals and plants call ponds and other freshwater environments their habitats.
Show pictures of some of these animals including fish, beaver, water lilies, and the water strider.
Fish have gills to breathe underwater.
The beaver has webbed feet so it can swim more easily through water. The beaver also has extremely sharp teeth to cut down trees and build homes.
The water lilies grow on the top of the water to get the needed sunlight for survival.
The water strider’s legs help it walk on water without ever sinking.
What do we notice about the legs of the water strider?
Pretend you are a fresh water animal or plant. Draw yourself with the adaptations that would help you survive. Or write about the adaptations you would have and why. Be sure to label your adaptations.

Objective: Students will be able to describe the environments of both the desert and rainforest. They will describe one similarity and one difference of these environments.
Rainforest: A wet environment that gets rain nearly every day.
Often there is less growth near the bottom of the rain forest.
Infer why there is less growth near the bottom of the rainforest.
The rainforest had very tall trees that reach for the sunlight. Therefore other plants have adapted to grow near the top of these trees.
Desert: A dry environment that gets little rain. Few plants and animals can survive in this environment.
Plants that do survive have adapted in order to survive.
A cactus stores water to use when needed.
Other animals have adapted the way they find food.
On a Chicago summer is it cooler or hotter at night?
It is also cooler in the desert. Therefore, many animals, like the lizard, hide in the shade all day and search for food at night when it is much cooler.
Read Aloud: What Can Live in a Desert? by Sheila Anderson

Vocabulary quiz on the following words: habitat, adapt, rain forest, grassland, desert, ocean, pond, food chain, food web, and environment

Social Studies
Quiz: Cardinal and Primary Intercardinal directions (N, E, S, W and NE, SE, NW, SW)

Students will continue working on and editing their map.
What are some of the key characteristics of a map?
Why do we need all of these parts to make our map effective?
Can anyone predict what might happen if someone did not have all of the parts of a map?
What if it lacked a compass?
A key?
A river, ocean, or, mountain?
Why do people use maps?

Map must have a title
Map must have a map key
Map must have a compass rose
Map must have various landforms labeled on the key

Allow students to volunteer to present what they have already created on their map, and then discuss what that particular student is doing well, and what he/she should add.

Natural Resources continued:
Students will begin discussing the use of air and soil.
Read Aloud: Wind Power by David Neufeld
Who here has ever seen a windmill before?
Can some describe to me how these windmills look?
What does the environment where these windmills are located look like? Can someone infer why it is such barren land?
Can anyone infer how the windmill helps make energy?
How does soil help meet our need for food?
Have a discussion about some of the pros and cons of using natural resources to help humans.

Introduce the multi-level independent read aloud to support students of all reading levels.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of March 27

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

This is a reminder that the Unit 7 Math Written Assessment and Open Response will be given on Monday, March 28 and Tuesday, March 29 respectively. Students received the study guide on Thursday, March 25. Please make sure your child completes the study guide and reviews the graded homework to ensure success.

Beginning on April 25, students will be writing a research paper in class about insects. The teachers will meet with your child prior to this to select an insect of choice. Once the decision is made, please help your child select informational texts from home, school and community libraries to use in class. Students are required to bring three sources to class by Monday, April 25 in order to have sufficient information for the research. The three options are:

Option 1: one book, one magazine article, and one child-friendly internet article
Option 2: two books, and one child-friendly internet article
Option 3: three grade level books

Due to the teachers strike planned for Friday April 1. The previously scheduled spelling test will take place on Monday, April 4.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the NSP student from the University of Chicago
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
Word Study
Literature Circle: Animorphs: The Message by K. A. Applegate
Reader’s Theater: The Shoemaker and the Elves
IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level I (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 27 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming: Teacher says a real word. Students make nonsense rhyming words from it.
Onset Fluency: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word, and then isolate the beginning onset.
Ex: T: kite S: /k/
Blending: Basic sight word review
Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher reads the word series. Students say the requested sound (varies by day).
Tues & Wed: Final Sound, Thurs & Fri: Medial Sound
Segmenting: Basic sight word review
Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: too, S: too; t-oo
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ (underlined word) to /*/ and the word is?
Ex. T: waterfall, S: waterfall, T: change the/fall/ to /melon/ and the word is? S: watermelon
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, March 28, 2016. We will read and discus natural resources.
Inquiry Question: How have you used natural resources today? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Interactive Read Aloud: Dear Mrs. LaRue Letters from Obedience School by Mark Teague
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Four: Readers Let a Series Book Lead Us into Learning about a Topic
“Readers, sometimes reading one book can lead us to wonder about new topics. Today I want to teach you that when you find yourself wondering about something as you read your series book, you can stop and say, ‘I want to learn more about that!’ ”
Tip: “While reading and talking about our series books, we may wonder things like, ‘What kind of place is this?’ or ‘Who are/were these people?’ or ‘What is life like for ____________?’ This can help us find topics we may want to learn more about.”
Tip: “We can look over the books we have read so far and come up with some possible topics to learn about. Today I want to teach you that this can be done in different ways, on our own or in our clubs. We can work together to find out more about one thing we wonder about, or we can each investigate a different topic and then bring back what we each find to share with our clubs.”
For the next three days, students will read books with a partner and discuss possible topics they investigate.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session13 Prove it! Adding Quotes to support Opinions
Minilesson
Connection: Share your observations about the impressive work students have been doing in this unit. Recall prior learning about quotation marks and hint at the new work they can do. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate how you use direct quotes from the touchtone text to support your opinion. Reread your writing, thinking about your opinion. Then go back to the text to find evidence to support your opinion. Finally, add in the direct quote, using revision strips and quotation marks. Restate the entire teaching point, recapping your process, to reinforce the demonstration.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to plan for their independent work. Ask students to recall their writing and make a plan for how to make it stronger by quoting the books they are writing about.
Link: Remind students to call upon all they know to make their writing strong and powerful. Give them an opportunity to get started on their revision work, right in the meeting area, before sending them off to work independently.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, March 29, 2016. We will continue to write letters of nominations of favorite books.
Inquiry Question: How can you persuade readers to read your nominated book? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Reading
– Interactive Read Aloud: LaRue Across America Postcards From America by Mark Teague
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Four: Readers Let a Series Book Lead Us into Learning about a Topic
“Readers, sometimes reading one book can lead us to wonder about new topics. Today I want to teach you that when you find yourself wondering about something as you read your series book, you can stop and say, ‘I want to learn more about that!’ ”
Tip: “While reading and talking about our series books, we may wonder things like, ‘What kind of place is this?’ or ‘Who are/were these people?’ or ‘What is life like for ____________?’ This can help us find topics we may want to learn more about.”
Tip: “We can look over the books we have read so far and come up with some possible topics to learn about. Today I want to teach you that this can be done in different ways, on our own or in our clubs. We can work together to find out more about one thing we wonder about, or we can each investigate a different topic and then bring back what we each find to share with our clubs.”
– Students read and discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 14 Good. Better. Best

Have a student share his or her writing with the whole class.
Students also share their writing with a partner.
Review vocabulary words by having students get up to stretch and say out loud what the words mean: introduction, opinion, persuade, conclusion, evidence

Minilesson
Connection: Tell students a story about watching movies and then comparing them in a discussion with friends. Relate this to the kind of thinking and writing they can do across books. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Show students how you compare similar books. Model your thinking closely about what aspects of the book you are comparing, and then include this thinking in your writing. Debrief, reviewing the steps you went through to compare books and think closely about the comparison.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to practice this work using books from your collection.
Link: Remind students how making comparisons between books is another kind of evidence that can support their opinion. Give them an opportunity to come up with some possible books to compare.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, March 30, 2016. We will read and discuss environmental factors, which require animals and plants to adapt in order to survive.
Inquiry Question: What are some ways animals and plants adapt? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Reading
Interactive Read Aloud: Detective LaRue Letters from the Investigation by Mark Teague
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Four: Readers Let a Series Book Lead Us into Learning about a Topic
“Readers, sometimes reading one book can lead us to wonder about new topics. Today I want to teach you that when you find yourself wondering about something as you read your series book, you can stop and say, ‘I want to learn more about that!’ ”
Tip: “While reading and talking about our series books, we may wonder things like, ‘What kind of place is this?’ or ‘Who are/were these people?’ or ‘What is life like for ____________?’ This can help us find topics we may want to learn more about.”
Tip: “We can look over the books we have read so far and come up with some possible topics to learn about. Today I want to teach you that this can be done in different ways, on our own or in our clubs. We can work together to find out more about one thing we wonder about, or we can each investigate a different topic and then bring back what we each find to share with our clubs.”
– Students read and discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session15 Giving Readers Signposts and Rest Stops
Minilesson
Connection: Gather your writers and explain how longer sentences need some rest stops. Name the teaching point.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Invite your writers to notice some rest stop punctuation in a few well-written sentences. Guide them through the steps of first noticing the punctuation and then asking themselves what the purpose of the punctuation is. Record punctuation observations in a class chart.
Link: Before sending students off, give them a chance to try rest-stop punctuation in their own fabulous writing. Remind the class that punctuation is one way of taking care of your readers.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, March 31, 2016. We will use properties of two-dimensional geometry to solve problems involving spatial visualization.
Inquiry Question: When you divide a rectangle in half vertically, how many rectangles do you see? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
(The following words will be tested on Friday, April 7.)

soft, lift, shift, drift, gift, left, raft, craft, loft, swift, sift, apart, form, congruent, arrange, geometric

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 16 Writing Introductions and Conclusions to Captivate
Minilesson
Connection: Tell students that you are impressed with their nomination writing and all of the strategies that they are using to make their pieces powerful and persuasive. Explain that opinion writers have the challenge of catching the attention of their audience and communicating their claims, before releasing them. Name the inquiry question.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Set writers up to investigate a mentor text by guiding then through a series of steps that help students discover answers to the overarching question. Then listen in and coach, to elicit and collect their comments. Coach students to study structure, voice, word choice, and craft as they work in pairs. Listen in and highlight observations that students make. Reconvene the group to elicit students’ observations. Repeat their observations using more precise language, and record these on sticky notes to add to a Venn diagram chart.
Link: Send writers off to work independently, reminding them to call on prior knowledge as well as what they have learned today about writing introductions and conclusions.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Lesson 7-10 (Day 1)

Day 1 Administer the Unit Assessment

1. Warm Up
Self-Assessment
Students complete the Self Assessment. (“You do”, independent)

2a. Assess
Unit 7 Assessment
Students complete the Unit 7 Assessment to demonstrate their progress on the Common Core State Standards covered in this unit. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 7-10 (Day 2)

Day 2 Administer the Open Response
2b. Assess
Students decide if two different sets of base-10 blocks represent the same number and explain their thinking.
(“You do”, independent)

Discussing the Problem
Students discuss the representation and their thinking. (“We do”, whole class)

3. Looking Ahead
Math Boxes 7-10
Students complete the practice and maintaining skills on journal page 194. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Instructional Math Task
Stuff Animal Collection

Three Reads: reading the situation/problem three times, each time with a particular focus— comprehending the text, comprehending the mathematical structure of the situation, listing all possible mathematical questions.
Setting the stage:
“We are going to work on a word problem today. We will read it three times. Each time I am going to ask you to answer a specific question. The first time you will have to listen carefully because I am going to read it out loud to you. You don’t have it in front of you.”
First Read (comprehending the text):
“Listen carefully. What I would like you to listen for is:
What is this situation is about?
(Not the mathematics, not the answer; just the context. Do you understand the words that describe this situation?)”
Read out loud a problem stem, a word problem without the question.
Debrief.
Second Read (comprehending the mathematics):
“Here is the situation. [Show the situation on the screen/board. Ask a student to read it out loud for the class.] ____ is going to read it out loud for us. What I would like you to listen/read for is the important information in the situation. By that I mean the quantities (numbers and their units) and their relationships. Remember, in every situation there are explicit quantities (e.g., 64 inches) and implicit quantities (e.g., John’s height). Look for both.
What are the quantities in this situation? How are those quantities related?”
Debrief.
Third Read (listing all possible mathematical questions):
“____ will read the situation for us one more time. This time I would like you to think about all the possible questions we could ask of this situation. Not what the people in the situation are wearing, but questions about the quantities and their relationships.
What are all the possible mathematical questions we could ask of this situation?
Debrief.
Working on the problem:
“Today I would like you to work on this question:
Joe and Jane collect the same kinds of stuffed animals. Joe has forty-eight monkeys, twenty-five bears, and sixty-seven dogs. Jane looks at Joe’s collection and says she has the same number of stuffed animals. Jane has thirty-four monkeys and fifty-eight bears. How many dogs does Jane have? Show all your mathematical thinking.”
[Make sure every student gets a copy of the problem to work on.]
Draw a diagram that represents the quantities in the problem and how their relationships.
Use your diagram to solve the problem.
Debrief: Compare and contrast different ways of thinking (This is ____diagram. Who can explain ____’s way of thinking? How is his/her way of thinking similar/different to yours?); different diagrams (How are these diagrams the same? How are they different?); choose which two or three diagrams to discuss deeply (from least sophisticated to more sophisticated); help students evaluate the diagrams (which diagram shows the relationships among the quantities better? Which diagram would help you the most to solve the problem? Why?); and make connections from one diagram to the next.
Have students solve the problem.

Problem of the Month

The Problems of the Month (POM) are used in a variety of ways to promote problem solving and to foster the first standard of mathematical practice from the Common Core State Standards: “Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.” The
POM may be used by a teacher to promote problem solving and to address the differentiated needs of her students. A department or grade level may engage their students in a POM to showcase problem solving as a key aspect of doing mathematics. POMs can also be used school wide to promote a problem‐solving theme at a school. The goal is for all students to have the experience of attacking and solving non‐routine problems and developing their mathematical reasoning skills. Although obtaining and justifying solutions to the problems is the objective, the process of learning to problem solve is even more important.

Overview
In the Problem of the Month, Infinite Windows, students use properties of two-dimensional geometry to solve problems involving spatial visualization. The mathematical topics that underlie this POM are the attributes of polygons, symmetry, spatial visualization, transformations, patterns, functions and fractal geometry. The problem asks the student to use spatial reasoning to make sense of part of a visual image. In the first level of the POM, students are asked to determine the number of rectangles in a figure comprised of different‐sized rectangles. Their task is to identify the number of rectangles and show how they were counted.

Mathematical Concepts
Spatial visualization plays an important part in real‐world experiences. From designing the most complex structures created by designers, architects, and construction workers to arranging the furniture in a room, spatial awareness and visualization are essential. In this POM, students explore various aspects of spatial visualization. This involves examining symmetrical patterns as well and understanding the relationship between multiple lines of reflection. Students will use their spatial sense and develop understandings of attributes in plane geometry and the use of basic transformations.

Infinite Windows
Teacher provides the following prompt (a picture will be included):
Tracy and Debbie are counting rectangles. The figure below is made of different rectangles and rectangles of different sizes.
How many rectangles can you find in the figure above? Show and explain how you found all of them.

Science
Students will continue to learn about what makes an item a natural resource, and how often they use these natural resources every day.
Review the charted list of natural resources and the uses of that resource.
Students will review a natural resource map to see which areas have which natural resources.
Continue the discussion of water and trees as natural resources.
Students work in pairs to chart how much water they have used since they woke up that morning. Students share their information and we chart as a class how much water we have used since waking up.
For exact usage use:
http://environment.national geographic.com/environment/freshwater/water-calculator-methodology/

Students work in pairs to read “Living Things and Their Environments” from chapter 4 of Harcourt Science Book. They will discuss and complete the Vocabulary Power worksheet RS 26.

Continue to discuss the use of wood. Trees must be removed for lumber, which is used for buildings and furniture.

Students work in pairs to chart ways in which people waste natural resources. They discuss the information gathered and explain some ways in which we as second graders can preserve our natural resources.

Students work in pairs to read “What Is an Environment” from chapter 4 (pages 150-159) of Harcourt Science Book. They will discuss and complete the Lesson Quick Study worksheet RS 27, 28.

Switch the students thinking about the use of natural resources from the perspective of a human to the perspective of another living item in that environment.
Yesterday we talked about how humans use the natural resources.
How do other living species use the same natural resources?
What happens when there are no natural resources for these animals and plants to use?
Often because of humans or other environmental factors animals are forced to adapt in order to survive.
Some of these adaptations include extra blubber on ocean animals or how ducks have oily skin. These small adaptations happen over time. Often animals slowly change with the environment. The environment is constantly changing and animals and plants are a part of the environment.

Duck feather experiment:
Students will have two duck feathers, one they will cover in grease and the other they will not. The students will then dip each feather into water and notice the differences. The plain feather is before an animal like a duck adapted.

Oreo experiment
Students are each given one Oreo. The students must open the cookie and eat the cream out of the middle before they eat the cookie. Then you say that because humans harmed their environment they no longer have arms. They must complete the same task as above without using their hands. They must adapt.
Guiding questions:
How did you feel when you could not use your hands to get the white part out of the cookie?
How did you adapt?
Was your adaption effective?
If you had another cookie how would you adapt you original method?

Social Studies
Students will continue working on and editing their map.
What are some of the key characteristics of a map?
Why do we need all of these parts to make our map effective?
Can anyone predict what might happen if someone did not have all of the parts of a map?
What if it lacked a compass?
A key?
A river, ocean, or, mountain?
Why do people use maps?

Map must have a title
Map must have a map key
Map must have a compass rose
Map must have various landforms labeled on the key

Allow students to volunteer to present what they have already created on their map, and then discuss what that particular student is doing well, and what he/she should add.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of March 20

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

This is a reminder that students will take the Balancing Science Unit Test on Monday, March 21. The graded study guide was sent home on Friday, March 18. Please refer to it to help your child prepare for the test.

The Unit 7 Math Written Assessment and Open Response will be given on Monday, March 28 and Tuesday, March 29 respectively. Students will receive the study guide on Thursday, March 25. Please help your child complete the study guide and review the graded homework to ensure success.

The third-quarter-parent/teacher conferences will take place on Wednesday, April 13. If you haven’t signed up for the third quarter parent/teacher conferences, please do so. The sign-up schedules are posted outside the front door of rooms 103 and 106. Parents, who do not sign up by April 5, will be assigned the time slots available! We will be sending home the finalized schedule on April 6.

There will be no school on Friday, March 25. CPS has ordered that day to be a furlough day.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the NSP student from the University of Chicago
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
Listening Centers: Mentor Texts Mercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo
Word Study
Literature Circle
Reader’s Theater
IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level I (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 26 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming: Teacher says a real word. Students make nonsense rhyming words from it.
Onset Fluency: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word, and then isolate the beginning onset.
Ex: T: kite S: /k/
Blending: Basic sight word review
Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher reads the word series. Students say the requested sound (varies by day).
Tues & Wed: Final Sound, Thurs & Fri: Medial Sound
Segmenting: Basic sight word review
Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: too, S: too; t-oo
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ (underlined word) to /*/ and the word is?
Ex. T: waterfall, S: waterfall, T: change the/fall/ to /melon/ and the word is? S: watermelon
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Animal Habitats” by Jack Hartmann from YouTube

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, March 21, 2016. We will create a line plot for the data from the standing jumps.
Today’s Question: How can data be shown on a line? Discuss your answer with a classmate.

Reading
Interactive Read-Aloud: Cowgirl Kate and Cocoa by Erica Silverman
Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“There are lots of ways that a reading club can tackle comparing and contrasting series books. Today, you will have a few options for how your club will do this work. You could get lots of ideas going by having two members read a couple books in one series while the other members read two books in another series, or you could focus on character similarities and differences across series. Other book clubs may prefer to focus on the big ideas. Maybe you might even think about how certain types of books (funny, detective, etc.) are similar and different.”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 11 Publishing Our Opinions for All to Read
Mini-lesson
Connection: Drumroll the upcoming writing celebration. Remind students that writers fancy up their writing before publishing, and ask them to recall which tools located in the classroom they can use as resources to do this. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Start a quick study of one of the book you have written about. Think out loud about what you see, noting not just the feature but why you think the author or illustrator included it. Start a quick chart to list different extras writers might include.
Active Engagement: Invite students to find the extras in their books, asking why the author may have chosen to include them.
Link: Remind students of their ongoing work and invite them to add the work of including extras to their plans for the day.
Students publish one of their letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, March 22, 2016. We will continue to examine the way characters behave in books in a series.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to pay attention to the patterns of how the characters behave? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Reading
Interactive Read-Aloud: Cowgirl Kate and Cocoa: School Days by Erica Silverman
Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“We know that, just like real people, characters can act differently depending on who they are with or who they are around. Today I want to teach you that, as readers, we can come up with possible reasons this is so. We can closely study the patterns around our characters’ interactions and then make theories about these patterns. We can try to figure out why they’re acting or reacting in certain ways. Are they trying to impress or embarrass or annoy the other character they’re with? Why?”
“Readers can even come up with new theories as we study characters’ reactions and interactions. We can look from book to book to book within a series to see if and when these patterns tend to repeat.”
– Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 11 Publishing Our Opinions for All to Read
Students continue to publish one of their letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: When is Handwriting a Priority?

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, March 23, 2016. We will read and discuss the impact that people have on the environment.
Inquiry Question: How can people have an effect on the environment? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Interactive Read-Aloud: Cowgirl Kate and Cocoa: Rain or Shine by Erica Silverman
Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“Whether we’re reading alone or talking in our clubs, readers come up with theories about why characters do certain things or say certain things. We also read to find out what the author is trying to teach us. Today I want to teach you that we can think about how these theories and ideas matter to the real world. For example, after reading Chester’s Way, we may ask, ‘What does this make me think about copycats now?’ or ‘Does this book or this series help me to think differently about best friends now?’ ”
– Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session12 And the Nominees Are…
Mini-lesson
Connection: Tells students a story about visiting a bookstore and noticing all of the award-winning books. Explain that this is the work they will be undertaking: writing nominations for their own favorite books. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Walk students through the steps you take: first, choosing a book to nominate, then thinking about what makes your chosen book so special and the reasons why it is deserving of an award. Debrief.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to practice, first by choosing a book to nominate, and then by planning the reasons why their books deserve an award. Ask students to rehearse their writing with their partners.
Link: Send students off to write, reiterating the procedure you introduced during the mini-lesson.
Students begin writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, March 24, 2016. We will continue working on our maps.
Inquiry Question: Why do mapmakers use symbols? Share what you think with a classmate!

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
(The following words will be tested on Friday, April 1.)
drink, think, sink, stink, wink, thank, bank, drank, honk, blank, shrink, sphere, cube, pyramid, prism, rectangular

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Reading
Interactive Read-Aloud: Cowgirl Kate and Cocoa: Partners by Erica Silverman
Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Four: Readers Let a Series Book Lead Us into Learning about a Topic
“Readers, sometimes reading one book can lead us to wonder about new topics. Today I want to teach you that when you find yourself wondering about something as you read your series book, you can stop and say, ‘I want to learn more about that!’ ”
Tip: “While reading and talking about our series books, we may wonder things like, ‘What kind of place is this?’ or ‘Who are/were these people?’ or ‘What is life like for ____________?’ This can help us find topics we may want to learn more about.”
Tip: “We can look over the books we have read so far and come up with some possible topics to learn about. Today I want to teach you that this can be done in different ways, on our own or in our clubs. We can work together to find out more about one thing we wonder about, or we can each investigate a different topic and then bring back what we each find to share with our clubs.”
– Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 12 And the Nominees Are…
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Getting Mileage Out of Any Learning Tools You Have at Hand

Math
Lesson 7-7 Representing Data: Standing Jumps
Students discuss the shortest and longest standing jumps and create a line plot for the data.

Goals:
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: line plot

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers dictate pairs of numbers for students to write on their erasable boards and record with >, < , or =.

989 and 971
445 and 454
877 and 788
(“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
Turn to journal page 181. Write your name and the length of your longer jumper in inches on a stick-on note.

Math Talk
Discussing the Data
As students share their jump lengths in inches, list the data in order from shortest to longest. Tape an actual tape measure to the board and mark the longest and the shortest jump lengths.

Note: Explain that another name for shortest jump is minimum and another name for the longest jump is maximum.

Students calculate the difference between the longest and shortest jumps, and then share their solution strategies.
Teachers display a comparison diagram on the board. Fill in the largest quantity and the small quantity. Write a question mark for the difference. (“We do”, whole class)

Making a Class Line Plot
Teachers display a number line writing the shortest standing-jump below the leftmost tick and the longest standing-jump under the rightmost tick.

Teachers guide the students to create a line plot of the data.

1. Students come to the display in small groups.

2. Students find the numbers on the number line that match their stick-on notes. They post their stick-on notes just above those tick marks.

3. If there is a stick-on note already on the line plot, students put their stick-on notes right above that stick-on note.

After all the stick-on notes have been posted, remove them one by one and replace each note with an X. (“We do”, whole class)

Note: It’s important for the teacher to replace the stick-on notes with X’s rather than the students because the X’s should be uniform in size and equal balance apart to help students use the line plot to answer questions.

Ask: What does it mean when there are a lot of X’s above a number?
How many students have a jump of 42 inches?

Students answer Problem 3 on journal page 181. (“You do”, independent)

Summarize
Teachers guide students to read about line plots on My Reference Book, page 114.
Discuss the Try It Together question at the bottom of the page. (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Solving Subtraction Problems
Students solve subtraction problems using number grids, number lines, or base-10 blocks on journal page 184. (“We do”, partners; “We do”, small group)

Math Boxes 7-7
Students complete the mixed practice on journal page 7-9. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Lesson 7-8 Representing Data: Arm Spans
Students make a frequency table and a line plot for a set of data.

Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: frequency table, line plot
1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers dictate 2- and 3-digit numbers. Have students mentally add and subtract and record their answers on erasable boards. (“We do”, whole class)

Add: 100 to 300
100 to 820
100 to 780

Subtract: 100 from 100
100 from 188
100 from 910

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
Take 1 stick-on note. Turn to journal page 180. Print your name and arm span in inches on the stick-on note. (“You do”, independent)

Math Talk
Comparing Arm Span Measures
Have students look at their arm span measurements and compare both measurements.
Ask: Why was one of your measurements a smaller number than the other?

Have students share their thinking as to why one measure was a smaller number than the other. (“We do”, whole class)

Tape an actual tape measure to the board and mark the shortest and longest arm spans.

Teachers display a comparison diagram on the board. Fill in the largest quantity and the small quantity. Write a question mark for the difference. (“We do”, whole class)

With the class, find the difference between the two arm spans. Explain that the students will use the class arm span data to make a frequency table and a line plot.
Teachers may want to read about tally charts in My Reference Book, page 113 with the class. (“We do”, whole class)

Making a Frequency Table of Arm Span Data
Teachers display a copy of the table on Math Masters, page 204 and work as a class to fill in the frequency table of arm spans. Record students’ data on the display as students do so on journal page 186.

Follow these steps:
1. Fill in the Arm Span column. In the first row, write the length of the shortest arm span in class. Fill in the subsequent rows with all of the possible arm spans to the nearest inch, up to the longest arm span in the class.

2. Ask each student in turn to say his or her arm span. As students share their data, everyone makes a tally mark next to the arm span length reported.

3. After all the measurements have been tallied, write the number for each set of tallies.

4. Check that no measurements have been omitted, add the frequency numbers and compare the sum to the number of students in the class.

Discuss the completed table. (“We do”, whole class)

Academic Language Development
The term frequent may not be familiar to students. Introduce the term using contextual information and restatements with more familiar words to help students construct an understanding of the term.
Fro example: How many times did you go to the dentist this year? Do you often go to the dentists? Do you make frequent visits to the dentist? Point out to the students that the words frequent, frequently, and frequency belong to the same word family. (“We do”, whole class)

Make a Line Plot of arm Span Data
Have students use the information in the frequency table to draw a line plot on journal page 187.
Explain: A line plot is a type of display that shows data organized above a labeled line.
Teachers display Math Masters, page 205 and show how to draw the scale of possible arm lengths. Discuss how you know which numbers to start and end. (“We do”, whole class)

Students record the scale on their line plots. For each tally mark next to an arm span length in the frequency table, they draw an X above the tick mark for the corresponding length on the line plot.

To make sure that all the data from the class are represented, prompt students to count the number of Xs and compare the total to the number of students in the class. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Discuss students’ completed line plots.
Ask:
What does it mean when there are a lot of Xs above a number?
Which arm span is the most common?
How many students have an arm of 51 inches? Of 46 inches?

Assessment Opportunity
Observe:
Which students represent the data in the line plot?
Which students need additional support to represent the data in the line plot?

Summarize
Students compare the frequency table and the line plot on journal pages 186-187. (“We do”, whole class)

Ask: How are the frequency table and the line plot similar?
How are they different?

3. Practice
Playing Beat the Calculator
Students play Beat the Calculator. (“We do”, small groups)

Observe
Which facts do students now from memory?
Which students need additional support to play the game?

Discuss
What strategies do you use to solve the facts you did not know?
Why is knowing addition facts helpful?
(“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes 7-8
Students complete the mixed practice on journal page 206. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Lesson 7-9 Explorations (2 Days)
Exploring Shape Attributes, Graphs, and Measurements
Students sort shapes, draw a picture graph, and measure body parts.

Goals:
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers display math problems. Students write their answers on erasable boards. (“We do”, whole class)

? = 9 + 3 + 11 + 17
? = 12 + 13 + 17 + 8

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Message
Place a tally mark by your favorite fruit.
Then find activity Sheets 7-12 in the back of your journal. Remove the pages from your journal and look at the shapes. (“You do”, independent)

Talk with your partner about things you notice about the shapes. (“We do”, whole class)

Math Talk
Discussing Shapes
Have students share what they notice about the shapes.

Have students find a shape with three sides. Tell them to look for other shapes with the same amount of sides.
Ask: Are the three-sided shapes the same or different? Explain your answer. (“We do”, whole class)

Exploration A: Sorting shapes
Students cut out shapes and sort them according to attributes.
As students are sorting their shapes into groups, ask:
How are you sorting your shapes?
Which shapes are in this group?
Which shapes are in that group?
Why did you put them there?

Academic Language Development
Students may be more familiar with the term sort to mean type or sort of. As an example, say:
What sort of games do you like – board games or video games?
Point out that sort also describes the action of putting objects into like groups.
Use the word interchangeably with sort to reinforce students’ understanding of this term as an action.
Say: You can sort shapes by the number of sides.
How else might you sort the shapes?
(“We do”, whole class)

Students trace three shapes from two different sorts on journal pages 190-191 and label the sorts. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Note: Have students store their shapes labeled with their name in zip-lock bags for use in Unit 8.

Exploration B: Drawing a Picture Graph
Students draw a picture graph of their favorite-fruit data.
Display the fruit data collected during the Math Message for all students to see while they complete Exploration B.
Students complete a tally chart by counting the tallies from the Math Message and then use the data to draw a picture graph on journal page 192. (“We do”, partners; “We do”, small group)

Exploration C: Measuring Body Parts
Students measure body parts and record data.
Students measure specified body parts and record their measurements on journal page 193. (“We do”, partners; “We do”, small groups)

Summarize
Have students share how they sorted their shapes in Exploration A. (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Playing Addition/Subtraction Spin
Students play several rounds of Addition/Subtraction Spin. (“We do”, whole class)

Assessment Opportunity
Observe:
Which students are engaged in the game?
Which students need additional support to play the game?

Discuss:
What shortcut or rule did you use to help you add or subtract?
How do you know your rule works?
(“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes 7-9
Students complete the mixed practice on journal page 189. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Science
Balancing and Weighing Unit Test
Pre-assessment for the science unit focused on the environment
Introduction to the unit
Vocabulary Introduction
Environment, habitat, adapt, desert, rain forest, grassland, tundra, ocean, pond, food chain, and food web
Not discussing the vocabulary today, but letting the students hear the words they will hear the rest of the unit.
Guiding questions to informally gage schema?
What is a habitat? Ocean? Grassland? Etc.
What types of animals would we experience in each?
Can anyone describe the difference between a food chain and a food web?
Are humans in a food chain or food web?

Students will describe a variety of landscapes using colorful word choices.
Do a photo walk using the smart board and PowerPoint. Show a variety of pictures and have student describe what they are seeing.
Read aloud: Living Things and Their Environments Harcourt Science Book
Students will be able to describe the effects people have on the environment.
Intro: Brainstorm the variety of ways in which people have an effect on the environment.
Recognize the effects on people today and predict the effects in the future. People have an effect on the environment.
Read The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
This is a fiction book with non-fiction messages and implications.
As I read discuss the implications of mistreatment of natural resources.
What did we learn about what could happen when natural resources are mistreated?
How can we as a second grade class help reduce how much we waste natural resources?
Students will learn about what makes an item a natural resource, and how often they use these natural resources every day.
List natural resources on the board and the uses of that resource.
Students will review a natural resource map to see which areas have which natural resources.
Begin the discussion of water and trees as natural resources.
Discuss how much water the students have used since they woke up that morning.
For exact usage use:
http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/freshwater/water-calculator-methodology/
Then discuss the use of wood. Trees must be removed for lumber, which is used for buildings and furniture.
How do people waste natural resources?
What are some ways in which we as second graders can preserve our natural resources?

Social Studies
Students will continue working on and editing their map.

Map must have title
Map must have a map key
Map must have a compass rose
Map must have various landforms labeled on the key

Students volunteer to present what they have already created on their map, and then discuss what that particular student is doing well, and what he/she should add.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of March 13

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Daylight savings time began Sunday, March 13 at 2 a.m. Please set your clocks ahead one hour if you haven’t already done so.

The Mid-term Progress Reports was sent home with the students on Friday, March 11. Please discuss the report with your child and complete the bottom portion to return to us. If we have requested a conference with you, kindly email us to schedule an appointment.

The Balancing and Weighing Science Unit Test will take place on Monday, March 21. Students will complete the study guide in class. The graded study guide will be sent home on Friday, March 18. Please refer to it to help your child prepare for the test.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the NSP student from the University of Chicago
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
Listening Centers: Mentor Texts Mercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo
Word Study
Literature Circle
Reader’s Theater
IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level I (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 25 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming: Teacher says a real word. Students make nonsense rhyming words from it.
Onset Fluency: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word, and then isolate the beginning onset.
Ex: T: kite S: /k/
Blending: Basic sight word review
Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher reads the word series. Students say the requested sound (varies by day).
Tues & Wed: Final Sound, Thurs & Fri: Medial Sound
Segmenting: Basic sight word review
Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: too, S: too; t-oo
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ (underlined word) to /*/ and the word is?
Ex. T: waterfall, S: waterfall, T: change the/fall/ to /melon/ and the word is? S: watermelon
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Over In The Meadow” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p.209-210 and You Tube, Barefoot Books

Day 1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, March 14, 2016. In science, we will apply a strategy to discover which of the six sealed canisters contains six marbles.
Inquiry Question: What strategy can you employ to identify a canister with the greatest amount of marbles? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Two: Even When Readers Think We Know How a Series Will Go, We Are Ready to Be Surprised
“Readers, we know that characters, like people, aren’t always one way—even if they are often predictable. This is because characters are complex. Today I want to teach you that as we talk and learn about characters, we can use this knowledge to challenge and revise our all-or-nothing thinking. Instead of saying, ‘Pinky always,’ we might say, ‘Sometimes he ____________.’
Tip: “When we notice our character acting in a way we don’t agree with or are confused by, we can sort out our thinking in a partnership conversation. We might say things like, ‘I disagree with what Jamaica did,’ or ‘I don’t know what Maria means by ____________,’ or ‘Why does Harry think that is important?’ ”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud
George and Martha: Split Pea Soup by James Marshall
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 8: Reading Closely to Generate More Writing
Minilesson
Connection: Use an example to illustrate the importance of close reading. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate by looking back at an important part of the touchtone text. Highlight the fact that you pause to attend closely to what’s in the text, saying or writing what you notice. Make it clear that noticing is not enough. Instead, writers need to ask, “What new ideas does this give me?” Debrief by explaining to students how you notice new details and incorporated them into your planning.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to try the same work using the touchstone text.
Link: Remind students that they should be working toward the goal of writing more about their opinions, and that close reading of their books can give them more ideas to write about. Prompt them to think back to all the strategies they’ve learned to make their writing powerful.
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Morning meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, March 15, 2016. In Math, we will measure using the metric system. Inquiry Question: Why is it useful to rely on personal references when estimating lengths? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Two: Even When Readers Think We Know How a Series Will Go, We Are Ready to Be Surprised
“Since we know characters don’t always act predictably, we can expect to be surprised now and then by things they do and say. Today I want to teach you that we can read our series on the lookout for those surprising moments—when a character acts out of character. When we see a character acting in a surprising way, we can pause and do some big thinking, jotting on a Post-it what we notice that is different and why we think that this is so.”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud
George and Martha: The Flying Machine by James Marshall

Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 8: Reading Closely to Generate More Writing
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Linking Details and Ideas

Day 3:
Morning meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, March 16, 2016. In math, we will be collecting data on arm spans and standing jumps.
Inquiry Question: Why should data be gathered in an accurate manner? Discuss your thinking with a classmate.

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Two: Even When Readers Think We Know How a Series Will Go, We Are Ready to Be Surprised
“Readers, you know how when we come to the end of a book, we know some of our work is just beginning? Well, today I want to teach you that when we end a book, we can reflect, asking, ‘What was the whole book about?’ and ‘Was the author trying to teach us something?’ Then we might go back and find evidence in the book that the author really was trying to teach that lesson.”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud
George and Martha: The Tub by James Marshall

Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 9: Gathering More Evidence to support Each of Our Opinions
Mini-lesson
Connection: Congratulate students on the close reading work they did yesterday. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Let students know that you are aware that they are noticing details and using them to come up with an opinion. But now, they need to take it to the next level and search for even more details to support each of their opinions. Demonstrate taking an idea or opinion from a section of a letter and returning to a book to collect related details and evidence. Debrief, describing the process you followed to gather more details and evidence from the text.
Active Engagement: Ask students to join you in supporting a new opinion.
Link: Add on to the anchor chart and remind students of the importance of using strategies outlined on it.
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
Morning meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, March 17, 2016. In social studies, we will begin creating our own maps of our new chosen town.
Inquiry Question: Why do we need map keys to make our maps effective?
Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“Today I want to remind you that when we meet with club members, we don’t only think about our current series, we think about all the series books we have read, and we think about the patterns in those books. We can think about the types of characters, the types of problems, even the messages the different authors might be teaching. We can talk with our club, thinking ‘What is the same in these series?’ and ‘What is different?’ ”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud
George and Martha: The Mirror by James Marshall

Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 9: Gathering More Evidence to support Each of Our Opinions
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Using the Classroom Environment to Teach

Day 5:
Morning meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, March 18, 2016. In science, we will begin brainstorming and discussing what we know about living things and their environment.
Inquiry Question: How do living things benefit from their environment? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Thursday, March 24.)
back, stack, pack, dock, lock, quack, sack, snack, quick, neck, check, circle, square, rectangle, triangle, plane

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 10: Why is the Author Using a Capital Here?
Mini-lesson
Connection: Let writers know that as their writing becomes more complex, so too does their use of capitals.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Provide questions to guide the class inquiry. In this case, “Why is the author using a capital letter here?”
Guided Inquiry: Set writers up to read apart of a letter about a book, letting them know that they should listen and read along, thinking about the inquiry question. Read through the mentor text a second time, reminding students of the guiding question and pushing them toward closer examination. Pull the students back together and challenge them to think about the difference uses of capitals across the writing. Remind them of the inquiry question and get them working to answer it with a partner. Add the students’ observations to the class chart.
Link: Send students off to revise, edit, and work on their letters, keeping in mind all the strategies they have learned so far.
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Lesson 7-4 Measuring with Yards (Day 2)
Students explore U.S. customary length units and measure to the nearest yard.

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Choose appropriate tools.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Vocabulary: standard unit, yard (yd), personal reference

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students find the difference between pairs of numbers. (“We do”, whole class)
31 and 19
57 and 92

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Teachers pose this problem.
About how many children in our class can lie head-to-foot along the longest wall of our classroom? (“You do”, independent)

Students share the answers and strategies used to solve the problem. (“We do”, whole class)

Measuring with a nonstandard Unit
Teachers ask volunteers to measure the length of the classroom by lying head-to-foot along the longest wall.
Ask: Are all second graders the same height?
Why is it important that we measure with units that are all the same length?

Teachers select another volunteer to measure the length of the classroom using the volunteer as the unit.

Ask: How could we tell someone in another state how long our classroom is?

Teachers lead a discussion around some of the difficulties of using people as unit of measure.

Ask: How can we make sure that we get the same measurement no matter who measures an object?

Introducing the Yard
Teachers display a yardstick and explain that a yard (yd) is a unit in the U.S. customary system that is 36 inches long.
On the Class Data Pad write “A yard is 36 inches long.”
Teachers lead a discussion about the everyday and mathematical meanings of yard. People in the United States commonly use the yard to measure lengths longer than a few feet. (“We do”, whole class)

Finding Personal References for U.S, Customary Units
Have students complete page 175 in the math journal 2. (“We do”, small groups)

Estimating and Measuring Distances
Standing near the shortest wall of the classroom, show students your own personal reference for 1 yard. Ask students to imagine how many times your personal reference will fit along the length of the wall.
Teachers record students’ estimates on the Class Data Pad.

Next, teachers model measuring the same wall with a yardstick. Emphasize the importance of where the yardstick ends before moving it to avoid gaps and overlaps as you measure.

Teachers have students complete page 176. (“We do”, small groups; partners)

Summarize
Students share their estimation strategies with the class. Point out that using their personal references to help estimate and then using a measuring tool to find the actual measurement will improve their estimation skills. (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Playing Basketball Addition
Students play Basketball Addition to practice adding three or more 1-digit and 2-digit numbers. (“We do”, small groups)

Observe
Which students successfully add the numbers to find a total score?
Which students need support to understand and play the game?

Discuss
Which numbers did you choose to add first? Why?
Can you use another strategy to add the numbers?

Math Boxes 7-4
Students practice and maintain skill. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs or small groups)

Lesson 7-5 Measuring Meters
Students find personal references for metric units of measure; they choose appropriate units and tools to estimate and measure lengths.

Goals:
– Choose appropriate tools.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Vocabulary: meter (m)
1. Warm Up

Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers display problems one at a time. Students solve them on their erasable boards. Encourage students to use mental strategies. (“We do”, whole class)

3 + 17 + 15 + 5 = ?
? = 12 + 26 + 14 + 8

Daily Math Routines
Students complete the daily math routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus

Math Talk
Ask: What are the names of units we use to measure?
What are the names of tools we use to measure length?
(“We do”, whole class)

Introducing the Meter
Teachers remind students that inches, feet and yards are part of the U.S. customary system, and centimeters are part of the metric system.
Say: Students, in the metric system, the meter is another commonly used standard unit of length. The abbreviation for meter is m.

Display the meter stick. On the Data Class Pad, and write “ a meter is 100 centimeters long”

Teachers display a meter stick and a centimeter cube taped to a poster labeled each length.

Say: In the United States, the U.S. customary system is used for everyday purposes, whereas the metric system is used mostly for scientific purposes. Most labels on canned and packaged foods show both the metric and U.S. customary units of measure. Most countries in the world use only the metric system.
(“We do”, whole class)

Teachers distribute a meter stick, a yardstick, and tape measure to each partnership. Students compare their meter sticks and yardsticks with the tape measure. (“We do”, partners)

After several minutes, bring students back together to share their findings. (“We do”, whole class)

Examples of comments:
The tape measure is the longest of the three.
The yardstick is the shortest of the three.
The meter stick is a little longer than the yardstick.
The tape measure is easy to use when measuring around things or when measuring longer things.
All three tools are easy to use when measuring things that are straight.

Ask: About how much longer in centimeters is the meter stick than the yardstick? About how much longer in centimeters is the tape measure than the meter stick?

Note: It is not important that the students know the exact length difference between 1 yard and 1 meter. Knowing that 1 meter is a little longer than 1 yard is sufficient.

Finding Personal References for Metric Units

Students, personal references are useful when estimating lengths. In Lesson 7-4, we found personal references for U.S. customary units of length. Today, you will work with your partner to find personal references for 1 centimeter, 10 centimeters, and I meter. For example, the width of a second grader’s little finger might be about 1 centimeter.
(“We do”, whole class)

Note: Because 1 yard and 1 meter are close in length so expect some students to select the same personal references for both lengths.

Students find things that are personal references for metric units and record their work for Problem 2 on journal page 175. (“We do”, partners)

After students have completed Problem 2, bring the class back together. On the Class Data Pad, list some of the personal references that students found. (“We do”, whole class)

Estimating and Measuring Lengths
Students discuss with their partners how they might use a personal reference for 1 centimeter to estimate the length of a crayon. (“We do”, partners)

After a few minutes, bring the class back together to share ideas. (“We do”, whole class)

Ask: What other units could you use to measure the crayon?
Why not use feet or meters?

Students use their personal references for metric units to help them estimate the lengths described on journal page 178. Then they select measuring tools and measure the lengths in metric units. Students do the same for U.S. customary units. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Summarize
Invite students to discuss the units and tools they used to estimate and measure the lengths on journal page 178. (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Practicing With Fact Triangles
Students practice with Fact Triangles listing the addition facts they know and the facts they need more practice with on the Addition Facts Inventory Record, Parts 1 and 2. (“You do”, independent)

Math Boxes 7-5
Students complete the mixed practice on journal page 179. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Lesson 7-6 (2 Days) Generating Data: Standing Jumps and Arm Spans
Students measure lengths to the nearest centimeter and to the nearest inch.

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Vocabulary: arm span

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers dictate 2- and 3-digit numbers and have students mentally add or subtract 100, recording their answers on erasable boards. (“We do”, whole class)

Add 100 to 500.
100 to 640
100 to 890

Subtract 100 from 500.
100 from 220
100 from 830

Daily Math Routines
Students complete the daily math routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Say: One friend measures your arm span in inches. Another friend measures your arm span in centimeters.
Who do you think will report the larger number? Why?
(“We do”, whole class)

Measuring Arm Spans
Teachers have a volunteer stand with his or her arms fully extended. Arm span is the distance from fingertip across outstretched arms. Have the class make an estimate of the lengths of the volunteer’s arm span in inches. Then one helper holds the end of the tape measure at the tip of the volunteer’s right middle finger as the second helper pulls the tape tight across the volunteer’s chest. The second helper then holds the tape at the tip of the left middle finger and reads the tape to the nearest inch.
Turn the tape over, repeat the procedure, and have the second helper read the tape to the nearest inch.

Ask: Is the number larger when you measure in inches or centimeters? Why?

Repeat this procedure several times with different volunteers and helpers. Check the measurements they report are correct to the nearest inch and the nearest centimeter.

Say: Today you will collect arm span and standing jump data to use in later lessons.
(“We do”, whole class)

Teachers divide the class into small groups of four. Students will remain in these groups for both data-collection activities. Students take measurements in both centimeters and inches.

Collecting and Recording Arm Span Data
Students collect data and record their findings on journal p. 180. (“We do”, small groups)

Academic Language Development
To teach the meaning of “measuring to the nearest unit” build on children’s understanding of what it means to be near someone or something. Use a yardstick or tape measure to find the length of something, such as a desk, to the nearest inch.
Ask: Which number would you use in the measurement? Why?
Help students generalize the “Measuring to the nearest unit” means choosing the number nearest to the length of the object.
Provide sentence frames such as the following:
“This ______________ measures _______________ to the nearest ______________.”

Collecting and Recording Standing Jump Data
Students make two jumps and record the length of each one in both centimeters and inches on journal page 181. (“We do”, small groups)

1. Assign a job to each group member.
The jumper jumps.
The Line Judge makes sure the Jumper’s toes don’t cross the line.
The marker marks where the Jumper lands.
The Measurer measures the length of the jump with the Jumper’s help.

Teachers show students how to place a marker where the Jumper’s back heel lands and how to measure from the starting line to the marker. After the Measurer measures the jump in one unit, he or she should turn the tape measure over to read the measurement in the other unit. Jumps are recorded to the nearest centimeter and inch.

2. Demonstrate a jump. The toes of both feet should be just touching the starting line. No running start is allowed. Neither is stepping back.

3. Let each student take several practice jumps before measuring a jump.

4. Each Jumper makes two jumps that are measured. They record the lengths of their own jumps in their journals. They also circle the measurement of the longer jump.

5. When the first Jumper has recorded two jumps, group members rotate jobs so that each student eventually performs all the different jobs.

Students complete journal page 181. (“We do”, small groups)

Assessment Opportunity
Observe:
Which students line up the metal end of the measuring tape correctly?
Which students need additional support to complete the data collection?

Summarize
Ask: When measuring in inches, how did you determine the nearest inch? (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Comparing Measurements
Partners choose measuring tools and measure their height, head size, and show length in centimeters. Then they find the differences between their measurements. Students complete journal page 182. (“We do”, partners)

Math Boxes 7-6
Students complete the mixed practice on journal page 183. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners; “We do”, small groups)

Problem of the Month: Between the Lines
Overview:
In the Problem of the Month Between the Lines, students use polygons to solve problems involving area. The mathematical topics that underlie this POM are the attributes of linear measurement, two‐dimensional geometry, area, and geometric justification.
The problem asks students to explore polygons and the relationship of their areas in various problem situations. In the first level of the POM, students are presented with an outline of an irregular shaped animal and pattern blocks. The students are then asked to cover (tile) the interior regions with pattern blocks. The second part of the task involves the same figure only flipped horizontally. They are asked to cover the region again using a different arrangement. In level B, students are presented with a set of isosceles trapezoids that are scaled larger by a linear factor. The students are asked to cover the area of each trapezoid with unit trapezoids. They are also asked to examine the growth in the size of the area and find a pattern.
Mathematical Concepts: In this POM, students explore the relationship of area of polygons. Students use polygons in spatial visualization, tessellation and area problems. Later in the POM, students will use knowledge of area, geometric properties, the Pythagorean
Theorem as well as reasoning and justification to determine and verify problems involving geometry and measurement.

Science
Where Are the Six Marbles?
– Students apply a strategy to discover which of five sealed canisters contains six marbles.
– Students discuss the importance of the weight of the empty canister in solving this problem.

Ask:
– What could you find out about the six marbles that would give you information to help you solve the problem?
– How could you compare the canisters to find out the one that has six marbles?
– How could you use the Unifix Cubes to find the canister that has six marbles.

Ask students to share which canister they think has the six marbles. Ask them to describe the reason for their decisions. What did they learn about the canisters and the marbles that led them to conclude that a specific canister contain the six marbles?

Ask students to discuss how the weight of the canister affected both their strategies and their results.
Where Are the Six Marbles?
– Students apply a strategy to discover which of five sealed canisters contains six marbles.
– Students discuss the importance of the weight of the empty canister in solving this problem.

Ask:
– How could you find out how many marbles are in each canister?

Students work in groups to discuss strategies for finding the number of marbles in each canister.

If students are having difficulty explaining, ask:
– How could you use the equal-arm balance, marbles, and an empty canister to find out how many marbles are in each canister?
– How could you use the equal-arm balance, and Unifix Cubes to find out how many marbles are in each canister?

Lab: How could you find out how many marbles are in each canister?

Students work independently to write to explain the inquiry question.

Graphing The Weights of the Six Canisters

– Students review the information on the data table from the previous lesson.

– Students discuss in pairs how they would use the data to create a bar graph.

– Each student will make a bar graph that shows the weights of the six canisters.

Review for the Balancing and Weighing Unit Test
– Students utilize the beam balance, the equal arm balance, and manipulatives to complete the study guide to prepare for the unit test.
Students utilize the beam balance, the equal arm balance, and manipulatives to review the following concepts for the Balancing and Weighing Unit Test.
– On a beam balance, balance is dependent on the amount of mass of an object, the relative lengths of the arms of the beam, and the location of the fulcrum.
– Weighing is the process of balancing an object against a certain number of standard units.
– The weight of an object is not determined by its size.
– Equal volumes of different foods will not all have equal weights; equal weights of different foods will not all have equal volumes.

Social Studies
Lesson 3: Maps and Globes
Objectives:
– Identify major landforms and bodies of water, including continents and oceans, on maps and globes.
– Compare maps and globes.
– Use a globe to find the poles, the cardinal directions, and the equator.
Vocabulary: continents, cardinal directions, equator, globe
Geography: Have students take turns locating Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America on the map. Ask them to identify the continent in which we live. Point out islands that are near the continents. Explain that islands are usually considered to be part of the continent they are closest to. Provide examples such as Great Britain and Europe and Japan and Asia. Ask “Which is the largest continent? Which is the smallest?’
Help students locate the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, and Arctic Oceans on the map. Explain that almost three-fourths of Earth’s surface is covered with water and that most of that water is salt water. Help students determine that the Pacific Ocean is the largest of the four oceans and the Arctic is the smallest. Explain that the Pacific Ocean is also the deepest ocean in the world. Ask “Why is a map such as this one so useful?”
Display a globe and a world map. Ask students to compare and contrast the images of the continents and oceans shown on the globe and a map. Have them compare the colors used on the globe and map. Invite students to name the continents and oceans shown on the globe.
Next, help students locate the North Pole and the South Pole on the globe. Remind them that east is the direction where the sun appears every morning, and west is where the sun sets each evening. Invite students to use their fingers to trace the symbol for the equator around the globe. Emphasize that this line only appears on maps and globes. Have students put a finger on any area north of the equator. Explain that most of the world’s dry land and most of its people are in this part of the world. Then have them put a finger on any area south of the equator. Explain that only two continents, Australia and Antarctica, lie completely within this area. Ask “What are the two things you can learn about Earth from looking at a globe?”

Students will begin creating their own maps of their new town.
Read Aloud: Me on the Map by Joan Sweeney
The scenario: The students have just bought empty land in which they can do anything they want. They must make a map of their new state/city.

What are some of the key characteristics of a map?
Why do we need all of these parts to make our map effective?
Can anyone predict what might happen if someone did not have all of the parts of a map?
What if it lacked a compass?
A key?
A river, ocean, or, mountain?
Why do people use maps?

I want you to make a map of your new state.
Map must have title
Map must have a map key
Map must have a compass rose
Map must have various landforms labeled on the key

Allow students to volunteer to present what they have already created on their map, and then discuss what that particular student is doing well, and what he/she should add.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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