Week of February 7

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

This is a reminder that the Unit 5 Progress Check and Open Response will take place on Monday, February 8 and Tuesday, February 9 respectively. Please help your child review the graded homework. Students should be able to:
– Add and subtract 1-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 10 to two and three-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 100 to three-digit numbers
– Draw coins to show a given amount
– Use an open number line to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-More diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-Less diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Parts-and-Total diagram to solve a story problem
– Explain how to find a sum of two numbers in writing and by drawing tally marks, base-ten blocks, or bills and coins, etc.

Friday, February 12, is two days before Valentine’s Day. Students are encouraged to wear a piece of red clothing to school on that day. If your child is interested in bringing Valentine greetings to share, please ensure he/she brings enough for 30 other students.

School will be closed on Monday, February 15 in observance of Presidents’ Day.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the NSP student from the University of Chicago
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
Word Study
Building Fry Sight First One Hundred Words
Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers (Tier 2)

Mini iPads Reading:
George Washington Carver by Sam Wellman
Who Was George Washington Carver by Jim Gigliotti
“George Washington Carver” on BrainpopJr.

IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level D (Tier 3);
Level G (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 20 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and open their eyes if the words rhyme, or close their eyes if the words do not.
Onset Fluency: Thumbs up if the words begin with the same blend; thumbs down if the words do not begin with the same blend.
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher says the word. Students say the final sound found in the series. Ex. T: get, got, bet, S: /t/
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Louis Armstrong – “Go down Moses” (from YouTube), “Lift Every Voice and Sing” (from YouTube)

Day 1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, February 8, 2016. In science, we will explore how the amount of weight and position of weight affect balance.
Inquiry Question: How did the paperclip affect the way you balanced the paper butterfly the other day? Share your answer with a partner.

Reading Workshop
Shared Reading: A Picture Book of George Washington Carver by David Adler

Targeted Reading Strategies
– Retell and Summary
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of retelling to understand and remember a timeline of events
– Use the reading strategy utilizing retelling notes to summarize texts

– Read page 13 aloud using the document camera and Smart Board from the text.
– Display an example from the retelling notes from Thursday’s lesson.
– Ask students to summarize in their minds using the notes displayed.
– Have students think, pair, and share their summaries.
– Teachers scribe a volunteer’s summary on chart paper or Smart Board.
– Ask students to reread the summary.
– Teachers guide students to edit the summary.
– After editing, have the students read the summary aloud.

Students read books and articles about George Washington Carver independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Introducing a How-To Chapter: In this session teachers will guide the students to understand that they will be teachers as well as writers. In their “All About Books” they need to write at least one chapter about how to do something.
– Teachers will lead a discussion with the students about directions for completing a task/game by using directions from board games that students are familiar with.
– Scribes will chart scenarios for following directions or rules for games.
– Students continue writing their “All About Books”.

Day 2
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, February 9, 2016. During Reading Workshop, we will continue to use the strategy of summarizing.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How does summarizing help you identify the main idea of the text? Explain your thinking to a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Targeted Reading Strategies
– Retell and Summary
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of retelling to understand and remember a timeline of events
– Use the reading strategy utilizing retelling notes to summarize texts

– Teachers guide students to utilize an article to identify important details about George Washington Carver’s experiences at the Tuskegee Institute.
During the reading workshop, you will work with a reading buddy to identify and highlight important information about George Washington Carver’s experiences as a professor at the Tuskegee Institute. Remember to read carefully and support your partner during the shared reading. Use your highlighted information to summarize the article.
– Students work in pairs to read, highlight and summarize the article “Tuskegee Institute”.

Tuskegee Institute
After graduating from Iowa State, Carver embarked on a career of teaching and research. Booker T. Washington, the principal of the African-American Tuskegee Institute, hired Carver to run the school’s agricultural department in 1896. Washington lured the promising young botanist to the institute with a hefty salary and the promise of two rooms on campus, while most faculty members lived with a roommate. Carver’s special status stemmed from his accomplishments and reputation, as well as his degree from a prominent institution not normally open to black students.
Tuskegee’s agricultural department achieved national renown under Carver’s leadership, with a curriculum and a faculty that he helped to shape. Areas of research and training included methods of crop rotation and the development of alternative cash crops for farmers in areas heavily planted with cotton. This work helped struggling sharecroppers in the South, many of them former slaves now faced with necessary cultivation under harsh conditions, including the devastation of the boll weevil in 1892. The development of new crops and diversification of crop use helped to stabilize the livelihoods of these people who had backgrounds not unlike Carver’s own.

The education of African-American students at Tuskegee contributed directly to the effort of economic stabilization among blacks. In addition to formal education in a traditional classroom setting, Carver pioneered a mobile classroom to bring his lessons to farmers. The classroom was known as a “Jesup wagon,” after New York financier and Tuskegee donor Morris Ketchum Jesup.

– Teachers collect the students’ summaries to review and plan for Day 3.

Students read books and articles about George Washington Carver independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Read Aloud: George Washington Carver by Margo McLoone pages 17 to 22

– Distribute to students the graphic organizers for the chapter entitled “Dr. Carver’s Impacts on Society”. Refer to the read aloud to model to students how to take notes on the graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
– Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 3
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, February 10, 2016. During science, we will begin making mobiles to explore the concept of balance.
Inquiry Question: How do you move the fulcrum of the beam balance with an uneven amount of weight on both sides? Discuss your answer with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Targeted Reading Strategies
– Retell and Summary
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of retelling to understand and remember a timeline of events
– Use the reading strategy utilizing retelling notes to summarize texts

– Teachers display one or two summaries on the Smart Board using the document camera.
– Students choral read and discuss the summaries.
– Teachers guide students to utilize an article to identify important details about George Washington Carver’s “Rise to Prominence”.
During the reading workshop, you will work with a reading buddy to identify and highlight important information about George Washington Carver’s “Rise to Prominence.” Remember to read carefully and support your partner during the shared reading. Use your highlighted information to summarize the article.
– Students work in pairs to read, highlight and summarize the article “Rise to Prominence”.

Rise to Prominence
Carver’s work at Tuskegee included groundbreaking research on plant biology that brought him to national prominence. Many of these early experiments focused on the development of new uses for crops such as peanuts, sweet potatoes, soybeans and pecans. The hundreds of products he invented included plastics, paints, dyes and even a kind of gasoline. In 1920, Carver delivered a speech before the Peanut Growers Association, attesting to the wide potential of peanuts. The following year, he testified before Congress in support of a tariff on imported peanuts. With the help of Carver’s testimony, the proponents of the tariff were able to institute it in 1922.
Carver’s prominence as a scientific expert made him one of the most famous African-Americans of his time, and one of the best-known African-American intellectuals up to that point. By the time of his testimony, however, Carver had already achieved international fame in political and professional circles. President Theodore Roosevelt admired his work and sought his advice on agricultural matters in the United States. Carver was also recognized abroad for his scientific expertise. In 1916, he was made a member of the British Royal Society of Arts—a rare honor for an American. Carver also advised Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi on matters of agriculture and nutrition.
Carver used his celebrity to promote scientific causes for the remainder of his life. He wrote a syndicated newspaper column and toured the nation, speaking on the importance of agricultural innovation, the achievements and example of Tuskegee, and the possibilities for racial harmony in the United States. From 1923 to 1933, Carver toured white Southern colleges for the Commission on Interracial Cooperation.
The politics of accommodation championed by both George Washington Carver and Booker T. Washington were anathema to activists who sought more radical change. Despite his involvement with government-funded scientific research and programs, Carver largely remained outside of the political sphere, and declined to criticize prevailing social norms outright. Nonetheless, Carver’s scholarship and research contributed to improved quality of life for many farming families and made Carver an icon for African-Americans and Anglo-Americans alike.
George Washington Carver died on January 5, 1943, at the age of 78 after falling down the stairs at his home. He was buried next to Booker T. Washington on the Tuskegee grounds. Carver’s epitaph reads: “He could have added fortune to fame, but caring for neither, he found happiness and honor in being helpful to the world.”
– Teachers collect the students’ summaries to review and plan for Day 4.

Students read books and articles about George Washington Carver independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Read Aloud: Who Was George Washington Carver? by Jim Gigliotti pages 87 to 101

– Using the notes from the graphic organizer, teacher models how to elaborate the notes into a chapter by charting a think-aloud for the chapter “Dr. Carver’s Impacts on Society”.
– Tell students: “Authors, you will now collaborate with your writing partner to elaborate the first chapter of your book. Support each other by remembering to praise your partners and provide positive feedback or additional ideas as you work collaboratively.
– Students discuss with a partner how they would compose their chapters “Dr. Carver’s Impacts on Society” for their All About Books.
– Students utilize notes to compose the chapter “Dr. Carver’s Impacts on Society” for their All About Books independently. Some students may work in pair to assist each other.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 4
Morning meeting:
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, February 11, 2016. In math, we will utilize the comparison diagram to practice solving comparison number stories.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What is the difference when you compare two unequal quantities? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Targeted Reading Strategies
– Retell and Summary
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of retelling to understand and remember a timeline of events
– Use the reading strategy utilizing retelling notes to summarize texts

– Teachers display one or two summaries on the Smart Board using the document camera.
– Students choral read and discuss the summaries.
– Teachers guide students to utilize an article to identify important details about George Washington Carver’s “Legacy”.
During the reading workshop, you will work with a reading buddy to identify and highlight important information about George Washington Carver’s “Legacy”. Remember to read carefully and support your partner during the shared reading. Use your highlighted information to summarize the article.
– Students work in pairs to read, highlight and summarize the article “Legacy”.

Legacy
Carver’s iconic status remained after his death, in part due to steps that Carver and others took during his lifetime to establish his legacy. Carver, who had lived a frugal life, used his savings to establish a museum devoted to his work, including some of his own paintings and drawings. In December 1947, a fire broke out in the museum, destroying much of the collection. One of the surviving works by Carver is a painting of a yucca and a cactus, displayed at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893. In addition to the museum, Carver also established the George Washington Carver Foundation at Tuskegee, with the aim of supporting future agricultural research.
A project to erect a national monument in Carver’s honor also began before his death. Harry S. Truman, then a senator from Missouri, sponsored a bill in favor of a monument during World War II. Supporters of the bill argued that the wartime expenditure was warranted because the monument would promote patriotic fervor among African-Americans and encourage them to enlist in the military. The bill passed unanimously in both houses.
In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated $30,000 for the monument west of Diamond, Missouri—the site of the plantation where Carver lived as a child. This was the first national monument dedicated to an African-American. The 210-acre complex includes a statue of Carver as well as a nature trail, museum and cemetery.
Carver appeared on U.S. commemorative postal stamps in 1948 and 1998, as well as a commemorative half dollar coin minted between 1951 and 1954. Numerous schools bear his name, as do two United States military vessels. In 2005, the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis opened a George Washington Carver garden, which includes a life-size statue of the garden’s famous namesake. These honors attest to George Washington Carver’s enduring legacy as an icon of African-American achievement, and of American ingenuity more broadly. Carver’s life has come to symbolize the transformative potential of education, even for those born into the most unfortunate and difficult of circumstances.

Students read books and articles about George Washington Carver independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Under the teacher’s guidance, students utilize Chromebooks and visit the following site to learn interesting facts about George Washington Carver.
http://nationalpeanutboard.org/the-facts/george-washington-carver/

– Distribute to students the graphic organizers for the chapter entitled “Interesting Facts about Dr. Carver”. Refer to the read aloud to model to students how to take notes on the graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
– Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 5
Morning Message: Today is Friday, February 12, 2016. In math, we will explore how different diagrams can be used in similar or different situations to organize the information.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How does using diagrams help you solve number stories? Explain your thinking to a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Muntu Dancers Performance (9:30 – 10:15)

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, February 19.)
still, learn, should, America, world, hush, slush, dash, wash, wish, dish, money, coin, bill, cent, dollar

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.
Quiz, “George Washington Carver”
Independent Reading

Math
Lesson 5-12 (Day 1)
Unit 5 Progress Check
Day 1: Administer the Unit Assessments.

Self-Assessment
Teachers guide students complete the Self Assessment. (“We do”, whole class; “You do”, independently)

Model 1-step problems involving addition and subtract.

Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.

Subtract within 20 fluently.

Add within 20 fluently.

Add within 100 fluently.

Subtract within 100 fluently.

Subtract multidigit numbers using models or strategies.

Add multidigit numbers using models or strategies.

Mentally add 10 to and subtract 10 from a given number.

Mentally add 100 to and subtract 100 from a given number.

Represent sums and differences on a number line diagram.

Solve problems involving coins and bills.

Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.

2a. Students complete the Unit 5 Assessment to demonstrate their progress on the Common Core Standards covered in this unit.
(“You do”, independent)

Lesson 5-12 (Day 2) Unit 5 Progress Check
Day 2: Administer the Open Response Assessment.
2b. Assess
Solving the Open Response Problem
Students find possible coin combinations for 75 cents and explain how they know one of the combinations equals 75 cents. (“You do”, independent)

Discussing the Problem

After completing the problem, students discuss solutions and explanations. (“We do”, whole class)

Solve problems involving coins and bills.

Read and write monetary amounts.

Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.

3. Look Ahead
Math Boxes 5-12
Students preview skills and concepts for Unit 6. (“We do, pairs; “You do”, independent)

Lesson 6-1 Representing Data: Pockets
Students will review coin equivalencies and make different combinations of coins for the same amount of money.

Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: data, tally chart, picture graph, graph key, bar graph

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Dennis is 48 inches tall. Tayla is 50 inches tall. How much taller is Tayla than Dennis? (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Massage: Students take a Counting Pockets page and count the number of pockets they have on their clothes. They record the number of pockets using tally marks.

Tallying Pockets Data
Explain that the tally marks represent data, or information that is gathered by counting, measuring, questioning, or observing. We count pockets to gather data about pockets.
Ask: How many children have five pockets? What is the most common number of pockets? Point to a number in the Number column. What does this number means? Explain that tally chart, like the one the students just made, is one way to display the data in a picture graph and a bar graph.

Drawing a Picture Graph
Display Math Masters, page 159 and explain that a picture graph is another way to display data. Instead of tally marks, picture graphs use pictures or symbols to represent numbers. Point out the features of the graph and ask students to explain what they think the features represent.
Demonstrate how to represent the class pockets data on a picture graph on Math Masters, page 159 as students follow along on journal page 134. When students seem comfortable, have them complete the picture graph on their own.
Discuss: What does the picture graph show? How many students have 5 pockets? How many students have 6 or more pockets? Do more students have 3 pockets or 4 pockets? Do you think the graph would look different if we were dressed in bathing suits? Explain.
With the class, read about picture graphs on My Reference Book, page 115.

Drawing a Bar Graph
Tell students that they will use the pocket data shown on their picture graph to make a bar graph. Refer students to My Reference Book, page 115 for a brief review of the bar graphs, if needed. Point out that the height of the bars shows the number of children. Then have students complete journal page 135 independently or with a partner.

Summarize
Have students compare the picture graph and the bar graph on journal pages 134-135. Ask: How are the picture graph and the bar graph similar? How are they different? (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Solving Addition Problems
Students add 2-digit numbers. Encourage them to use a number grid, a number line, and an open number line, or base-10 blocks as needed. Students complete Math Journal 2, p. 136 and Math Box 6-1 independently or with a partner.

Assessment Opportunity
Observe and evaluate students’ responses. Most students should be successful. Some students make need additional guidance.

Lesson 6-2 Comparison Number Stories
Students solve comparison number stories.

Goals:
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Choose appropriate tools.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Flash the Quick Look Card. Ask students to refer to the ten frames to mentally figure out the total number of dots. Then ask them to write a number sentence to express their thinking.

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Massage: Fish A is 14 inches long. Fish B is 6 inches long. How many inches longer is Fish A than Fish B?

Solving Comparison Number Stories
Math Message Follow-Up: Draw picture showing how students can solve the Math Message problem by lining up the two fish (the two quantities) against a ruler. Sketch a comparison diagram. Discuss the meanings of the words quantity and difference as they appear in the diagram. Explain that quantity describes an amount or a number of things, and the difference is the amount unmatched between the two quantities. Point out that the comparison diagram offers a convenient way to organize information in the Math Message problem.
Ask students to represent the number story using a number model with a question mark for the unknown. Ask: Can you write different number models to represents this number story? Ask students to explain how their number models fit the situation in the number story. After students solve the number story, write a summary number model.
Tell students that today they will work with number stories that compare two quantities. They will use a comparison diagram to organize the information from the story to decide whether to add or subtract.
Work with students to solve the following comparison stories.
Joey scored 30 points. Max scored 10 pints. How many more points did Joey score than Max?
With the class, fill in the comparison diagram. Ask students to generate number models to match the number story and explain how their number models fit the situation.
Invite students to share strategies for finding the difference between 30 and 10.
– Think: “What must I add to 10 to get to 30?”
– Think of the comparison diagram as a Fact Triangle. Think, “30 – 10 is the difference I want.”
Continue to guide students with example 2 and 3.

Practicing with Comparison Number Stories (Small Group/Partner)
Partners complete the problems on Journal pages 137-138. Students may draw pictures and use number lines, number grids, or any other tool to help them solve the problems.

Assessment Check-In
Expect that most students will be able to solve problem 1-4 using a number grid, a number line, drawing, or manipulatives. Some students may be able to write the number models for the problems. Others may be able to solve Problem 5 by finding the unknown quantity.

Summarize
Have volunteers share with the class their solution strategies from journal page 137.

3. Practice
Practicing with Fact Triangles
As students practice with Fact Triangles, have them use the Addition Facts Inventory Record, Parts 1 and 2 (journal pages 250-253)
Students complete Math Boxes 6-2 in their Math Journal 2, p. 139 (independently or with a partner)

Lesson 6-3 Interpreting Number Stories
Students choose diagrams to use for solving number stories.

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Dictate 2- and 3-digit numbers. Have students mentally add 10 or 100 to them, or subtract 10 or 100 from them, and record their answers on slates.
– Add 100 to 44, to 700, to 510. Subtract 100 from 700, from 318, from 809.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Solve Problem 1 on journal page 140. You may draw one of the diagrams at the top of the page to help.

Sharing Strategies (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: Ask students to their solution strategies for Problem 1. If no one suggests a diagram, sketch one and model how to use it. Change, comparison, and parts-and-total diagrams all work for Problem 1.

Selecting Diagrams (Whole Class)
Show students how different diagrams can be used to organize the information in Problem 1, which can be interpreted as a change situation, a comparison situation, and a parts-and-total situation. (Teacher Guide p. 547)
Different students might think about a number story in different ways and will choose diagrams that match their thinking.
Students solve problem 2 in Math Journal 2, p. 140 with a partner. Encourage students to share strategies, making sure to demonstrate how to organize the information in a diagram.
Differentiate: For students who have difficulty writing a number model with ? for the unknown, ask them first to explain how they view the problem. Then direct them toward the diagram that best matches their way of thinking. Alternatively, pick a diagram and ask students to explain how to put the numbers from the problem into that diagram. Have the students use the completed diagram to help them write the number model.
Have students explain using a sentence frame such as: “I used or chose the _____ diagram because I know ____ and I want to find ____.”

Solving Number Stories
Students work with a partner to solve problems on page 141. When the problem has been solved one way, ask if any group solved it a different way.

Assessment Check-In
Circulate and observe students’ work. Expect that most will write a number model to represent the story and solve the number story with or without diagrams or manipulatives. For students who struggle, use guiding questions to help them place the numbers in a diagram before writing a number model.

Summarize: Have students discuss how using diagrams can help them solve number stories.

3. Practice
Comparing Lengths
Students work independently or with a partner to solve problems in Math Journal 2, pp. 142-143.

Science
– Interactive Read Aloud: “Julie’s Balancing Act.”
Ask:
– Have you ever taken gymnastics classes?
– Did you ever walk a balance beam? What did you do to keep balance?
– Have you ever watched a ballet? How do you think a ballerina stays on her toes?
– In addition to gymnastics and ballet, what other activities require the ability to balance?

Lesson 3:
Exploring the beam balance
– Students build a beam balance.
– Students explore how the amount of weight and position of weight affect balance.
– Students discuss the various ways they are able to balance the beam.

– Students write about the exploration: Exploring the balancing beam.

Lesson 4: Moving the Fulcrum
Students will discover that they can make the beam balance, even though the weight it supports is uneven or unevenly distributed, by changing the position of the fulcrum.
– Students balance a beam with Unifix Cubes by changing the position of the fulcrum.
– Students describe and compare their observations.
– Students record their results.
– Students add their observations of balancing and weighing in the world around them to the class list.
Ask: Why is the fulcrum in this spot? Why does the beam balance when the fulcrum is there?
– Why do you think the beam can balance with an uneven number of cubes on the end?
– What did you discover today that could help explain why you had to move the pencil after you added a paper clip to the butterfly?

Interactive Read Aloud: Mirette on the High Wire by Emily Arnold McCully

Lesson 5: Building Mobiles
Making mobiles offers students an opportunity to apply what they have discovered about the relationship between balance and weight. Students discover that they can design mobiles with various fulcrum points and that they can change the balance of a mobile by adding a small amount of weight or by shifting its position slightly.
– Students build simple mobiles that balance.
– Students describe and compare how their mobiles balance.

Students begin to cut shapes out of construction paper and think about how they will design simple mobiles that require the understanding of balance.
Students use their shapes as weights, straws as beams and paper clips as fulcrum to begin assembling their mobiles.

Social Studies
Integrated with Language Arts

Friendship Bracelet

To make these easy friendship bracelets, you will need just a few things:
– embroidery floss in 4 pretty colors that go well together
– scissors
– clipboard
– masking tape to hold down the floss as you make your bracelet

To begin making the bracelet, cut each of the 4 colors of embroidery floss into 3-foot long segments.
Next, line up the 4 segments and tie a knot about 4 inches from one of the ends. Secure the floss to the clipboard with tape. Separate the 4 strands of floss.

To begin making this basic diagonal stripe friendship bracelet, start by taking the first strand (the one that’s farthest on the left) and put it over the second strand, forming a “4” shape.

Keep the second strand tight with one hand (this will act like a “base” strand) and loop the first strand around it with the other. (This will be called the “working” strand.) Pull both strands tight in opposite directions to make a knot.
Then, repeat this step exactly and make a second knot. (Note: As you make your friendship bracelet, the procedure will be to always make 2 knots on each “base” strand.)

(Hint: Try to think of the “working” strand loop and knot you are making on your “base” strand as color being placed on the base strand. In other words, each knot you make is almost like painting that color onto the base strand. So for instance, my first strand was an aqua blue and my second strand was a fuchsia pink; I therefore placed my aqua blue strand knot onto my fuchsia pink strand.)

Next, continue working with your first strand (in my bracelet, the aqua blue strand) and put it in a “4” shape over the next base strand (the purple).
Loop your working strand around the purple base strand and pull tight to make a knot. Then, as before, repeat this step to make a second knot.

Once you’ve made the two knots on the next strand, it will look like this.

Take your working strand and make 2 knots on the last remaining strand. You will now have 2 knots each on all 3 strands.

Your completed first row of knots will look like this once you are done.

Now that you’ve finished your first row of double knots, you will have a new working string — the strand that’s farthest on the left. (In this bracelet, the new working string is the fuchsia pink strand.)
Repeat the same double-knot process on each strand, again working your way to the last strand on the right.

Once you have placed 2 knots on each strand with the new working strand, you will have completed the second row of knots. Your bracelet will look something like this.

Take the next working string (in this case, the purple strand), which, again, is the strand that’s farthest on the left, and make double knots on each strand. When you are done, it will look like this.

Using this same pattern, keep making rows of knots as you make the bracelet longer.
Keep checking the length of the bracelet by putting it around the wrist (if your child is going to give it to a friend and that friend is not available, you can simply either get the measurement of that child’s wrist or take your best guess. When that person receives it, you can always adjust the length before tying the ends to finish the bracelet.

Add more masking tape to the bracelet as you work so that it stays securely anchored, which makes it easier for kids to tie the knots.
If you want to make a thicker bracelet, you can simply add more strands of each color of embroidery floss. So instead of one aqua blue, one fuchsia pink, and so on, you can use 2 or even 3 or 4 strands each of aqua blue, fuchsia, purple, and peach (or whatever colors you are using).
If you add more strands, though, it’s easy for the steps to get confusing. For younger children or kids who are just starting out with friendship bracelets, you may want to stick to the simple one-of-each-color pattern.

childparenting.about.com/od/Easter_Spring_Crafts_for_Kids/ss/Summer-Crafts-For-Kids-Easy-Friendship-Bracelets.htm#step15

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of January 31

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The second quarter ends on Thursday, February 4. Please look for your child’s report card, which will be distributed on Thursday, February 11. Please contact your child’s teacher to schedule a parent/teacher conference if needed.
Friday, February 5 is a professional development day for teachers and staff. It is a nonattendance day for students.
The Unit 5 Progress Check and Open Response will take place on Monday, February 8 and Tuesday, February 9 respectively. Please refer to the graded homework to help your child review.
Please help your child review the graded homework. Students should be able to:
– Add and subtract 1-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 10 to two and three-digit numbers
– Add and subtract 100 to three-digit numbers
– Draw coins to show a given amount
– Use an open number line to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-More diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Change-to-Less diagram to solve a story problem
– Use a Parts-and-Total diagram to solve a story problem
– Explain how to find a sum of two numbers in writing and by drawing tally marks, base-ten blocks, or bills and coins, etc.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the NSP student from the University of Chicago
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
Word Study
Building Fry Sight First One Hundred Words
Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers (Tier 2)

Mini iPads Reading:
George Washington Carver by Sam Wellman
Who Was George Washington Carver by Jim Gigliotti

IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level C (Tier 3);
Level F (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 19 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and open their eyes if the words rhyme, or close their eyes if the words do not.
Onset Fluency: Thumbs up if the words begin with the same blend; thumbs down if the words do not begin with the same blend.
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher says the word. Students say the final sound found in the series. Ex. T: get, got, bet, S: /t/
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Lift Every Voice and Sing” (from YouTube)

Day 1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, February 1, 2016. In science, we will use simple materials to explore the relationship between balance and mass.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What is mass? Explain your thinking to a classmate.

Shared Reading: A Picture Book of George Washington Carver by David Adler
Book Summary
This read-along picture book biography of George Washington Carver by David Adler presents information about his life, including his birth into slavery, education, scientific accomplishments, and death in 1943. Carver’s interest in plants began as a child when he had a secret garden. He received a degree in agriculture from Iowa State University and used his interest in plants to help African Americans by finding ways to use sweet potatoes and peanuts to replace the dependence on cotton as a crop in the South. Carver was an educator as well as a researcher, and was head of the agriculture department at Tuskegee Institute. Some vocabulary will need clarification. Dan Brown’s watercolor illustrations reflect the pastoral nature of Carver’s life.

Targeted Reading Strategies
– Retell and Summary
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of retelling to understand and remember a timeline of events
– Use the reading strategy utilizing retelling notes to summarize texts

Discussion Questions
– Ask students what hardships did George Washington Carver experience in his life?
– Ask students how did George respond during these adversities?

Introduce the Book
– Display the book using the document camera and Smart Board. Guide them to the cover of the book and read the title. Have students discuss what they see on the covers. Encourage them to offer ideas as to what type of book it is (genre, text type, fiction or nonfiction, and so on) and what it might be about.
– Ask students to carefully analyze and discuss the illustration of George Washington Carver on the cover of the book. Why might the illustrator, Dan Brown, choose to depict George in this way?
– Show students the title page. Discuss the information on the page (title of book, author’s and illustrator’s names).

Introduce the Reading Strategy: Elements of a biography
– Ask students to recall what they learned last week about the genres of biography and autobiography. Ask a volunteer to compare and contrast these genres. Remind the students that the book we will read together today is a biography. A biography includes information about the person’s personality, accomplishments, and influence on the world.

Introducing the Comprehension Skill: Retell
– Remind students that during the shared reading of our book this week, we will continue to practice the reading strategy of retelling what we read. Retelling is a strategy that enables us to understand and remember what the author is teaching us.
– Explain to students that when someone retells something, he or she explains the details of what happened in order.
– Read page 1 aloud with the students. Ask the students to pause at the end of the page and retell in their minds the beginning of George’s life.
Think-aloud: We read that George Washington Carver was born into slavery and then freed after the Civil War. He and his brother, who were orphans, lived with Moses and Susan – the couple who had owned them.
– Read page 3 aloud with the students. Have the students pause and retell what was read in their minds.
Think Aloud: We read that George hardly knew his mother and when he was a baby, his mother and he were kidnapped and taken to Arkansas. A neighbor found George. However, he never saw his mother again.
– Read page 4 aloud with the students. Have the students pause and retell in their minds what was read.

Think Aloud: George’s father was also a slave but he never met his father because he worked on a neighbor’s farm. His father was killed in an accident after George’s birth. George and his brother, James were raised by Susan and Moses Carver. The Carvers were good to the boys, and George called Moses Carver “Uncle Mose”.

Set the Purpose
– Have students read to find out about George Washington Carver. Remind them to stop reading at the end of each page with a sticky note to quickly retell in their mind the details of the events so far in Carver’s life, including the important dates. Remind them to scribe the dates and time-order words that identify specific events in Carver’s life.
Explain to the students that tomorrow we will utilize the notes from today’s shared reading and independent reading to begin to summarize what we’ve read.

Students read books and articles about George Washington Carver independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Read Aloud: George Washington Carver by Andy Carter and Carol Saller pages 27-33

Questions:
Where did George attend school?
What type of student was George?
How might being accepted to college in Iowa help George excel as a student?

– Using the notes from the graphic organizer, teacher models how to elaborate the notes into a chapter by charting a think-aloud for the chapter “Going to School”.
– Tell students: “Authors, you will now collaborate with your writing partner to elaborate the first chapter of your book. Support each other by remembering to praise your partners and provide positive feedback or additional ideas as you work collaboratively.
– Students discuss with a partner how they would compose their chapters “Going to School” for their All About Books.
– Students utilize notes to compose the chapter “Going to School” for their All About Books independently. Some students may work in pair to assist each other.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 2
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, February 2, 2016. We will use paper butterflies, paper clips and a pencil to explore the principles of balance.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How can you balance a paper butterfly on a pencil? Explain your thinking to a classmate.

Shared Reading: A Picture Book of George Washington Carver by David Adler

– Explain that today we will read our retelling notes from yesterday’s shared reading and use them to summarize the text.
– Display the retelling notes on the Smart Board.
Explain that we can use the retelling notes to summarize the story.
Have students read aloud.
– Page 1: George Washington Carver was born into slavery and then freed after the Civil War. He and his brother, who were orphans, lived with Moses and Susan – the couple who had owned them.
Explain that we can identify the most important words in our notes to summarize the text.
Think Aloud: After the Civil War, George and James were raised by their former slave owners, Susan and Moses Carver.

Have students read aloud.
– Page 3: George hardly knew his mother and when he was a baby, his mother and he were kidnapped and taken to Arkansas. A neighbor found George. However, he never saw his mother again.
Think Aloud: When George and his mother were kidnapped, a neighbor found him in Arkansas but he never saw his mother again.
Have students read aloud.
– Page 4: George’s father was also a slave but he never met his father because he worked on a neighbor’s farm. His father was killed in an accident when George’s birth. George and his brother, James were raised by Susan and Moses Carver. The Carvers were good to the boys, and George called Moses Carver “Uncle Mose”.
Think Aloud: George’s father, a slave at a nearby farm, and was killed in an accident before George’s birth. The Carvers were kind and provided a home for the two brothers.
Read the summary aloud.
After the Civil War, George and James were raised by their former slave owners, Susan and Moses Carver. When George and his mother were kidnapped, a neighbor found him in Arkansas but he never saw his mother again. George’s father, a slave at a nearby farm, was killed in an accident before George’s birth.

Explain that we can use this condensed version of the retelling notes to summarize the text.

Students read books and articles about George Washington Carver independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Read Aloud: George Washington Carver by Andy Carter and Carol Saller pages 35-42

Questions:
Where did George teach?
What did Dr. Carver teach the farmers that change their lives?
How might helping the farmers farm peanuts changed the way we farm today?

– Distribute to students the graphic organizers for the chapter entitled “Dr. Carver as a Professor”. Refer to the read aloud to model to students how to take notes on the graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 3
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, February 3, 2016. During science, we will build structures that balance.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How does the amount of weight and position of weight affect balance? Explain your thinking to a classmate.

Shared Reading: A Picture Book of George Washington Carver by David Adler

– Remind students that retelling is a strategy that enables us to understand and remember what the author is teaching us.
– Explain that today we will continue to retell and summarize our shared reading.
– Read page 5 aloud. Ask the students to pause at the end of the page and retell in their minds.
Think Aloud: George was not strong boy so he had the chores of feeding the animals and helping around the house. This provided time for him to swim and explore nature. He maintained his own garden and was curious about stones, flowers, insects, and birds. His interests were considered foolish in his neighborhood.
– Read page 7 aloud.
– Ask students to retell the text in their minds and be ready to share their retelling with a thinking partner.
– Have students take turns retelling the text on page 6.
– Ask one of the pairs of students to volunteer to share their retelling.
– Write the students’ retelling on the Smart Board. Read it aloud. Ask for volunteers to share notes if needed.
– Teachers add to notes to guide students to practice retelling.
– Pairs of students read and retell pages 9 and 10.
The students write their retelling notes on sticky notes.
Assessment Opportunity: Teachers circulate around to monitor and provide support to students as necessary.
– Explain that we will use our notes from today to summarize tomorrow.
– Teachers collect notes.
Select one or two examples to prepare for day 4.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Read Aloud: A Weed is a Flower – The Life of George Washington Carver by Aliki pages 18-23

Questions:
Why were the farmers afraid to plant sweet potatoes and peanuts?
What makes sweet potatoes and peanuts ideal plants for farmers?

– Using the notes from the graphic organizer, teacher models how to elaborate the notes into a chapter by charting a think-aloud for the chapter “Dr. Carver as a Professor”.
– Tell students: “Authors, you will now collaborate with your writing partner to elaborate the first chapter of your book. Support each other by remembering to praise your partners and provide positive feedback or additional ideas as you work collaboratively.
– Students discuss with a partner how they would compose their chapters “Dr. Carver as a Professor” for their All About Books.
– Students utilize notes to compose the chapter “Dr. Carver as a Professor” for their All About Books independently. Some students may work in pair to assist each other.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 4
Morning meeting:
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, February 4, 2016. During Reading Workshop, we will continue to use the strategy of summarizing.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How does summarizing increase your reading comprehension? Explain your thinking to a classmate.

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Thursday, February 12.)
letter, mother, answer, found, study, much, such, church, search, march, starch, repeat, subtract, divide, group, remainder
Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Shared Reading: A Picture Book of George Washington Carver by David Adler

– Explain that we will use their retelling notes from yesterday to summarize.
– Teachers display an example from one of the pairs of students on the Smart Board.
Read Aloud.
– Ask students to summarize in their minds using the notes displayed.
– Have students think, pair, and share their summaries.
– Teachers scribe a volunteer’s summary on chart paper or Smart Board.
– Ask students to reread the summary.
– Teachers guide students to edit the summary.
– After editing, have the students read the summary aloud.
Assessment Opportunity
– Give students copies of page 13 to read during independent or paired reading.
Remind them to jot down their retelling on sticky notes.
– Teachers collect their notes after independent reading to prepare for Day 5.

Writing
Read Aloud: Smart About… George Washington Carver – The Peanut Wizard by Laura Driscoll pages 27-32

Questions:
What did Dr. Carver invent?
What prompted him to invent the products?
Why was it important for him to not give up when his experiments fail?

– Distribute to students the graphic organizers for the chapter entitled “Dr. Carver’s Inventions”. Refer to the read aloud to model to students how to take notes on the graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
– Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 5
Teacher Institute Day

Math
Lesson 5-10 Change Number Stories
Students solve change number stories involving temperature.
Students solve change number stories involving temperature.
Vocabulary: thermometer, degrees Fahrenheit, change diagram, change-to-less number story

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students count up by 2s and 10s. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Students make observations about a temperature. (“We do”, whole class)

Discussing the Thermometer
Students discuss thermometer and temperatures.

Solving Change Number Stories (“I do, We do”, whole Class, Partner)
Read My Reference Book, page 27 with students. Discuss the similarities and differences between the diagrams. Use the diagrams to generate discussions and guide students to understand how to utilize the diagrams to solve Change Number Stories.
It was 50F at 9:00A.M. and 70F at noon. Did it get warmer or cooler? What type of change happened? Did it change for more or for less? Etc.

Using change Diagrams
Students work in pairs to solve Change Number Stories in Math Journal pages 125-126 and check each other’s work.

3. Practice
Playing Number Top-It
Students practice comparing 3-digit numbers. (“We do”, pairs; small groups)

Assessment Opportunity

Math Boxes 5-10
Students practice and maintain skills (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs; small group)

Lesson 5-11 Adding Multidigit Numbers (Day 1)
Students complete an open response problem by solving an addition problem using two different strategies.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary: open number line

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers dictate 2- and 3- digit numbers. Students mentally add or subtract 10 or 100 and record their answers on erasable boards.
Add 100 to the following: 121; 200; and 177.
Subtract 100 from the following: 133; 220; 700.
Add 10 to the following: 224; 298; and 409.
Subtract 10 from the following: 600; 508; and 222.

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2a. Focus
Math Message
Students solve a subtraction number story and talk about their strategies.

Buying a Clock
Students turn to and complete journal p. 128.
Number Story:
You buy a clock that costs $78. You pay with a $100 bill.
How much is your change? You may use a number grid to help you. (“You do”, independent)

Then students talk about their strategies with a partner.
Students discuss their subtraction strategies and the importance of attending to the units in the number story. (“We do”, pairs)

Math Message Follow-Up
Ask students to share the strategies they used to solve the Math Message number story.
Discuss the different tools students may use such as number grids, open number lines, and parts-and-total diagrams.

Solving the Open Response Problem
Students model a shopping problem and show two different strategies for finding the sum of two prices.
Distribute Math Masters, p. 148-149. Read the problem as a class and ask partners to discuss what the problem is asking them to do.
Teachers make base-10 blocks, number grids, and money toolkits ($1 and $10 bills only) available to the children.
Explain that an important part of the task is to show two different ways to find the total coast. Emphasize that solving a problem more than one way does not mean doing the problem a second time the same way.

Teachers circulate and note students who use mental strategies to solve the problem but only explain their strategies by writing “I did it in my head” or “I added them.”
Ask students to explain orally what they did, and then have them use words, numbers, or pictures to show what they did.
Encourage students who use base-10 blocks, bills, or other manipulatives to include drawings that show how they used the tools.
Partners should work together to share ideas about the task, but students should select their own items and record their strategies.

Summarize
Teachers guide students to read p. 3-5 in My Reference Book, which describes students’ thinking about solving problems and using more than one strategy.
Ask: Why do you think it is important to be able to solve a problem in more than one way?

Getting Ready for Day 2
Teachers review students’ work and plan discussion for reengagement.

Lesson 5-11 Adding Multidigit Numbers (Day 2)

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

2b. Focus
Setting Expectations
Students review the open response problem and discuss using pictures, numbers, and words to show their strategies. They also review how to respectfully discuss their own and others’ work. (“We do”, whole class)

Reengaging in the Problem
Students analyze and compare strategies they used to find the sum of two prices. (“We do”, whole class)

(Select and display students’ work in ways that are appropriate for your class.)

Display responses that use the same tool but different strategies to find the total.

Ask: What tool and strategy do you think Student A used to find the total?
What could this student do to help us understand the strategy better?
How are Student A’s and Student B’s work alike? Different?
What could the second student do to help us understand the strategy better?

Display responses that show different tools, but draw on similar strategies.

Display responses that show tools used in more or less efficient ways.

Display a response that shows an inappropriate use of a tool.
Ask: What tool and strategy did this student use to find the total coast?
How could the student use base-10 blocks in a better way?

Revising the Work
Students improve the clarity and completeness of their drawings and explanations.

3. Practice
Math Boxes 5-11
Students practice and maintain skill. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs or small groups)

Game Day

Buying and Selling
– Students practice counting money, children use their toolkit coins to buy fruit and vegetables using exact change.

What You Need
Fruit and Vegetable Cards, p. 120
toolkit coins
scissors

What To Do
Students work with a partner.
1. Cut apart the Fruit and Vegetable Cards on page 20.
2. Place cards facedown in a pile.
3. Take turns being a costumer and clerk at the Fruit and Vegetable Sale.
4. If you are a customer, pick a card and pay the exact amount in coins to the clerk.
5. If you are the clerk, check that a customer has paid the correct amount.
6. Trade jobs.
7. Repeat Steps 3-6 four more times.

Talk About It
Compare how you and your partner counted the exact change for an item. Did you count the same way?

More You Can Do
Buy two or more items at a time.

Dime-Nickel-Penny Grab
Students count coins and determine the total value of various coin combinations. Students grab coins and count the amount. They record their work on Math Masters, p G22.

What You Need
Dime-Nickel-Penny Grab Record Sheet, p G22
10 dimes
8 nickels
20 pennies

What to Do
Students work with a partner.
1. Mix the coins together and put them in a pile.
2. One partner grabs a handful of coins.
3. The other partner takes the coins that are left.
4. Each partner counts his or her coins. Record your work on the Record Sheet.
5. Circle the larger total. Whoever has the larger total value wins the round.
6. Repeat Steps 1-5.
Talk about It
Talk to your partner about different ways to count the coins.

Using Open Number Lines to Add
Students work with open number lines to solve number stories involving larger numbers.
What You Need
4 each of number cards 1-9
paper

What To Do
Draw a unit box on your paper and fill in a unit.
Then use an open number line to help solve your problem.
1. Draw four numbers cars. Make two 2-digit numbers.
2. Use your numbers to write an addition problem.
3. Draw an open number line to help you solve your problem.
4. Write a number model.
5. Repeat Steps 1-4 four more times.

Talk About It
Compare your number lines to the ones your neighbor drew. How are they the same? How are they different?

Science
Balancing and Weighing
Pre-Unit Assessment
On a beam balance, balance is dependent on the relative mass of objects, the location of the fulcrum, and the relative lengths of the arms of the beam.
Lesson 1: Thinking about balance
Students use simple materials to explore the relationship between balance and mass. T.G. p. 4 Unit Investigations.
Thinking about balance exploration:
– Using paper butterflies, paper clips and a pencil, students will explore the principles of balance
– Words study: fulcrum, symmetry, weight distribution

Lab Observation:
How did you move the pencil to balance the paper butterfly?

Lesson 2: Building Structures that Balance
– Students build structures that balance using a beam, fulcrum, and Unifix Cubes and base ten blocks to explore how the amount of weight and position of weight affect balance.
– Students read “Julie’s Balancing Act.”
– Students write about the exploration: Exploring the balancing beam.

Social Studies
Integrated with Language Arts

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of January 24

Dear Parent and Caregivers,

We would like to reiterate that the second grade classes will begin this year’s African-American unit of study the week of January 24. We will be researching the prolific scientist and inventor, Dr. George Washington Carver. Please support your child by assisting him/her to find age appropriate books, articles, and photos/images about George Washington Carver.

Students will be reading, writing, and creating an invention.
To provide support for your child please consider the following texts and websites.

Books
A Picture Book of George Washington Carver by David Adler and Dan Brown
A Weed is a Flower by Aliki
George Washington Carver by Tonya Bolden
George Washington Carver: The Peanut Wizard by Laura Driscoll
George Washington Carver by Kitson Jazynka
George Washington Carver by Jo Kittinger
George Washington Carver by Dana Meachum Rau
George Washington Carver by Sam Wellman
The Little Plant Doctor: A Story About George Washington Carver by Jean Marzollo
The Story of George Washington Carver by Eva Moore and Alexander Anderson

Websites
academickids.com
ducksters.com
mrnussbaum.com
brainpop.com
daniellesplace.com
scholastic.com/parents
socialstudiesforkids.com
kids.britannica.com
youtube search George Washington Carver

Students will take the science Rotational Unit Test on Thursday, January 28. The graded study guide was sent home last Thursday, January 21. Please have your child refer to the graded study guide to review for the test.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the NSP student from the University of Chicago
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
Word Study
Building Fry Sight First One Hundred Words
Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers (Tier 2)

Mini iPads Reading:
George Washington Carver by Sam Wellman
Who Was George Washington Carver by Jim Gigliotti

IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level C (Tier 3);
Level F (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 18 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and open their eyes if the words rhyme, or close their eyes if the words do not.
Onset Fluency: Thumbs up if the words begin with the same blend; thumbs down if the words do not begin with the same blend.
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher says the word. Students say the final sound found in the series. Ex. T: get, got, bet, S: /t/
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Group Activity: Louis Armstrong – “Go down Moses” (from YouTube)
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.

Day1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, January 25, 2016. We will begin to read and discuss the life and contributions of George Washington Carver.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What do you know about George Washington Carver? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading: George Washington Carver by Cynthia Kennedy Henzel A-Z Reading Levels L and O

Book Summary
George Washington Carver is a biographical text that chronicles the accomplishments of an African-American Scientist. Born into slavery but set free after the Civil War. Carver struggled to get an education during the time of segregated schools. He eventually became a professor of agriculture and an inventor who dedicated his life to helping farmers, and became famous in the process. He won respect of a nation at a time when African-Americans faced widespread discrimination.

About the Lesson
Targeted Reading Strategy
– Retell
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of retelling to understand and remember a timeline of events
– Identify elements of a biography
– Fluently read the diphthong /ou/ sound
– Recognize proper nouns: names of people
– Identify and create compound words

Content Words:
– agriculture (n.) the science of farming and raising livestock
– famous (adj.) well known
– fertilizer (n.) a natural or chemical substance that promotes plant growth
– inventor (n.) a person who creates, designs, or builds something that did not exist before
– professor (n.) a college or university teacher
– segregated (adj.) kept apart based on group differences, such as race

Enrichment
– Civil War (n.) a war between the citizens of the same country
– Congress (n.) the national legislative body of a country
– nutrients (n.) a substance that provides nourishment essential for growth and maintenance

Discussion Questions
– How did Susan’s teaching young George to read and write change his life?
– How might George’s life have been different if he hadn’t been educated?

Before Reading
Build Background
– Ask students if they heard of a man named George Washington Carver. Explain that he was a famous African-American scholar who lived during the time when most African-Americans weren’t able to attend college.
– Ask students to tell what they know about the Civil War and how it affected African-American families in the southern part of the United States. Explain that this book gives information about this part of U.S. history as it pertains to George Washington Carver’s life.
Preview the Book
Introduce the Book
– Give students their copy of the book. Guide them to the front and back covers and read the title. Have students discuss what they see on the covers. Encourage them to offer ideas as to what type of book it is (genre, text type, fiction or nonfiction, and so on) and what it might be about.
– Show students the title page. Discuss the information on the page (title of book, author’s name).
– Preview the table of contents on page 3. Remind students that the table of contents provides an overview of the book. Ask students what they expect to read about in the book on the basis of what they see in the table of contents.

Introduce the Reading Strategy: Element of a biography
– Ask students to explain the difference between a biography and an autobiography. Explain that this book is a biography. A biography includes information about the person’s personality, accomplishments, and influence on the world.
– Write the words Personality, Accomplishment and Influence in a three-column chart on the board. Ask students to explain the meaning of each of these words (personality: the qualities that make each person unique; accomplish: success achieve through practice of training; influence: an effect on someone or something).
– Read pages 4 and 5 aloud. Ask students to identify which element of a biography this information best reflects (personality). Invite them to identify the information about George Washington Carver’s personality. (Born into slavery, orphan, and often sick, George still learned to read, write, and sew. He liked gardening and exploring nature best.)

Think-aloud: I read that George Washington Carver was born into slavery and then freed after the Civil War. He and his brother, who were orphans, lived with Moses and Susan – the couple who had owned them. George was often sick, and he often stayed at home to help Susan. She taught him to read, write, and sew. But what George liked best was to garden and explore nature.

– Ask students to find, on the basis of the information about George so far, words to describe what George’s personality might be like.

Introducing the Comprehension Skill: Retell
– Explain to students that one way to understand and remember what they are reading is to stop now and then to retell in their mind what is happening in the story.
– Explain to students that when someone retells something, he or she explains the details of what happened in order. Point out that people retell stories as part of their daily lives, such as explaining what happened in school to a student who was absent. Ask students to share other examples of when people might give a retelling.
– Model retelling in a nonfiction example in detail, such as your own timeline.

Think-aloud: I was born in Vietnam…When I was 12 years old, I escaped with my brother to a refugee camp…The U.S. sponsored my brother and me to Michigan…, etc.

– Draw a timeline on the board and model how to complete a timeline with dates and details. Have students retell the details they remember as you fill in the timeline.
– Explain that in this book, the author shares nonfiction details about the life events of George Washington Carver. Point out that dates are often included when nonfiction details are given in a biography and that the timeline is a good way to record the details.
Explain to students that when they are reading on their own, they should stop on each page to think about the information about Carver’s life. When they stop to think about the important information, they should highlight the dates on these pages. Encourage students to retell in their mind the events in the book as they read.

Introducing the Vocabulary
– Write the following story-critical words from the content vocabulary on the board: famous, inventor, and professor.
– Point out that these three words can be found in the text and that knowing what they mean will help students understand what’s happening as they read the book. Have students think-pair-share what they think the words mean.
– Point out the glossary at the back of the book. Review or explain that a glossary and a dictionary contain lists of words and their definitions.
– Model how students can use a dictionary to find a word’s meaning. Have them locate the word famous in the dictionary. Invite a volunteer to read the definition of famous. Have students compare the dictionary definition with the glossary definition, pointing out the similarities and differences (glossaries only contain definitions for vocabulary words in that particular story, dictionaries contain longer and sometimes multiple definitions, and so on.) Have them compare these with their prior knowledge of the word.
– Have students follow along on page 14 as you read the sentence in which the word famous is found to confirm the meaning of the word. Repeat the exercise with the remaining vocabulary words.

Set the Purpose
– Have students read to find out about George Washington Carver. Remind then to stop reading at the end of each page with a sticky note to quickly retell in their mind the details of the events so far in Carver’s life, including the important dates. Remind them to highlight the dates and time-order words that identify specific events in Carver’s life.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
– Review with students the reading lesson earlier about George Washington Carver. Explain that, as part of this year African-American history month, for the next few weeks, we are writing All about Books focusing on George Washington Carver as an African-American scientist who had made significant contributions to our society. In addition, we each will present a simple invention as an inspiration from learning about Dr. Carver’s work.
– Provide students with blank tables of contents. Model to students how to complete their tables of contents by writing the information on chart paper for students to use as support.
– Students complete their tables of contents for their All about Books independently.
– Distribute to students the graphic organizers for the chapter entitled “Who Was George Washington Carver?” Refer to the reading this morning to model to students how to take notes on the graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
-Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, January 26, 2016. In math, we will utilize open number lines as a tool for solving number stories.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How is the open number line like the other number lines we have used? How is it different? How might the open number line be helpful when we solve number stories? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading: George Washington Carver by Cynthia Kennedy Henzel

– Guide the reading: Have students read to the end of page 8 after rereading pages 4 and 5. Encourage students who finish before everyone else to go back and reread.
Model retelling the events of Carver’s life using photographs, illustrations, and maps as a guide.
Think-aloud: I stopped after a few pages to retell in my mind what I had read so far. George Washington Carver was born in Missouri as a slave in 1864 during the Civil War. When the war ended, he and his older brother were freed, but they were orphans. The couple who had owned them gave them a home and taught George how to read, write, and sew. What George liked best was to garden and explore nature. He wanted to learn more, but many of the schools were segregated and did not allow African-American students, so he left home to attend school elsewhere when he was twelve. When he graduated from high school, he earned a scholarship to go to a Kansas college but was turned away because he was African-American. He attended a college in Iowa instead and studied agriculture. He was the school’s first African-American graduate and later became the school’s first African-American professor.
– Remind students that a retelling includes detail and description about the events of a story using a sequence of the most important events that someone would need to know to recount the person’s history correctly.
– Point out that sometimes, although a date is not directly given, clues may be found in the text that contain information from a timeline of someone’s life. Explain how to find a date for when George left Missouri (he was 12 years old, so his birth –1864-plus 12 years is 1876). Have students write the date in the margin of page 6.
– Ask students to explain elements of Carver’s personality, accomplishments, and influence using the information in the reading so far (personality: adventurous, hardworking, resilient, intelligent, determined; accomplishments: left home to attend a non-segregated school, was his college’s first African-American graduate, became the school’s first African=American professor; influence: pushed the boundaries of racial discrimination by continuing to work for his education despite adversity).
– Discuss how Carver’s personality might have influenced his accomplishments. Facilitate the discussion with questions such as: How would you describe Carver’s personality? What aspects of his personality might have helped him to be such a successful student?
– Check for understanding: Have students read pages 9 and 10. Cut out pages 9 and 10 from an extra copy of the book and place them next to the pages from the beginning of the story in the pocket chart or along a chalkboard ledge or document camera. Ask students to work with a partner, using the images and dates on the pages as a guide, to retell the details of events after Carver graduated from college. Listen to students’ retellings for correct order and description of the story events.
– Have students turn to a partner to discuss information from the section that reflects Carver’s personality, influence, and accomplishments. Have them write this information in the margin of their book. Invite students to share this information aloud.
– Have students read the remainder of the book. Remind them to think about the order of events in Carver’s life and to stop wherever they see a sticky note to highlight the dates and give more detail to the timeline of Carver’s accomplishments.
– Have students make a question mark in their books beside any word they do not understand or cannot pronounce. Encourage them to use strategies they have learned to read each word and figure out its meaning.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Read Aloud: George Washington Carver by Katherine Scraper

Questions:
Who was Dr. Carver?
When and where was he born?
Under what circumstance was he born?
How might his background have helped him empathize with the farmers?

– Using the notes from the graphic organizer, teacher models how to elaborate the notes into a chapter by charting a think-aloud for the chapter “Who Was George Washington Carver?”
– Tell students: “Authors, you will now collaborate with your writing partner to elaborate the first chapter of your book. Support each other by remembering to praise your partners and provide positive feedback or additional ideas as you work collaboratively.
– Students discuss with a partner how they would compose their chapters “Who Was George Washington Carver?” for their All About Books.
– Students utilize notes to compose the chapter “Who Was George Washington Carver?” for their All About Books independently. Some students may work in pair to assist each other.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 3:
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, January 27, 2016. In science, we will continue to explore arch bridges.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How is an arch a strong support system? Share your answer with a classmate.

Shared Reading: George Washington Carver by Cynthia Kennedy Henzel

After Reading
– Ask students what words, if any, they marked in their book. Use this opportunity to model how they can read these words using decoding strategies and context clues.
Reflect on the Reading Strategy
– Retell in detail the events of the story from 9 through 12.
Think-aloud: After becoming a professor, Carver went to Alabama in 1896 to help farmers with a big problem. He figured out that years of cotton farming had worn out the soil. He taught the farmers how to fertilize the soil and how to rotate crops by planting sweet potatoes, peas, or peanuts in the fields after cotton was picked in order to help put nutrients back in the soil. He became an inventor to help farmers sell their crops. He invented more than a hundred ways to use peanuts! Contrary to popular belief, he did not create peanut butter but did invent these uses for the peanut: pavement, grease, medicines, peanut coffee, peanut mayonnaise, peanut flour, peanut milk, shoe polish, bleach, sandpaper, and more.
Check for understanding: Have students work with a partner to retell the events of pages 13 through the end of the book. Listen for whether students include the correct events and details of Carver’s life in the order in which they happened.
– Ask students how retelling the events of the story in their mind as they read helped them understand the story.
– Independent practice: Introduce, explain, and have students complete the retell worksheet, working to accurately identify events on the timeline according to the date to use context clues to calculate dates when possible. When students are finished, discuss their answers aloud.

Reflect on the Comprehension Skill
– Discussion: Invite students to share information they learned about the rest of George Washington Carver’s accomplishments (successfully taught farmers how to rotate crops and fertilize, adding valuable nutrients to the soil; invented hundreds of uses for sweet potatoes and peanuts; spoke in front of the U.S. Congress, convincing them to pass a law to help U.S. farmers; became famous and talked to large crowds; won the respect of a nation as an African-American scholar at a time when few African-Americans were respected; successfully shared his belief that people should respect the Earth because nature would in turn provide the things people needed).
– Ask students to explain how these accomplishments have influenced others (they model the importance of challenging oneself and working toward goals, they model the importance of working with others in order to be successful, and so on).
Independent Practice: Have students use the inside front cover of their book to create a column chart with the headings Personality, Accomplishments, and Influence. Have them reread pages 14 and 15, and write information that describes each of the elements of a biography on the chart in their book. When students have finished working, discuss their answers.
Enduring understanding: In this book, you learned about a very successful man and his ambitious, dedicated nature. Now that you know this information, what qualities do you think can help you achieve your own goals throughout your lifetime?

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Read Aloud: A Weed is a Flower – The Life of George Washington Carver by Aliki pages 1-11

Questions:
Where did Dr. Carver grow up?
What happened to his biological mother?
Who raised George and his brother, Jim?
What were his interests as a child?
How did slavery affect his childhood?

– Distribute to students the graphic organizers for the chapter entitled “Where Did George Washington Carver Grow Up?” Refer to the read aloud to model to students how to take notes on the graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
– Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, January 28, 2016. In math, we will practice solving change-to-more number stories.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How do you determine if the quantity is increased or decreased when reading a story problem or looking at a number model? Explain what you know with a thought partner.

Shared Reading: George Washington Carver by Cynthia Kennedy Henzel

Build Skills
Phonics: Diphthong /ou/
– Have students look at the map on page 4. Show them what part of the United States is considered the South. Write the word south on the board and point to the letters ou. Tell students that the letters o and u together stand for the vowel sound they hear in the middle of the word south.
– Explain that the ou letter combination is one of the letter combinations that stand for this sound. The letter combination ow also makes the /ou/ sound. Tell students that these two letter combinations create a sound called the /ou/ diphthong.
– Write the word down on the board. Point out the letter combination that stand for the /ou/ sound and ask students to blend the letters o and w together to make the same vowel sound as in south. Point out that the /ou/ sound comes in the middle of south and down, but that it doesn’t come in the middle of words all the time (for example, in our). Next, run your finger under the letters as you blend the three sounds in down: d/ow/n. Point out that even though there are four letters, there are three sounds blended together to form the word. Then have students blend the word aloud with you as you run your finger under the letters.
– Tell students that the letter combinations ou and ow don’t always stand for the /ou/ sound. Write the words shout and should on the board and say them aloud. Ask students which word contains the same vowel sound as in south. Make sure students can differentiate between the two vowel sounds. Give other examples as necessary.
Check for understanding: Have students turn to page 10. Instruct them to find and circle three words that contain the diphthong /ou/ sound (out, about, and how).
– Independent practice: Introduce, explain, and have students complete the diphthong /ou/ worksheet. When students are finished, discuss their answer aloud.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Read Aloud: Smart About… George Washington Carver – The Peanut Wizard by Laura Driscoll pages 1-11

– Using the notes from the graphic organizer, teacher models how to elaborate the notes into a chapter by charting a think-aloud for the chapter “Where Did George Washington Carver Grow Up?”
– Tell students: “Authors, you will now collaborate with your writing partner to elaborate the first chapter of your book. Support each other by remembering to praise your partners and provide positive feedback or additional ideas as you work collaboratively.
– Students discuss with a partner how they would compose their chapters “Where Did George Washington Carver Grow Up?” for their All About Books.
– Students utilize notes to compose the chapter “Where Did George Washington Carver Grow Up?” for their All About Books independently. Some students may work in pair to assist each other.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, January 29, 2016. In science, we will begin to explore and discuss what balancing is.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What activity requires balancing? Explain to a classmate how the activity requires balancing.

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Thursday, February 4.)

away, animal, house, point, page, desk, mask, task, ask, tusk, disk, events, process, equal, array, multiply

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Shared Reading: George Washington Carver by Cynthia Kennedy Henzel

Grammar and Mechanics: Proper nouns: names of people
– Review or explain that a noun is a person, place, or thing. Ask students to read page 5 of the book projected on the Smart Board and give examples of nouns from the text (slave, brother, boys, and so on).
– Review or explain that a proper noun is the name of a specific person, place, or thing. A proper noun always begins with a capital letter. Tell students that, in this lesson, they will focus on the names of people. Write examples of the proper nouns/names of people from page 5 on the board (George, Jim, Moses, Susan Carver).
– Remind students not to confuse a proper noun with the capital letter used at the beginning of a sentence or title of a chapter. Point out instances in the book where capitals are used but a proper noun is not present.
– Check for understanding: Write the following nouns in a column on the board: boy, brother, woman, man. Ask volunteers to give examples of proper nouns or names of people for each, and write them on the board to the right of each common noun given (boy: John, Dylan, and so on).
– Independent practice: Introduce, explain, and have students complete the proper nouns: name of people worksheet. When they have finished, discuss their answers aloud.

Formative Assessment
Monitor Students to determine if they can:
– accurately and consistently retell the facts in the text during discussion and on a worksheet
– accurately identify elements of a biography during discussion and on a separate piece of paper
– fluently read the diphthong /ou/ sound during discussion and on a worksheet
– identify proper nouns that are the names of people during discussion and on a worksheet

Comprehension Checks (Book Quiz, Retelling Rubric)

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing
Read Aloud: A Weed is a Flower – The Life of George Washington Carver by Aliki pages 12-19

Questions:
Where did George attend school?
What subjects did he most enjoy?
Why was his interest in plants so important?

– Distribute to students the graphic organizers for the chapter entitled “Going to School?” Refer to the read aloud to model to students how to take notes on the graphic organizers.
– Students discuss at table groupings additional information about Dr. Carver from their own reading to contribute to the graphic organizers.
– Students continue to read and add information onto their graphic organizers.
– Teachers circulate, guide, and/or pose questions to support students, noting which students are ready for independent writing and those who may need additional support.

Math
Lesson 5-6 Mentally Adding and Subtracting 10 and 100
Students develop strategies for mentally adding and subtracting 10 and 100.

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Vocabulary: mental addition, mental subtraction

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students count up and back by 10s on a number grid.
Begin at 28. Count up by 10s past 100.
Begin at 82. Count back by 10s. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Students solve a + 10 addition problem.
“What is 120 + 10? Be prepared to explain how you found your answer.”

Sharing Strategies
Students share strategies for adding 10 to a 3 – digit number.
Teachers remind students that adding numbers in their heads is called mental addition. Subtracting numbers in their heads is mental subtraction. Students will use patterns to help them find rules for adding and subtracting 10 and 100 mentally. (“We do”, whole class)

Adding and Subtracting 10 and 100
Students use calculator counts to develop rules for mentally adding and subtracting 10 and 100.
Teachers review the procedure for skip counting on a calculator (See Lesson 1-6). (“We do”, whole class)
Have students start at 221 and count up by 10s to 281. Teachers record the counts as children read the counts chorally. Ask: “What patterns do you notice?”
Students continue the same count to 331 without clearing their calculators. Teachers record the counts. Ask: “What do you notice about the hundreds digit? Why do you think that happens?”
Students use their calculators to count back by 10s from 547 to 447. Teachers record the counts. Ask: “What patterns do you notice?”
“How is counting by 10s similar to adding or subtracting 10s?”
Teachers repeat the activity as needed counting on and back by 10 using 3 – digit numbers.
Teachers dictate 2 – and 3 – digit numbers and have the students apply the rules generated by the class to mentally add and subtract 10 and 100.
Students write their answers on erasable boards.
Say: “Add 10 to 50; 46; 278; 460; and 598.”
“Subtract 10 from 30; 78; 130; 433; and 598.”
“Add 100 to 34; 600; 340; and 596.”
“Subtract 100 from 500; 980; 156; and 432.” (“We do”, whole class)

Introducing Addition/Subtraction Spin
Teachers guide the students to read the directions for Addition/Subtraction Spin in My Reference Book p. 138-139. (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers model the game by playing several rounds. (“I do”)

3. Practice
Playing Addition/Subtract Spin
Students practice mentally adding and subtracting 10 and 100 to 3 – digit numbers. Have students discuss the rules they use as they play. (“We do”, pairs)

Sentence frames for discussion:
I spun a _____.
I added _____.
My rule was _____.

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers observe which students are engaged in the game, and which students need additional support.
Students share what shortcut or rule they use to help add or subtract. Ask: “How do you know your rule works?” (“We do” pairs; small groups)

Math Boxes 5 – 6
Students practice and maintain skills. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs)

Lesson 5-7 Open Numbers Lines (2 Days)
Open Numbers Lines
Students use open number lines as a tool for solving number stories.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

Vocabulary: open number line

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students view Quick Look Card 108 (Double Ten Frame 6 dots in the first frame and 7 dots in the second frame. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Students solve a + 10 number story.
Madison has 23 buttons in her craft box. She buys a package of 10 more buttons. How many buttons does Madison have now? (“You do”, independent)
Have students share their strategies for solving the number story. Teachers scribe their answers. (“We do”, whole class)

Using Open Number Lines
Students use open number lines to solve number stories.
Teachers ask: “What rule did we use in yesterday’s lesson for adding 10? Do we need to count by 1s to know where we would land on a number line or number grid?”
Teachers display a line number line to illustrate a jump of 10 from 23 to 33 on the Smart Board or chart paper.
Teachers demonstrate how to use an open number line as a tool that allows us to quickly record our thinking when we use mental strategies to add and subtract. Ask: “How is the open number line like the other number lines we have used? How is it different? How might the open number line be helpful when we solve number stories?”

Teachers tell students that they will use open number lines to solve number stories and to record their thinking. (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers pose number stories while students use erasable boards or paper and pencil to draw open numbers lines.
Joshua has 64 blocks in his toy box and 10 blocks on his table. How many blocks does Joshua have in all? (“We do”, whole class)
Students share strategies and display their open number lines. (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers highlight strategies that involve jumping to an easy number first, making a connection to going-through-10 strategy for solving subtraction facts. (“I do”, whole class)

Students work in pairs to solve additional number stories in math journal 2, p. 117. (“We do”, pairs)

Students discuss with a partner whether using an open number line to solve number stories is easier or harder than using a regular number line. (“We do”, pairs)

3. Practice
Playing Beat the Calculator
Students practice addition and subtraction facts. (“We do”, pairs; small groups)

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers observe which facts students know from memory, and which students need additional support.
Ask: “What strategies did you use to solve the facts you did not know? Why is it helpful to know addition and subtraction facts?” (“We do”, pairs)

Math Boxes 5-7
Students practice and maintain skills (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs; small group)

Lesson 5-8 Change-to-More Number Stories
Students solve change-to-more number stories.
Vocabulary: change-to-more number story, change diagram

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students solve facts number stories on erasable boards.
Tayla has 9 toy animals in her room and some toy animals in her backpack. She has 14 toy animals altogether. How many are in her backpack? (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Students determine if a bag weighs more before or after a book is put in it. (“You do”, independently; “We do”, whole class)
Students discuss how they know the weight of a bag changed to more.

Introducing the Change Diagram
Change number stories begin with a quantity. This quantity is increased or decreased. This lesson focuses on change-to-more stories.
Teachers display the Fish Poster on the Smart Board. (If necessary review the abbreviations lb. and in.
Teachers pose change-to-more number stories based on the poster.
Say: “Fish K weighs 35 pounds. It swallows Fish D, which weighs 5 pounds. How much does Fish K weigh now?”
Teachers display a Unit Box. Ask: “What label goes in the unit Box?”
Teachers model using the change diagram to solve the number story.
Teachers provide a story frame to support students.
We started with 35.
We changed it by adding 5.
We ended with 40.
Teachers ask questions as follows: What do we want to find out from the story? Do we know Fish K’s weight before it swallowed Fish D?
Teachers put 35 in the Start Box of the change diagram. Ask: “What change occurred? Does Fish K weigh more or less before it swallowed Fish D? How much more?
Teachers put +5 on the Change Line. Then put a question mark in the End Box reminding students that we don’t yet know the result. Explain how we can use a question mark to represent what we want to find out (or what we don’t know). Tell the students that in this problem the question mark represents how much Fish K weighs after swallowing Fish D.
Teachers explain that another way to represent a number story is by writing a number model. Write 35 + 5 = ? below the diagram.
Ask: How do we find Fish K’s weight after it swallowed Fish D?
Students share their strategies for finding Fish K’s total weight
Teachers write the number model below (35 + 5 = 40).
Teachers continue to model a few more number stories following this same procedure.
Teachers write students solutions on the Smart Board or chart paper using these steps:

Fill in the change diagram for each problem. Write the numbers that are known, and write a question mark for the number that is unknown.

Write the number model for the problem, using a question mark to represent the number that is unknown.

Solve the problem.

Teachers guide students to read more about change diagrams in My Reference Book, p. 27-29. (“We do”, whole class)

Solving Change-to-More Number Stories
Students solve Change-to-More number stories in math journal 2, p. 120-121. (“We do”, pairs)

Teachers note students” progress as they work in pairs. Ask: Which fish did we start with? What change took place?

Observe: Did students write the names of the fish in the appropriate boxes in the diagram?

Teachers have volunteers to share the strategies partners used to solve the number stories. (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Measuring Objects
Students measure objects in the classroom with the specified lengths in both centimeters and inches.
Students record their findings on p. 122.

Math Boxes 5-8
Students complete problems that focus on skills and understandings that are a prerequisite for Unit 6. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs)

Lesson 5-9 Parts-and-Total Number Stories
Students solve parts-and-total number stories.
Vocabulary: parts-and-total diagram, total, parts-and-total number story

Goals:
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers dictate 2- and 3-digit numbers and have students mentally add and subtract 10 and 100, recording their answers on erasable boards
Add 100 to the following: 66; 800, and 620.
Subtract 100 from the following: 400; 212; and 707. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Teachers display a domino with 8 dots on half of the domino and 9 dots on the other half of the domino. Students find the total number of dots on a domino. (“You do”, independently)

Sharing Strategies
Students share strategies they employed to find the total number of dots on the domino. (“We do”, whole class)

Introducing the Parts-and-Total diagram
Teachers draw a unit box with the label dots, displaying the parts-and-total diagram on the Smart Board. Write 8 and 9 in the boxes labeled Part. Write 17 in the box labeled Total.

Explain that the diagram is a convenient way to represent the domino used during math talk. The Part boxes show the number of dots on each side of the domino, and the Total box shows the total number of dots.

Teachers display different examples of diagrams on the Smart Board such as Venn diagrams or data tables, and explain that diagrams are simple drawings that help organize their thinking.

Pose an additional problem. Ask: A hot dog costs 45 cents. An orange costs 25 cents. What is the total cost?
Erase the label in the unit box and the numbers in the parts-and-total diagram used earlier. Write the label cents in the unit box. Discuss why the diagram is a good way to organize information from the parts-and-total number story. Write 45 cents and 25 cents in the two Parts boxes. The total cost is unknown, so write ? in the Total box.
Below the diagram, write a number model that represents the problem, using a question mark for what the students want to find out (or what they don’t know) 45 cents + 25 cents = ? .
Ask: How do we find the total cost?
Ask students to share their strategies for finding the total cost (eg. Counting up; using an open number line; using coins; using a number grid).
Below the number model with the question mark, write a summary number model with 70 cents replacing the question mark (45 cents + 25 cents = 70 cents).
Ask: How does each element in the diagram relate to the number models?

Solving Parts-and-Total Number stories
Students solve exercise 1 on journal p. 123. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs).
Students share their strategies used to solve the problem.

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers use students’ progress on p. 123 to identify which students need additional support.
Teachers pose additional number stories like in exercise 1, displaying and using parts-and-totals diagrams. (“We do”, small group)

3. Practice
Practicing with Fact Triangles
As students practice have them sort the triangles into facts they know and facts that need more practice. Record their progress on the addition Facts Inventory Record, Parts 1 and 2 on journal p. 250-253. (“We do”, pairs; small group)

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers note students’ progress from the Facts Inventory Record

Math Boxes 5-9
Students practice and maintain skills. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs)

Science
Mystery 2: Balance of Forces, Engineering

Human Bridges

Discuss: What would it feel like to be a tower on the Golden Gate Bridge? What forces would you feel as an arch bridge? To better understand the pushes and pulls at work in a bridge, your students can become the parts of different types of bridges.

Make a Human Suspension Bridge with 16 students and two sturdy ropes in an activity from the American Society for Engineering Education.
Activity
1. To build the human suspension bridge, select 16 students to participate.
2. Two pairs of taller students stand across from each other and hold the “cable” ropes on their shoulders. These students are the towers.
3. Four students act as anchors. Each one sits on the floor directly behind each tower and holds the ends of the cables.
4. Eight students can act as suspenders. Put four in a straight line between each opposing tower. They can kneel or sit while pulling the cables down toward the floor.
5. The floor serves as the roadway. The rest of the students in the classroom can act as cars.
Discussion
Ask the students who are acting as towers to describe what forces are at work in their “bridge”. Have them describe how each force works upon them. They should feel the rope pulling down on their shoulders. What happens to the bridge if there are no anchors? If there are no suspenders?
You can also discuss the pros and cons of a suspension bridge. For instance, these bridges are typically found in large cities with lots of boat traffic. They can be built high above sea, or land, with a large span between their towers, leaving the waterway clear for boats. However, they are very costly in materials and time.
Bridges
The Kintai Bridge in Japanis a historical wooden arch bridge, located in Iwakuni. Built in 1673, it spans Nishiki River, in a scenic location (at the foot of Mt. Yokoyama, offering great views of the castle above). Destroyed by a flood the next year, it was reconstructed and periodical maintenance included reconstruction of the bridge. It was destroyed again by floods in 1950 and the bridge which stands today was reconstructed in 1953.
The bridge is a very popular tourist destination in Japan, especially during the Cherry Blossom Festival in spring.
Students view The Kintal Bridge: Japan’s most beautiful bridge on YouTube Jan Knusel (< 2 min.)
Discuss: What forces would you feel as an arch bridge? To better understand the pushes and pulls at work in a bridge, you can become the parts of an arch bridge.

Human Arch

Vocabulary
arch : A curved structure that converts the downward compression force of its own weight, and of any weight pressing down on top of it, into a force along its curve. This results in an outward and downward force along the sides and base of the arch.
buttress: A side support that counteracts an outward pushing force, the way bookends keep books on a shelf from sliding sideways. Buttresses are often used to support the sides of arches and tall cathedral walls, where they counteract the outward thrust.
Students work in partnerships of four to simulate arch bridges.
1. Have two kids form an arch by placing their palms together and leaning toward each other, sliding their feet as far back as they can. Caution them not to lose their balance.
2. Have a third kid gently pull down on the top of the arch to test its strength.
3. Have the group brainstorm ways for two more kids to join the arch and make it stronger, but without breaking up the space beneath the arch. Guide them to the idea of adding buttresses by asking the arch-makers how stable their legs feel. Then repeat Step 2 and compare the results. (The buttresses exert an inward force on the sides of the arch that balances the outward force created by the load pressing down on the top of the arch.)
Discuss: Where do you feel a push or a pull?
How difficult is it to break the arch?
Teachers present The Interactive Forces Lab (PBS, WTTW) online
Forces act on big structures in many ways. Students click on the various actions to explore the forces at work and to see real-life examples.
This lab simplifies the real-life forces and actions that affect structures, in order to illustrate key concepts.
Squeezing (Compression)
Compression is a force that squeezes a material together. When a material is in compression, it tends to become shorter.
Compression: See It In Real Life
The lower columns of a skyscraper are squeezed by the heavy weight above them. This squeezing force is called compression.
Stretching (Tension)
Tension is a force that stretches a material apart. When a material is in tension, it tends to become longer.
Tension: See It In Real Life
The weight of the roadway and all the cars traveling on it pull on the vertical cables in this suspension bridge. The cables are in tension.
Bending
When a straight material becomes curved, one side squeezes together and the other side stretches apart. This action is called bending.
Bending: See It In Real Life
The topside of the metal bar is pulled apart in tension, and the bottom side is squeezed together in compression. This combination of opposite forces produces an action called bending.
Sliding (Shear)
Shear is a force that causes parts of a material to slide past one another in opposite directions.
Shear: See It In Real Life
During an earthquake, parts of this roadway slid in opposite directions. This sliding action is called shear.
Twisting (Torsion)
Torsion is an action that twists a material.
Torsion: See It In Real Life
In 1940, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge twisted violently in strong winds and collapsed. The twisting force that tore this bridge in half is called torsion.
Forces act on big structures in many ways. Compression is a force that squeezes a material together. When a material is in compression, it tends to become shorter. The lower columns of a skyscraper are squeezed by the heavy weight above them. This squeezing force is called compression. Tension is a force that stretches a material apart. When a material is in tension, it tends to become longer. The weight of the roadway and all the cars traveling on it pull on the vertical cables in this suspension bridge. The cables are in tension. Torsion is an action that twists a material. In 1940, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge twisted violently in strong winds and collapsed. The twisting force that tore this bridge in half is called torsion. Shear is a force that causes parts of a material to slide past one another in opposite directions. During an earthquake, parts of this roadway slid in opposite directions. This sliding action is called shear. When a straight material becomes curved, one side squeezes together and the other side stretches apart. This action is called bending. The topside of the metal bar is pulled apart in tension, and the bottom side is squeezed together in compression. This combination of opposite forces produces an action called bending.

Rotational Unit Test

Pre-Unit Assessment
– Students write ideas in response to the statement “What I know about balancing.”
– Chart students’ responses to “What they would like to know about balancing.”
– Let the students know that during the next few weeks they will be investigating balancing and weighing. At the end of this time, they will look at the chart again to see which questions they have answered.
Interactive Read Aloud: The Man Who Walked between the Towers by Mordicai Gerstein

Social Studies
Integrated with language arts

Video: George Washington Carver from Brainpopjr.com, George Washington Carver for Kids, and George Washington Carver in under 2 minutes
– Students view the video and take notes to support their writing about Dr. George Washington Carver.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of January 17

Dear Parent and Caregivers,

The second grade classes will begin this year’s African-American unit of study the week of January 24. We will be researching the prolific scientist and inventor, Mr. George Washington Carver. The purpose of this unit is to provide a means for students to understand what inventors think about when making an invention, particularly the kinds of effects the inventions can have on the larger community. We will read, discuss and create writing and visual projects pertaining to Carver’s life in science and the numerous inventions for which he is solely responsible. Throughout this unit, we will celebrate this illustrious African-American Scientist and the impact his work has had on our lives.

Please support your child by assisting him/her to find age appropriate books, articles, and photos/images about George Washington Carver.

Students will take the Rotational Unit Test on Thursday, January 28. A study guide will be sent home on Wednesday, January 20. Please have your child complete the study guide and submit it the following day. We will grade the study guide and return it with the students for further reviewing for the test.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading Conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the NSP student from the University of Chicago
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
Word Study
Building Fry Sight First One Hundred Words
Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers (Tier 2)

Mini iPads Reading:
Telling Time by Patrick Murphy (Kindle)
Newton and Me by Lynn Mayer

Change to two Kindle levels of readers the first mid-to above benchmark and the second one below to at benchmark:
I Have a Dream by Dan Jackson

Martin Luther King Jr. Day by Margaret McNamara

IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level C (Tier 3);
Level F (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 17 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and open their eyes if the words rhyme, or close their eyes if the words do not.
Onset Fluency: Thumbs up if the words begin with the same blend; thumbs down if the words do not begin with the same blend.
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher says the word. Students say the final sound found in the series. Ex. T: get, got, bet, S: /t/
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Group Activity: Hello song in different languages. (Youtube)
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.

Day1:
No class – Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Annyoung (hello in Korean)
Today is Tuesday, January 19, 2016. In science, we will learn about bridge design and use our knowledge of forces to engineer a strong bridge made of paper.

Today’s Inquiry Question: What makes bridges so strong?
Share your answer with a classmate.

Reading Workshop

Shared Reading: My Daddy, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Martin Luther King III
Page 1

Book Summary
This memoir is written from the point of view of Dr. King’s elder son. This book includes valuable lessons about being a child of the illustrious reverend and civil rights activist. While Dr. King worked tirelessly to change unfair laws and practices, his family encountered numerous experiences of prejudice and antagonism in their home community, as well as, nationwide in the United States. This story opens the minds and hearts of the reader through the passionate words of the child who called Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., “daddy”.

Key Question
How did the civil rights movement affect the children of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.?

Targeted Reading Strategy
Summarize

Objectives
Ask and answer questions
Identify meanings of pertinent story words
Use the reading strategy of summarizing to understand text
Understand and identify cause-and-effect relationships

Story Words
creed (n.): belief
consoled (v.): comforted
protest (n.): challenge because of disapproval
nonviolence (n.): peaceful means, not force
compassion (n): concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others

Word Knowledge
Students work in small groups to discuss and match story words by drawing a line to each definition. Have each group pick a student to match the story words and definitions on sentence strips. After displaying the story words and definitions in a pocket chart, allow each group to share their thinking.

Ask and answer questions
Before reading the book, ask students: How does a parent’s occupation impact the lives of their children?
Use this essential question to create a thoughtful discussion about the lives of students at home.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 17 Introductions and Conclusions—Addressing and Audience
Review Friday’s lesson. Have a few students share what they have written about introduction and/or conclusion.
Students continue writing their introductions and conclusions for their All about Books.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour,
Today is Wednesday, January 20, 2016. We will continue to discuss Dr. King’s life as explained through the eyes of his son.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why and how might people treat each other unfairly? Share your answer with a classmate.

Reading Workshop

Shared Reading: My Daddy, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Martin Luther King III
Pages 2-11

Ask students what they think it means to be treated unfairly at home or school because of their parents’ jobs.

Assign groups of students. Have one member of each group pull a slip of paper with a type of occupation.
Group 1: President of the U.S.A.
Group 2: Sanitation worker
Group 3: Teacher in your school

Pose these questions for small group discussion
How might a child be treated by classmates if his/her parent’s occupation is ____________? By neighbors? By strangers?

Encourage them to give examples of positive and negative treatment by others.

Lead the discussion with students about their reaction to being treated differently because of their parent’s occupation.

Explain that the fair and unfair treatment of others based upon this scenario is real.

During the shared reading ask students what they know about the children of Dr. King as they read. Encourage students to identify evidence in the book that reveals the lives of the King children and other family members.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 18 Editing – Aligning Expectations to the Common Core
Minilesson
Connection: Remind writers that they must edit their writing so that it is ready for readers at tomorrow’ celebration
“Writers, we are getting ready for our science exhibition celebration. At our celebration, you will share both your findings from your experiments and your information books with the world. We need to make sure everyone can read these easily! You have been working so hard to make your writing the best it can be by reading and revising your work and by using the information Writing Checklist to remind you of all that you do.”
Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate using the checklist to edit a piece of writing. Highlight the use of your and change it into the contraction you’re. Demonstrate using the checklist to edit for capitalization and comas. Recap the demonstration, and name the teaching point with clear, concise language.
Active Engagement: Set writers to practice this strategy on a shared text. Give students a bit of wait time to apply the strategy. Listen in to partnership discuss editing strategies. Recap the work the students practiced.
Link: Send students off to begin editing their own information books.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa,
Today is Thursday, January 21, 2016. In math, we will practice making arrays to explore multiplication concepts.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How does an array show repeated addition? Share your answer with a classmate.

Reading Workshop

Shared Reading: My Daddy, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Martin Luther King III
Pages 12-21

Cause and effect
Review and discuss cause-and-effect relationships. Explain that a cause is an action or event that makes something happen, and the effect is what happens because of, or as a result of, the action or event.

Think-aloud: I know that there are reasons, or causes, for events to happen. When the sky darkens with stratus clouds and the sound of thunder is heard. I know that it will storm. The cause is the heavy moisture in the clouds; the effect is the rainstorm.
Explain to students that there can be more than one effect resulting from a cause. Ask students: What else can happen during the thunder and rain? Yes, there may be lightning as well.

Model the following to students:
I know that there are reasons, or causes, for events to happen. Dr. King presented a speech because some Americans were treated unfairly. The cause is that people were treated unfairly. The effect is the speech.
Explain to students that there can be more than one effect resulting from a cause. Ask students: What else might have resulted from Dr. King’s speech? Have students share their thinking with a classmate. Then we share as a class.

Explain to students that they will be looking for cause-and-effect relationships as they read the book, My Daddy, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Assigned selected pages to groups of students. Have students work in small groups to read the pages and use a graphic organizer to record cause-and-effect relationships related specifically to events in Martin Luther King Jr’s life by asking the questions, what happened? and why did it happen?

Ask students to select a presenter and share their results with the class.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Deeper, More Powerful and Thoughtful Revision
Review the lesson on Reread During Editing
– Using a writing sample, teachers model the focus point (After I finish a piece of writing, I will reread even more carefully! I am going to reread to check carefully for mistakes in spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar. This kind of rereading is called proofreading. Proofreading is a time when we read to edit or fix mistakes.)
– Students reread their “All About Books” to check for errors.
– Students utilize the checklist to edit their “All About Books”.
– Explain to students that not only do writers edit their work, they also prepare it for publication. Model to students how to fancy up their writing.
– Students recopying their writing. They illustrate important parts of their “All About Books.”

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Ni hao,
Today is Friday, January 22, 2016. We will continue to practice summarizing.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What types of questions do we ask ourselves to help us summarize a passage? Share your answer with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Reading Workshop

Shared Reading: My Daddy, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Martin Luther King III
Pages 22-28

Summarizing
Review with students that to summarize, “I need to decide which information is the most important to remember in each section I read. To do this, I can consider who and what the section is about, what happened, and when and why it happened. Then I organize that information into a few sentences.”

Model the process to students through the think aloud below.

Under who I write: the family of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Under what I write: M.L. III and family were treated unfairly
Under when I write: the 1960s during the Civil Rights Movement
Under where I write: Atlanta, Georgia
Under why I write: some people did not agree with Dr. King’s beliefs

When I organize all the information, a summary might be: The lives of the children of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. were affected by unfair treatment during the 1960s in Atlanta, Georgia because some people did not agree with Dr. King’s beliefs or teachings regarding the Civil Rights Movement.

Jig-saw Summarizing Activity
Assign different sections of the book to different groups of students. Have them work in small groups to summarize the assigned text and select a presenter to share the summary with the class.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Some students will be pulled out for Vision and Hearing Screening.

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on January 29.)
change, off, play, spell, air, bend, send, mind, offend, sand, land, draw, object, feature, label, steps

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing Workshop
Deeper, More Powerful and Thoughtful Revision
– Students continue to recopy their writing and illustrate important parts of their “All About Books.”

Math
Pre-Assessment MARS Test “All the Fun of the Fair” (Formative Assessment, not part of the students’ grades)
The task challenges a student to demonstrate understanding of concepts involved in money. A student must understand the dollar and cent notations and which amount represents more. Additionally, the student must be able to find the sum of two amounts, count a combination of coins and explain their answer to indicate if the coins represent the given amount.

MARS Unit 4 Post Assessment “Carols Number” (Formative Assessment, not part of the students’ grades)
The task challenges a student to demonstrate understanding of concepts involved in place value. A student must understand the relative magnitude of whole numbers from the quantity of a digit in a particular place in the number and use this understanding to compare different numbers. The student must make sense of the concepts of sequences, quantity, and the relative position of numbers.

Lesson 5-5 Exploring Arrays, Time, and Shapes (2 Days)
Students make arrays, match clock faces to digital notation, and construct shapes on Geoboards.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Vocabulary: array

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students write numbers in expanded form on half sheets of paper. (“We do”, whole class)
235 (200 + 30 + 5); 358 (300 + 50 + 8); 405 (400 + 5 or 400 + 0 + 5); 399 (300 + 90 + 9); 600 (600 or 600 + 0 + 0); 2,304 (2,000 + 300 + 4 or 2,000 + 300 + 0 + 4)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines (including identifying the daily temperature to the nearest degree F). (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Students determine the number of dots in an array of 2 rows of 5 dots (Activity Card 69). (“You do”, independently; “We do”, pairs)

Introducing Arrays
Students skip count to find the number of dots in arrays and write number models to represent them.
Teachers explain the arrangement of dots in rows and columns is an array. All of the rows have the same number of dots, and all the columns have the same number of dots.
Ask: “How many rows are there? How many dots are in each row? How many dots are there in all?”
Students share their strategies for finding the total number of dots.
Teachers explain that the corresponding addition number model uses equal addends to represent the array.
Teachers continue to model by displaying a 3 – by – 4 array utilizing the thinking strategies as listed above. (“We do”, whole class)

Exploration A: Making Arrays
Students make arrays using centimeter cubes and write number models to represent them. (“We do”, pairs)

Exploration B: Playing Clock Concentration
Each student makes a set of Clock Concentration Cards. Then students work in pairs to match times shown on clock faces to digital notation. (“We do”, pairs)

Exploration C: Making Shapes
Students follow directions on Activity Card 71 to make shapes on geoboards with rubber bands. Then students use a straightedge to copy and label each shape on Math Masters, p. 131. (“We do”, pairs)

3. Practice
Playing Addition Top-It
Students review the directions in My Reference Book, p170 – 172. Students practice addition facts recording their answers on the addition Top – It Record Sheet. (“We do”, pairs)

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers observe what strategies students are using to determine the sum, and which children are using the correct comparison symbols on the record sheet.
Teachers ask: “How did you figure out the sums? How did you know which comparison symbol to write on the record sheet?” (“We do”, pairs)

Math Boxes 5-5
Students practice and maintain skills. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, pairs)

Science
Mystery 2: Balance of Forces, Engineering

What makes bridges so strong?

In this Mystery, students will learn about bridge design and use their knowledge of forces to engineer a strong bridge made of paper.

Students view the lesson’s video.

Discuss: How could you keep a bridge like this from sagging?

Activity: Paper Bridge

Discuss: Can you build a bridge that holds 100 pennies, using 1 sheet of paper and up to 5 paper clips?

A bridge must support its own weight (the dead load) as well as the weight of anything placed on it, like the pennies (the live load). Your paper bridge must span 20 centimeters (about 8 in.). The sides of your bridge will rest on two books and cannot be taped or attached to the books or the table.

What You Will Need
• plain paper
• 5 paper clips
• ruler
• 2 books or blocks
• at least 100 pennies or other small weights
• scissors

Discuss: Describe how you think the bridge should be constructed in order to support its dead load plus the live load of the pennies.
Materials:

Activity
1. Discuss possible ideas with your partner before you start building. What can you do to the paper to make it stronger? When you have decided on a design, construct your bridge.
2. Place the bridge across two supports that are 20 cm apart. Remember that the space below the bridge must be clear to allow boats to pass!
3. To test your bridge, load it with pennies one at a time, until it collapses. Record how many pennies your bridge supported.

Discuss: Describe how well your bridge supported its dead load and the live load you placed on it. Was the bridge as strong as you thought it would be? Where did it fail?

Build on It
– Redesign your bridge and test it again, using a new sheet of paper. How does your second attempt compare? How can engineers test their plans for building a full-size bridge?
– Is there a difference in the load your bridge can hold if you put the load in the center of the bridge compared to spreading it out along the bridge? Make a prediction and test it.

Paper Bridge Challenge

Discuss: Do the bridges you’ve seen so far give you any ideas about how you can support a strong paper bridge? (Think about how you can support the bridge so it doesn’t sag.)

Materials
– Bridge Challenge Handouts
– rulers (1 for each partnership)
– several sheets of typing paper
– scissors
– books to stack (4 for each partnership)
– pennies (at least 400)
– Bridge Designer’s Notebook Handouts

Bridge challenge
Using only two sheets of paper, build a strong bridge that will reach across a 6-inch gap. The bridge must be at least 3 inches wide.

The Test:
How many pennies will your bridge hold before it collapses?

Practice: Students use paper, books, and pennies to create paper bridges.
1. Place the stacks of books 6 inches apart, using your ruler to measure the gap.
2. Think about bridges you have seen. Can you make something that has the same shape out of paper?
3. Experiment!
Make a paper bridge across the gap between the books.
Put pennies on your bridge, one by one. Watch what happens when pennies push downward.
Keep adding pennies until the bridge collapses.
Think about how you could change your bridge so it’s better at fighting the downward push.
Change your bridge and try again. Build at least three different bridges.
4. Keep track of your experiments on your Bridge Designer’s Notebook.

Discuss: How did your partnership design each bridge? Why? What design held the most pennies?

Activity: Gumdrops and toothpicks make great trusses

Review the concept of truss system from the lesson’s video lesson.

Geodesic Gumdrops: Make amazing architecture with candy and toothpicks.
What do I need?
– A bag of gumdrops (If you can’t find gumdrops, try using bits of rolled of clay, mini-marshmallows, or partly-cooked beans.)
– A box of round toothpicks

What do I do?
Make Squares and Cubes

1. Start with 4 toothpicks and 4 gumdrops. Poke the toothpicks into the gumdrops to make a square with a gumdrop at each corner.
2. Poke another toothpick into the top of each gumdrop. Put a gumdrop on the top of each toothpick. Connect the gumdrops with toothpicks to make a cube. (A cube has a square on each side. It takes 8 gumdrops and 12 toothpicks.)
3. Use more toothpicks and gumdrops to keep building squares onto the sides of the cube. When your structure is about 6 inches tall or wide, try wiggling it from side to side.

Discuss: Does it feel solid, or does it feel kind of shaky?

Making Triangles and Pyramids
1. Start with 3 gumdrops and 3 toothpicks. Poke the toothpicks into gumdrops to make a triangle with a gumdrop at each point.
2. Poke another toothpick into the top of each gumdrop. Bend those 3 toothpicks into one gumdrop to make a 3-sided pyramid. (A 3-sided pyramid has a triangle on each side. It takes 4 gumdrops and 6 toothpicks.)
3. Use more toothpicks and gumdrops to keep building triangles onto the sides of your pyramid. When your structure is about 6 sides tall or wide, try wiggling it from side to side.

Discuss: Does it feel kind of shaky?

Making 4-Sided Pyramids
You can make a very big structure out of squares and cubes, but it’ll be wiggly and will probably fall down. If you try to make a structure out of only triangles and pyramids, it won’t be wiggly, but you’ll probably run out of gumdrops and toothpicks before it gets very big. A 4-sided pyramid has a square on the bottom and triangles on all 4 sides. When you make a structure that has both triangles and squares, you can make big structures that are less wiggly.

1. Build a square, then poke a toothpick into the top of each corner.
2. Bend all 4 toothpicks into the center and connect them with one gumdrop, to make a 4-sided pyramid.

Discuss: What other ways can you use squares and triangles together?
How big of a structure can you make before you run out of gumdrops?

What’s Going On?
Stretching and squashing – some basic principles
Even though your gumdrop structures are standing absolutely still. Their parts are always pulling and pushing on each other.
Structures remain standing because some parts are being pulled or stretched and other parts are being pushed or squashed. The parts that are being squashed are in compression.

Sometimes you can figure out whether something is in tension or compression by imaging yourself in the object’s place. If you’re a brick and someone piles more bricks on you, you’ll feel squashed and you’re in compression. If you’re a long steel cable attached to a couple of towers and someone hangs a bridge from you, you’ll feel stretched – you’re in tension.

Some materials – like bricks – don’t squash easily; they are strong in compression. Others – like steel cables or rubber bands – don’t break when you stretch them; they are strong under tension. Still others – like steel bars and toothpicks – are strong under both compression and tension.

What’s the big deal about triangles?
As you’ve probably already discovered, squares collapse easily under compression. Four toothpicks joined in a square tend to collapse by giving way at their joints, their weakest points. A square can fold into a diamond, like this:

But if you make a toothpick triangle, the situation changes. The only way to change the angles of the triangle is by shortening one of the sides. So to make the triangle collapse you would have to push hard enough to break one of the toothpicks.

If you want to, you can use your gumdrops and toothpicks to build some strong structures that are made by combining triangles and squares. The pattern on the left is one that’s similar to some used in modern bridge design.

Observing around you: Looking for other triangles in structures around you may give you ideas for other designs you can build with gumdrops and toothpicks.

Social Studies
Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., integrated with language arts

Students use the research notes from previous lesson to continue the final drafts of their state research books. They will identify:
– Name of governor of the state
– The state’s capital
– The state’s population
– The state’s nickname
– The state’s motto
– The state’s date of admission to the union
– The state bird (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flower (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flag (include a drawing or picture)
Students use the Chrome Notebooks to search for:
– Additional interesting facts about the state

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of January 10

Dear Parent and Caregivers,

The midterm progress reports were sent home on January 8. Please discuss the progress reports with your child, sign the bottom portion and return it promptly. If a conference has been requested by a teacher, please contact us via e-mail to schedule an appointment.

This week in science we continue our unit on forces, called “Invisible Forces.” Your child learned how almost any action one can imagine consists of a push or a pull, or as scientists call them: a force.

In class your child was presented with a list of action verbs like “drag,” “lift,” “press,” and asked to decide whether they were pushes or pulls. You can help support your child’s learning by continuing this at home. Try applying it to actions that might be of personal interest, like the actions involved in a favorite sport (a throw, a hit, a slam dunk, a tackle, etc.).

Students will take a short quiz about rotational motion on Friday, January 15. Please refer to the study guide we will be sending home on Monday, January 11 to help your child prepare.

There will be no school on Monday, January 18 in observance of Dr. Martin Luther King Day.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– M.O.Y. TRC assessments.
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading Conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the NSP student from the University of Chicago
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
Listening Center: Zoo by Gail Gibbons
Word Study
Building Fry Sight First One Hundred Words
Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers (Tier 2)

Mini iPads Reading:
Telling Time by Patrick Murphy (Kindle)
Newton and Me by Lynn Mayer

Change to two Kindle levels of readers the first mid-to above benchmark and the second one below to at benchmark:
I Have a Dream by Dan Jackson

Martin Luther King Jr. Day by Margaret McNamara

IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level C (Tier 3);
Level F (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed!by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 16 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and open their eyes if the words rhyme, or close their eyes if the words do not.
Onset Fluency: Thumbs up if the words begin with the same blend; thumbs down if the words do not begin with the same blend.
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher says the word. Students say the final sound found in the series. Ex. T: get, got, bet, S: /t/
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Greetings in Swahili (YouTube (Swahili 101): “When you say hello, I say Jambo.
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Swahili “Jambo” Song (YouTube, Learning Through Songs)

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Jambo,
Today is Monday, January 11, 2016. We will read and discuss the courageous life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What are the characteristics of a courageous person? Explain your answer to a classmate.

Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
– Inquiry Questions: Can you imagine a world where laws kept black and white people apart? Where black children couldn’t swim in the same pools as white children? Or go to the same schools? A place where laws made it hard for black people to vote? Or where a black person had to stand up on the bus so a white person could sit down? Turn and talk with a classmate.

Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg

Book Summary
Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the most important civil rights leaders in American history. He worked hard for equality and taught others how to stand up for what they believed in. This book tells the story of his courageous life from his birth in 1929 to his death in 1968.

Key Question
Why is Martin Luther King Jr. called a great leader?
Targeted Reading Strategy
Summarize
Objectives
Use the reading strategy of summarizing to understand text
Understand and identify cause-and-effect relationships
Identify and categorize r-controlled vowel sounds
Identify and use pronouns
Identify and find synonyms in a thesaurus

Vocabulary
Academic vocabulary
remember (v.), separate (v.)

Story words
• Civil War (n.), march (n.), minister (n.), refused (v.), rights (n.), separation (n.), slavery (n.)
Discuss each academic vocabulary word with students. Point to the use of each word in
the book, and then use each word in a different model sentence.

Ask and answer questions
Before reading the book, ask students: What makes a person a leader? Use this discussion to create a working definition of a leader. Then ask students what they know about Martin Luther King Jr. Generate questions they would like answered about Martin Luther King Jr. as they read. Encourage students to highlight text in the book that answers these questions.
Before Reading
Build Background
Ask students what they think it means to be treated fairly. Encourage them to give examples of fairness at home or at school. Ask who they depend on to make sure they are treated fairly at home or at school.
Group students. Explain to students in one group that there is a new (imaginary) rule at school, and they will have to always stand at the back of the line for recess, or they may not play on the same playground as everyone else. Lead a discussion with students about their reaction to this “new” school rule.
Explain that these conditions really did exist in the United States not long ago, and that Martin Luther King Jr. worked very hard to make sure that people of all colors would have equal rights and have equal access to the same things.
Show students a map of the United States. Point out the Southern region and the states of Georgia and Alabama, where Martin Luther King Jr. lived and worked.
Preview the Book
Introduce the Book
Give students their copy of the book. Guide them to the front and back covers and read the title. Have students discuss what they see on the covers. Encourage them to offer ideas as to what type of book it is (genre, text type, fiction or nonfiction, and so on) and what it might be about.
Show students the title page. Discuss the information on the page (title of book, author’s name).
Preview the table of contents on page 3. Remind students that the table of contents provides an overview of the book. Ask students what they expect to read about in the book, based on what they see in the table of contents. (Accept all answers that students can justify.)
Introduce the Reading Strategy: Summarize
Explain to students that one way to understand and remember information in a book is to write
a summary, or a brief overview, of the most important information in a section or chapter. Point out that a summary includes the main idea and one or two supporting details. It often answers the questions who, what, when, where, and why.
Create a chart on the board, similar to the summarize worksheet, with the headings who, what, when, where, and why. Read the introduction on page 4 aloud to students and model summarizing.
Think-aloud: To summarize, I need to decide which information is the most important to remember in a section. To do this, I can consider who and what the section was about, what happened, and when and why it happened. Then I can organize that information into a few sentences. This section is quite short, but I can still identify Who: Martin Luther King Jr., a great African American leader. Under the What heading, I will write celebrate Martin Luther King Day. Under When, I will write each year. It does not mention a place, so I will leave the Where heading blank. I will leave the Why heading blank also. When I organize all this information, a summary of this first page might be: Every year, we celebrate a great African American leader named Martin Luther King Jr.
As students read, encourage them to use other reading strategies in addition to the targeted strategy presented in this section.
Introduce the Comprehension Skill: Cause and effect
Discuss cause-and-effect relationships. Explain that a cause is an action or event that makes something happen, and the effect is what happens because of, or as a result of, the action or event.
Think-aloud: I know that there are reasons, or causes, for events to happen. When the temperature outside is very cold and it drops below 32 degrees (0 degrees Celsius), a puddle of water will freeze. The cause is the temperature dropping; the effect is the puddle freezing.
Explain to students that there can be more than one effect resulting from a cause. Ask students what else can happen when the temperature drops below 32 degrees Fahrenheit.
Explain to students that they will be looking for cause-and-effect relationships as they read the book.
Introduce the Vocabulary
Model strategies that students can use to work out words they don’t know. For example, they can use what they know about letters and sounds, base words, prefixes, and suffixes. They can also use the context to work out meanings of unfamiliar words.
Have them find the word minister on page 5. Ask how they might read this word if they don’t already know it. Suggest that they look at syllables or chunks. Point out the -er suffix.
Remind students to look for clues to a word’s meaning in the sentence that contains the unfamiliar word, as well as in sentences before and after. Read aloud the last sentence on page 5 and point out the phrase job was at a church.
Explain to students that sometimes they will not find any context clues that define an unfamiliar word. Point out the glossary at the back of the book. Review or explain that a glossary contains a list of words from the book and their definitions. Model how students can use the glossary to locate a word’s meaning. Have a volunteer read the definition for minister in the glossary.
Have students locate other content vocabulary words in the glossary and text. Read and discuss their definitions as a class.
Set the Purpose
Have students read to find out more about Martin Luther King Jr.’s life. Remind them to stop after every few pages to identify the most important information to summarize.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: All About Kites by Elizabeth Austin Chapter 1 and 2

Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 15 Using Comparisons to Teach Readers
Minilesson
Connection: Remind students that they already know what it means to write with details. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Tell a story that illustrates how using a comparison can help readers understand something that is unfamiliar to them. Show an example from your demonstration text of using a comparison to help readers picture a detail.
Active Engagement: Set students up to try adding a comparison to a page from your demonstration text.
Link: Remind writers of all the strategies they know how to teach readers.
Students continue to write their information books.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour,
Today is Tuesday, January 12, 2016. We will continue to discuss the courageous life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Today’s Inquiry Question: What are the characteristics of a leader? Share your answer with a classmate.

Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
During Reading
Student Reading
Have students read to the end of page 6. Encourage those who finish early to go back and reread.
Model summarizing important information in the book.
Think-aloud: I want to stop reading at the end of this page to summarize what I’ve read so far. First, I thought about the information that answered the questions who, what, when, where, and why. Then, in my mind, I organized the important information into a few sentences. In this section, I read that Martin Luther King Jr. grew up in a loving family. Where he lived in the South, the laws had always been unfair to African Americans. Even after the Civil War ended slavery, new laws kept blacks apart from whites.
Invite students to assist you in filling in this information on the chart. Have them decide which facts go in the various boxes. Point out that sometimes not all of the questions (who, what, when, where, and why) are answered in every section.
Create a summary with students for this section, based on the information in the chart. (Martin Luther King grew up where laws had always been unfair to blacks. Even though slavery had ended, laws still kept blacks separate.) Guide students to understand that not all the information from the book will go in the chart—only the most important details.
Create a two-column cause-and-effect chart on the board. Write Celebrate every year under the Effect heading. Ask students to use the text and think-aloud discussion to identify what caused this to happen (Martin Luther King Jr. was a great leader whom we honor for his work to make the laws fair). Write this information under the Cause heading.
Introduce and explain the cause-and-effect worksheet. Ask students to write the information from the board on their worksheet. Have them identify a cause-and-effect relationship that happened as a result of Southern states passing new laws after the Civil War (black people were kept apart from whites.) Write this information on the class chart, and allow students time to transfer it onto their worksheet.
Check for understanding: Have students read to the end of page 7. When they have finished reading, have them work with a partner to identify the important information (Who: Blacks; What: had to attend separate, poor schools; sit in the back seats of buses; use separate drinking fountains and restrooms; Why: unfair laws took away many rights of blacks).
Ask students to assist you in filling in the class chart with the information from page 6. Monitor their responses to check for accuracy and to reinforce that not all columns of the chart will be filled in (for example, there will be nothing listed under When or Where for page 7).
Have students read to the end of page 8. Ask them to identify what caused Rosa Parks to be arrested. Add their response to the class chart, and have them copy it onto their worksheets. (Cause: Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus; Effect: She was put in jail).
Have students read the remainder of the book. Encourage them to stop after each section to think about who, what, when, where, and why as they read the rest of the story. Remind them to continue thinking about cause-and-effect relationships as they read.
Have students make a question mark in their book beside any word they do not understand or cannot pronounce. Encourage them to use the strategies they have learned to read each word and figure out its meaning.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: All About Kites by Elizabeth Austin Chapter 3

Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 15 Using Comparisons to Teach Readers
Conferring and Small-Group Work—Conferring to Ensure Students Have Grasped the Essentials of the Unit
Students continue to write their information books.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Hola,
Today is Wednesday, January 13, 2016. In science, we will practice using our hopper and then complete the “High Hop Score Card”.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How do you think you could change the hopper to make it go higher?

Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
Reflect on the Comprehension Skill
Discussion: Discuss with students the information on their cause-and-effect worksheet. Point out that sometimes one effect leads to another, and so on. Return to the chart on the board and explain how the last effect you recorded (Rosa Parks was arrested) caused another effect: Martin decided to act.
Independent practice: Have students complete their worksheet by turning to pages 9 and 10 and identifying what caused the city to change the law and allow blacks to sit anywhere on buses. (Cause: Thousands of blacks stopped using the buses for almost a year; Effect: The city changed the law). If time allows, have them share their answers.
Enduring understanding: In this story, you read about a great man who thought he could solve conflicts in a peaceful way. Now that you know this information, what will you think about the next time you have a conflict with a friend or family member? Have students turn-to-talk before selecting a few to share out with the class.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: All About Kites by Elizabeth Austin Chapter 4

Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 16 Showing Hidden Worlds with Science Writing
Minilesson
Connection: Offer writers a real-life example of the scientific process they have been working through. Explain that the job of those who study and write about science often is to explain things that are out of our range of perception—things that are hard for us to experience from regular life. Name the teaching point.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Explain and offer an example of slowing things down, writing lots of steps for one moment. Ask students to find a spot in your table of contents where that strategy might help, then talk to a partner about how that part might go. Demonstrate telling the slowed-down hidden story in one chapter of your topic. Explain and offer an example of showing the insides of something. Ask students to find a spot in their tables of contents where that strategy might help, and then talk to a partner about how that part might go.
Link: Send writers off to apply, from now on, these or any other invented strategies to help them convey information about their topic, and forces and motion, to their readers.
Students continue to write their information books.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Ni hao,
Today is Thursday, January 14, 2016. We will make purchases and practice making change during math.
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why is it important to understand how to know how to make change from purchases? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
Build Skills
Phonics: Identify r-controlled vowels
Write the word Luther on the board. Have students find the word in the first sentence on page 4.
Explain to students that, in some words, when the letter r comes after a vowel, it can affect the sound of the vowel. For example, the e in the word Luther is not making its short or long sound, but rather the /er/ sound.
Create a four-column chart on the board and explain to students that the most common spellings/groupings for words in which the vowel may be affected by the letter r include (write as column headings on the chart):
– er, ir, ur (as in father, first, church)
– or, ore (as in born, more, and before) – ar (as in Martin).
Check for understanding: Have students brainstorm other examples that belong in each category. Record their responses in the correct columns.
Partnered practice: Assign pages of the story to pairs of students and have them locate additional examples of r-controlled vowel sounds. Have student pairs record their examples under the appropriate spelling patterns on the board.
Review the chart on the board as a group when students have finished. Emphasize spelling patterns for r-controlled words that students may encounter repeatedly.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: All About Kites by Elizabeth Austin Chapter 5

Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 16 Showing Hidden Worlds with Science Writing
Minilesson
Reviews yesterday’s lesson and discuss examples of writing that are “hidden story” examples: one that is slowed down using a lot of steps, and another showing the inside of an object.
Students continue to write their information books.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa,
Today is Friday, January 15, 2016. We will focus on writing conclusions for our “All About Books”
Today’s Inquiry Question: Why might a conclusion be important for an ending of a book? Share your answer with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on January 22.)
try, kind, hand, picture, again, fast, past, last, contrast, blast, cast, oral, science, data, record, magnify

The above words will be tested on January 22.
Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
Word Work: Synonyms
Review or explain that a word that means the same or almost the same thing as another word
is called a synonym. One reason that writers replace words with synonyms is to make a piece of writing more interesting.
Point out the word loving on page 5 and show students a thesaurus. Look up loving and model how to use a thesaurus. If the word can be more than one part of speech (for example, some words can be either a noun or a verb), make sure to model how part of speech can effect the meaning of a word, and remind students to choose the correct synonyms listed in the thesaurus, based on part of speech.
Give students a thesaurus. Ask them to find the word loving and confirm the synonyms suggested.
Check for understanding: Have students read the first paragraph on page 10. Ask them to circle the word angry. Have students use the thesaurus to find a synonym for the word angry that will make the sentence more interesting. Remind them, when using a thesaurus, to choose words that do not change the meaning or verb tense of the sentence (for example, buy vs. bought). Have students write the sentence using the new word at the bottom of the page. Encourage them to share their sentences.
Independent practice: Introduce, explain, and have students complete the synonyms worksheet. Discuss answers aloud after they are finished.

Students read independently using skills they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 17 Introductions and Conclusions—Addressing and Audience
Ask students to recall the beginning or ending of a favorite movie, book, or even a poem or song. Tell them that the writer did his or her very best to make that introduction and conclusion memorable and powerful for the audience. Tell students that today is the day they will do the same. Today is the day they will craft introductions and conclusions that are fun and engaging for their audience. “Today I want to teach you that writers give their information books an introduction and a conclusion. When writing introductions and conclusions, writers try to get the reader’s attention so they can highlight important information about a topic.” Project samples of introduction and conclusion pages and explicitly model to students how to write them.
Students begin writing their introductions and conclusions for their All about Books.

Math
Lesson 5 – 1 Playing Beat the Calculator
Students play Beat the Calculator to develop fact power by using mental strategies to add two 1 – digit numbers.

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Vocabulary: addition fact, fact power
1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
– Students use >, , , <, or =) 431

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Math Message
Students share five addition facts they know as the teachers chart them horizontally and vertically. (“We do”, whole class)

Teachers divide the class into two groups and pose an addition fact. Students in one group solve the fact with a calculator. Students in the second group add the facts mentally. (“We do”, whole class)
Repeat the activity with other addition facts. Mix easy and challenging facts so each group has the chance to find the sum first.
Teachers tell students that they will use their brains and their calculators to practice addition facts.

Teachers select three children to demonstrate the game. One student is the Caller, the second student is the Calculator, and the third student is the Brain. (See directions TG 447) (“We do”, whole class)

Playing Beat the Calculator
Groups of three students play the game.

Observe
Teachers circulate to provide guidance and to assess the students’ progress.
Which students in the Brain role are automatic in their fact recall?
Which students in the Brain role appear to be using efficient strategies to find the sum? (“We do”, small groups)

Discuss
For the facts you didn’t automatically know, what strategies did you use to find the sums?
What did you find easy about this game? What did you find challenging?

Practice
Subtract -10 Number Stories
Students complete journal 2, p. 103. (“We do”, partners)

Math Boxes 5-1
Students complete the mixed practice in journal 2, p. 104. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, independent)

Lesson 5-2 Using Coins to Buy Things
Students will review coin equivalencies and make different combinations of coins for the same amount of money.

Goals:
– Solve problems more than one way.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary: equivalencies

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students count by 5s, 10s, and 25s. Students refer to The Number-Grid Poster
Begin at 50. Count by 5s to 150.
Begin at 140. Count by 10s to 250.Begin at 100. Count by 25s to 300. (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
Students find the total value of 10 pennies, 6 nickels, 6 dimes, and 4 quarters.
Students share their strategies and justify their answer for finding the value of this combination of coins.

Reviewing Money Equivalencies
Teachers guide the students reading My Reference Book, pp. 110-11.
Teachers have students respond in unison to the following questions about the coins and the $1 bill.
Display a nickel.
“What is it called? How much is it worth?
Write nickel and 5 cents on the Class Data Pad.
”How much are two nickels worth?”
Repeat with a penny, a dime, a quarter, and a dollar bill.
Teachers pose questions about coin equivalencies and record them on the Class Data Pad as a Table of Equivalencies.

Explain to the students that they will exchange coins buying and selling items in Pine School’s Fruit and Vegetable Sale. (“We do”, whole class)

3. Practice
Buying and Selling
Teachers display the Pine School’s Fruit and Vegetable Sale poster from Math Masters p. 121.
Students count out the coins they would use to buy one pear. Partners check each other’s coin combinations.
Student volunteers share their coin combinations they used. Teachers list the four possible combinations. Possible combinations: 13 pennies; 1 dime and 3 pennies; 2 nickels and 3 pennies; 1 nickel and 8 pennies (“We do”, whole class)
Repeat the activity with other fruits and vegetables.

Partnerships take turns being customer and clerk at the Pine School’s Fruit and Vegetable Sale. Students record four transactions on journal 2, p. 107. (“We do”, pairs)

Summarize
Student volunteers share some of their answers and discuss the possible coin combinations for each transaction. (“We do”, whole class)

Assessment Opportunity
Observe and evaluate students’ responses for Problems 1 and 2. Most students should be successful. Some students make need additional guidance for exercises 3 and 4.

Lesson 5-3 Counting Up with Money
Students will find coin combinations to pay for items and make change by counting up.

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Vocabulary

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers pose number stories for students to solve on slip of paper.
Tayla has some flowers in a vase. She takes out 7 flowers. Then there are 6 flowers. How many flowers were in the vase before Tayla took some out? (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines. Adjust to telling temperature to the nearest degree. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
You want to buy a toy that costs 48 cents. Which coins would you use to pay for it?

Students share their solutions. Explain that any group of coins that has a total of 48 cents is a correct solution.
Ask: “How can you find the fewest possible coins needed to buy the toy?”
Sample answer: Start with the coin that has the highest value, a quarter. I can use 1 quarter. Then I count from 25 cents with the coin that has the next highest value. I can use 2 dimes, so I count 25 cents, 35 cents, 45 cents. I cannot use any nickels. The fewest possible coins needed to buy the toy is: 1 quarter, 2 dimes, and 3 pennies. (“We do”, whole class)

Making Change
Point out to the students that there are times when you do not have exact change when buying an item, so the clerk needs to give you back the correct amount of change. Tell the students: “In today’s lesson we will learn how to make change by counting up to find the correct amount.

Students turn to Pine School’s Fruit and Vegetable Sale in journal 2, p. 106.
Teachers pose the following problem: “I am buying an orange. I give the clerk 2 dimes. How much change should the clerk give me back?”
Teachers demonstrate how to make change by counting up.
Start with the cost of the item: 18 cents.
Count up to the amount of the money used to pay for the items: 20 cents.
Display the transaction as follows:
I bought an orange. It costs 18 cents. I paid 2 dimes (20 cents). My change was 2 pennies (2 cents)

Point out that the child could have paid for an orange with a quarter. In that case the change would have been:

I bought an orange. It costs 18 cents. I paid 1 quarter (25 cents). My Change was1 nickel and 2 pennies (or 7 pennies)

Teachers pose a few more similar problems. Students work collaboratively to determine the change and record the transactions on the chart. (“We do”, whole class)

Students take turns being the clerk and the customer. The customer selects an item and pays for it by giving coins to the clerk with a total value greater than the price of the item. The clerk counts up to make change. (“We do”, partners)

Several students share transactions with the class.
Teachers add the transactions to the table and compare how they are alike and different. (“We do”, whole class)

Going Shopping
Partners continue the shopping activity. They take turns being the customer and the clerk. Each child records a few transactions as customer in their journals, on p. 109, using the EDM symbols for coins. (“We do”, partners)

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers circulate and observe the students’ transactions noting their progress.

Summarize
Invite partners to share the transactions they recorded on journal p. 109.
Then students separate their coins and bills and return them to the storage baggies. (“We do”, partners)

3. Practice
Playing Salute!
??Students play Salute! game that was learning during unit 3. (“We do”, small groups of three)
Math Boxes
Students complete the mixed practice in journal 2, p. 110.

Lesson 5-4 (2 Days) Coin Calculations
Students make purchases and practice making change.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make connections between representations.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students show how they can pay for an item using coins.
An apple that costs 55 cents (“We do”, whole class)

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
What does a vending machine do? How does it work?
Several students share their answers. (“We do”, whole class)

Buying Items with Exact Change
Teachers display a copy of the Milk and Juice Vending Machine and pose the following questions:

Which coins or bills can you use in the vending machine?
Can you buy something if you don’t have the exact amount of coins or bills?
What does the “exact change” light mean?

Teachers review the concept of making change: the buyer pays with coins or bills that add up to more than the cost of the item, and vending machine gives back the money owed (the difference).

Explain that in today’s lesson students will buy items from the vending machine with and without exact change.

Buying Items without Exact Change
Teachers pose the following question:
What happens when the exact change light is off?
Teachers ask students to pretend that they want to buy a carton of orange juice. Have students suggest various coin combinations they might use to pay with exact change.
Teachers and students display the coin combinations on the SmartBoard or with the “Big Money” magnetic coins. (“We do”, whole class)

Then ask students to pretend they don’t have exact change to buy the juice.
Display 3 quarters.
“What change would the machine give back?”
Display the transactions with coins. (“We do”, whole class)

“Are there other ways to pay for the juice without exact change?” (“We do”, whole class)

Assessment Opportunity
Students record their transactions with paper and pencils.

Repeat the transactions as needed. (“We do”, partners; small groups)

Students complete Problems 1-2 in journal 2, p. 112-113. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, independent)

Summarize
A few students share their transactions for problem 2 in journal, p. 113.
Students separate and return their coins to the storage baggies.

3. Practice
Playing Target to 50
Students play and record their turns on the Target Record Sheet.

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers circulate and observe.
Which students are correctly representing their numbers with base-ten blocks?
Which students seem to have a strategy for deciding whether to make a 1- or a 2- digit number? To add or subtract your number?

Discuss
Students share answers to the following questions:
How did you decide to make a 1- or a 2- digit number? To add or subtract your number?
How did you know when to exchange?

Math Boxes 5-4
Students complete the mixed practice in journal 2, p. 111. (“We do”, partners; “You do”, independent)

Science
Mystery 1: Forces
How could you win a tug-of-war against an elephant?

In this Mystery, students will see that by learning to think about pushes and pulls — forces — they can accomplish extraordinary things!

Students view the lesson’s video.

Discuss: Can you think of any way for your team to win? Is there something you could do to make it harder for the elephant to pull?

Practice: Think about each action below. For each one, ask yourself: Is it a push or a pull? (Answers on next slide.)
squeeze
pinch
tug
smack
drag
lift

Can you come up with any other verbs where there’s either a pull or a push?

Discuss: Do you have any ideas for how you could get the watermelon to burst using rubber bands?

Making a Hopper

Prep for “Hopper Popper” Activity:
To make and test a Hopper, each student needs:

– Enough “light chipboard” to cut a 3” x 6” rectangle — available at craft or office supply stores or on (This chipboard is about as thick as the cardboard used to for cereal boxes, so you also have the option of raiding the recycling bin for supplies.
– A ruler
– A pen
– Scissors
– 2 or 3 #16 rubber bands — available at craft or office supply stores or on. (These rubber bands are 1/16” wide and about 2” long, measured from one end of the loop to the other.)
– Copy of Make a Hopper, How to Hop, and the High Hop Scorecard
Each group also needs:
– A hole punch to share

For open-ended exploration, the class will also need:

– Extra chipboard for students who want to make additional hoppers
Rubber bands of different sizes and thicknesses
To help guide students during open-ended exploration, the teacher needs a printout of.

Students view a video of how to make a hopper.

Students make hoppers.

Activity:
Students practice using their hopper and then completing the “High Hop Score Card”.

Students discuss their explorations.

Extra Activity: Tug-of-War

Online videos: This tug-of-war match shows how important the push of feet against the ground is.

Tug-of-war is a great way to give students a feel for forces. You’ll need a sturdy rope, a room with a slick floor, and masking tape. Use masking tape to mark the center of the rope and make a line on the floor.
Discuss with the students how to make two, evenly matched tug-of-war teams. Have the teams play tug-of-war, starting with the center of the rope directly above the line.
Then have a rematch with one simple change: The winning team must take their shoes off and play in their stocking feet. (They’ll feel like an elephant on roller skates.)
If students mention friction here, let them know you’ll be exploring that topic fully in a future Mystery.

Invisible Forces
Mystery 1: Written Response Questions

Students take a quiz about rotational motion.

Reading (fiction): Fishing for Forces (in class or homework as extending the topic activity)

Social Studies
Government Unit Assessment
Unit of Study

Students use the research notes from previous lesson to continue the final drafts of their state research books. They will identify:
– Name of governor of the state
– The state’s capital
– The state’s population
– The state’s nickname
– The state’s motto
– The state’s date of admission to the union
– The state bird (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flower (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flag (include a drawing or picture)
– Interesting facts about the state

Unit of Study
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., integrated with language arts

Shared Reading: Martin Luther King Jr. by Bea Silverberg
After Reading
Ask students what words, if any, they marked in their book. Use this opportunity to model how they can read these words using decoding strategies and context clues.
Reflect on the Reading Strategy
Review with students how thinking about who, what, when, where, and why for each section of the book can be used to write a summary. Discuss with them the benefits of summarizing information they read (to understand the main points of a larger piece of writing).
Think-aloud: I know that summarizing keeps me actively involved in what I’m reading and helps me remember what I’ve read. I know that I will remember more about Martin Luther King Jr. because I summarized as I read the book.
Partnered practice: Distribute the summarize worksheet to students, and have them complete it in pairs using the final section of the book, “I Have a Dream.” Invite volunteers to read their summaries if time allows.

Now that students have background knowledge from the book, read aloud to them an actual transcript of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, or have them listen to a recording of it. Lead a roundtable discussion of students’ comprehension and reactions to the wording and content of the speech.

– Students collaborate in small groups to discuss and present the following focus questions:
Compare and Contrast
How was life different for
African Americans before Martin Luther King worked to get unfair laws changed?
Analyze
Do you think that all people in the United States have equal rights today? Explain.
Evaluate
What changes do we see today, as a result of Martin Luther King Jr. working to make the laws more fair?
Fact or Opinion
Martin Luther King Jr. was a very brave person. Is this statement a fact or an opinion? How do you know?
Classify Information
How can you tell that this book is a biography?

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of January 3

Dear Parent and Caregivers,

Happy New Year! We are looking forward to seeing everyone on Monday, January 5.

Students will take the math Unit 4 Written Assessment and the math Unit 4 Cumulative Assessment on Thursday, January 7 and Friday January 8 respectively. Please refer to the graded homework and the listed goals below to assist your child’s review for the assessments.
– Understand 3-digit place value.
– Read and write numbers in expanded form.
– Compare and order numbers.
– Add multiple numbers using models or strategies.
– Measure the length of an object.
– Select appropriate tools to measure length.
– Tell and write time using analog and digital clocks.
– Use A.M. and P.M.
– Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
– Determine whether the number of objects in a group is odd or even.
– Express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
– Count by 1s.
– Mentally add 10 to and subtract 10 from a given number.
– Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number-line diagram.
– Solve problems involving coins and bills.
– Read and write monetary amounts.

The social studies unit test about government will take place on Tuesday, January 12. We will send the study guide home on Tuesday, January 5 for students to complete and return the following day. The graded study guide will be sent home on Thursday, January 7 for students to study for the unit test.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Progress monitoring students reading
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading Conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher and/or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
Listening Center: Zoo by Gail Gibbons
Word Study
Building Fry Sight First One Hundred Words
Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers (Tier 2)
Mini iPads Reading:
Telling Time by Patrick Murphy (Kindle)
Newton and Me by Lynn Mayer
IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level C (Tier 3);
Level F (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 15 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and open their eyes if the words rhyme, or close their eyes if the words do not.
Onset Fluency: Thumbs up if the words begin with the same blend; thumbs down if the words do not begin with the same blend.
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher says the word. Students say the final sound found in the series. Ex. T: get, got, bet, S: /t/
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting:
– Greetings in Hawaiian: “When you say hello, I say Aloha”
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Doodle-lee-do” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p. 82-83

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Aloha Wildcats,
Today is Monday, January 4, 2016. We will compare and contrast standard units of measurement.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How do the U.S. Customary measurement units and the Metric System differ? Share your thoughts with a partner.

Paired Reading
Students browse and read mentor texts to prepare for the writing of the “All About Books”.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books

Read-Aloud: Inclined Planes by Valerie Bodden

Session 12 Drawing on All We know to Rehearse and Plan Informational Books
Minilesson
Connection: Drumroll the start of a new bend, and channel students to quickly locate a topic they can teach an information book about forces and motion. Ask some students to share their topics, in this way raising possibilities for students who still haven’t selected one. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Name and explain your topic choice. Demonstrate planning how your teaching (and writing) will go. Name what you have done in a way that is transferable to another day and another topic.
Active Engagement: Channel students to think of a topic they could teach others, and then ask partners to have a go at describing each section of their booklet to other.
Link: Restate the teaching point, making it applicable to not only today but every day.
Students begin drafting their information books, focusing on how to organize information by creating a table of content for their books.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Ni haoWildcats,
Today is Tuesday, January 5, 2016. We will read and discuss a story about the Statue of Liberty.
Inquiry Question: How might the Statue of Liberty be a symbol of the United States? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading: The Story of the Statue by Heather Lynn Banks
About the Lesson
Targeted Reading Strategy: visualize
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of visualizing to understand text
– Identify author’s purpose
– Read and categorize words with r-controlled vowels
– Recognize and use proper nouns
– Understand and use syllable patterns to divide two- and three-syllable words
Vocabulary
Content words:
Story critical: freedom (n.), independence (n.), liberty (n.), statue (n.), tablet (n.), torch (n.) Enrichment: base (n.), copper (n.), Declaration of Independence (n.), engineer (n.), iron (n.), model (n.)
Before Reading
Build Background
– Show students several photos or images of statues, perhaps including some famous local ones. Have students share their ideas on why people make and erect statues (for example, as artwork, to remember or honor someone, or as a symbol of something).
– Show students a picture of the Statue of Liberty. Ask them to share what they know about the Statue of Liberty (for example, where it is, what it is made of, how old it is, how tall it is, and so on).
Preview the Book
Introduce the Book
– Guide them to the front and back covers and read the title. Have students discuss what they see on the covers. Encourage them to offer ideas as to what type of book it is (genre, text type, fiction or nonfiction, and so on) and what it might be about.
– Show students the title page. Discuss the information on the page (title of book, author’s name).
– Preview the table of contents on page 3. Remind students that the table of contents provides an overview of the book. Ask students what they expect to read about in the book, based on what they see in the table of contents. (Accept all answers that students can justify.)
Introduce the Reading Strategy: Visualize
– Explain to students that good readers often visualize, or make pictures in their mind, as they
read. Readers use what they already know about a topic and the words from the text to make pictures in their mind.
– Model how to visualize using the title of the book. Think-aloud: When I read a book, I pause after a few pages or after reading a description of something to create a picture in my mind of the information I’ve just read. This helps me to better understand what I am reading. For example, when I read the title The Story of the Statue, I pictured a statue of a little girl that I know of in my local park. I remembered that her family placed the statue there after she died of an illness. The statue had a story behind it. I wonder if this book is going to tell me the story of the Statue of Liberty.
– Invite students to share what they visualized when they heard the title of the book. Have them compare the picture in their mind with the picture on the front cover.
– As students read, encourage them to use other reading strategies in addition to the targeted strategy presented in this section.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 13 Tapping Informational Know-How for Drafting
Minilesson
Connection: Ask students to review their tables of contents, selecting a chapter they are especially ready to write. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate planning and writing chapters. Restate the strategy in clear and explicit language.
Active Engagement: Set students up to plan a chapter of a second-grader’s information book. Debrief—highlight the work students did on the sample chapter that is transferable to other books and other topics.
Link: Send students off to begin drafting their information books, tucking in reminders about how to write informational texts and how to connect their writing to the science they have been learning.
Students continue to draft their information books.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Bonjour Wildcats,
Today is Wednesday, January 6, 2016. We will use observations from the rolling sphere explorations to explain how a runway works.
Today’s Inquiry Question: How does the steepness of the runway slope affect the way the sphere rolls? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading: The Story of the Statue by Heather Lynn Banks
Introduce the Comprehension Skill: Author’s purpose
– Explain to students that an author usually has a reason or purpose for writing a book. The
purpose is either to inform, entertain, or persuade. Explain that to inform means to give someone information about something; to entertain means to amuse someone; and to persuade means to convince someone to think or do something in a new way.
– Read the title page and the introduction aloud. Model how to identify author’s purpose.
Think-aloud: When authors write, they have a reason, or purpose, for writing their book. They want to inform me, entertain me, or persuade me. After reading the title and the first page of this book, I think the author wants readers to learn new facts and information about the Statue of Liberty, so I think her purpose in writing the book was to inform readers. Sometimes authors write for more than one purpose, so I will keep reading to see if she also wants to entertain us or persuade us.
Introduce the Vocabulary
– While previewing the book, reinforce the vocabulary words that students will encounter. For example, while looking at the picture on page 4, you might say: It looks as though the Statue of Liberty is holding some kind of torch.
– Remind students to look at the picture and the letters with which a word begins or ends to figure out a difficult word. For example, point to the word statue on page 4 and say: I am going to check the picture and think about what word would make sense in this sentence. I know the book is about the Statue of Liberty. This word starts with the /st/ sound, and when I say statue, I hear the /st/ sound at the beginning of the word. Using the picture, sounds, and context of the story, I think this word is statue. Statue makes sense in the sentence. It looks and sounds right, too.
– Point out the glossary at the back of the book. Review or explain that a glossary contains a list of words from the book and their definitions.
– Ask a volunteer to read the glossary definition for Declaration of Independence. Have students turn to page 13 and read the sentence that Declaration of Independence appears in and the sentence that follows it. Provide background information on the Declaration of Independence and why it stands for the birth of the United States of America.
Set the Purpose
– Have students read to find out more about the Statue of Liberty. Remind them to visualize as they read and to think about the author’s purpose for writing the book.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 14 Studying Mentor Texts
Connection: Remind students of the path of their learning so far in this unit, and let them know how it connects to today’s teaching point. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Tell students there are many ways science writing fits within information books. Explain that they can figure out some of them by looking at published texts. Then they can try out those ways! Point out a technique writers use to include science in an informational text. Show students an example of your own writing that incorporates this technique and channel them to think how to do likewise in their own books.
Active Engagement: Point out another technique, and ask students to help you figure out how to use it in your own writing.
Link: Remind writers that they know how to use authors as mentors, and ask then to get started finding, in published works, a technique that can help the with their current writing.
Students continue to draft their information books.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Konnichiwa Wildcats,
Today is Thursday, January 7, 2016. We will begin the final drafts of our state research books.
Inquiry Question: Why might one state’s population differ from that of another state? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading: The Story of the Statue by Heather Lynn Banks
After Reading
– Ask students what words, if any, they marked in their book. Use this opportunity to model how they can read these words using decoding strategies and context clues.
Reflect on the Reading Strategy
– Ask students to explain or show how the strategy of visualizing helped them understand and remember important information in the book.
Think-aloud: When I read pages 14 and 15 and looked at the photograph on page 14, I pictured myself on that ferryboat, approaching the Statue of Liberty. This helped me to think back and remember everything I had learned about it.
Reflect on the Comprehension Skill
– Discussion: Review the three main purposes that authors have for writing. Ask students if they think it is possible for an author to have more than one purpose when writing. Ask if, for example, it’s possible for an author to inform and entertain readers at the same time.
– Enduring understanding: In this book, you learned about a very famous statue in the United States. You also learned the “story” about it. The next time you see a statue somewhere, what will you want to know about it?
Build Skills
Phonics: R-controlled vowels
– Write these words from the book on the board: far, first, York, Liberty. Read the words aloud and have students repeat them with you.
Tell students that the letter r can affect the sound of the vowel that precedes it in many different ways. Return to the words on the board, underline the vowel + r, and emphasize the different sounds.
– Check for understanding: Create a three-column chart on the chalkboard and label the columns ar, er/ir/ur, and or. Model how to place the words far, first, York, and Liberty on the chart. Next, write the following words on the board in a separate place: copper, story, torch, art. Have volunteers tell in which column each word should be placed.
– Independent practice: Invite students to work in pairs to look through their book to find words that contain r-controlled vowels. Have them come to the chart and write any words they find. If time allows, discuss their answers.
Grammar and Mechanics: Proper nouns
– Review or explain that a noun is a person, place or thing. Ask students to turn to page 6 and give examples of nouns from the page (artist, island, model, statue, and so on).
Review or explain that a proper noun is the name of a specific person, place, or thing. A proper noun always begins with a capital letter. Write examples of proper nouns from page 6 on the board (Mr. Bartholdi, New York, Mr. Eiffel).
 Remind students not to confuse the capital letter in a proper noun with the capital letter used at the beginning of a sentence or in the title of a chapter or section of a book. Point out instances in the book where capitals are used but a proper noun is not present.
Check for understanding: Write the following nouns in a column on the board: girl, boy, street, month, holiday, country. Ask volunteers to give examples of proper nouns for each word. Record their responses next to the regular nouns (Mary, Joe, Hudson Street, July, and so on).
– Independent practice: Introduce, explain, and have students complete the proper nouns worksheet. If time allows, discuss their answers.
Word Work: Syllable patterns
– Review or explain that it is important to know how to divide words into syllables, both for speaking and for reading.
Review the following syllable rules and provide an example of each: 1. each syllable is a “beat” of a word. 2. every syllable has only one vowel sound. 3. Words are divided between syllables.
4. A compound word is usually divided between its two base words. example: playground/ play-ground
5. A prefix or suffix usually makes a separate syllable. example: tallest/tall-est
Write the words needed, outside, and taken on the board, and ask students to say each word.
Have them tell the number of syllables in each word. Write the number of syllables that students provide next to each word.
– Model and discuss with students where the syllable break comes in each word and why (need/ed, suffix; out/side, compound word; tak/en, one vowel per syllable).
Check for understanding: Write the following words on the board: itself, worker. Ask students to use the inside back cover of their book to write how each word should be divided into syllables. Discuss their responses.
– Independent practice: Introduce, explain, and have students complete the syllable patterns worksheet. If time allows, have students discuss their answers.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 14 Studying Mentor Texts
Conferring and Small-Group Work
Help students pop out their science content in their information books by nudging then to articulate how and why to use a particular toll or material. Provide examples to support students’ writing.
Students continue to draft their information books.

Day 5:
Morning Message:
Hola Wildcats,
Today is Friday, January 8, 2016. We will continue to use observations from the rolling sphere explorations to explain how a runway works.
Today’s Inquiry Question:
How does the size of the loop affect the marble’s ability to complete the runway? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Students read independently.

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on January 15.)
land, different, home, us, move, bump, stump, clump, stamp, clamp, camp, question, experiment, predict, observe, guess

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend III Writing about Forces and Motion in Information Books
Session 14 Studying Mentor Texts
Collecting Ideas from Mentor Texts
Collect students’ suggestions of ways to integrate scientific knowledge into their information writing. If needed, add a few techniques of your own.
Chart: To Put More Information in Informational Writing…
– Add a new voice in a different size or color.
– Use arrows to show how something works.
– Use dashes to add definitions.
– Add captions to pictures.
Students continue to write about their experiments.
Students continue to write their information books.

Math
Lesson 4-10 The Centimeter
Students are introduced to the centimeter as a standard unit of a length.

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Have students do place-value exercises on slates.
Level 1: Write 73. Circle the digit in the tens place. Put an X on the digit in the ones place.
Level 2: Write 415. Circle the digit in the tens place. Put an X on the digit in the ones place. What is the value of the digit that is not marked?
Level 3: Write 2,308. Circle the digit in the hundreds place. What is the value of the digit in the tens place? In what place is the 8?

Daily Routines: Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Take out your 12-inch and 10-centimeter rulers. Compare the two rulers. Talk to our partner about how they are the same and how they are different.

Introducing the Centimeter (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up:
Invite students to share the similarities and differences they noticed between the two rulers.

Explain that the space, or interval, between each number is a standard unit of measure called centimeter, which is a unit of length in the metric system. The abbreviation for centimeter is cm. Although people in the United States use the U.S. customary system in everyday life, the metric system of centimeters, meters, kilograms liters, and so on, is used by people in the United States and around the world for scientific purposes. Knowing how to measure in both systems is important.

Distribute the tape measurers to partnerships. Have students compare the tape measurer with their 12-inch and 10-centimeter rulers. Have students share what they notice.

Ask: Why do people need tape measurers if we already have rulers? How can one tape measurer be both 60 inches long and 150 centimeters long?

Have students compare the length of on inch on the 12-inch ruler with the length of a centimeter on the 10-centimeter ruler. Remind students to use halfway marks between numbers on both rulers to help them measure to the nearest inch or centimeter.

Model how to fold a piece of paper at the halfway mark. Ask: Why do we call this the halfway mark? Have students fold a piece of paper at points or beyond the halfway mark and then check which side of the paper is closer to the fold. Use visuals like this to discuss measurements to the nearest inch or centimeter.

Measuring with the 12-inch and 10-centimeter Rulers
Students use their tape measures or their 12-inch and 10-centimeter rulers to measure the lengths of the pictures in Problem 1 and 2 on journal page 87. Students share their measurement strategies and results. Ask: Why do our measurements in inches always come out in smaller numbers than our measurements in centimeters? Help students see that it takes fewer units to measure something with a longer unit (inches) than with a shorter one (centimeter).

Differentiate: To highlight the centimeter and inch intervals on their rulers, have students lightly shade the space between 1 and 2 with a different color. They continue alternating between the two colors as they shade each centimeter or inch space. Then when they use their rulers to measure, they count the shaded spaces.

Students complete journal page 87.

Summarize: Have students share something they learned about measurement.

3. Practice (Partner/Small Group)
Students play the Exchange Game. Reference Book, pp. 146-148; Math Master, p. G21

Differentiate: Students use the double ten frame to place their cubes until they can exchange 10 cubes for a long.

Observe:
– Which students are using efficient strategies to make exchanges?
– Which students can tell you the number represented by the base-10 blocks?
– Students complete Math Journal 1, p. 88.

Lesson 4-11 Matching Facts with Strategies, Measuring a Path, Exploring Arrays. (2 Days)
Students match subtraction facts with strategies, measure a path in inches and centimeters, and explore arrays.

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Pose number stories. Have students share their strategies.
Level 1: At the market, Leyanna bought 12 peaches. Her family ate 6 of the peaches that night. How many peaches are left?
Level 2: Jermaine has 9 books sitting on his desk. He took 4 of the books back to the library. How many books are still on Jermaine’s desk?
Level 3: Wisdom has 13 strawberries in her lunchbox. She ate some of the strawberries at lunch. After lunch, Wisdom has 7 strawberries in her lunchbox. How many did she eat at lunch?
Daily Routines: Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Look at the My Subtraction Fact Strategies Table on journal page 48. Talk with a partner about your favorite subtraction strategies.

Reviewing Subtraction Fact Strategies (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: Invite students to share a favorite subtraction strategy. Encourage them to apply their favorite strategy to solve one or two facts. Some students might use the doubles strategy, whereas others might use the going-back-through-10 strategy.

Assign students in groups to work on the following explorations: (Small Group)

Exploration A: Matching Facts with Strategies
Students independently match subtraction facts from Math Masters, page 110 to strategies they could use to solve them on journal page 89. In small groups, students discuss their reasoning for their pairings, focusing especially on differences in how they matched facts and strategies.

Differentiate: Have students who struggle refer to their My Subtraction Fact Strategies on journal page 48. Consider having students focus on only one or two strategies.
Academic Language Development: Encourage students to explain what they are doing or thinking when they match facts to a strategy. Extend their understanding of the term match in this context.

Exploration B: Measuring a Long Path
Students use the inch side of their tape measures to measure a path taped on the floor. They record the length of each part of the path on Math Masters, page 111 and then find the total length. Students repeat the activity using the centimeter side of their tape measure.

Exploration C: Exploring Arrays
Students use spinner to generate a number and take that number of counters. They build a rectangular array using all the counters and then draw the array. Students then build a different array for the same number and draw that result.

While introducing this exploration, tell students that an array is an arrangement of objects in rows and columns. Display an example of an array.
Summarize: Have students share a strategy they used to make arrays in Exploration C.

3. Practice (Partner/Small Group)
Students use number grids to solve = 10 number stories in Math Journal 1, p. 90, 91

Lesson 4-12 Unit 4 Progress Check

Goals:
– Understand 3-digit place value.
– Read and write numbers in expanded form.
– Compare and order numbers.
– Add multiple numbers using models or strategies.
– Measure the length of an object.
– Select appropriate tools to measure length.
– Tell and write time using analog and digital clocks.
– Use A.M. and P.M.
– Make sense of the representations you and other use.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.

Day 1: Administer the Unit Assessments.
Day 2: Administer the Cumulative Assessment.

Self Assessment (Independent)
Students complete the Self Assessment to reflect on their progress in Unit 4.

2a Assess
Unit 4 Assessment (Independent)
Students complete the Unit 4 Assessment to demonstrate their progress on the Common Core Standards covered in this unit.

Differentiate: Adjusting the Assessment
To scaffold items 1 and 2, provide students with a toolkit clock and label the hour hand and minute hands.
To extend item 3, have students write additional activities they do throughout the day and label them with a time and A.M. or P.M.
To scaffold items 4, 5, and 6, provide students with base-10 blocks and a place value mat.
To extend items 7 and 8, have students use their 6-inch rulers to measure items longer than 6 inches.

Lesson 4-12 Unit 4 Cumulative Assessment

Goals:
– Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
– Determine whether the number of objects in a group is odd or even.
– Express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
– Count by 1s.
– Mentally add 10 to and subtract 10 from a given number.
– Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number-line diagram.
– Tell and write time using analog and digital clocks.
– Solve problems involving coins and bills.
– Read and write monetary amounts.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

2b Assess
Cumulative Assessment
Students complete the Cumulative Assessment. The problems in the Cumulative Assessment address content from Units 1-3.

Differentiate: Adjust the Assessment
To scaffold item 1, provide students with a toolkit clock and label the hour hand and minute hands.
To extend items 2 and 3, provide students with +/-0 and+/-1 problems with larger numbers.
To extend item 4, have students complete number sequences in the thousands.
To scaffold items 5 and 6, provide students with real nickels and quarters.
To scaffold item 7, provide students with a filled-in number grid.
To scaffold item 8, provide students with 18 counters.

Look Ahead
Math Boxes 4-12: Preview for Unit 5 (Small Group, Partner or Independent)
Math Boxes 4-12 are paired with Math Boxes 4-8. These problems focus on skills and understandings that are prerequisite for Unit 5. Use information from these Math Boxes to plan instruction and grouping in Unit 5.

Science
Rollers
Rolling Spheres
Inquiry Question: How can we make a runway that will keep a marble rolling?
Investigation Summary
Students roll marbles in cups and down runways to observe spheres as rollers. They work with the flexible runways to make the rolling marbles do tricks. As a culminating experience, students work together as a class to connect the runway sections to make one long runway through which a marble can roll nonstop.
Science Content
– Spheres are round in all directions and roll in all directions.
– A runway must be high at the start and low at the finish for a sphere to roll the complete length.
– Spheres roll down a slope.
Teacher Observation
– Check understanding that a sphere rolls from a higher to lower position.
Guiding the Investigation (Day 1)
– Introduce spheres.
– Distribute materials.
– Introduce runways.
– Teacher models to students how to construct a runway.
– Students work in small teams to discuss how they would construct their runways.
– Students construct runways with their team members.
Teacher:
– Give the first runway challenge.
– Monitor the projects.
Students:
– Show, tell, and return materials.
Guiding the Investigation (Day 2)
– Make a long runway.
– Start construction.
– Troubleshoot the runway
– Work in larger teams.
– Monitor the projects.
– Show, tell, and return materials.
– Close the investigation.
– Assess progress.
Guiding the Investigation (Day 3)
– Give advanced runway challenges (bending runways, runways with loops, etc.)
– Start construction.
– Troubleshoot the runway
– Work in larger teams.
– Monitor the projects.
– Show, tell, and return materials.
– Close the investigation.
– Assess progress.

Lab Observation:

Students discuss the previous day’s findings with a partner, then whole group.

Science Notebook:
Students jot down pertinent notes such as materials, procedure and inquiry question.
They illustrate the observation.

Teacher reviews with students how to write a lab observation.

Students work with a partner to discuss how they would write their lab observations.

Students write to explain how they can make a runway that will keep a marble rolling.
They must incorporate the charted vocabulary and scientific terminology the writing.

Inquiry Question: How does the size of the loop affect the marble’s ability to complete the runway?

Materials:
Styrofoam runways, tape, marbles, cups

Students formulate their hypothesis beginning with: I think the marble will be able to complete the runway with the larger/smaller loop because…

Working in partnerships, students design runway with loops of different sizes.

Students perform a multiple-trialed experiment and collect data to prove or disprove their hypothesis.

Students discuss their findings with a partner.

Students write to explain their findings.

Assessment Opportunity
Teachers review students’ science notebook entries to see who demonstrates the understanding of topic.

Social Studies
Research Project: States
Teachers will guide students to begin their projects on states using child friendly educational websites. Students will be provided with guidelines to focus on researching information for their assigned states.
Students will label each state on the U.S.A. map, highlighting their state with color.
Students continue to complete the questionnaire worksheet of the state research.
Students use the research notes from previous lesson to begin the final drafts of their state research books. They will identify:
– Name of governor of the state
– The state’s capital
– The state’s population
– The state’s nickname
– The state’s motto
– The state’s date of admission to the union
– The state bird (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flower (include a drawing or picture)
– The state flag (include a drawing or picture)
– Interesting facts about the state

Review for Government Unit Test. (The test takes place next Tuesday.)

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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Week of December 13

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

A second quiz for the social studies Government Unit will be administered on Wednesday, December 16. A study guide will be sent home on Monday, December 14. Please refer to it to assist your child to prepare for the quiz.

Please submit the luncheon forms and payment by Monday, December 14. The form is uploaded on the blog under forms for your convenience.

We extend our best wishes during this time of year and wish you a happy holiday!

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Progress monitoring students reading
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading Conferences
– Writing conferences
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher and/or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Centers:
1. Listening Center: Zoo by Gail Gibbons
2. Word Study
– Building Fry Sight First One Hundred Words
Students read, build words with letters, and write words with erasable markers (Tier 2)
– Making Words Grade 3; Lesson 3 (Enrichment)
– Using the shared reading text, The Power of Magnets, students will complete a graphic organizer identifying the main idea/details and an alphabetical order practice worksheet (Tuesday-Friday)
Mini iPads
Telling Time by Patrick Murphy (Kindle)
Newton and Me by Lynn Mayer
IPads: Accelerated Readers
MTSS:
– Letter Name Fluency (Tier 3)
– Intensive Reading Support with Leveled Literacy Intervention Blue System Level C (Tier 3);
Level F (Tier 2)

Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 14 (Different words will be given each day.)
Letter Naming: “The letter is___”; “Sound is___”
Rhyming: Teacher says the word. Students offer rhyming words. Can say “Give me 5” to remind students of 5 word limit.
Onset Fluency: Teacher reads the nonsense word groups. Students say the onset sound found in each series. Ex. T: zab, zib, zub, S: /z/
Blending: Teacher says the individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole world. Ex. T: /p-o-n-d/, S: pond
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word and over enunciate the medial sound. Ex. T: rib, S: rIb
Segmenting: Teachers says the word whole. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: band, S: band; /b-a-n-d/
Use hand motion for chopping.
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? Ex. T: limit, S: limit, T: change the/lim/ to /hab/ and the word is? S: habit
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning Meeting (Daily)
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Practice for the Winter Assembly

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, December 14, 2015. We will explore two- and three-digit numbers with base-10 blocks.
Inquiry Question: How many ways can you represent the number 406 with base-10 blocks? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Reading Workshop
Unit 4–Reading Nonfiction, Reading the World
Part Four: Nonfiction Readers Can Read More Than One Book about a Topic to Compare and Contrast
“Today I want to teach you that nonfiction readers grow our understanding of a topic by reading many books on it. When we read the second, third, and/or fourth book on a topic, we mix and match what we’re reading now with what we read before to grow a more complete understanding of this topic. One way nonfiction readers mix and match information across books is by making quick notes.”
– Provide and explain examples to students.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Do-4U the Robot Experiences Forces and Motion by Mark Weakland
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 10: Designing and Writing New Experiment
Minilesson
Connection: Situate students in the work of the unit so far, and let them know that they can continue with their plans today. Name the teaching point.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Set writers up to explore a new problem. Ask partners to say aloud the procedure for their revised experiment, discussing a variable they will change.
Link: Remind students of the ways scientists structure their writing. Set writers up to design, conduct, and write up new experiments.
Students continue to write about their experiments.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, December 15, 2015. We will investigate rolling cups during science.
Inquiry Question: How can we rely on previous explorations to predict the behavior of a rolling cup? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading: The Power of Magnets by Elizabeth Austin
The Power of Magnets introduces the reader to the science behind magnets. Through examples and a hands-on activity that encourages students to make their own magnet, readers will learn about the practical applications of magnets. Photographs and diagrams support the text.
Targeted Reading Strategy: Summarize
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of summarizing to understand text
– Identify main ideas and supporting details in an informational text
– Identify long /i/ (as in -ight) word family
– Identify and use commas in a series
– Arrange words in alphabetical order
Vocabulary
Content words:
Story critical: attracts (v.), current (n.), electricity (n.), force (n.), magnetism (n.), repel (v.) Enrichment: code (n.), generators (n.), invisible (adj.)
Before Reading
Build Background
– Ask students to share what they know about magnets. Create a KWL chart on the board. Explain that the K stands for information they know, the W stands for what they want to know, and the L stands for what they have learned. Record students’ ideas in the K column. Let them know you will add to this chart after reading the book.
– Encourage students to volunteer questions that they have about magnets. Record what they are wondering or wanting to learn in the W section of the KWL chart.
Independent Reading

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 10: Designing and Writing New Experiment
– Conferring And Small-Group Work: Reminding Writers to Plan “Let’s take a step back, rewind and think about what you need to do. Scientists plan how their writing will go, before they begin their trials, so they know how they will keep track of the information.”
Students continue to write about their experiments.

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, December 16, 2015. We explore measuring with non-standard units.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to use standard units of measurement? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading: The Power of Magnets by Elizabeth Austin
Introduce the Book
– Guide them to the front and back covers and read the title. Have students discuss what they see on the covers. Encourage them to offer ideas as to what type of book it is (genre, text type, fiction or nonfiction, and so on) and what it might be about.
– Show students the title page. Discuss the information on the page (title of book, author’s name).
– Preview the table of contents on page 3. Remind students that the table of contents provides an overview of the book. Ask students what they expect to read about in the book, based on what they see in the table of contents. (Accept all answers that students can justify.)
Introduce the Reading Strategy: Summarize
– Explain to students that one way to understand an informational text is to put the most important information in each paragraph or section into their own words. A good summary is brief (no more than two sentences) and includes only the most important information. One strategy readers can use to summarize is to underline important words as they read and use these words to create a sentence in their own words about what they read.
– Read page 4 aloud to students. Model how to summarize.
Think-aloud: Whenever I read a book, I always pause to summarize the most important information in my mind. As I read this page aloud, I will underline what I think are the most important words to help me create a summary. (Read aloud and underline the following words: magnet, metal, attracts, electricity, magnetism), Now that I’ve underlined these words, I can use them to restate in my own words what I just read about. I think a good summary of this first section might sound something like this: Magnets attract other metals. Many objects in our homes have electricity running through them that comes from magnets.
Have students read page 6 and ask them to underline the most important words on the page. These may be important words, like magnet, that appear often, or they may be words that are in bold. When they are finished reading, ask students to work with a partner to write a summary of page 6. Remind them that their summary should be brief and in their own words. Invite student volunteers to share the summary they created with their partner. Remind students that as they read, they should use the strategy of summarizing to put text into their own words, which will make it easier to understand and remember.
– As we read, encourage them to use other reading strategies in addition to the targeted strategy presented in this section.
During Reading:
Model summarizing important information in the book. Think-aloud: After reading page 7, I underlined several important words that I can use in writing my summary: pole, magnet, attract and repel. I can use these details to help write a summary in my own words. Here is my brief summary for this page: Magnets have two poles, a north pole and a south pole. Poles that are the same will repel each other, while poles that are different will attract each other because of the force of magnetism.

Independent Reading

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 10: Designing and Writing New Experiment
– Share: Comparing results
Divide the class in half, and ask each half to determine from their results whose catapult flung cotton balls the farthest. Ask volunteers to recreate the experiments of the best catapult from each group to see if the winning results can be repeated—and see if the lab reports can be followed! Ask students to write down their ideas and hypotheses about why these two catapults shot farther than all the others and to connect these ideas to their own experiments.
Students continue to write about their experiments.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, December 17, 2015. We will explore how weight affects the way in which the rolling-cup system rolls.
Inquiry Question: How does the added weight affect the distance the rolling-cup system? Share your thinking with a classmate.

Shared Reading: The Power of Magnets by Elizabeth Austin
Introduce the Comprehension Skill: Main idea and details
– Explain to students that every book has a main idea that is the most important idea in the book. Often the main idea is related to the title of the book, so they can use the title for clues about the main idea. Invite students to look at the title page of the book again to make predictions about what the main idea of the book will be.
– Tell students that as they read, they will be looking for details that give them more information about, or support, the main idea. Explain that when reading informational text, they can also often use the table of contents to find supporting details. Ask students to return to page 3 to review the table of contents.
– Model using the table of contents to identify possible supporting details.
Think-aloud: As I look over page 3, I see that I am going to learn about invisible magnetism and magnets everywhere. I will pay attention to the details in each of these sections to help me identify supporting details.
– Introduce and explain the main-idea-and-details worksheet. Draw a similar chart on the board. Say: I can use this chart to help me keep track of the main idea and details in each section of the book. I will use the section heading as a clue to the main idea for that section.
During Reading:
– Check for understanding:
On a separate sheet of paper, have students draw a web similar to the main-idea-and-details worksheet. Have them write the main idea of the first section, “Invisible Magnetism,” and the details that support the main idea.
– Remind them to continue thinking about the important details of the book as they read so they can summarize the information in their mind as they read.

Independent Reading

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Reports and Science Books
Bend II Writing to Teach Others about Our Discoveries
Session 11: Editing—Domain-Specific Language
Minilesson
Connection: Liken the particular ways in which students talk about things they know well to how scientists talk about the subjects they study using specialized words. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Teach the concept of technical language, inviting students to brainstorm domain-specific terms they know on topics they know well.
Active Engagement: Redirect students’ attention to the shared class topic, forces and motion, and together, generate a list of domain-specific words. Suggest that the class come up with a system for recording technical language.
Link: Suggest that students view their work to be sure it includes forces and motion lingo—and if not, to incorporate it in clear, thoughtful ways.
Students edit their writing.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, December 18, 2015.
We will show our creative side during the winter assembly.

Winter Assembly (9:30 a.m.)

Students take the spelling test.

Students read independently.

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on January 11.)
ask, when, men, read, need, short, core, sport, report, port, escort, solid, liquid, gas, size, texture

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Math
Lesson 4-7 Playing Target
Students use base-10 blocks to model addition and subtraction of multi-digit numbers.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and other use.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Display base-10 blocks. Students represent the number for the base-10 blocks.
Differentiation:
Level 1: 4 longs and 3 cubes. Add 4 more cubes.
Level 2: 5 longs and 7 cubes. Add 3 more cubes. What trade can I make?
Level 3: 7 longs and 5 cubes. How can I remove 6 cubes? What number is shown now?

Daily Routines: Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Complete the Math Message on journal page 78.

Making Exchanges (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: Ask a volunteer to explain the exchange that Luke made. Emphasize that 5 longs and 10 cubes are equivalent to 6 longs.
Distribute base-10 blocks. Have students use longs and cubes to represent the number in Problem 1 and 2 on journal page 78 and answer the questions. Discuss the answers. Have volunteers explain the exchanges they made to use the fewest blocks to show the totals.
Have students represent 56 with the fewest possible blocks. Then have them subtract 7 ones. As you circulate, ask students to explain how they found the answer.
Pose additional base-10 block problem until most students seem comfortable making the necessary exchanges.
– Show 31. Take away 4.
– Show 34. Take away 15.
– Show 19 and 33. What is the total value?
– Show 35 and 27. What is the total value?
Explain that students will use base-10 blocks to add and subtract while playing Target to 50.

Playing Target to 50 (Partner)
Explain the rule for Target.
Play a few rounds with the class and show students how to record their turns on the Target Record Sheet. When students seem comfortable with the game, have them play in partnership as teacher circulates.

Observe
– Which students are correctly representing their numbers with base-10 blocks?
– Which students seem to have a strategy for deciding whether to make 1- or 2-digit numbers? To add or subtract their numbers?
Discuss
– How did you decide whether to make a 1- or 2-digit number? To add or subtract your number?
– How did you know when to make an exchange?

Summarize: Bring the class together and ask students to talk about the game. Ask: What was easy? What was challenging?

Practicing Place-Value Concepts
Students work on page 79 of their Math Journal.

Lesson 4-8 How Big Is a Foot?
Students measure objects with a foot-long foot.

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Pose 10-more and 10-less problems. Leveled exercises:
Level 1: What is 10 more than 90? 10 more than 100? 10 less than 80? 10 less than 130?
Level 2: What is 10 more than 87? 10 more than 143? 10 less than 93? 10 less that 139?
Level 3: What is 10 more than 93? 10 more than 295? 10 less than 107? 10 less than 204?

Daily Routines: Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: With a partner, read My Reference Book, pages 98-99. Talk about two things you learned from your reading.

Discussing Units of Length (Whole Class and Partner)
Math Message Follow-Up: Have students share what they learned from reading My Reference Book, pages 98-99. Explain that in this lesson the class will learn about the foot and about the importance of using consistence measurement units.

Reading and Discussing How Big Is a Foot? (Whole Class)
Literature Link: Read How Big Is a Foot? by Rolf Myler with the class.
Discuss why the bed in the story didn’t turn out to be the right size.
To emphasize the message in the story, mark off a distance on the floor and measure it in “teacher feet” placed heel to toe. Ask students to count your steps, point out that you are leaving no gaps between your feet. Record the total number of teacher feet the students count. (“I do. We do”)
Next have a student measure the same distance the same way. Make sure the student leaves no gaps. Record the total in student feet, using the student’s name to record the unit.
Compare the two measurements. Informally develop the idea that it takes more small units than large units to measure something.
Ask: What could we do to make sure we get the same number of the feet every time we measure the marked distance? Does it matter which foot we use if we all agree to use it?

Measuring with a Foot-Long Foot (Whole Class, Small Group)
Show the class a foot-long (12-inch) ruler and explain that the foot is a standard unit of measurement in the United States. Compare it to the standard (12-inch) foot on Math Master, page TA23. Mention that sometimes a foot-long foot is called “the standard foot.”
Students work in partnership to measure the lengths of a few objects around the room. Students measure the objects independently and then collaborate with their partners to agree on an approximate number of feet for each object. Explain that most objects will not have a measurement that is an exact number of feet. For example, a desktop might be a little more than 2 feet wide.
As partners measure objects, provide sentence frames to facilitate their discussions:
– It measures about… feet.
– It is a little less than … feet.
– It is about halfway between … and … feet.
Students record their measures on journal page 81.
Differentiate: Provide students with additional cutouts of the foot-long foot so they can line them up heel to toe as they measure.

Summarize: Have students discuss why they and their partner were able to agree on measures when they measure with the foot-long foot.
Have students carefully fold their foot-long foot in half and store it in their journal for use in Lesson 4-9.

3. Practice (Partner/Independent)
Renaming Numbers
Students complete journal page 82 and 83.

Lesson 4-9 The Inch
Students are introduced to the inches as a standard unit of a length.

Goals:
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk
Mental Math and Fluency
Show cards and ask students what they saw and how they saw it.
Level 1: 6 dots and 4 dots
Level 2: 9 dots and 5 dots
Level 3: 8 dots and 6 dots

Daily Routines: Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Take out your foot-long foot and one square pattern block. About how many square pattern blocks long is the foot-long foot?

Sharing Strategies (Whole Class)
Have students share their strategies for measuring the length of the foot-long foot with the square pattern block. To check the result, have a volunteer line up square pattern blocks end to end along the length of the line segment and count the total. Ask: How many square pattern blocks long is the line segment?
Explain that today we will learn about a unit of measure called the inch.

Introducing the Inch (Whole Class)
Tel students to examine the cut-out 12 inch ruler. After a few minutes, invite students to share what they notice.
– There are numbers from 0 to 12.
– The spaces between the numbers are the same size.
– Some of the lines on the ruler are longer than others.
– There is a longer line for each number.
– There is a shorter line marked about halfway between each of the numbers.
Explain that the space, or interval, between each number is a standard unit of measure called an inch. The measurement system of inches, feet, pounds, quarts, and so on, which is used for everyday purposes in the United States, is called the U.S. customary system of measurement. Explain how the halfway mark will help when students measure to the nearest inch.
Have students use the 12-inch ruler to measure the length of the foot-long foot. Tell students to always include a unit after the measure so that others will know what it means.

Emphasize that any ruler is made up of equally spaced same-size units.

Have students count the intervals. Ask: How many spaces are there in all on the ruler? How many inches are there on the ruler?
Ask students to count the inch spaces between 6 and 9 on their rulers. Ask: What is the distance between 6 and 9? Read more about measuring with inches on My Reference Book, page 101.

Differentiate: As students count the intervals, have them use a square pattern block instead of a finger so they can see a concrete representation of each space.

Measuring with Different Tools (Partner/Independent)
Distribute six 1-inch square pattern blocks to each partner. Have students use the square pattern blocks to measure the items pictured on journal page 84. Students record the lengths. Teacher circulates to assess. When students are done, bring the class together to discuss their methods.
Next have students use the 12-inch rulers to measure the length of the same items on journal page 84. Students record the lengths. Ask them to share their methods for using the ruler. Ask: How is measuring lengths with the pattern blocks the same as measuring lengths with the 12-inch ruler? Have partners discuss how they could show someone that measuring with pattern blocks yields the same results as measuring with the 12-inch ruler.

Summarize: After a few minutes, have students share their thinking with the whole group.

3. Practice (Partner/Independent)
Students complete Math Journal page 85, 86.

Catch –Up and Game Day

Playing Addition Top-It
Students and teachers read My Reference Book on p. 170 – 172.
Teachers model a few rounds with a student and show students how to record their number models on the Addition Top – It record Sheet. (“We do”, whole class)
Students play the game recording the number models to complete the record sheet. (“We do”, pairs, small groups)

Playing Salute!
Students play Salute! to practice addition by solving for a missing addend, which is an important strategy for developing fluency with addition and subtraction facts.
Teachers review the directions for “Salute!” on pp. 162 and 163 of My Reference Book. (“I do”, whole class)
Students play in groups of three, taking turns being the dealer using four cards each of 0 – 10. (“We do”, small groups)
Teachers circulate among groups encouraging students to reflect on and discuss strategies for a more efficient round looking for the following strategies:
Counting back by 1s
Counting back in pieces (by numbers larger than 1)
Counting up by 1s
Counting up in pieces
Think addition, especially with a known or easier fact
Making 10
Near doubles

Playing Target!
Playing Target to 50 (Partner)
Review the rule for Target.
Play a few rounds with the class and show students how to record their turns on the Target Record Sheet. When students seem comfortable with the game, have them play in partnership as teacher circulates.

Telling Time
Students work with an assigned partner to take turns practice telling time using plastic analogue clocks.

Science
Roller
Rolling Wheels
Inquiry Question: How does the size of the disk affect the distance the wheel and axle system travels?

Materials:
red disks, yellow disks, green shafts, slopes, meter sticks

Students formulate their hypothesis beginning with: I think the bigger/smaller the disk, the farther/shorter distance the wheel and axle travels because …

Working in partnerships, students design slopes with different angles.

Students perform a multiple-trialed experiment and collect data to prove or disprove their hypothesis.

Students discuss their findings with a partner.

Students write to explain their findings.

Rolling Cups
Inquiry Question: Can we predict the behavior of a rolling cup? What happens if weight is added to a rolling-cup system?
Investigation Summary
Students roll paper cups down ramps. They observe the way cups roll and use the predictable curved rolling path to meet challenges. They put cups together to make them roll straight and weigh them in various ways to see how weight affects rolling.
Science Content
– Cups roll in the direction of the smaller end.
– To roll straight, two cups can be taped together so the ends are the same size.
– The amount and location of an added weight can change the way a system rolls.
Teacher Observation
– Check predictions and descriptions of cups rolling down slopes.
Guiding the Investigation
– Review rolling.
– Introduce cups.
– Distribute materials.
– Review cup rolling.
– Distribute tape.
– Add weight to the straight roller.
– Teacher models to students how to tape the cups and add the weight.
Teacher proposes:
– Park-the-car problem.
– The fall-on-your-face problem.
– The try to go straight.
– Students work with a partner to discuss how they would solve the proposed problems.
– Students solve the proposed problems independently or with a partner.
– Teacher assesses progress.
– Students show-and-tell.
– Return materials.
– Discuss the addition of weight.
Wrapping Up Part 2
– Making word bank entries No new words were introduced in this part. Review relevant words from previous parts.
– Make content chart entries
Add these new concepts to the content chart: What happens when you put a cup on a slope? How can you tell which direction a cup will roll? How can you make a cup go straight? How do weights change the motion of a rolling cup?
Lab Observation:
– Students work with a partner to discuss how they would write their lab observations.
– Students write independently to explain the following question:
How do weights change the motion of a rolling cup? Why?

Rolling Cups
Inquiry Question: How does the added weight affect the distance the rolling-cup system travels?

Materials:
Paper cups, pennies, tape, slopes, meter sticks

Students formulate their hypothesis beginning with: I think the more weight/less weight is added to the cup, the farther/shorter distance the rolling-cup system travels because …

Working in partnerships, students design slopes with different angles.

Students perform a multiple-trialed experiment and collect data to prove or disprove their hypothesis.

Students discuss their findings with a partner.

Students write to explain their findings.

Social Studies
Shared Reading: A-Z Reading World Holidays by Cecelia Maeson
Book Summary
People all over the world celebrate holidays rich in tradition. Celebrations include preparing and eating food, playing games, and telling stories. In this informational text, students learn about seven holidays from around the world and how each one is celebrated.
About the Lesson
Targeted Reading Strategy
– Connect to prior knowledge
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of connecting to prior knowledge to understand text
– Compare and contrast information
– Identify r-controlled /o/ sound
– Recognize subject-verb agreement
– Arrange words in alphabetical order
Vocabulary
– Content words: Chinese New Year, Christmas, dreidel, Hanukkah, Holi, kinara, Kwanzaa, menorah, mkeka, New Year, Ramadan, traditions
Before Reading
Build Background
– Ask students to identify holidays they celebrate. Invite them to describe how they celebrate them. Record student responses on the board.
– Have students use the information on the board to identify similarities and differences between the ways the holidays are celebrated. Explain that people around the world celebrate different holidays and that they have special ways of celebrating, called traditions.
Preview the Book
Introduce the Book
– Guide them to the front and back covers and read the title. Have students discuss what they see on the covers. Encourage them to offer ideas as to what type of book it is (genre, text type, fiction or nonfiction, and so on) and what it might be about.
– Show students the title page. Discuss the information on the page (title of book, author’s name).
– Preview the table of contents on page 3. Remind students that the table of contents provides an overview of the book. Ask students what they expect to read about in the book, based on what they see in the table of contents. Ask students what holidays might be shown in the photographs. (Accept all answers that students can justify.)
Introduce the Reading Strategy: Connect to prior knowledge
– Explain to students that good readers use what they already know about a topic to understand and remember new information as they read.
– Model connecting to prior knowledge using the information on the covers.
Think-aloud: As I look at the front cover of this book, I notice fireworks exploding in the sky. I’ve seen people light fireworks to celebrate the Fourth of July. They are very colorful. How would you describe fireworks that you have seen? I didn’t see the Fourth of July listed in the table of contents. What other holidays do you know that use fireworks as part of the celebration? What else do you know about fireworks?
– Have students preview the covers of the book. Ask them to make connections to prior knowledge and to discuss the photographs on the pages. Ask open-ended questions such as the following: What holidays might be represented in these photographs? What traditions are represented in the photographs? What else do you see that may be important in a book about world holidays?
– As we read, encourage students to use other reading strategies in addition to the targeted strategy presented in this section.
Introduce the Comprehension Skill: Compare and contrast
– Explain that one way to understand and organize new information in a book is to explain how topics are alike and different. Write the words compare and contrast on the board. Point out that explaining how things are alike is called comparing and explaining how things are different is called contrasting. Write the word alike under compare and the word different under contrast on the board.
– Draw a Venn diagram on the board. Label the left side Pen and the right side Pencil.
– Show students a pen and a pencil. Model how to compare and contrast using these objects.
Think-aloud: I can compare and contrast a pen and a pencil. I know a pen uses ink to make marks on a page, but a pencil uses lead. I will write ink on the Venn diagram under the heading Pen and lead under the heading Pencil to show one way that these two objects are different. I know that a pen and a pencil are both used for writing. I will write writing tools on the diagram where the circles overlap to show one way that these two objects are the same.
– Invite students to suggest other ways that a pen and a pencil are the same and different. Record student responses on the Venn diagram under the appropriate heading.
Introduce the Vocabulary
– Explain that the names of holidays are listed in the table of contents. Read the table of contents together.
– Review the correct pronunciation for the following holidays: Hanukkah (HAN-nuh-kuh), Kwanzaa (KWAN-zah), Holi (ho-LEE), and Ramadan (RAH-meh-dahn). Discuss the fact that each of these words is the name of a holiday celebrated around the world that students will read about in the book. Point out that the holidays all begin with a capital letter because they name a specific holiday.
– Have students work in small groups to discuss what they already know about the holidays listed in the table of contents.
Turn to the glossary on page 16. Read the words and discuss their meanings aloud.
Set the Purpose
– Have students read to find out how holidays around the world are celebrated and how the traditions are similar and different. Remind them to stop after every couple of pages to think about what they already know about holiday traditions and to think about how they celebrate these holidays.
Read to the end of page 6. Ask students to highlight places in the text where they connected to prior knowledge.
– Model connecting to prior knowledge.
Think-aloud: When I read about Chinese New Year and placing good-luck sayings in homes, I thought about the fortunes that are inside fortune cookies. When I go to a Chinese restaurant, I always have a fortune cookie at the end of the meal. I wonder if wishing for good luck is something that is important in the Chinese culture.
– Ask students to share new information about the holidays they have discussed in their groups. Draw a Venn diagram on the board. Label the left side Chinese New Year and the right side Christmas. Have students identify similarities and differences they notice between Chinese New Year and Christmas. (Both holidays include traditions of giving gifts and using colorful objects to celebrate. Christmas is in December, but Chinese New Year is in January or February. Many people place a tree in their home to celebrate Christmas, but people place good- luck sayings in their home to celebrate Chinese New Year.) Record this information on the board.
– Check for understanding: Read to the end of page 8. Ask volunteers to share how they connected to prior knowledge as they read. Ask open-ended questions to facilitate the discussion: Which traditions are similar with your own holiday traditions? What are some of the symbols and customs associated with these celebrations? How are these four holidays similar and different? Check for students’ understanding during the discussion.
– Read the remainder of the book. Ask them to think about what they already know about holiday celebrations and traditions to help them understand new information as they read. Remind them to fill in their vocabulary worksheet with additional information they learned about the holidays in the book.
After Reading
Reflect on the Reading Strategy
– Discuss how making connections between information they read about and what they already knew about the topic keeps them actively involved and helps them remember what they have read.
– Think-aloud: As I read about Kwanzaa and Hanukkah, I thought about how these two holidays use candles to celebrate. I thought about how at my church, we light candles to celebrate the season before Christmas, which is called Advent. We light one candle each Sunday before Christmas. This is similar to Kwanzaa and Hanukkah because people who celebrate those holidays light candles to celebrate as well.
– Have students share examples of how they connected to prior knowledge to understand the information in the book.
Reflect on the Comprehension Skill
– Discussion: Have students provide examples of how Hanukkah and Kwanzaa are alike and different (alike: use candles, begin in December, eat with family and friends, give gifts; different: a kinara is used for Kwanzaa to hold the candles and a menorah is used for Hanukkah, Kwanzaa lasts seven days and Hanukkah lasts eight nights).
– Enduring understanding: People all over the world value particular customs, art, symbols, and traditions in holiday celebrations. Now that you know this, what does this information teach you about the similarities among and differences between people of other cultures?

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

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