Week of May 21

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Thank you parents and caregivers for chaperoning the field trip. Despite the rain, we hope you still enjoyed the time with our students.

The mid-term progress report was sent home on Friday, May 19. Please review the report with your child and sign the bottom portion and return it to us the following week. If you desire to meet with any of your child’s teachers, please fill in the request on the bottom of the form.

There is no school for students, teachers and staff on Monday, May 29 in observance of Memorial Day.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 5: Series Book Readers Use What They Know about the Characters to Predict (Day 1)
Learning Activities
Anchor Chart: add Use what they know…
Readers Learn about Characters from Their Relationships with Other Characters:
Students will notice the character’s relationships with others.

Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: “My Ladybug Collection” by Tricky Smarty on YouTube
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a chapter about the “How To” and illustrate each step of the “How To” of their All About Insect Book.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 5: Series Book Readers Use What They Know about the Characters to Predict (Day 2)
Learning Activities
Students will share a part of the book that surprised them by asking questions and sharing possible predictions
Students will notice the character’s relationships with others. How do they act around others?
Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Chirping Crickets by Melvin Berger
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the uniqueness or interesting facts about the insect for the All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the uniqueness or interesting facts about their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter Six: Uniqueness or Interesting Facts)
-Students work independently to take notes on the uniqueness or interesting facts about their insects.

Day 3:
Mr. Hoang 103 NWEA Math Assessment
(9:00 – 10:45)

Ms. Charleston 106
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 6: Series Book Readers Learn about Characters from Their Relationships with Other Characters (Day 1)
Learning Activities
Readers find information about characters by paying attention to the text.
Readers predict what will happen next in the story.
Students can discuss the book by:
• Listening to other friends’ ideas and adding on to what they shared:
• “I agree with what she said because I also noticed that _____ was important and I would like to add to that with my observation of _________ which also supports_____”
• Asking questions
• Readers refer to the book they are talking about by using specific examples from the text.
Session 5 of Read Aloud:
As students are reading, they continue to get a deeper understanding of the characters and story by:
*Noticing ways a character responds to different situations
*Thinking about:
“Are there specific words that I can think of as a reader to describe the characters?
Write down your ideas so that they stay fresh in your mind.

Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a chapter about the uniqueness or interesting facts their insects their insects.

Day 4:
Mr. Hoang 103 NWEA Reading Assessment (9:00 – 10:45)

Ms. Charleston 106
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 6: Series Book Readers Learn about Characters from Their Relationships with Other Characters (Day 1)
Learning Activities
Readers find information about characters by paying attention to the text.
Readers predict what will happen next in the story.
Students can discuss the book by:
• Listening to other friend’s ideas and adding on to what they shared:
• “I agree with what she said because I also noticed that _____ was important and I would like to add to that with my observation of _________ which also supports_____”
• Asking questions
• Readers refer to the book they are talking about by using specific examples from the text.

Session 5 of Read Aloud:
As students are reading, they continue to get a deeper understanding of the characters and story by:
*Noticing ways a character responds to different situations
*Thinking about:
“Are there specific words that I can think of as a reader to describe the characters?
Write down your ideas so that they stay fresh in your mind.

Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshops
Shared Reading: Awesome Ants by Rus Buyok (A-Z Reading)
Focusing on Writing Interesting Facts

– Students share what they have written about the uniqueness and/or interesting facts about their insects to their assigned partner.
– Students continue to compose the chapter about the uniqueness or interesting facts of their insects.

Day 5:
Parent Read Aloud
Spelling Test
Reading Comprehension Quiz

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, June 2.)
thankful, cheerful, hopeful, grateful, thoughtful, useful, forgetful, painful, joyful, careful, helpful, connect, self, text, world, meaning

Writing Workshops
Introductions—Addressing and Audience
Students will craft introductions that are fun and engaging for their audience.
Students begin writing their introductions for their Insect Books.

Math
NWEA Practice Session

Lesson 9-8 Equivalent Money Amounts (2 Days)

Students practice finding coin and bill combinations with equivalent values and using cents and dollars – and – cents notation.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 9-9 Estimating Costs
Day 1: Students select items from a store poster and use mental math to estimate the total cost.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.

Lesson 9-9 Day 2: Reengagement
The students discuss selected students’ estimates, and the students revise their work.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.

Science
Integrated with language arts

Science Content:
– Insects need air, water, and space.
– Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors.
– The life cycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces eggs.
– The life cycle of the cricket is egg, nymph, and adult, which produces eggs.

Students will:
– Observe mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in mealworm structure and behavior over time.
– Observe cricket nymphs, and adults over time.
– Describe and record changes in cricket structure and behavior over time.

Social Studies
Interactive Read Aloud (on the Smart Board): Memorial Day by Ann Weil
Objectives:
* Explain the significance of various national celebrations.
* Sequence early American history.
* Identify places that remind us of our history.

Family Tree Project
Students utilize the questionnaires from their interviews to create family trees.

Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of May 14

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Happy Mother’s Day!

Engineering Day will be Wednesday, May 17. The students will display and present their engineering designs. We are inviting parents to visit our classrooms from 9:30- 10:00. We hope you can make it out to see all the student’s hard work.

The second-grade classrooms will participate in a field trip to the Lincoln Park Zoo on Friday, May 19 to learn about animal habitats. Students will need to bring a bag lunch from home on that day. Please label the lunch bag with your child’s name.

On Wednesday, May 17, students will take a science quiz about insects. A study guide will be sent home on Monday. Please refer to it to help your child review for the quiz.

The mid-term progress reports will go home on Friday, May 20. Please review the report with your child and sign the bottom portion and return it to me the following week. If you desire to meet with any of your child’s teachers, please fill in the request on the bottom of the form.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 3: Series Book Readers Notice Similarities in Their Characters Across the Series (Day 1)

Learning Activities
Anchor Chart: Clubs Talk Together
Readers often find the character is the same in more than one book
Club conversations are powerful because readers
• share proof from your book
• look in another book to find a similar example of your discovery
• talk about it

Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Insect Life Cycle by Chuck Garofano from Reading A to Z
Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What are the life cycle stages of an insect?
-What are the types of metamorphosis? Explain.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would continue to take notes and to elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a chapter about their insect’s life cycle.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 3: Series Book Readers Notice Similarities in Their Characters Across the Series (Day 2)
Learning Activities
Readers often find the character is the same in more than one book
Read part of mentor text, discuss and remind students to post it when they notice things

Club conversations are powerful because readers
• share proof from your book
• look in another book to find a similar example of your discovery
• talk about it
Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Stick Insects by Valerie Bodden Walker Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What are the life cycle stages of a stick insect?
– What is this type of metamorphosis called?
– Why do you think a stick insect undergoes only three stages for the life cycle? How does this differ from the life cycle of a butterfly?
– Students continue to write the chapter about their insect’s life cycle.
– Students illustrate the life cycle of their insects.
– Students share their work-in-progress with their partners.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 4: Series Book Readers Grow to Understand the Characters (Day 1)

Learning Activities
Students will think about how well they know the main character (compare to their best friends) understanding the character’s thoughts and actions by being able to anticipate them
Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: How do Flies Walk Upside Down? by Melvin and Gilda Berger (Pages 1-20)
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss a “How To” and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter Five: “How To”).
– Students decide what they will write for the “How To” chapter. They read independently to gather information for the “How To” chapter of their insects.

Day 4:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 4: Series Book Readers Grow to Understand the Characters (Day 1)
Learning Activities
Students will think about how well they know the main character (compare to their best friends) understanding the character’s thoughts and actions by being able to anticipate them
Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: How do Flies Walk Upside Down? by Melvin and Gilda Berger (Pages 21-48)
– Students collaborate in pairs to explain how they would write the “How To”.
-Students work independently to take notes on the “How To” chapter of their insects.

Day 5:
Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, May 26.)
fastest, slowest, biggest, shortest, loudest, softest, smartest, silliest, brightest, funniest, bravest, result, context, valid, select, revise

Field trip to Lincoln Park Zoo to learn about animal habitats

Math
Lesson 9-5 Reviewing Place Value
Students write multi-digit numbers in expanded form and compare them.

Vocabulary: thousand cube

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Lesson 9-6
Expand-and-Trade Subtraction, Part 1
Students use base-10 blocks to solve subtraction problems. This prepares them to learn expand-and-trade subtraction in the next lesson.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

Lesson 9-7 Expand-and-Trade Subtraction, Part 2 (2 Days)

Students use expand-and-trade subtraction to subtract multi-digit numbers.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

Vocabulary: expand-and-trade subtraction

NWEA Practice Session if we are back from the field trip.

Science
Design, and then “Improve” their original design

Students will be able to:

• implement each step of the Engineering Design Process

• use prior analyses of materials, plant needs, and consumer needs to inform the design of a package for a plant

• evaluate a plant design using established criteria

• improve their designs

Engineering Day

Students will present their plant packages to visitors.
Students present their plant package designs to classmates.

Review design process for quiz.

Engineering quiz: Plant Packages

Social Studies
Tracing A Community History
Objectives:
– Trace the history of El Paso, Texas.
– Explain how local people and events have influenced local community history.
– Describe changes in a community over time.
Vocabulary:
museum, settler

Past and Present
Objectives:
– Identify historical figures whose contributions have influenced the community, state, and nation.
– Describe ways people honor their heroes.
– Give examples of places in the community where individuals are remembered.
Vocabulary: monument, memorial, hero
Interactive Read Aloud: Good for Thurgood Marshall by Marvin Bird

Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of May 7

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Please submit the Lincoln Park Zoo field trip permission slip and fee as they are due on Monday, May 8. World Language Night is Friday. WE hope to see everyone there!! Please continue to send in clear 2 Liter bottles. We are need of them for science.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 1: Series Book Readers Collect Information about the Main Characters (Day 1)

Learning Activities
Readers Collect Information about the Main Character: Anchor Chart-
Students are working with reading partner on the same text in a series: Students will preview text and pay close attention to what they learned about the main character.
Mid-workshop: Using post its to grow ideas about the main characters using questions like…
• I wonder if…
• Maybe she does this because…
• I think she always….
Partners will share the discoveries they’ve made about their main character/s so far

Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Insect DK EyeWitness Books by Laurence Mound pages 42 and 43
Questions to Guide Discussion:
– What are the characteristics of the habitats of insects that live among plants?
– What elements of the habitat are essential to the insects’ survival?
– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter two, which is the insect’s habitat.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the habitats of their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter two: Habitat(s) of the Insect).
-Students work independently to take notes on the habitat(s) of their insects.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 1: Series Book Readers Collect Information about the Main Characters (Day 2)

Learning Activities
Readers Collect Information about the Main Character: Anchor Chart-
Students are working with reading partner on the same text in a series: Students will preview text and pay close attention to what they learned about the main character.
Mid-workshop: Using post its to grow ideas about the main characters using questions like…
• I wonder if…
• Maybe she does this because…
• I think she always….
Partners will share the discoveries they’ve made about their main character/s so far

Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Insect DK EyeWitness Books by Laurence Mound pages 44 and 45
Questions to Guide Discussion:
– How do insects living among plants avoid from being eaten?
-What is camouflage? How else does an insect take advantage of its habitat in order to survive?
Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s habitat(s).
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s habitat(s).

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 2: Series Book Readers Pay Attention to How Characters Respond to Problem
Learning Activities (Day 1)
Learning Activities

TP: Notice how a character responds to a problem to figure out what that tells you about the character
*Students can reread text to write down details about other characters & how they respond to the problems
Students talk to partners about their character while taking turns and listening, while referring to the text so that they can build on each other’s ideas.

Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Awesome Ants by Rus Buyok from Reading A to Z
Questions to Guide Discussion:
– What kinds of foods do ants eat?
– How do ants communicate to each other when they find food?
– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter three, which is the insect’s diet.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the diet of their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter two: The Insect’s Diet).
– Students work independently to take notes on the diet of their insects.

Day 4:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 4: Series Book Clubs
Bend 1: Becoming Experts on Characters
Session 2: Series Book Readers Pay Attention to How Characters Respond to Problem
Learning Activities (Day 2)
Learning Activities

TP: Notice how a character responds to a problem to figure out what that tells you about the character
*Students can reread text to write down details about other characters & how they respond to the problems
Students talk to partners about their character while taking turns and listening, while referring to the text so that they can build on each other’s ideas.

Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Dragonnflies by Cheryl Reif Snyder from Reading A to Z
Questions to Guide Discussion:
– What is the diet of the dragonflies?
– How do dragonflies hunt for their food?
Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s diet.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s diet.

Day 5:
Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, May 19.)
painter, washer, dryer, flyer, server, worker, singer, teacher, speaker, thinker, dreamer, reason, sketch, problem, justify, check

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Dragonnflies by Cheryl Reif Snyder from Reading A to Z
Questions to Guide Discussion:
– What is the diet of the dragonflies?
– How do dragonflies hunt for their food?
Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s diet.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s diet.

Math
Lesson 9-2 Exploring Equal Shares, Pattern-Block Fractions, and Number Lines (Day 2)
Students explore equal shares of different shapes, use pattern blocks to divide shapes, and make a number line.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.

Lesson 9-3 Sharing Muffins (Day 1)
Day 1: Open Response
Students decide how to share muffins equally and use words to name the shares.

Vocabulary: equal shares, one-half, two-halves, one-fourth, four-fourths, one-quarter

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

Lesson 9-3 Sharing Muffins (Day 2)
Day 2: Open Response

Lesson 9-4 Fractional Units of Length (2 Days)
Students measure lengths to the nearest half-inch.
Vocabulary: half-inch, fourth-inch, precise, quarter-inch

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Students learn that measuring in half-inches rather than in inches or feet, produces more-precise measurements.

Science
Lesson 3: Evaluating Needs and Creating Criteria
Students will:
• determine the needs of the plant for which they are designing a package.
• determine the needs of the consumer for whom they are designing the package.
• list the properties of the materials available for their plant package designs
• discuss these materials in regard to their abilities to meet the needs of products and consumers
Students will be able to:
• identify and explain the needs of the product and of the consumer.
• identify and explain the package functions required to meet the needs of the product and consumer.
• identify properties of the materials that can be used in a plant package design and evaluate how well they meet the needs of the product and consumer.
• Brainstorm ways that the two packages and other materials could be modified to meet the needs of the product and the consumer.
Lesson 4: Design a Plant Package
Students will:
“Ask” questions about a problem, “Imagine” different solutions, “Plan,” design, and then “Improve” their original design.
Students will be able to:
• implement each step of the Engineering Design Process.
• use prior analyses of materials, plant needs, and consumer needs to inform the design of a package for a plant.
• evaluate a plant design using established criteria.

Social Studies
Comparing Groups of Native Americans
Objectives:
– Compare Native American groups.
– Sequence early American history.
Interactive Read Aloud (on the Smart Board): The Inuit: Northern Living by David Meissner from Reading A to Z
– Read about two different Native American groups.
Compare and contrast their food, clothing, and shelter with a Venn diagram.
How did they use the natural resources around them?

BUILDING YOUR FAMILY HISTORY
Family Tree Project

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of April 30

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

This a reminder that students will take the math Unit 8 Assessment on Monday, May 1 and the Cumulative Assessment on Tuesday, May 2 Please refer to the graded homework as well as the skills listed below to support your child.

Don’t forget that Spring Picture Day is tomorrow.

Unit 8 Assessment
Skills:
– Draw a 3 or 4-sided shape with or without a right angle.
– Name and explain polygons (triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons).
– Recognize parallel sides in a polygon.
– Name attributes of 3-dimensonal shapes, such as cube, rectangular prism, pyramid, cylinder, cone, etc.) For example, a rectangular prism has 6 faces, the faces are rectangles, a rectangular prism has 12 sides and 8 vertices.
– Partition a rectangle into same-size squares.
– Draw an array with given rows and columns. Write a number model for the array.

Cumulative Assessment
Skills:
– Tell time to the nearest 5 minutes.
– Estimate and measure lengths to the nearest inch and centimeter.
– Make friendly numbers to add four 2-digit numbers (e.g. 13 + 12 + 17 + 28 = ? Add 13 and 17 first. Then add 12 and 28, etc.)
– Solve comparison number stories (e.g. Taylor is 54 inches tall. Gracie is 48 inches tall. How much taller is Taylor?)
– Read and interpret a bar graph.
– Use given data to create a bar graph.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 4: Tackling Goals in the Company of Others
Session 15: Organizing Goal Clubs (Day1)

Learning Activities

Book Club readers will make plans to reach their goals.
Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read-Aloud: Insects by Melissa Stewart
– What are the characteristics of an insect?
– What is unique about an insect?
-How do insects travel?
– Are insects important to our environment? Why?
– Teachers present the rubric to explain expectations for the insect All-About Books.
– Students work in pairs to view books on insects.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 4: Tackling Goals in the Company of Others
Session 15: Organizing Goal Clubs (Day1)

Learning Activities

Book Club readers will make plans to reach their goals.
• Book Club members give each other feedback to help one another.
• Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read-Aloud: Insects by Melissa Stewart
– What are the characteristics of an insect?
– What is unique about an insect?
-How do insects travel?
– Are insects important to our environment? Why?
– Teachers present the rubric to explain expectations for the insect All-About Books.
– Students work in pairs to view books on insects.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 4: Tackling Goals in the Company of Others
Session 16: Giving Feedback to Group Members (Day1)

Learning Activities
Strong readers retell knowledge about the topic, using their own words and key words.
Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Insects Research (All About Book)
Interactive Read Aloud: Bugs Are Insects by Anne Rockwell p.16-33
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the characteristics of each student’s chosen insect, and to generate ideas for their writing
-Students work independently to take notes on the characteristics of their chosen insects.

Day 4:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 4: Tackling Goals in the Company of Others
Session 16: Giving Feedback to Group Members (Day2)

Learning Activities
Strong readers retell knowledge about the topic, using their own words and key words.
Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Insects Research (All About Book)
Interactive Read-Aloud: Bugs and Other Insects by Bobbie Kalman and Tammy Everts p. 4-5
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.

Day 5:
Parent Read Aloud
Spelling Test
Reading Comprehension Quiz

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, May 12.)
badly, madly, quickly, weekly, daily, sadly, gladly, proudly, softly, loudly, bravely, pattern, describe, extend, simple, determine

Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
Interactive Read Aloud: Insect DK Eyewitness Books by Laurence Mound pages 42 and 43
– What are the characteristics of the habitats of insects that live among plants?
– What elements of the habitat are essential to the insects’ survival?
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the habitat of insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the habitats of their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing
-Students work independently to take notes on the habitat(s) of their insects.

Math
Unit 8 Assessment
Cumulative Assessment

9-1 Creating and Naming Equal Parts
Students divide shapes and use fraction vocabulary to name the shares.

Vocabulary: equal share, one-half (1-half), two-halves (2-halves), one-fourth (1-fourth), one-quarter (1-quarter), four-fourths (4-fourths), one-third (1-third), three-thirds (3-thirds)

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Partitioning Shapes
Students partition shapes and, for each shape, name a single part and the whole.

9-2 Exploring Equal Shares, Pattern-Block Fractions, and Number Lines (2 Days)
Students explore equal shares of different shapes, use pattern blocks to divide shapes, and make a number line.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.

Exploration A: Sharing Crackers
Students divide crackers into equal parts and explain how they know the parts are equal.

Exploration B: Making Equal Parts
Students use pattern blocks to divide shapes into equal parts.

Exploration C: Making a Number Line
Students make number lines and label their halfway marks.

Science
Who are Packaging Engineers?
Students will
• examine a wide variety of packages.
• analyze the functions of a package in terms of the product and intended consumer.
• review some of the common functions of packages and identify some additional functions.
• brainstorm ways to “Improve” an existing package.
Students will be able to
• identify the package, product, an intended consumer for a given packaged product.
• identify and explain the functions of given packages.
• identify properties of a package and of the product for which the package was designed.
• explain how a given package is designed for its product and its intended consumer.
• analyze a given package to identify ways that it could be improved.
Evaluating Needs and Creating Criteria
Students will
• determine the needs of the plant for which they are designing a package.
• determine the needs of the consumer for whom they are designing the package.
• list the properties of the materials available for their plant package designs.
• discuss these materials regarding their abilities to meet the needs of products and consumers.
Students will be able to
identify and explain the needs of the product and of the consumer.
identify and explain the package functions required to meet the needs of the product and consumer.
identify properties of the materials that can be used in a plant package design and evaluate how well they meet the needs of the product and consumer.
brainstorm ways that the two packages and other materials could be modified to meet the needs of the product and the consumer.

Social Studies
Comparing Groups of Native Americans
Objectives:
– Compare Native American groups.
– Sequence early American history.
Interactive Read Aloud: Aloud (on the Smart Board): Ancient Cliff Dwellers by Kira Freed from Reading A to Z
– Read about two different Native American groups.
Compare and contrast their food, clothing, and shelter with a Venn diagram.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of April 23

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We had a good turnout for report card pick-up and parent-teacher conferences. Thank you, parents, guardians, and family members. Science Night is Friday, April 28!!!We hope to see everyone there. It will be an exciting night with hands on science activities. If you can volunteer, please let us know.

Students will take the math Unit 8 Assessment on Monday, May 1 and the Cumulative Assessment on Tuesday, May 2 Please refer to the graded homework as well as the skills listed below to support your child.

Unit 8 Assessment
Skills:
– Draw a 3 or 4-sided shape with or without a right angle.
– Name and explain polygons (triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons).
– Recognize parallel sides in a polygon.
– Name attributes of 3-dimensonal shapes, such as cube, rectangular prism, pyramid, cylinder, cone, etc.) For example, a rectangular prism has 6 faces, the faces are rectangles, a rectangular prism has 12 sides and 8 vertices.
– Partition a rectangle into same-size squares.
– Draw an array with given rows and columns. Write a number model for the array.

Cumulative Assessment
Skills:
– Tell time to the nearest 5 minutes.
– Estimate and measure lengths to the nearest inch and centimeter.
– Make friendly numbers to add four 2-digit numbers (e.g. 13 + 12 + 17 + 28 = ? Add 13 and 17 first. Then add 12 and 28, etc.)
– Solve comparison number stories (e.g. Taylor is 54 inches tall. Gracie is 48 inches tall. How much taller is Taylor?)
– Read and interpret a bar graph.
– Use given data to create a bar graph.

Beginning on May 1, students will be writing a research paper in class about insects. The teachers will meet with your child prior to this to select an insect of choice. Once the decision is made, please help your child select informational texts from home, school and community libraries to use in class. Students are required to bring three sources to class by Monday, May 1 in order to have sufficient information for the research. The three options are:

Option 1: one book, one magazine article, and one child-friendly internet article
Option 2: two books, and one child-friendly internet article
Option 3: three grade level books

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 13: Using Writing to Solve Reading Problems (Day1)

Learning Activities
Skillful readers use their pencil to help them out of a reading emergency.
Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
“Writing Adaptations of Familiar Fairy Tales and Folk Tales, and Perhaps Writing Original Fantasy Stories as Well” from the Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop by Lucy Calkins and colleagues from the Reading and Writing Project
Interactive Read Aloud: Believe Me, Goldilocks Rocks! The Story of the Tree Bears as Told by Baby Bear by Nancy Loewen

Students will stretch out their stories and write scene after scene, remembering to make each one like a Small Moment story.
Students continue writing their adaptations.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 13: Using Writing to Solve Reading Problems (Day2)

Learning Activities
Skillful readers use their pencil to help them out of a reading emergency.
Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
“Writing Adaptations of Familiar Fairy Tales and Folk Tales, and Perhaps Writing Original Fantasy Stories as Well” from the Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop by Lucy Calkins and colleagues from the Reading and Writing Project
Interactive Read Aloud: Seriously, Cinderella Is So Annoying! The Story of Cinderella as Told by The Wicked Stepmother by Trisha Speed Shaskan
Students will read their stories with partners and give each other advice on how to make sure each of our stories has a lesson.”
Students continue writing their adaptations.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 4: Tackling Goals in the Company of Others
Session 14: Self-Assessing and Setting Goals (Day1)

Learning Activities
Strong readers evaluate their reading by setting goals and making a goal.
• Readers evaluate their understanding of literary language
• Readers evaluate their fluency
• Readers evaluate their strategies for tracking a longer book After looking at student goals, create book clubs
Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
“Writing Adaptations of Familiar Fairy Tales and Folk Tales, and Perhaps Writing Original Fantasy Stories as Well” from the Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop by Lucy Calkins and colleagues from the Reading and Writing Project
Interactive Read Aloud: Seriously, Snow White was So Forgetful! The Story of Snow White as Told by the Dwarves! by Nancy Loewen
Students continue writing their adaptations.

Day 4:
Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 4: Tackling Goals in the Company of Others
Session 14: Self-Assessing and Setting Goals (Day2)

Learning Activities
Strong readers evaluate their reading by setting goals and making a goal.
• Readers evaluate their understanding of literary language Readers evaluate their fluency
• Readers evaluate their strategies for tracking a longer book
• After looking at student goals, create book clubs
Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
“Writing Adaptations of Familiar Fairy Tales and Folk Tales, and Perhaps Writing Original Fantasy Stories as Well” from the Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop by Lucy Calkins and colleagues from the Reading and Writing Project
Interactive Read Aloud: Falling Rapunzel by Leah Wilcox
Students will reread their stories and decide if they should rewrite the same story again, trying to make it stronger.

Day 5:
Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, May 5.)
whale, when, where, what, why, which, whistle, whip, whiff, while, whirl, represent, show, display, know, count

Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing Workshop
“Writing Adaptations of Familiar Fairy Tales and Folk Tales, and Perhaps Writing Original Fantasy Stories as Well” from the Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop by Lucy Calkins and colleagues from the Reading and Writing Project
Students continue writing their adaptations.

Math
Lesson 8-9 More Equal Groups and Arrays
Students build equal groups and arrays and write number models for them.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

Lesson 8-10 Playing Array Concentration
Students play Array Concentration to practice finding the total number of objects in arrays and writing corresponding number models.

Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Lesson 8-11 Exploring Mystery Shapes, Polygons, and Equal Parts (2Days)
Students describe attributes of shapes, build polygons with trapezoids, and show fractions on a geoboard.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Exploration A: Identifying Mystery Shapes (Small Group)

Exploration B: Making Pattern-Block Worktables (Small Group)

Exploration C: Partitioning Shapes into Equal Parts (Small Group)

Review/Games

Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Exploring Arrays

Adding Four 2-Digit Numbers

Science
A Gift from Fadil
Students will:
Read the story A Gift from Fadil
Discuss the field of package engineering
Identify several possible functions of a package
Trace Fadil’s use of the Engineering Design Process
Students will be able to:
Identify and explain the role of packaging engineers in designing packages
Identify and explain some functions of packages
Identify packages as technology, and explain why they are technology
Identify and explain the steps of the engineering Design Process as described in the story
After reading students will review vocabulary from the text and complete a vocabulary worksheet.

Social Studies
Examine Primary Sources Learning About the Past
Objectives:
– Name sources of information, such as people, places, and artifacts.
– Obtain information about a topic using a variety of sources.
– Compare sources of information about the past.
Vocabulary: history, source, artifact
– Small group activity
– Students work cooperatively to observe, discuss, and write the characteristics of artifacts and explain how technology has developed over time to replace these artifacts.

Skills: Predict a Likely Outcome
Objectives:
– Recognize the importance of knowing the past to predict the future.
– Follow steps for making a prediction.
Vocabulary: predict

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of April 17

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

A copy of the conference schedule was sent home with students on Thursday, April 6 to remind you of your conference time. We are looking forward to seeing you on Report-card Pickup day, which is Wednesday, April 19.

In order to be considerate to all, please keep your appointment time. Each conference is allotted for ten minutes. However, should you feel the need to discuss your child’s progress further, you can always request another appointment and we will be happy to accommodate.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Morning Message: Today is Monday, April 17, 2017. We will begin reading and discussing about past and present.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to learn about the past? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 11: Holding On to Stories Even When Books Are Long (Day 1)
Learning Activities
Skillful readers pause at the end of each chapter to think, “What’s the main event that happened in this chapter” by using post it notes to remind them.
• Display a book with the “just right” amount of Post-Its that shows they were used to note the MOST important things that happen. Also display a book with too many, and too little.
• Model with Minnie and Moo Go Dancing.
• Display Anchor, “Keeping Track of Longer Books” and add – Ask your same book partner for help and Determine what’s important (major events and problems characters face and how they deal with it)
• Mid-Workshop TP: Display anchor on page 75 Stop and Think and have partners reread their Post-Its to each other and discuss their thinking.

Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing Workshop
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Video: “Little Red Ridding Hood” You Tube by Fairy Stories and Songs for Kids
Teach students that authors sometimes make deliberate choices about which characters in their book will take on which role. One character might be the good guy—the hero—while another is the bad guy—the villain. And then, of course, there’s the sidekick, the wise adviser, the trickster, to name just a few.
Some authors changed the characters—turning girls to boys or people to animals. Others have changed the setting—moving the story from a kingdom far away to the middle of a big city. Well, today I’m going to teach how you can get started planning your very own adaptation. One thing that writers do is think, ‘What would I like to change?’ and ‘How will the change affect all the parts of my story?’ We then plan out our stories, either in a booklet or storyboard.”

Students begin planning their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Day 2:
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 18, 2017. We will continue to learn how rectangles can be partitioned into equal squares.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to divide a rectangle into square? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 11: Holding On to Stories Even When Books Are Long (Day 2)
Learning Activities
Skillful readers pause at the end of each chapter to think, “What’s the main event that happened in this chapter” by using post it notes to remind them.
• Display a book with the “just right” amount of Post-Its that shows they were used to note the MOST important things that happen. Also display a book with too many, and too little.
• Model with Minnie and Moo Go Dancing.
• Display Anchor, “Keeping Track of Longer Books” and add – Ask your same book partner for help and Determine what’s important (major events and problems characters face and how they deal with it)
• Mid-Workshop TP: Display anchor on page 75 Stop and Think and have partners reread their Post-Its to each other and discuss their thinking.

Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing Workshop
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Interactive Read Aloud: Honestly Red Ridding Hood Was Rotten! as Told by the Wolf by Trisha Speed Shaskan
Writers ask ourselves, ‘Why am I rewriting this fairy tale?’ ‘Who am I writing it for?’ and ‘What is it, exactly, that I am trying to say?’ One thing that we can do to answer these questions as we plan and write our own is to reread, re-study, and re-think the fairy tales we’ve been studying with our partners. We study and talk about the choices the author made to change their version and how we might revise our plans or stories so that our adaptations are meaningful.”
Example: “Sometimes, we rewrite a familiar tale because we disagree with the way the tale has stereotyped girls, with the good ones always being beautiful and the bad ones always being ugly, or authors may disagree with the way wolves, foxes, or stepmothers are stereotyped as nasty, evil, and mean. Sometimes authors rewrite a tale so that it makes more sense to readers who live in different places or in other cultures.”

Students begin planning their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Day 3:
Parent/Teacher Conferences

Day 4:
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, April 20, 2017. We will read and discuss early uses of calendars and clocks as ways to measure time.
Inquiry Question: How do you measure time? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 12: Staying on Track When Books Get Tricky

Learning Activities

Skillful readers use strategies to stay on track when books get tricky.
• Add to “Keeping Track of Longer Books” anchor chart – “ “When you get off track, stop, reread and answer questions”
• Mid-Workshop TP: If you come to the end of the chapter and do not know what to write on your post it, you are in a “reading emergency”. This means you should review the anchor charts to make sure you comprehend the story. (See page 79 for a picture of a “reading emergency kit”)

Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing Workshop
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Interactive Read Aloud: Trust Me, Jack’s Beanstalk Stinks! as Told by the Giant by Eric Braun
Remind children that as they pay attention to the characters in their books, they can think about the role the character plays to predict what’s going to happen. Is the character good or bad? Will she win or will she lose? Teach children to pay attention to the pattern, to ask and answer, “Why is this happening? What will happen next?” Teach children to think about whether a character in the story is the one who is teaching a lesson or learning a lesson.

Tip: ”Writers, we revise our plans or plan another adaptation, then another, playing with different ideas before we get started in writing. As we revise our plans, we think ‘Where exactly will my story begin?’ and ‘What will my character be saying and doing?’ so that we can begin our stories close to the main action.”

Students begin planning their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Day 5:
Morning Message: Today is Friday, April 21, 2017. We will continue writing adaptations of familiar tales.
Inquiry Question: Why does an author rewrite a familiar tale in the point of view of a different character? Share what you think with a classmate.

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, April 28.)
bolt, jolt, colt, felt, belt, welt, built, stilt, wilt, melt, salt, face, edge, vertices, set, tally

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Independent Reading: Students select and read a story from our classroom collection and Internet A to Z Reading. They look for elements found in fairy/folk tales.

Writing Workshop
Unit 7 – Reading and Role Playing
Fiction, Folktales, and Fairy Tales
Interactive Read Aloud: With Love, Little Red Hen by Alma Flor Ada
Teach students that fairy tales and folktales are archetypes for modern stories, that characters who play similar roles will pop up again and again, not only in these old tales but in more modern stories, too. The hope is that children take note of not just the magic in fairy tales and folktales (though of course, that’s part of the fun!), but also the ways in which archetypes from these genres repeat themselves again and again in modern literature, albeit in non-magical forms. This is the case not only with characters but also with plots, imagery, themes, but for now it’s enough that children come to recognize similar roles across books.
Teach students that we choose one of our plans, take the number of pages we need to make a book, transfer our ideas from our planning booklets by jotting a note in the margin or sketching a quick picture on each page, and begin writing using everything we know about storytelling and fairy/folk tale language.”

Students begin writing their adaptations of familiar fairy/folk tales.

Math
Lesson 8-6 Partitioning Rectangles, Part 1
Students use manipulatives to partition rectangles into same-size squares.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Lesson 8-7 Partitioning Rectangles, Part 2
Students partition rectangles into same-size squares.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.

Lesson 8-8 Equal-Groups and Array Number Stories
Students solve number stories about equal groups and arrays.

Goals:
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.

Problem of the Month
Infinite Windows
Teacher provides the following prompt (a picture will be included):
Tracy and Debbie are counting rectangles. The figure below is made of different rectangles and rectangles of different sizes.
How many rectangles can you find in the figure above? Show and explain how you found all of them.

Science
Lesson 1 What is Technology
Students will examine everyday examples of technology.
Discuss how these objects were designed to solve problems
Discuss the materials that objects are made of.
Students will be able to:
Identify everyday objects made by people as technology
Identify the problems that a particular object solves
Identify that objects are designed as a solution to a problem
Identify engineers as the people who design objects

Students will:
Read the story A Gift from Fadil
Discuss the field of package engineering
Identify several possible functions of a package
Trace Fadil’s use of the Engineering Design Process

Students will be able to:
Identify and explain the role of packaging engineers in designing packages
Identify and explain some functions of packages
Identify packages as technology, and explain why they are technology
Identify and explain the steps of the engineering Design Process as described in the story.

Social Studies
Interactive Read Aloud: …If You Lived in Colonial Times by Ann McGovern
Unit 5 Past and Present
Objectives:
– Use a visual to predict content.
– Interpret a quotation.
– Use a sequence chart to prepare for the unit.

Lesson 1
Objectives:
– Identify early uses of calendars and clocks as ways to measure time.
– Describe the order of events by using designations of time periods such as ancient times and modern times.
– Use vocabulary related to chronology, including past, present, and future.
Vocabulary: ancient, modern

Skills Read a Time Line
Objectives:
– Trace the history of space exploration on a time line.
– Create and interpret time lines.
– Sequence and categorize information.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of April 2

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

There will be no school on Friday, April 7. Therefore, the weekly spelling test will take place on Thursday, April 6.

Spring break begins Monday, April 10. Classes resume Monday, April 17.

Please visit IMPACT on a regular basis to be informed of grades and missing assignments. Missing assignments need to be submitted immediately.

Balanced Literacy
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
MTSS:
– Math

Day 1
Morning Message: Today is Monday, April 3, 2017. We will identify and discuss attributes of quadrilaterals.
Inquiry Question: What are parallel sides of quadrilaterals? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 9: Reading as a Writer—Focusing on Special Language (day 1)

Learning Activities
Strong readers see when authors use writing strategies (comparisons/similes/metaphors, alliteration, time-passing words, repetition, idioms) to make their books come alive.
• Model with The Leaving Morning by Angela Johnson.
• Students use Post-It’s to mark when the author is using writing strategies.

Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 14 Good. Better. Best

Have a student share his or her writing with the whole class.
Students also share their writing with a partner.
Review vocabulary words by having students get up to stretch and say out loud what the words mean: introduction, opinion, persuade, conclusion, evidence

Minilesson
Connection: Tell students a story about watching movies and then comparing them in a discussion with friends. Relate this to the kind of thinking and writing they can do across books. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Show students how you compare similar books. Model your thinking closely about what aspects of the book you are comparing, and then include this thinking in your writing. Debrief, reviewing the steps you went through to compare books and think closely about the comparison.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to practice this work using books from your collection.
Link: Remind students how making comparisons between books is another kind of evidence that can support their opinion. Give them an opportunity to come up with some possible books to compare.

Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 4, 2017. We will continue to write letters of nominations of favorite books.
Inquiry Question: How can you persuade readers to read your nominated book? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 2: Understanding Literacy Language
Session 9: Reading as a Writer—Focusing on Special Language (day 2)

Learning Activities
Strong readers see when authors use writing strategies (comparisons/similes/metaphors, alliteration, time-passing words, repetition, idioms) to make their books come alive.
• Model with The Leaving Morning by Angela Johnson.
• Students use Post-It’s to mark when the author is using writing strategies.

Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session15 Giving Readers Signposts and Rest Stops
Minilesson
Connection: Gather your writers and explain how longer sentences need some rest stops. Name the teaching point.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Invite your writers to notice some rest stop punctuation in a few well-written sentences. Guide them through the steps of first noticing the punctuation and then asking themselves what the purpose of the punctuation is. Record punctuation observations in a class chart.
Link: Before sending students off, give them a chance to try rest-stop punctuation in their own fabulous writing. Remind the class that punctuation is one way of taking care of your readers.

Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 3:
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, April 5, 2017. We will begin to explore 3D shapes?
Inquiry Question: What are the characteristics of 3D shapes? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 10: Setting Up Routines for Same-Book Partners (day 1)

Learning Activities

When reading a longer book, skillful readers use strategies to keep hold of the whole story.
• Introduce the strategy of a reading partner to help you hold onto the storyline in a longer book.
• Display Anchor chart, “Same Book Partners” (Page 64)
• Assign student book partners
• Mid-Workshop TP: Display anchor, “Questions Partners Can Ask Each Other” on page 67

Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 16 Writing Introductions and Conclusions to Captivate
Minilesson
Connection: Tell students that you are impressed with their nomination writing and all of the strategies that they are using to make their pieces powerful and persuasive. Explain that opinion writers have the challenge of catching the attention of their audience and communicating their claims, before releasing them. Name the inquiry question.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Set writers up to investigate a mentor text by guiding then through a series of steps that help students discover answers to the overarching question. Then listen in and coach, to elicit and collect their comments. Coach students to study structure, voice, word choice, and craft as they work in pairs. Listen in and highlight observations that students make. Reconvene the group to elicit students’ observations. Repeat their observations using more precise language, and record these on sticky notes to add to a Venn diagram chart.
Link: Send writers off to work independently, reminding them to call on prior knowledge as well as what they have learned today about writing introductions and conclusions.

Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, April 6, 2017. We will begin reading and discussing about past and present.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to learn about the past? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading Workshop
Unit: 3
Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
Bend 3: Meeting the Challenges of Longer Books
Session 10: Setting Up Routines for Same-Book Partners (day 2)

Learning Activities

When reading a longer book, skillful readers use strategies to keep hold of the whole story.
• Introduce the strategy of a reading partner to help you hold onto the storyline in a longer book.
• Display Anchor chart, “Same Book Partners” (Page 64)
• Assign student book partners
• Mid-Workshop TP: Display anchor, “Questions Partners Can Ask Each Other” on page 67

Spelling Test

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, April 21.)
soft, lift, shift, drift, gift, left, raft, craft, loft, swift, sift, apart, form, congruent, arrange, geometric

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 16 Writing Introductions and Conclusions to Captivate
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Motivating Students to Make Revisions when They Think that They’re All Done.

Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Lesson 8-4 Drawing and Reasoning About Quadrilaterals (2 Days)
Day 1: Students draw quadrilaterals with given attributes.
Day 2: The class discusses solutions, and students revise their work.
Goals:
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Lesson 8-5 Attributes of 3-Dimensional Shapes (2 Days)
Students sort and compare 3-dimensional shapes according to their attributes.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

Discussing Attributes of 3-dimensional Shapes
Use your models of 3-dimensional shapes to point out the following attributes:
– Cylinders, cones, and spheres all have curve surfaces.
– Rectangular prisms, cubes, pyramids, cylinders, and cones all have flat surfaces called faces.
– An edge of a cube, a prism, or a pyramid is a line segment where two faces meet.
– An edge of a cone or a cylinder is a curve where a flat face meets a curved surface.
– A vertex on a 3-dimensional shape such as a cube, a prism, or a pyramid is a point at which at least 3 edges meet. (The plural of vertex is vertices.)
– The apex of a cone is the point that is opposite the flat face.
Draw students attention to the faces, edges, and vertices on the base-10 thousand cube. Have partners take turns running their fingers along the edges of their centimeter cubes and pointing out the faces and the vertices.

Cube and Rectangular Prism
– They have the same number of faces, vertices, and edges.
– Each face on both shapes has 4 sides and 4 angles.
– All of the faces of the cube are squares.
– The faces of the rectangular prism can be squares or rectangles.
– Rectangular prisms that have all square faces are called cubes. A cube is a special kind of rectangular prism.
Cube and Cylinder
– The cylinder can roll when push. The cube can’t.
– The cylinder has a curved surface. The cube doesn’t.
– The cylinder has 2 flat faces. The cube has 6 flat faces.
– The cube’s faces are squares. The flat faces on the cylinder are circles.
Cube and Pyramid
– Most of the faces of a pyramid are triangles. (Sometimes one of the faces is not a triangle.) All of the faces of a cube are square.
– A cube and pyramid both have vertices where edges come together. A pyramid has a special vertex called an apex where the triangle faces come together.
Cube and Cone
– The cone can roll when pushed. The cube can’t.
– The cone has a curved surface and 1 flat face in the shape of a circle. The cube has 6 flat faces that are all squares.
– The cone has a point, or apex, opposite the circular face. The cube has 8 vertices.
As time allows, compare and contrast other pairs of shapes.

Science
Balancing Unit Assessment

Design Challenge
Teacher goes over the steps of the design process:
– Ask “What is the problem that needs to be solved?”
– Imagine (Brainstorm how you can solve the problem)
– Plan (draw or make a prototype)
-Create (Follow your plan and test it out)
– Improve (What works? What doesn’t? How can you modify it?)

Teacher introduce the problem:
How can you create a 1-foot pedestal that can hold a statue for 20 seconds?

Students brainstorm in groups how to solve the design challenge.

Students work in groups to plan out their structures. They will be given materials to explore.

Students draw their plans in their science notebook. They present and explain why their plan will be successful.

Students will create their structures using the given materials: tape, scissors, index cards, and beanie baby.

Teacher will walk around and facilitate discussion.

Students will test their structures using the given materials: index cards and tape.

Students discuss with groups and evaluate if their structures worked or not and what can they do to improve their structures.

Students will draw and take notes on their improvements.

Students will improve their structures using the given materials: index cards and tape.

Students will retest their structure.

Social Studies
Students will continue working on and editing their map.

Unit 5 Past and Present
Objectives:
– Use a visual to predict content.
– Interpret a quotation.
– Use a sequence chart to prepare for the unit.
Access Prior Knowledge:
– Ask children to name activities they do in school every day. Record the activities they mention on separate sentence strips and display the activities on the board in random order. Then call on volunteers to arrange the activities in time order.
Visual learning:
– Present picture and ask questions to guide students to discover time line. Point out that time is always passing. Over time, some things change and some stay the same. Have children predict what changes they might learn about in this unit.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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