Week of November 19

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The Everyday Math Unit 3 Progress Check and Open Response will be administered on Tuesday, 11/28, and Wednesday, 11/29 respectively. Please refer to the graded homework to assist your child. Students must be able to:
– Write addition and subtraction fact family from a fact triangle
– Solve “What’s My Rule?” problems
– Use strategies to solve subtraction facts, (-0, -1, doubles facts, fact family)
– Find the missing addend when the sum and the other addend is given
– Explain how to make ten to add

There will not be classes on Wednesday, November 22 through Sunday, November 26 in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday.

Have a safe and restful holiday!

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day)
Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Word Study
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1:
Reading Workshop
Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge
Sesson 4: Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge (Day 2)
Nonfiction Readers Ask, “How Does This Book Go?”
Readers ask, “How does this book go?”
• Using the Table of Contents to get a quick glance of what topics are covered
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Interactive Read-Aloud: ‘Twas the Night Before Thanksgiving by Dav Pilkey
Skill: Identifying the point of view of narrator.

Writing Workshop
Giving Thanks This Thanksgiving
– Students will select an important person in their life to write a letter of thanks.
– Pairs of students will discuss the person he/she has selected.
– Students work in assigned pairs to share ideas of their letters.
– Students will compose the rough draft of their letters.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Close Reading: “How Things Move” Cross-Curricular Focus: Physical Science
– Students will orally read the passage.
– The students will reread the text dependent questions orally.
– Students will reread with a pencil using the following annotations; question marks, circling important information/ evidence of the answer to the essential question.
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
– Student volunteers will share their rough draft of letters of thanks.
– Students edit, illustrate and publish their letters of thanks.
– Students will present their published letters in small groups.

Math
Lesson 3 – 11 Exploring Rectangles, Fact Wheels, and Coins ( 2 Days)
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Work with time and money.
– Reason with shapes and their attributes.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Vocabulary: square, rectangle fact wheel

Exploration A: Covering a Rectangle with Different – Size Squares
Students cover the rectangle with 1 – inch, then 2 – inch squares to explore how measurement relates to the size of the unit.

Exploration B: Practicing Addition on a Fact Wheel
Students work to solve addition facts shown on a fact wheel. They write the subtraction facts related to the addition facts.

Exploration C: Making Coin Stamp Booklets
Students work to make booklets showing various groups of coins. They find the total value of each group of coins.

Science
Unit 2
1-2 What If Rain Boots Were Made of Paper?
Overview: Students are introduced to their role as student glue engineers after the class receives a letter from the principal of your school requesting their help in designing glue for school use. Students begin exploring properties of materials through the book What If Rain Boots Were Made of Paper? This playful book invites students to think about what everyday things are made of and why. As they learn the meanings of the words property and material, students consider a variety of silly examples in the book and reflect on how they might use materials to design things. In addition to introducing students to the concepts of properties and materials, this lesson also provides students with a larger context for understanding that engineers design materials and a reason for students to be interested in the properties of materials. Students also receive their Investigation Notebooks and learn some of the ways that engineers use notebooks.

Students learn:
• Materials are the stuff that things are made of.
• Materials have properties.
• Properties include how materials smell, look, taste, feel, and sound.
• Materials have properties that make them good for some uses and NOT so good for others.
• Engineers design things to solve problems.
• Good readers make predictions about what they are going to read or learn.

3: Reading What if Rain Boots Were Made of Paper?
Students apply the strategy of predicting as they read the unit’s first book, What If Rain Boots Were Made of Paper?, with a partner.
4: Reflecting on Materials and Properties
Students reflect on key vocabulary and concepts that were introduced and explored throughout the lesson.
5: Keeping Track of New Ideas
Students are introduced to the purpose of posting new things the class learns.

1-3 Observing Properties of Glue
Overview: Students gain firsthand experience observing the properties of materials and of two mystery substances—Glue A and Glue B. The teacher first creates riddles describing materials in the classroom by their properties. Students use their prior knowledge of the properties of the mystery materials to figure out what they are. Next, students learn that there can be different types of the same material, for instance not all wood is the same, not all metal is the same, not all paper is the same, and not all glue is the same. Students learn the word substance and then they observe and record the properties of two mystery glues to decide whether the two glues are the same substance or different substances. They set up a “sticky test” of the two glues to further observe their properties during the next lesson after the glues have dried. The purpose of this lesson is to build on the idea introduced in What If Rain Boots Were Made of Paper? that different materials have different properties and also to prepare students to conduct careful observations.

Students learn:
• Different materials have different properties.
• You can tell if materials or substances are different by observing their properties.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Materials Riddles
The class reflects on What If Rain Boots Were Made of Paper? to remind themselves of the meanings of the words material and property and of the idea that different materials have different properties that make them better for some uses and not so good for others. Students consolidate their understanding of materials and properties by trying to figure out the answer to several materials riddles.
2: Uses and Properties of Glue
The teacher situates the problem that students will try to solve over the course of the unit—designing a glue the school can use—in the context of their discussion about materials and properties. What properties would they want their glue to have? Students access their prior knowledge about glue, including its uses and desirable properties.

Social Studies
Leader in Me
Habit 4: Think Win-Win
Emotional Bank Accounts

In this lesson, students discover:
• Examples of Emotional Bank Account deposits.
• Examples of Emotional Bank Account withdrawals.
• How Emotional Bank Account deposits strengthen relationships.

Lesson 4: Our State Government
Objectives:
– Compare the roles of mayor and governor.
– Describe state government.
– Identify some responsibilities of state government.
Vocabulary: governor, legislature, property
Civics and Government:

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston, Anh Tuan Hoang and Susie Yu

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Week of November 12

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The government vocabulary quiz will be given on Friday, November 17. The vocabulary cards were be sent home with students on Monday, November 6. Student should study these cards to help them understand concepts and skills covered in class. We will send home a study guide on Monday to help students prepare.

Murray Language Academy is conducting a Thanksgiving food drive from Monday, November 13 through Tuesday, November 21. We are asking each student to bring at least a can of food a day to support the Chicago Food Pantry. Please help us make this event successful.

Report card pick-up is Wednesday, November 15. We look forward to seeing you.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day)
Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Word Study
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1:
Reading Workshop
Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge
Session 3: Nonfiction Readers Ask. “What Is This book Teaching Me?” (Day 1)
Readers grow knowledge when they put what they see and think together and ask, “What is this book teaching me?”
Shared Reading:
– Students read chorally from the Smart Board or chart. Question: What is force? Answer: Any influence that changes the motion of an object.
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book

Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson

Session 2: Studying a Mentor Text—Procedural Writing
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Channeling Students to Use Mentors from Start to Finish
Mid-Workshop Teaching
Noticing More in the Mentor Text
Review:
To Write Like a Scientist…
1. Ask a question about how the world works.
2. Record a hypothesis, a guess.
3. How will you test it? Record your procedure.
4. Conduct multiple trials, and record your results.
5. Analyze your results, and write a conclusion.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge
Session 3: Nonfiction Readers Ask. “What Is This book Teaching Me?” (Day 2)
Readers grow knowledge when they put what they see and think together and ask, “What is this book teaching me?”
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by John Graham

Session 2: Studying a Mentor Text—Procedural Writing
Share: Self-Assessment
Introduce students to the Information Writing Checklist for Grade 2 and 3.
Students check their writing against the checklist to see if it fits the criteria.

Day 3:
Report Card Pick-Up

Day 4:
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Reading Workshop (106)
Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge
Session 4: Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge (Day 1)
Nonfiction Readers Ask, “How Does This Book Go?”
Readers ask, “How does this book go?”
• Describe how a nonfiction book is like a gift of knowledge. Carefully unwrap your gift and each of its part and think, “how does this book go?”
• Using the Table of Contents to get a quick glance of what topics are covered
Force Poem by Anonymous
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 3: New Wanderings, New Experiments
Mini Lesson
Teaching: Lay out some materials that students can use when they devise their own innovations from the initial experiment.
Active Engagement: Students recount what they should do first, next, and then they will do those things.
Students continue to conduct and write about their experiments.

Day 5:
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on December 2.)
also, beat, seat, three, small, mean, clean, peak, dream, beach, team, length, weight, height, meat, distance

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Phonemic Awareness Progress Check

Reading Workshop (103)
Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge
Session 4: Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge (Day 1)
Nonfiction Readers Ask, “How Does This Book Go?”
Readers ask, “How does this book go?”
• Describe how a nonfiction book is like a gift of knowledge. Carefully unwrap your gift and each of its part and think, “how does this book go?”
• Using the Table of Contents to get a quick glance of what topics are covered
Force Poem by Anonymous
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Session 3: New Wanderings, New Experiments
Conferring and Small-Group Work—Coaching Partners to Help Each Other

Students continue to conduct and write about their experiments. They work with an assigned partner to coach each other about their writing.

Math
Lesson 3 – 8 Using Double to Subtract
Students use double to solve subtract facts.
Goals:
– Subtract within 20 fluently.
– Use subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Vocabulary: think – addition strategy, related facts

Lesson 3 – 9 Going – Back – Through – 10 Strategy for Subtraction (2 Days)
Students will use the going – back – through – 10 strategy for subtraction.
Goals:
– Subtract within 20 fluently.
– Use subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
– Represent sums and differences on a number-line diagram.
– Make connections between representations.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.

Vocabulary: friendly number, going back through 10

Lesson 3-10 Going – Up – Through – 10 Subtraction Strategy
Students will use the going-up-through-10 strategy for subtraction.
Goals:
– Subtract within 20 fluently.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Represent sums and differences on a number-line diagram.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

Vocabulary: going up through 10

Science
4.3 Conducting The Seed Investigations
3: Fluffy Seed Investigation
Students apply the investigation procedures they learned in the Propeller Seed Investigation as they investigate how far seeds with and without fluffy parts move when blown by wind.
4: Explaining Wind Dispersal
Students apply their understanding of wind dispersal to the trees of the Bengal Tiger Reserve as they write their final scientific explanation of the unit.

1-1 Pre-Unit Assessment
Overview: Students’ Initial Explanations
Working in groups of four, students examine four substances: cornstarch, salt, flour, and cinnamon. They are first asked to describe the properties of each substance, and then they are asked to choose two substances and predict what properties a mixture of those substances would have. Next, students are presented with a mystery mixture of two of the substances and use their knowledge of the properties of substances to determine which two substances are included in the mixture. The oral explanations students provide in this lesson serve as a Pre-Unit Assessment for formative purposes, designed to reveal students’ initial understanding of some of the unit’s core content prior to instruction. As such, students’ explanations offer a baseline from which to measure growth of understanding over the course of the unit. These explanations can also provide the teacher with insight into students’ thinking as they begin this unit. This will allow the teacher to draw connections to students’ experiences and to watch for alternate conceptions that might get in the way of students’ understanding.

Students learn:
• Reflecting on what you understand and don’t understand allows you to prepare for learning new things.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Observing Materials
Students examine four substances in self-sealing bags. They describe the properties of each substance. Then they choose two substances and predict the properties that a mixture containing those substances would have.

2: Observing a Mystery Mixture
Students observe a mystery mixture of two of the substances and explain which substances the mixture contains. Students’ initial ideas about the ingredients of the mystery mixture reveal their initial understanding of additional core content of the unit.

Unit 2
1-2 What If Rain Boots Were Made of Paper?

Overview: Students are introduced to their role as student glue engineers after the class receives a letter from the principal of your school requesting their help in designing glue for school use. Students begin exploring properties of materials through the book What If Rain Boots Were Made of Paper? This playful book invites students to think about what everyday things are made of and why. As they learn the meanings of the words property and material, students consider a variety of silly examples in the book and reflect on how they might use materials to design things. In addition to introducing students to the concepts of properties and materials, this lesson also provides students with a larger context for understanding that engineers design materials and a reason for students to be interested in the properties of materials. Students also receive their Investigation Notebooks and learn some of the ways that engineers use notebooks.

Students learn:
• Materials are the stuff that things are made of.
• Materials have properties.
• Properties include how materials smell, look, taste, feel, and sound.
• Materials have properties that make them good for some uses and NOT so good for others.
• Engineers design things to solve problems.
• Good readers make predictions about what they are going to read or learn.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Introducing the Design Challenge
A fictional letter from the principal introduces students to a problem for which they must design a solution.
2: Predicting as a Reading Strategy
Students are introduced to the reading comprehension strategy of predicting and the teacher models how to use the strategy in reading the first pages of the book.

Social Studies
Leader in Me
Courage and Consideration
One of the key concepts of Habit 4: Think Win-Win—courage and consideration— helps us learn to balance the courage to voice our opinions with the consideration for others’ thoughts. In this lesson, students discover:
Habit 4
• Courage to share thoughts is a leadership skill.
• Saying no to peer pressure requires courage.
• How to respond to negative pressure with consideration.

Leaders have courage to say no when something is not a win for them and consideration for what is a win for others.

Think Win-Win requires courage and consideration.

Lesson 3: Choosing Leaders
Interactive Read Aloud: Read and discuss the chapter “Choosing Leaders”.
Main Idea: Americans choose their leaders.
Objectives:
– Recognize the importance of leaders throughout history.
– Discuss what makes a good leader.
– Identify ways that public officials are selected, including election and appointment to office.
Vocabulary: election, vote, appoint

Skill: Making a Choice by Voting
Vocabulary: majority rule

Review for quiz
– government: a group of citizens who run a community
– law: a rule that people of a community must follow
– tax: money paid to the government that is used to pay for services
– vote: a choice that gets counted
– patriotism: a feeling of pride that people have for their country
– consequence: something that happens because of what a person does
– brotherhood: friendship or cooperation
– mayor: a leader of our city
– governor: a leader of our state

Vocabulary quiz

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of November 5

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

A reminder of Parent/Teacher conference will be sent home with students on Wednesday, November 8 to remind you of your conference time. We are looking forward to seeing you on Report-card Pickup day, which is Wednesday, November 15. Report-card Pickup day is a non-attendance day for students.

In order to be considerate to all, please keep your appointment time. Each conference is allotted for ten minutes. However, should you feel the need to discuss your child’s progress further, you can always request another appointment and we will be happy to accommodate.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day)
Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Words Center: Making words
– Listening Center: Raz Kids
– Guided Reading
– Accelerated Readers
– MTSS: Math

Word Study
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1:
Reading Workshop
Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge
Session 1: Nonfiction Readers Notice and Learn (Day 1)
Nonfiction readers grow knowledge by paying attention to details and putting the parts of text together in their mind.
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson
Session 1: Learning to Write about Science
Mini Lesson
Connection: Students will be guided through the process of conducting an experiment and writing within each step of an experiment.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Students will be guided through the process of doing an experiment and writing a lab report. They will form and record a hypothesis, then conduct and record the experiment.
Link: Students will conduct and record the second leg of the experiment with more independence, while still in the meeting area, contrasting the results from this trial with those from the earlier trail.
– Students write their lab reports.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge
Session 1: Nonfiction Readers Notice and Learn (Day 2)
Nonfiction readers grow knowledge by paying attention to details and putting the parts of text together in their mind.
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson
Session 1: Learning to Write about Science
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Engagement
Share: Writing Like Scientists
Students will discuss where they did each of the kinds of writing you have explained and listed as the components of a lab report. Chart:
To Write Like a Scientist…
1. Ask a question about how the world works.
2. Record a hypothesis, a guess.
3. How will you test it? Record your procedure.
4. Conduct multiple trials, and record your results.
5. Analyze your results, and write a conclusion.
– Students write and revise their lab reports.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge
Session 2: Nonfiction Readers Notice, Learn, and Question (Day 1)
As readers notice details and try putting things together to learn about a topic, questions often come up. Readers keep those questions in mind as they read.
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson
Session 2: Studying a Mentor Text—Procedural Writing
Connection: Students will understand the purpose of writing up their experiments with exact, precise information
Teaching and Active Engagement: Students will study a mentor text for something they could try in their own writing
– Students write and revise their lab reports.

Day 4:
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Reading Workshop (106)
Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge
Session 2: Nonfiction Readers Notice, Learn, and Question (Day 2)
As readers notice details and try putting things together to learn about a topic, questions often come up. Readers keep those questions in mind as they read
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by Jack Challoner and Maggie Hewson
Session 2: Studying a Mentor Text—Procedural Writing
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Channeling Students to Use Mentors from Start to Finish
Mid-Workshop Teaching
Noticing More in the Mentor Text
Review:
To Write Like a Scientist…
1. Ask a question about how the world works.
2. Record a hypothesis, a guess.
3. How will you test it? Record your procedure.
4. Conduct multiple trials, and record your results.
5. Analyze your results, and write a conclusion.

– Students write their lab reports.

Day 5:
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on November 17.)
set, put, end, does, another, head, bread, dead, sweat, deaf, spread, rock, mineral, break, weather, soil

Reading Workshop (103)
Bend 1: Thinking Hard and Growing Knowledge
Session 2: Nonfiction Readers Notice, Learn, and Question (Day 2)
As readers notice details and try putting things together to learn about a topic, questions often come up. Readers keep those questions in mind as they read
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Writing Workshop
Unit Two
Information—Lab Report and Science Book
Interactive Read Aloud: Hands-On Science: Forces and Motion by John Graham
Session 2: Studying a Mentor Text—Procedural Writing
Share: Self-Assessment
Students will be introduced to the Information Writing Checklist for Grade 2 and 3.
Students check their writing against the checklist to see if it fits the criteria.

Math
Lesson 3 – 3 Fact Families
Students generate fact families using related numbers on Fact Triangles.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
– Add and subtract multidigit numbers using models or strategies.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
Vocabulary: facts table, row, column, diagonal, related facts, fact family, Fact Triangle

Lesson 3 – 4 Playing Salute!
Students play Salute! to find missing addends.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Record comparisons using >, =, or, <.
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.
Vocabulary: equivalent names, missing addend

Lesson 3 – 5 Subtraction Strategies: Counting Up and Counting Back
Students discuss and use the counting-up and counting-back strategies for subtraction.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.
– Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.
Vocabulary: counting back, counting up

Lesson 3- 6 – 0 and – 1 Fact Strategies and Subtraction Top – It
Students explore the – 0 and – 1 fact strategies and play Subtract Top – It
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.
Vocabulary: – 0 facts, – 1 facts, difference

Lesson 3 – 7 “What My Rule?”
Students find missing numbers and missing rules in “What’s My Rule?” problems.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.
Vocabulary: “What’s My Rule?”, function machine, input, output

Science
4-1 Investigating Seeds
Overview: Students read to gather more information about additional methods of seed dispersal and about how models can be used to investigate the process of seed dispersal. The class revisits the broadleaf forest habitat of the Bengal Tiger Reserve to consider different ways the seeds from trees living in this habitat might be dispersed. Students are introduced to the book Investigating Seeds, about a group of friends who investigate how seeds get to new places. The class reads the first part of the book together in order to find out how seeds that aren’t eaten by animals get dispersed. Then, partners set their own purpose for reading the remainder of the book. After reading, students record the ways in which the friends in the book used a model to investigate seed dispersal. The purpose of this lesson is for students to learn that seeds can be dispersed in a variety of ways and to expand their understanding of how models can be used to investigate the process of seed dispersal.

Students learn:
– Seeds can be dispersed when they stick to animal fur and get carried to another place.
– Seeds can be dispersed when they blow in the wind.
– Scientists can use models to investigate how seeds are dispersed.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Revisiting Seed Dispersal
Students are introduced to the Chapter 4 Question, which frames the work students will do for the next few lessons.
2: Think-Draw-Pair-Share Routine
Students revisit the plants of the broadleaf forest habitat and engage in the Think-Draw-Pair-Share Routine to discuss other ways that seeds might be dispersed.
3: Whole-Class Reading
Students are introduced to Investigating Seeds and the first purpose for reading this book: to find out different ways that seeds can be dispersed.
4: Partner Reading
Student pairs set their own purpose for reading the remainder of Investigating Seeds. After reading, students record how the friends in the book used a model to investigate seed dispersal.

4-2 Planning the Seed Investigations
Overview: In this lesson, students continue investigating the question, How do seeds that animals don’t use for food get dispersed? First, students consider the function of the spiked structures around burclover seeds. They then observe images of two additional plants and their seeds in the Bengal Tiger Reserve to predict how those seeds are dispersed. Students are then introduced to the Seed Investigations, during which they will test features of the sal and red silk plants. Students revisit Investigating Seeds to explain how the friends in the book decided what to measure in their investigation. The teacher models how to plan what to measure in the Propeller Seed Investigation, and then student groups determine how to measure in the Fluffy Seed Investigation. The purpose of this lesson is for students to consider how structures around seeds might support seed dispersal and for students to more independently practice making a plan for measuring in an investigation.

Students learn:
– Scientists make models to explore phenomena that they cannot observe directly.
– Scientists determine how to measure in an investigation based on what they are interested in learning about.
– Structures around seeds help those seeds get dispersed in certain ways.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Introducing the Seed Investigations
Students consider how the structures of burclover plants, sal trees, and red silk trees help those plants’ seeds get dispersed.
2: Measurement in Investigating Seeds
Students return to Investigating Seeds to discuss how the friends in the book measured in their investigation of burclover seed dispersal and why it is important to take more than one measurement
3: Planning the Propeller Seed Investigation
Students discuss how to measure to learn how propellers help seeds move in the wind.
4: Planning the Fluffy Seed Investigation
Student pairs determine how to measure in the Fluffy Seed Investigation.

4.3 Conducting The Seed Investigations
Overview: In this lesson, students use models to investigate how seeds that are not used by animals for food are dispersed in their habitat. The class uses a model to investigate how many seeds with and without propellers move in the wind. Groups then use a model to investigate whether seeds with fluffy parts move farther in the wind than seeds without fluffy parts. Students record and compare the data collected in the two investigations to learn that both propellers and fluffy parts help seeds get dispersed to new places away from the plant that made the seeds. Students write a final scientific explanation about what they have learned about how the seeds from sal trees and red silk trees get dispersed. The purpose of this lesson is for students to use models to conduct investigations of different ways in which seeds can be dispersed in a habitat.

Students learn:
– Propeller structures on seeds allow the seeds to be dispersed by wind.
– Fluffy structures on seeds allow the seeds to be dispersed by wind.
– A tape measure can be used to measure distance.
– Performing an investigation the same way each time allows scientists to compare multiple investigations and tests.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Propeller Seed Investigation Setup
Students are introduced to the setup for the Propeller Seed Investigation, which helps them to understand that it is important to conduct multiple tests.
2: Propeller Seed Investigation
Students develop their understanding of wind dispersal as they investigate how many seeds with and without propellers are moved when placed in front of a wind source.

Social Studies
Leader in Me
Habit 3 Put First Things First
Organization
Habit 3: Put First Things First teaches us to organize and execute around priorities. Rather than focusing on things and time, organization fueled by Habit 3 focuses on building relationships and accomplishing goals. In this lesson, students discover:
• The characteristics of an organized person.
• Three steps to being more organized.
• Why being organized is important.

Habit 4 Think Win-Win
Win-Win or No Deal
The key concept “Win-Win or No Deal” acknowledges that there are times we can choose to disagree agreeably. While leaders are consistently friendly, they do not need to be friends with everyone. In this lesson, students discover:
• How to identify bullying.
• Strategies for disagreeing agreeably with a bully.
• A personal plan if they are being bullied.

Government
Lesson 1: Getting Along in a Community
Objectives:
– Identify functions of government.
– Describe how governments establish order, provide security, and manage conflict.
– Recognize laws in the community and the consequence of breaking them.
Vocabulary: government, law, consequence, order

Lesson 2: Community Governments
Objectives:
– Describe a community government.
– Explain a role of a judge in a court.
– Identify some governmental services in the community, such as libraries, schools, and parks, and explain their value to the community.
Vocabulary: mayor, council, court, judge, government, services, tax
Civic and Government
Read and discuss services provide by the governments.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of October 29

Dear Parents and Caretakers,

Thank you for attending the Literacy Night last week. We hope you enjoyed the evening.

On Monday, October 30, students will participate in the field trip to the International Children’s Film Festival. Please make sure your child has a lunch for school on this day.

Report card pick-up/conference day takes place on Wednesday, November 15. Please stop by our school to sign up if you haven’t done so. The sign-up sheets are posted on the wall next to our classrooms’ doors. If you do not sign up by Wednesday, November 8, we will assign you one of the available slots so that a copy of the conference schedule can be sent home with students on November 9.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading Conferences
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Teachers administer the beginning-of-year TRC (Text Reading and Comprehension)

Word Study
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1:
Field Trip to the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Paying Close Attention to Authors (use what we learn in writing to help us think deeply in reading)
Session 17: Readers Celebrate How Much They Have Grown (Day 1)
Readers Celebrate How Much They Have Grown by:
Helping readers grow by giving them tips and advice about a book using post-its
Interactive Read Aloud: Punctuation Takes A Vacation by Robin Pulver (Day 1)

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication
– Each student begins recopying his/her edited “Small Moment” story. Students will illustrate their stories with watercolor paints and watercolor paper to create a story book.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Paying Close Attention to Authors (use what we learn in writing to help us think deeply in reading)
Session 17: Readers Celebrate How Much They Have Grown (Day 2)
Readers Celebrate How Much They Have Grown by:
Helping readers grow by giving them tips and advice about a book using post-its
Interactive Read Aloud: Punctuation Takes A Vacation by Robin Pulver (Day 2)

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication
– Each student begins recopying his/her edited “Small Moment” story. Students will illustrate their stories with watercolor paints and watercolor paper to create a story book.

Day 4:
Reading Workshop
Readers Make Sure That We Don’t Just Read the Words, We Understand Them—and Then We Read More and More
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Friday, November 10.)
boy, follow, came, want, show, nurse, curve, turn, burn, curl, purse, growth, affect, gravity, stress, fruit

Read Aloud:
Meet the Marks read by Maya

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 18 Editing and Preparing for Publication
– Each student begins recopying his/her edited “Small Moment” story. Students will illustrate their stories with watercolor paints and watercolor paper to create a story book.

Day 5:
School Improvement Day (No School for students)

Math
MARS Tasks:
– Get Clued Up
This problem gives students a chance to use addition and subtraction to find and describe a number pattern.

Lesson 3 – 1 Open Response and Engagement (Day 1)
Students will solve an open response problem using their own fact strategies.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
– Make sense of your own problem.
– Explain your mathematical thinking clearly and precisely.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: making ten, double ten frame, near doubles

Lesson 3 – 1 Open Response and Engagement (Day 2)
Getting Ready for Day 2

Lesson 3 – 2 Subtraction from Addition: Think Addition
Students write subtraction number stories and generate related addition and subtraction facts.
Goals:
– Add and subtract within 20 fluently.
– Know all sums of two 1-digit numbers automatically.
– Use addition and subtraction to solve 1-step number stories.
– Add and subtract multidigit numbers using models or strategies.
– Model real-world situations using symbols.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Vocabulary: subtraction number story, subtraction facts, addition facts, related facts, think – addition strategy

Science
3-5 Plant and Animal Interdependence
Overview: In this lesson, students continue to explore seed dispersal as they investigate how plants and animals depend on each other in different habitats. First, students locate the seeds they hid in Lesson 3.1, discuss how chipmunks disperse pine tree seeds by hiding and forgetting them, and explain how the pine tree and chipmunks depend on each. Then, students investigate the plant and animal relationships in the three habitats from the A Good Place To Grow app. They use information from Handbook of Habitats to determine how the seeds in each habitat are dispersed. Finally, students write about how a plant and an animal in a habitat depend on each other. The purpose of this lesson is for students to deepen their understanding of plant and animal interdependence as they investigate more examples of seed dispersal.

Students learn:
• Some plants depend on animals to disperse their seeds. These animals depend on the plants for food.

3: Seed Dispersal in Different Habitats
Students transfer their knowledge of seed dispersal methods by using the reference book to find out which animals disperse the seeds of certain plants in desert and everglades habitats. Students gain experience using features of the reference book more independently.

4: Reflecting on Seed Dispersal
As they write about how plants and animals in each of the habitats they investigated in this lesson depend on each other, students consolidate their understanding of interdependence of plants and animals in different habitats.

3-6 Explaining the Problem in the Reserve
Overview
Students construct a scientific explanation to answer the Chapter 3 Question: Why aren’t the chalta seeds getting to places where they can grow? Partners explore new data from another part of the broadleaf forest indicating that chalta seeds have only been found in elephant droppings, but no elephants have been observed on the reserve since the construction of a fence. Students revisit the Concept Mapping Routine to explore connections among science vocabulary related to how seeds get to new places in their habitats. Students then discuss their ideas about the dispersal of the chalta seeds in the reserve. They write a topic sentence and supporting sentences of a scientific explanation of this idea. This writing activity serves as a Critical Juncture, through which students demonstrate their understanding of the ideas in the chapter, revealing whether they have gained an understanding of how animals disperse seeds with juicy fruit to new places. The purpose of this lesson is for students to apply what they have learned in Chapter 3 to explain why the chalta seeds in the Bengal Tiger Reserve are not getting to places where they can grow.

Students learn:
• A scientific explanation is written to be shared with someone.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Revisiting the Bengal Tiger Reserve
Students revisit the Chapter 3 Question and analyze new data from the broadleaf forest habitat and the Bengal Tiger Reserve, which helps them construct an explanation of why the chalta seeds are not getting to new places in the habitat where they can grow.
2: Concept Mapping
Students use the Concept Mapping Routine to conceptualize and articulate the relationships among key science ideas related to how seeds get to new places in their habitats.
3: Writing a Scientific Explanation
Students compose a scientific explanation to answer the Chapter 3 Question about why the chalta seeds in the Bengal Tiger Reserve are not getting to places where they can grow. This activity serves as the third and final Critical Juncture, providing an opportunity to assess students’ understanding that some plants rely on animals to disperse their seeds and that one way animals can disperse seeds is by eating fruit and leaving droppings containing the seeds in new places.

Unit 1 Assessment

Social Studies
Leader in Me
Habit 3 Put First Things First
Say No to Less Important Thing: It takes determination and focus to say no, especially when distractions invite us to say yes at every turn. Habit 3: Put First Things First teaches us that leaders organize and execute around balanced priorities. In this lesson, students discover:
• How to identify the less important things.
• Why less important things keep us from accomplishing goals.
• How to say no to less important things.

Roles and goals, a key concept of Habit 3, encourages us to focus our time on who we are and on relationships rather than things. Understanding who we are and who we want to be allows us to set goals to lead our own lives and prepare to lead others. In this lesson, students discover: • How to determine our most important roles. • How setting goals now will help prepare us for future roles. • Goals can be set based on current roles.

One leader may have multiple roles. For each role, they have goals.

– Students take a written assessment about the Community Unit.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston, Anh Tuan Hoang and Susie Yu

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Week of October 22

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The Unit 2 Math Progress Check and the cumulative assessment will be administered on Wednesday, October 25 and Friday, October 27 respectively. Please review graded homework and the unit 1 test to support your child’s success.
Students must demonstrate mastery in:
– Adding doubles facts and combinations of ten
– Decomposing an addend to make ten before adding (e.g. 7+5= ? Think 7+3+2=?)
– Identifying helper facts (e.g. 5+6=? Use 5+5=10. Then add 1 more.)
– Identifying fact family for a domino. Write the turn-around fact.
– Knowing different names for a number (e.g. 16 is 10+6, 12+4, etc.)
– Identifying and explaining why a number is odd or even.

The social studies Community Unit Test will take place Wednesday, November 1. The study guides will be sent home Friday to help students prepare. Additionally, the science Plants and Animals Relationship Unit Test will be administered Thursday, November 2. Please refer to all the science lessons posted on this site to help your child prepare.

Please visit IMPACT on a regular basis to be informed of grades and missing assignments. Missing assignments need to be submitted immediately.

Last but not least, thank you parents for volunteering on the field trip last Friday. We could not have done it without your support!

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading Conferences
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Teachers administer the beginning-of-year TRC (Text Reading and Comprehension)

Word Study
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed!y Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 4 (Daily, Different words will be given each day.)

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Paying Close Attention to Authors (use what we learn in writing to help us think deeply in reading)
Session 15: Readers Think About How the Whole Book Clicks Together, Noticing Masterful Writing (Day 1)
Readers Think About How the Whole Book Clicks Together, Noticing Masterful Writing by:
Reflecting after reading the book
Retelling the main events of the book
Re-reading the ending
Stopping and jotting how the beginning, middle, and ending of the book “click” together
Identifying how the ending fits with the whole book
Noticing how all parts of the book build on each other
Retelling the main parts in the beginning, middle, and ending to remember what happened in the story (ex: Somebody Wanted But So Then)
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 14. Rereading and Quick Editing: Preparing for a Mini-Celebration
Writers will use editing checklists to make sure their writing is ready for an audience.
Using the checklist, students work independently to edit their writing.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Paying Close Attention to Authors (use what we learn in writing to help us think deeply in reading)
Session 15: Readers Think About How the Whole Book Clicks Together, Noticing Masterful Writing (Day 2)
Readers Think About How the Whole Book Clicks Together, Noticing Masterful Writing by:
Asking HOW does the author make the story “click” together after reading the ending of the book
Reflecting after reading the book
Retelling the main events of the book
Re-reading the ending
Stopping and jotting how the beginning, middle, and ending of the book “click” together
Identifying how the ending fits with the whole book
Noticing how all parts of the book build on each other
Retelling the main parts in the beginning, middle, and ending to remember what happened in the story (ex: Somebody Wanted But So Then)

– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 15 Learning Craft Moves from Any Mentor Text

Mini Lesson
– Active Engagement: Students will identify how the author made a part powerful, and name the craft moves she used that they can try, too.
– Link: Students will reread their writing and plan with their partners.
Share: Sharing Favorite Parts of Writing
Students will choose a part of their writing that they would love to share.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Paying Close Attention to Authors (use what we learn in writing to help us think deeply in reading)
Session 16: Readers Think, “What Does the Author Want to Teach Me?” (Day 1)
Readers Think, “What Does the Author Want to Teach Me?” by:
Taking a peek at the cover or at a few pages of the book to predict a lesson one can learn from the story
Identifying a lesson, one can learn from the story
Talking with a partner about a lesson one can learn from the story
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 16 Being Bold—Trying New Craft Moves
Mini Lesson
– Active Engagement: Students will find a craft move from their own mentor texts, and then help you incorporate it into the teacher’s story.
Link: Send students off to try out what they‘ve learned from their mentor author in their own writing.

Day 4:
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Reading Workshop (106)
Bend 3: Paying Close Attention to Authors (use what we learn in writing to help us think deeply in reading)
Session 16: Readers Think, “What Does the Author Want to Teach Me?” (Day 2)
Readers Think, “What Does the Author Want to Teach Me?” by:
Taking a peek at the cover or at a few pages of the book to predict a lesson one can learn from the story
Identifying a lesson, one can learn from the story
Talking with a partner about a lesson one can learn from the story
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 16 Being Bold—Trying New Craft Moves
-Share: Learning from Mentor Authors
Students will share the work he/she has done under the mentorship of a new author.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Day 5:
106 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on Thursday, November 2.)
means, old, any, same, tell, blue, true, clue, glue, due, argue, hero, action, cause, influence, kind
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 3
Study Your Own Authors
Session 17 Writers Can Help Each Other
– Model to students how to elicit the help of a classmate.
– Students meet in partnerships to offer each other feedback on their writing.

Math
Lesson 2 – 11 Playing Name That Number
Objectives:
– Use tally marks, arrays, and numerical expressions involving addition and subtraction to give equivalent names for whole numbers.

Students many ways to name numbers.
Vocabulary: name – collection box, equivalent

Lesson 2 – 12 Frames and Arrows
Objectives:
– Use manipulatives, number grids, tally marks, mental arithmetic, paper & pencil, and calculators to solve problems involving the addition
and subtraction of multidigit whole numbers; describe the strategies used.

Students will skip count, add, and subtract to solve Frames – Arrows problems.
Vocabulary: Frames-and-Arrows diagram, frame, arrow, arrow rule

Lesson 2 – 13 Unit 2 Progress Check (Day 1)
Students complete the Unit 2 assessment and self-assessment.
Differentiate:
The teacher provides counters and ten frames for items 1, 2, 3, 6; and dominoes for item 4

Review for Cumulative Assessment and Game Day

Game:
Name That Number
Skill: Using addition and subtraction to name equivalent numbers

Lesson 2 – 13 Cumulative Assessment
Students complete the cumulative assessment.

Science
3-3 Investigating Seed Dispersal
Overview: In this lesson, students use a model to construct understanding about how animals help seeds get to places in their habitat where they can get what they need to grow. Students are introduced to Dispersing Seeds Model, Part 2, which is a continuation of the model from Lesson 3.2. In Part 2 of this model, students work in groups to model how organisms make droppings around their habitats, thus contributing to seed dispersal. Students practice measurement as they count the number of droppings that landed in places where seeds could get what they need to grow and the number of seeds inside droppings they dissect. From their data, students determine which animals disperse each seed type in the model. Students reflect on the ideas they have constructed in the Dispersing Seeds Model and consolidate their thinking in a short writing task. The purpose of this lesson is to provide students with an opportunity to continue to investigate seed dispersal by engaging in the practice of developing and using models, to practice measurement skills more independently, and to synthesize their understanding of how seeds get to new places in a habitat.

Students learn:
• Animals sometimes disperse seeds by eating fruit, moving to another place, and leaving droppings with the seeds inside.
• Before scientists investigate, they decide how they will measure the thing they want to learn about.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Introducing the Dispersing Seeds Model, Part 2
Students consider what they have already investigated about how seeds get to places where they can grow and are invited to consider what they will investigate in Part 2 of the Dispersing Seeds Model.
2: Dispersing Seeds Model, Part 2
As students engage in Part 2 of the model, they continue to build their understanding of how seeds might get to new places in a habitat.
3: Counting Droppings and Seeds
Before they investigate, students are provided an opportunity to independently consider how and what to measure. Students dissect models of bird droppings to practice their measurement skills and to consolidate their understanding of how seeds could end up in new places in a habitat.
4: Reflecting on the Model Habitat
Students consolidate their understanding of seed dispersal and the key concepts they constructed over the last two lessons.

3-4 Diagramming a System
Overview: In this lesson, the class creates diagrams to illustrate the relationships among plants and animals within a particular habitat. Students reread a section of Habitat Scientist and use information from the book to help the teacher complete a diagram of the mountain habitat depicted in the book. Partners revisit the “Broadleaf Forest in India” section of Handbook of Habitats and record the different plants and animals that live in this habitat in their notebooks. Using this recorded information, students create diagrams of the broadleaf forest habitat and complete sentences to describe the relationships among plants and animals in this habitat. The purpose of this lesson is for students to begin to develop an understanding that plants and animals within a habitat depend on each other to get what they need and that animals help seeds get to new places in their habitat.

Students learn:
• Scientists create diagrams to show how something works or what its parts are.
• Some plants and animals in a habitat depend on each other to get what they need to live and grow.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Diagramming a Habitat
Rereading a section of Habitat Scientist with the purpose of finding out how plants and animals depend on each other supports students’ developing understanding of interdependent relationships within a habitat.
2: Parts of the Broadleaf Forest Habitat
Rereading the “Broadleaf Forest in India” section of Handbook of Habitats helps students identify the different plants and animals that live in this habitat.
3: Diagramming the Broadleaf Forest Habitat
Diagramming the relationships among the plants and animals in the broadleaf forest supports students’ developing understanding of interdependence among the different parts of a habitat.
4: Talking About the Broadleaf Forest Habitat
Discussing how the plants and animals in the broadleaf forest habitat depend on each other helps students articulate what they have represented in their diagrams.

3-5 Plant and Animal Interdependence
Overview: In this lesson, students continue to explore seed dispersal as they investigate how plants and animals depend on each other in different habitats. First, students locate the seeds they hid in Lesson 3.1, discuss how chipmunks disperse pine tree seeds by hiding and forgetting them, and explain how the pine tree and chipmunks depend on each. Then, students investigate the plant and animal relationships in the three habitats from the A Good Place To Grow app. They use information from Handbook of Habitats to determine how the seeds in each habitat are dispersed. Finally, students write about how a plant and an animal in a habitat depend on each other. The purpose of this lesson is for students to deepen their understanding of plant and animal interdependence as they investigate more examples of seed dispersal.

Students learn:
• Some plants depend on animals to disperse their seeds. These animals depend on the plants for food.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Returning to the Hiding Seeds Model
By locating the seeds they hid in their habitat in Lesson 3.1, students are provided with a firsthand experience to construct ideas about how seeds are dispersed when animals hide and forget them.
2: Seed Dispersal in a City Park
Students transfer their knowledge of seed dispersal methods by using the reference book to find out what animals disperse acorns in a city park.

Social Studies
Leader in Me
Habit 3 Put First Things First
Prioritize: Leaders have many things to do. They prioritize and do their most important thing first.
Interactive Read Aloud: The Ant and the Grasshopper
“Prioritize” is a key concept of Habit 3: Put First Things First. Prioritize means to get our most important tasks done first and in the right order.
In this lesson, students discover:
• The definition of prioritize.
• How to decide which things are most important.
• Why it is important to do our most important things first.

Say No to Less Important Thing: It takes determination and focus to say no, especially when distractions invite us
to say yes at every turn. Habit 3: Put First Things First teaches us that leaders
organize and execute around balanced priorities. In this lesson, students discover:
• How to identify the less important things.
• Why less important things keep us from accomplishing goals.
• How to say no to less important things.

Community
Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 5 – About Change
Main Idea: People and places change over time.
Vocabulary: change
Objectives:
– Identify ways people and places change.
– Compare photographs of a place taken at different times.

Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 6 – Needs and Wants
Main Idea: Everyone has needs and wants.
Vocabulary: need, want

Students continue to design a map of their neighborhood and write to describe important places in their neighborhood.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of October 15

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The second graders will participate in a field trip to the Morton Arboretum this coming Friday, October 20. Please make sure your child is dressed appropriately for the outdoors. Students need to bring a lunch for the field trip. Parents, who volunteer for the field trip, must be in the multi-purpose room no later than 9:00a.m.

If you would like to purchase a bully shirt for your child, please send in the order form by Friday, October 20.

Due to the field trip, the spelling test for this week will take place on Thursday, October 19.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading Conferences
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Teachers administer the beginning-of-year TRC (Text Reading and Comprehension)

Word Study
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 4 (Daily, Different words will be given each day.)

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Paying Close Attention to Authors (use what we learn in writing to help us think deeply in reading)
Session 13: Readers Notice that Authors Have Intentions (Day 1)
Readers Notice that Authors Have Intentions by:
Model this lesson with Those Darn Squirrels
Noticing ways authors make them react when they read
When readers react, ask, “WHY did the author do that?” and “HOW did the author do that?”
Noticing powerful parts and stopping to identify the author’s techniques
Marking HOW and WHY on post its to remember for later
Charting craft moves (ex: What is powerful? Why is it powerful?, How is it powerful?)
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 11
Learning to Write in Powerful Ways
Students will develop the habits of writers: being more observant, catching their thinking on paper, setting goals and using all they know to make writing better. Mini Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Paying Close Attention to Authors (use what we learn in writing to help us think deeply in reading)
Session 13: Readers Notice that Authors Have Intentions (Day 2)
Readers Notice that Authors Have Intentions by:
Model this lesson with Those Darn Squirrels
Noticing ways authors make them react when they read
When readers react, ask, “WHY did the author do that?” and “HOW did the author do that?”
Noticing powerful parts and stopping to identify the author’s techniques
Marking HOW and WHY on post its to remember for later
Charting craft moves (ex: What is powerful? Why is it powerful?, How is it powerful?)
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 12 Emulating Authors in Ways that Matter
Mini Lesson
– Active Engagement: Students will help you revise a text, using craft moves
– Link: Students will apply what they have learned from authors and to make their writing better.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Paying Close Attention to Authors (use what we learn in writing to help us think deeply in reading)
Session 14: Readers Don’t Just Notice Craft Moves-They Try Them! (Day 1)
Readers Don’t Just Notice Craft Moves-They Try Them! by:
Choosing a page, they love in a book, identifying the craft move, and trying it in their writing
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 13 Mining Mentor Texts for Word Choice (Studying and Revising for Precise and Specific Language)
Mini Lesson
– Teaching and Active Engagement: Students will participate in a “symphony share” where each student shares out examples of beautiful language he or she noticed in Owl Moon.
– Link: Students will use both the craft strategies and the language choices that they’ve learned from Owl Moon to get their writing ready for the celebration.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.

Day 4:
103 to library 9:10 – 9:55

Reading Workshop
Bend 3: Paying Close Attention to Authors (use what we learn in writing to help us think deeply in reading)
Session 14: Readers Don’t Just Notice Craft Moves-They Try Them! (Day 2)
Readers Don’t Just Notice Craft Moves-They Try Them! by:
Choosing a page, they love in a book, identifying the craft move, and trying it in their writing
Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 13 Mining Mentor Texts for Word Choice (Studying and Revising for Precise and Specific Language)
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Planning and Reflecting on Your Conferences and Small-Group Teaching
Mid-Workshop Teaching: Using writing partners as editing partners
Share: Interviewing Writing Partners Can Teach Both Partners about Writing

Day 5:
Field Trip to Morton Arboretum

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on October 28.)
much, before, line, right, too, loud, sound, found, shout, count, mouth, urban, suburban, rural, magnet, touch

Math
Lesson 2 – 8 Exploring Addition Tools, Odd and Even Patterns, and Shapes (2 Days)
Students explore counting up, odd and even numbers, and shapes.
Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make connections between representations.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

Objectives:
– Use manipulatives, number grids, tally marks, mental arithmetic, paper & pencil, and calculators to solve problems involving the addition
and subtraction of multidigit whole numbers; describe the strategies used; calculate and compare values of coin and bill combinations.
– Create and complete two-dimensional symmetric shapes or designs.
– Recognize numbers as odd or even.
Vocabulary: divide, half, halves, fourths

Exploration A: Using Tools to Add

Exploration B: Sorting Dominoes

Exploration C: Making Geoboard Shapes

Lesson 2 – 9 Even Numbers and Equal Addends
Students identify even and odd numbers, and they write number models to express even and odd numbers as sums.
Goals:
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Objectives:
– Recognize and manipulate odd and even numbers.
Vocabulary: equal addends

Lesson 2 – 10 Name – Collection Boxes
Students generate equivalent names for numbers and write them in name – collection boxes.
Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.

Objectives:
– Use tally marks, arrays, and numerical expressions involving addition and subtraction to give equivalent names for whole numbers.

Vocabulary: name – collection box, equivalent

Science
3-1 Habitat Scientists
Overview: In this lesson, students begin to consider the Chapter 3 Question: Why aren’t the chalta seeds getting to places where they can grow? After being introduced to the next investigation question, students engage in the Think-Draw-Pair-Share routine to begin to think about how seeds get to new places in a habitat. Students read Habitat Scientist to gather more information about the different parts of a habitat and to extend their ideas about what parts of a habitat might help seeds get to new places. The book also introduces students to the idea that plants and animals depend on each other for the things they need to grow and live. Pairs then record the different parts of the habitat featured in the book. At the end of the lesson, students are introduced to the idea that animals hide seeds for later retrieval. Students hide seeds around the classroom to retrieve in a later lesson. The purpose of this lesson is to initiate students’ ideas about the parts of a habitat system, how those parts work together, and what parts might help seeds get to new places.

Students learn:
• A habitat is a system with many parts that affect each other.
• Habitats include not just where a plant or animal lives, but all the things it needs to grow in that place, such as sunlight, water, and other living things.
• There are many different plants and animals in the same habitat.
• Animals sometimes move seeds.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Think-Draw-Pair-Share Routine
To motivate the next chapter of investigating, students consider what they have learned about the Bengal Tiger Reserve thus far and are introduced to their next chapter and investigation questions.
2: Setting a Purpose for Reading
Introduction of Habitat Scientist and the purpose for reading this book—to learn more about the parts of a habitat—prepares students to focus their thinking while reading this book with a partner in the next activity.
3: Partner Reading
Working with a partner to read Habitat Scientist and record the function of different parts of a plant helps support students in reading with a purpose. Students gather and record information to help them consider the various parts of a habitat and how these parts might help seeds get to new places.
4: Hiding Seeds Model
Taking on the role of animals who hide seeds to retrieve for food at a later time prepares students to learn about animal dispersal of seeds in subsequent lessons.

3-2 Investigating How Seeds Move
Overview: In this lesson, students use a model to construct understanding about how animals can help move seeds around a habitat. Students are introduced to a fictional habitat and some of the plants and animals that live there and to the Dispersing Seeds Model, which models the interactions between those plants and animals. Students work in groups to model how organisms eat fruits and move around their habitats, thus contributing to seed dispersal. Students practice measurement as they analyze and discuss the results of the model. The purpose of this lesson is to provide students with an opportunity to investigate seed dispersal by engaging in the practice of developing and using models.

Students learn:
• When animals eat fruit, they can eat the seeds inside the fruit and move those seeds around a habitat.
• Counting is a way of measuring. We can use counting to compare results.
• Models help scientists observe things that they can’t normally observe.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Introducing the Model
Students are introduced to the next investigation question and construct their next purpose for investigating using a model.
2: Parts of the Dispersing Seeds Model
Students are introduced to the parts of the fictional habitat they will study in their model, which prepares them for engaging in the model in the next activity.
3: Dispersing Seeds Model, Part 1
Students engage in the Dispersing Seeds Model, Part 1, which provides them with a firsthand investigation of seed dispersal and enables them to begin constructing ideas about how seeds inside edible fruits are dispersed in a habitat.
4: Debriefing the Dispersing Seeds Model, Part 1
Students reflect on what they observed in the Dispersing Seeds Model, Part 1 and analyze the data that their groups collected to discover how the two animals in the fictional habitat moved seeds around the habitat.

Social Studies
Leader in Me
Habit 2: Begin with the End in Mind
Set Goals
Goals give leaders direction and motivation.
Goals must be specific and achievable. That means you can do it if you really try.
Students write goals that are specific and achievable.
Make a Plan
Leaders set goals, and then make plans to achieve them.
Students discuss with a partner about what they would need to prepare for a week-long imaginary trip.

Community Quiz

Community
– Students work independently to write a paragraph describing their neighborhoods.
Make a Map:
Skill: Read a Map Key

Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 4 – A Citizen of Many Communities
Objectives:
– Use your address to identify where you live.
– Locate communities, states, the United States, and selected countries on maps and globes.
– Compare cities, suburbs, and rural or farming areas.
Link Geography and History
Main Idea: You are a citizen of your city, state, and country.
Vocabulary: city, suburb, state, country

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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Week of October 8

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The First Quarter Mid-term Progress Reports were distributed to students on Friday, October 6. Please review your child’s progress, sign and return the bottom portion of the report by Friday, October 13. Parents/Guardians interested in meeting with teachers may include their requests on the return slip or via email.

The Social Studies Community Vocabulary Quiz will be administered Wednesday, October 18. Please refer to the vocabulary packet sent home on October 2 for the words and their definitions. A study guide will be sent home to the students on Friday, October 13 to help them prepare for the quiz.

Picture Day is on Thursday, October 12. Please have your child dress his/her best.

There will be no school on Columbus Day, Monday, October 9.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.
Differentiated Instruction/Formative Assessments:
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
– Reading Conferences
– Writing conferences
– Teachers model to students how to sketch their ideas and transform those ideas into written sentences.
– Teachers administer the beginning-of-year TRC (Text Reading and Comprehension)

Word Study
Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 4 (Daily, Different words will be given each day.)

Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop based on A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project

Day 1:
Columbus Day

Day 2:
Reading Workshop
Bend 2: Working Hard to Solve Tricky Words (tackle hard words)
Session 11: Readers Have Strategies for Figuring Out Brand-New Words, Too (Day 1)
Readers Have Strategies for Figuring Out Brand-New Words, Too by:
Asking, “What does this tricky word mean?”
Substituting a synonym that makes sense for the tricky word
Drawing a picture to show what the word means
Picturing the story in your mind and thinking of a word that makes sense
Covering up the tricky word and thinking of another word to replace it
Independent Reading
– Students read independently using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 9: Close Reading
Mini Lesson
Close Reading: Owl Moon by Jane Yolen
– Guided Inquiry: Students will study a powerful part of the mentor text and to name the effect it has. Students will discuss how the author makes this part of the text so powerful.

Day 3:
Reading Workshop
Bend 2: Working Hard to Solve Tricky Words (tackle hard words)
Session 11: Readers Have Strategies for Figuring Out Brand-New Words, Too (Day 2)
Readers Have Strategies for Figuring Out Brand-New Words, Too by:
Asking, “What does this tricky word mean?”
Substituting a synonym that makes sense for the tricky word
Drawing a picture to show what the word means
Picturing the story in your mind and thinking of a word that makes sense
Covering up the tricky word and thinking of another word to replace it
Independent Reading
– Students read independently using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 9: Close Reading
– Share: Trying Out Craft Moves
Students will use a Post-it to highlight the most important parts of their stories, in partnership, in preparation for trying out more craft moves in their writing in future workshop.
Students continue to write/revise their Small Moment narratives.
Confer with small groups of students during writing to provide feedback.

Day 4:
Reading Workshop
Bend 2: Working Hard to Solve Tricky Words (tackle hard words)
Session 12: Readers Check Themselves and Their Reading (Day 1)

Readers Check Themselves and Their Reading by:
Not waiting for someone else to catch their mistakes
Stopping as soon as something doesn’t seem or sound right and fixing it
Rereading the word or sentence
Fixing the mistake so it makes sense
Monitoring reading pace (not going too fast or too slow)
Independent Reading
– Students read independently using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 1 Narrative, Bend 2
Noticing Author’s Craft: Studying Imagery, Tension, and Literary Language in Owl Moon
Session 10: Learning to Write in Powerful Ways
Mini Lesson
– Active Engagement:
Students will find places in the teacher’s writing to try out craft moves employed by the mentor text.
– Link: Students will look through the writing in their folders and make plan for the day’s work. As well as look at books for ideas to make their writing more powerful.

Day 5:
Parent Read Aloud

Students take the spelling test.

Word Study
Spelling Words: (The following words will be tested on October 19.)
say, great, where, help, through, gold, colt, fold, mold, sold, told, limited, resource, offspring, parent, stages

Reading Workshop
Bend 2: Working Hard to Solve Tricky Words (tackle hard words)
Session 12: Readers Check Themselves and Their Reading (Day 2)

Readers Check Themselves and Their Reading by:
Not waiting for someone else to catch their mistakes
Stopping as soon as something doesn’t seem or sound right and fixing it
Rereading the word or sentence
Fixing the mistake so it makes

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Reading Comprehension Quiz

Math
Lesson 2–5 The Near – Doubles Strategy
– Students use near – doubles strategy to solve addition facts.

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.

Vocabulary: near – doubles strategy, helper fact

Lesson 2–6 The Turn – Around Rule for Addition
– Students use dominoes to explore the turn–around rule for addition.

Goals:
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Vocabulary: turn – around rule

Lesson 2–7 Subtraction and the Turn – Around Rule
Day 1: Students solve an open response problem by writing number stories and models.

Goals:
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations.

Day 2:
Objectives:
– Use manipulatives, number grids, tally marks, mental arithmetic, paper & pencil, and calculators to solve problems involving the addition
and subtraction of multidigit whole numbers; describe the strategies used.
Students discuss their solutions and revise their work.
– Focus 2b
Setting Expectations
Students revisit guidelines for a cooperative learning environment and discuss what needs to be included in a full response.

Science
2-4 Finding a Good Place to Grow
Lesson at a Glance
3: Recording a Good Place to Grow
Students think independently about and apply the ideas they have constructed about places where new plants can grow before discussing those ideas with a partner.

4: A Good Place to Grow in the Reserve
Students consider what they have learned in the context of the Bengal Tiger Reserve, which prepares them for the scientific explanation they will write in the next lesson.

2-5 Why Aren’t New Chalta Trees Growing?
Overview
Students write a scientific explanation to answer the Chapter 2 Question: Why aren’t the chalta seeds getting what they need to grow? The teacher introduces new data indicating that the Bengal Tiger Reserve continues to get adequate sunlight and water, even though no new chalta trees are growing in the reserve. Students return to the Plant and Animal Relationships Modeling Tool to identify places where plants can or cannot grow in a different habitat. Students review the purpose of scientific explanations, discuss their ideas about the question, and use sentence frames to scaffold their writing of a scientific explanation. This activity serves as the second part of the two-part Chapter 2 Critical Juncture Assessment, which will reveal students’ readiness to move on to Chapter 3 by determining whether they have gained an understanding of what seeds need in their habitats to grow into full-grown plants. The purpose of this lesson is for students to apply what they have learned throughout Chapter 2 in order to explain why the seeds from the chalta trees are not getting what they need to grow into full-grown chalta trees.

Students learn:
• Scientists use scientific vocabulary in their explanations.
• Words such as because can help link ideas together in a scientific explanation.

Lesson at a Glance
1: Revisiting the Bengal Tiger Reserve
Students revisit the first two Chapter Questions with new data about the sunlight and weather patterns in the Bengal Tiger Reserve.
2: A Good Place to Grow in the Everglades
Students complete a new activity in the Plant and Animal Relationships Modeling Tool to identify places where seeds can or cannot grow.
3: Writing a Scientific Explanation
Students work together to write a scientific explanation to answer the Chapter 2 Question. Revisiting topic sentences, supporting ideas, and discussing scientific language helps students structure their explanations.
Chapter 2 Quiz

Social Studies
Leader in Me Chapter 1 Open Book Quiz
Habit 2 Begin with the End in Mind
What Matters Most
Effective leaders know what is most important to them.
Read and discuss What matters most. Students write three actions that show how they live that principle before completing a diamante about what matters most to them.

Interactive Read Aloud: Chores by Nick Bruce
Lesson 2 – A member of Different Groups
Compare and Contrast: Students work in groups to discuss, chart, and explain how the roles will be different when students get older.
Students share out to the class how their roles will be different when they get older.

Interactive Read aloud: Lesson 3 – Around the Neighborhood
Main Idea: People share places in the neighborhood.
Vocabulary: neighborhood, map, location
Students work in pairs to describe their neighborhood to each other.
Students share out their descriptions of their neighborhoods to the class.
Students continue to work on their Anti-Bullying Posters.

Thank you for your support.
Keniesha Charleston and Anh Tuan Hoang

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