Week of May 3

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The second grade classrooms will take their annual field trip to the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum on Friday, May 8. Students will participate in a workshop entitled “Metamorphosing Monarchs” and visit the butterfly atrium. Students will need to bring a bag lunch from home on the day of the field trip as we will be eating lunch at the museum.

As your child continues to research their selected insect, the sources he/she is using may need to be renewed at the library. Parents have reported being able to renew library books on-line. Please ensure your child has the sources available until the end of the research project.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 32 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming
– Teacher gives the rime. Students make rhyming words ending with the given rime.
Ex. T: ack S: black, knack, etc.
Onset Fluency
– Teacher says the word pair. Students open their eyes if the word pair begins with the same vowel sound. Students close their eyes if the word pair do not begin with the same vowel sound.
Blending
– Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Ex. T: /b-a-k-e-r/ S: baker
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Ex. T:/yawn/ S: yAWn
Segmenting
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, T: winner S: winner /w-i-n-er/
Substituting
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes
– Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Reading Centers: Kindle books about insects
Science Center: Observing and noting mealworms’ and crickets’ behavior
Technology Center: A.R. on mini- IPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Sing “Hungry Caterpillar” by TheLearningStation You Tube

Day 1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, May 4, 2015. We will discuss an insect’s incomplete life cycle.
Inquiry Question: Why might some insects’ life cycles undergo only three stages? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can make our own captions or add to existing captions in the book. We can put together what the author tells us, what the picture tells us, and our own thoughts.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: My Life As A Cicada by M. Eigh (Kindle Book, Cloud Reader)
Questions to Guide Discussion:
– What are the life cycle stages of cicadas?
– What is this type of metamorphosis named?
– Using the notes teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s life cycle.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a chapter about their insect’s life cycle.

Day 2
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, May 5, 2015. In social studies, we will learn how to read an information table.
Inquiry Question: How is information easier to understand in table form? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading: Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can make plans alone or with our club members to take action based on the ideas in our books and our reactions to them. We can think about how we can make a real-world difference based on what we’re learning.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
– Interactive Read Aloud: Fireflies by Sally M. Walker Questions to Guide Discussion:
– What are the life cycle stages of fireflies?
– What is this type of metamorphosis named?
– Students continue to write the chapter about their insect’s life cycle.
– Students illustrate the life cycle of their insects.
– Students share their work-in-progress with their partners.

Day 3
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Today is Wednesday, May 6, 2015. We will practice finding coin and bill combinations with equivalent values and using cents and dollars – and – cents notation.
Inquiry Question: How do you show 86 cents two different ways? Which way takes up less space and why? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading: Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Three: In Nonfiction Clubs We Can Compare and Contrast Information about Our Topics
“Club members can compare information in our nonfiction books to what we know in our own lives. Today I want to teach you that we can think about what the book says, and compare it with something similar in our own lives. By comparing these two bits of information, we can come to a new conclusion about the topic we’re studying.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
– Interactive Read Aloud: Bring Home the Butterflies by Tony Gomez
– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter five, which is a “How To”
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the “How To” of insects for their All-About Books.
– Teachers provide, explain, and discuss examples of the How-To chapter on the Smart Board.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss a “How To” and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter Five: “How To”).
– Students work independently to take notes on the “How To” of their insects.

Day 4
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, May 7, 2015. We will begin writing a “how to” for our insect research papers.
Inquiry Question: How might you arrange information in your “how to” to help readers understand clearly what you are writing? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading: Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Three: In Nonfiction Clubs We Can Compare and Contrast Information about Our Topics
“Today I want to teach you that club members can talk about differences in the information we’re learning. We can think about why they are different and then what might explain those differences. This can help us come to new understandings about our topics.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
– Interactive Read Aloud: Mrs.Carter’s Butterfly Garden by Steve Rich
– Using the notes, teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph for the “How To” of their All About Insect Book.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a chapter about the “How To” and illustrate each step of the “How To” of their All About Insect Book.

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 103 (10:00 – 10:45)

Day 5
Spelling Test

Spelling Words:
painter, washer, dryer, flyer, server, worker, singer, teacher, speaker, thinker, dreamer, reason, sketch, problem, justify, check

The above words will be tested on Friday, May 15.

Field Trip to Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum

Math
Lesson 9-7 Expand-and-Trade Subtraction, Part 2 (2 Days)
Students use expand-and-trade subtraction to subtract multi-digit numbers.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

Vocabulary: expand-and-trade subtraction

1. Warm Up

Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers pose the following subtraction problems involving multiples of 10 for students to solve.
70 – 20
65 -10
81 – 30
75 – 25
82 – 42
91 – 41

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
What is a ballpark estimate for 93 – 68 = ?

Have students share their ballpark estimates and invite students to demonstrate his or her solution using base-10 shorthand.
Display the problem in vertical form and list the students’ suggested base-10 shorthand.
Ask: How can we write each number in expanded form?

79
– 34

70 + 9
30 + 4

Ask: Do we need to make any trades?
Teachers guide students through subtracting the tens and then the ones.
Record the steps.

Repeat the process for other problems that do not need subtraction trades.

Introducing Expand-and-Trade Subtraction
Next teachers pose the problem

84
– 56

80 + 4
50 + 6

Have students trade one long for 10 ones.

Tell students that the subtraction method is called expand – and – trade subtraction because students use expanded form to think about whether they need to make trades.

160
– 77

100 + 60 + 0
70 + 7

Teachers record the following number sentence to summarize: 160 – 77 = 83 (“We do”, whole class)

Practicing Expand-and-Trade Subtraction
Students complete p. 234 – 235 to practice expand – and – trade subtraction. (“We do”, partners)

3. Practice
Playing Beat the Calculator
Student play Beat the Calculator as taught during Lesson 5-1.

Math Boxes 9-7
Students complete the mixed practice on p. 236. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 9-8 Equivalent Money Amounts (2 Days)
Students practice finding coin and bill combinations with equivalent values and using cents and dollars – and – cents notation.

Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers pose problems involving money.
How much money is 2 dimes and 6 pennies?
How much money is 1 quarter, 1 dime, and 3 pennies?

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
Ask: How much money is 2 quarters, 5 dimes, 4 nickels, and 7 pennies.
Have volunteers share their strategies they used to find the total of the coins above. (“We do”, whole class)

Reviewing Values of Coins and Bills
Teachers review coin values posing the following questions:

How many pennies are in a nickel? In a dime?
How many pennies are in a quarter? In 50 cents?
How many pennies are in one dollar? In 2 dollars? In 10 dollars?
How many dimes are in a dollar? In 60 cents?
How many nickels are in a quarter? In a dollar? In half a dollar?
How many quarters are in a dollar? In a half dollar?

Tell students they will solve more problems involving money. (“We do”, whole class)

Using Dollars – and – Cents Notation
Ask: What is one way to write one dollar and twenty-seven cents (127 cents)?
What is another way?

Teachers say that an amount with a 0 before the decimal point, such as $0.74, is less than one dollar. It can be written with a cents symbol or dollar-and-cents notation.
Have volunteers scribe the following amounts:
275 cents
305 cents
89 cents

Teachers invite volunteers to share how they knew where to put the decimal point in 3-digit money amounts. (“We do”, whole class)

Making Equivalent Amounts with Coins and Bills
Teachers guide students to examine the Good Buys Poster in journal, p. 238.
Students read money amounts on the poster chorally.

Students complete journal p. 239. (“We do”, partners, small group)

3. Practice
Playing Hit the Target
Students play Hit the Target, using Math Masters p. G25. (“We do”, partners)

Observe
Which students seem to have a strategy for hitting the target number?
Which students need additional support to understand and play the game?

Discuss
How did you decide which number to add or subtract?
If you didn’t hit the target number on your first try, how did you decide what to do next? (“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes 9-8
Students complete Math Boxes 9-8 in journal p. 237. (“You do”, independent)

Science
Food Web
Objective: Students will know that a food web is many food chains linked together.
In a web all the parts are connected, which makes it strong and work effectively.
Picture a spider’s web. All the parts work together to make the web an effective way for the spider to catch prey.
Have note cards created with numerous animals and plants. Then read a teacher created story. As the story continues the students will toss the yarn to their peer. The students will continue until they have created a web. Now the teacher will discuss how in a web the animals rely on one another.
Sometimes an animal may become extinct or have a reduced number. Cut a few connecting strings. Look what happens to our web then. Often animals can adapt their food choice.
The food web we just created is not as complex or complete as the food webs in nature. This is because many times animals can eat more than one type of prey.
Guiding Questions:
Why is it called a food web?
What could happen if part of the food web is somehow disrupted?
Interactive Read-Aloud: Who Eats What? Food Chains and Food Webs by Patricia Lauber
Review
What are the characteristics of an environment? What are the characteristics of a habitat? Review how animals adapt for their environments.
Review the various geographical areas including, tundra, desert, rainforest, grassland, ocean, and freshwater.
Review the similarities and difference of food chains and food webs.
Unit Assessment: Animals and Their Environments

Social Studies
Using Tables:
Objective: Students will understand the characteristics of tables. Also, students will create their own table.
A table is a chart that is used in many non-fiction texts to organize information.
It is important to know how to read these tables.
Tables have many characteristics! Show a chart on the Smart Board. Begin teaching about the characteristics of the chart.
The title shows what information can be found on a table. It is important to look at all of the titles on charts because sometimes a chart can tell more than one thing.
To read a chart you must down the column and across the row.
Have students go back and work with their learning partners to work with a chart. They must answer these questions:
What is the title of the table?
What does the table show?
How is the information organized?
Write something you learned from the table.

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 106 (1:40 – 2:25)

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of April 26

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

The Science Chapter 4 Test will be administered Thursday, May 7. Throughout this week, students will be reviewing by rereading the chapter and completing homework assignments. Please monitor your child’s homework by referring to the textbook pages listed at the bottom of each assignment.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 31 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming
– Teacher gives the rime. Students make rhyming words ending with the given rime.
Ex. T: ack S: black, knack, etc.
Onset Fluency
– Teacher says the word pair. Students open their eyes if the word pair begins with the same vowel sound. Students close their eyes if the word pair do not begin with the same vowel sound.
Blending
– Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Ex. T: /b-a-k-e-r/ S: baker
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Ex. T:/yawn/ S: yAWn
Segmenting
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, T: winner S: winner /w-i-n-er/
Substituting
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes
– Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Reading Centers: Kindle books about insects
Science Center: Observing and noting mealworms’ and crickets’ behavior
Technology Center: A.R. on mini- IPads

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Sing “What is an Insect Song” by Dove Whisper on You Tube

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, April 27, 2015. We will learn how to measure lengths to the nearest half-inch.
Inquiry Question: How do you determine the halfway point between two numbers? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can use our skills of envisioning what the author is saying to really think about the information being presented. We can read a fact on the page and look at the picture. Then we can make the picture move like a movie by reading more facts on that same page. As we see what the author says, we can say what we think about what we see.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: The Big Book of Bugs Damselflies and Dragonflies by DK Publishing p.18-19
Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What are the characteristics of the habitats of damselflies and dragonflies?
-What elements of the habitat are essential to the insects’ survival?
– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter two, which is the insect’s habitat.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the habitat of insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the habitats of their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter two: Habitat(s) of the Insect).
-Students work independently to take notes on the habitat(s) of their insects.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 28, 2015. We will discuss ways in which people respond to natural disasters.
Inquiry Question: How can one be safe during a tornado? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“To get ideas, readers don’t just let the facts fly over our heads. Today I want to teach you that we really try to understand and imagine what we’re learning.
When we do this, we can think about why this information matters, and what our own thoughts about the information are.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: The Big Book of Bugs Stick and Leaf Insects by DK Publishing p. 26-27
Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What are the characteristics of the habitat of stick and leaf insects?
-What elements of the habitat are essential to the insects’ survival?
Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s habitat(s).
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s habitat(s).

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Today is Wednesday, April 29 2015. We will write multi-digit numbers in expanded form and compare them.
Inquiry Question: How can seeing numbers in expanded form help you compare the numbers? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can use sentence starters with question words to help us get ideas. We can ask a question and then push ourselves to answer it. We can use words like, ‘How do. . . ?’ and ‘Why do. . . ?’ and ‘How come. . . ?’”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Ants, Facts and Cool Pictures by James Mayrose (Kindle)
Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What and how do aphids produce food for ants?
-What is the reciprocal relationship between ants and aphids?
– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter three, which is the insect’s diet.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the diet of the insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the diet of their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter two: The Insect’s Diet).
-Students work independently to take notes on the diet of their insects.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, April 30, 2015. We will read and discuss food chain.
Inquiry Question: How does a food chain work? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Today I want to teach you that readers can share our revised thinking with our club members. We can take a fact that we have in the ‘I think I know’ column of our RAN chart and move it based on what we’re now learning. This new information can also help us have an idea.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Sneaker The Praying Mantis Watch Me and Learn by Maura Kempa
Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What is the diet of the praying mantis?
-What is the diet of larger praying mantis?
Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s diet.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s diet.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, May 1, 2015. We will observe and record our mealworms’ activities.
Inquiry Question: How does your mealworm grow? How can you tell if your mealworm has just gotten bigger? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
badly, madly, quickly, weekly, daily, sadly, gladly, proudly, softly, loudly, bravely, pattern, describe, extend, simple, determine

The above words will be tested on Friday, May 8.

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing
Interactive Read Aloud: Complete Life Cycle of the Monarch Butterfly on You Tube (dscotprod)
Questions to Guide Discussion:
-What are the life cycle stages of butterflies?
-What is this type of metamorphosis named?

– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter four, which is the insect’s life cycle.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing about the life cycle of insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the life cycle of their insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter Four: Life Cycle of the Insect).
-Students work independently to take notes on the life cycle of their insects.

Math
Lesson 9-4 Fractional Units of Length (2 Days)
Students measure lengths to the nearest half-inch.

Vocabulary: half-inch, fourth-inch, precise, quarter-inch

Goals:
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.
– Use an appropriate level of precision for your problem.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers display addition problems with four addends. Encourage students to look for combinations that will make adding easier.
13 + 27 + 21 + 19 =
12 + 18 + 23 + 17 =
26 + 24 + 32 + 18 =

Daily Routines
Students complete the daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
What is the length of your pinky finger? Is it about 1 inch or 2 inches long? (“We do”, whole class)

Discussing the Need for Precise Measurements
Have students measure their pinky fingers and label the sticky note in inches.
Students stand in the area of the classroom with the label that corresponds to their pinky finger measurement.
Ask: Can we tell from the measurements which child has the longest pinky finger? The shortest? Why?

Explain that precise measurements can help determine which child has the shortest and which child has the longest pinky finger, regardless of where the students are located. Tell students that a measurement is more precise when it is made using a smaller unit. For example, a measurement to the nearest inch is more precise than a measurement to the nearest foot.
Ask students to measure the length of their journals (from top to bottom, not side to side) to the nearest foot and the nearest inch.
Say: Imagine that a child from another school tells you that their math book is about 1 foot tall, and another child from the same school tells you the same math books are about 10 inches tall. Can you tell from the measurements from the nearest foot whether our math books taller than their math books? Can you tell from the measurements whether our math books are taller than their math books?

Teachers point out that measurement tools are made by people. There is a limit to what people can observe and what tools can do, so all measurements are approximate—close to the measurement but not exact. However, some tools are better than others for making more-precise measurements because they are marked with smaller units, and measurements that are more precise tell us more about the “exact” measurement of an object the less-precise measurements do.

Tell the students that they will explore a measurement unit that will allow them to make more-precise measurements. (“We do”, whole class)

Introducing Half-Inches
Teachers explain that measuring in half-inches rather than in inches or feet, produces more-precise measurements.
Display Math Masters, p. TA33 and have students examine the inch ruler shown on it. Ask a volunteer to point to the mark that divides an inch on the ruler into 2 equal parts. Point out that this mark is called the “half-inch mark”.
Ask: How long is the part between the zero mark and the half-inch mark? The part between the half-inch mark and the 1-inch mark?
Use your fingers to trace the spaces between the 0 and half-inch mark and between the half-inch and the 1-inch mark as the students count chorally: 1-half, 2-halves. Ask: How many half-inches make 1 whole inch?
Next ask: How many spaces are marked between 0 and 1-inch marks? Are these spaces equal in length? Have the students look for the marks that divide the inch into 4 equal parts. Ask: How long is the space between two such marks? Use your fingers to trace the quarter-inch space between the o and 1-inch marks and count the divisions of each inch in unison: 1-fourth, 2-fourths, 3-fourths, 4-fourths. (“We do”, whole class)
Ask: How many fourths-inches make 1 whole inch?
Teachers add a ruler divided into quarter-inches to the 4 Equal Shares poster.

Measuring to the Nearest Half-Inch
Students cut out the 12-inch ruler on Math Masters, p. 259.
Students measure the objects in journal 2, p. 227, and measure their desks.

3. Practice
Partitioning Shapes Into Equal Shares
Have the students partition circles into halves, thirds and fourths in journal, p. 228). (We do”, partners)

Math Boxes 9-4
Students complete the mixed practice in journal, p. 229. (“You do”, independent)

Lesson 9-5 Reviewing Place Value
Students write multi-digit numbers in expanded form and compare them.

Vocabulary: thousand cube

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Teachers will read-aloud the following descriptions of numbers. Have students write the numbers on erasable boards.
Write a number with 7 in the hundreds place, 0 in the tens place, and 4 in the ones place.

Daily Routines
The students complete the daily routines. (“We do”, whole class)

2. Focus
Math Talk
How would you fill in the blanks below?
In 573, the 5 is worth ______, the 7 is worth ______, and the 3 is worth _______.

Reviewing Place Value and Expanded Form

What is the value of the 5?
What is the value of the 7?
What is the value of the 3?

Representing Multi-Digit Numbers
Distribute a Place-Value Mat (Math Masters, p. 262) to each child. Hold up a base-10 cube.
Ask: What is this base-10 block called? What is its value? Repeat with the long and flat.
Ask three volunteers to come to the front of the room. The first child, on the left as viewed by the class, holds 3 flats for all to see. The child in the middle holds up 5 longs, and the child on the right holds up 2 cubes.
Ask: What number do these blocks represent?
Have the students say the number aloud in unison and show it with number cards on their Place-Value Mats.
Next ask: How can these base-10 blocks help us write the expanded form for this number?
Have students write the expanded form.
Repeat this activity with several 3-digit numbers.

Reverse the procedure by displaying a 3-digit number and asking three volunteers to come to the front of the room and show the number with base-10 blocks. Then have all the students show the number with cards on their Place-Value Mats and write the number in expanded form. Include examples with 0 as a digit.

Teachers display the thousands cube. Ask: What do you think this block is worth?
How do you know?

Continue with additional volunteers to display the base-10 thousand cubes, flats, longs and cubes into four-digit numbers. Continue to write the numbers in expanded form. (“We do”, whole class)

Comparing Multi-Digit Numbers
Display the numbers 292 and 289.
Ask: to write the expanded form for each number, with the hundreds, tens and ones for each number aligned vertically.
Ask: How can we use expanded form of each number to help us compare them?
Teachers have students write a number sentence using > , < , =. (“We do”, whole class)

Then, students complete journal, p. 230 using expanded form to compare 3 and 4-digit numbers. (“We do”, partners; small groups)

3. Practice
Playing Shape Capture
Students identify attributes in shapes by playing Shape Capture. (“We do”, partners, teams)
Observe:
Which students can correctly find shapes with specified attributes?
Which students are checking other team’s or player’s selections?
Discuss
How did you make sure the other team or player was capturing shapes that matched the Attributes Cards?
Which shapes were easy to capture? Which were harder to capture? Why?

Math Boxes 9-5
Students complete Math Boxes 9-5 in journal, p. 231. (“You do”, independent)

3. Practice
Playing Shape Capture

Math Boxes 9-5

Lesson 9-6 (2 Days)
Expand-and-Trade Subtraction, Part 1
Students use base-10 blocks to solve subtraction problems. This prepares them to learn expand-and-trade subtraction in the next lesson.

Goals:
– Check whether your answer makes sense.
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students write numbers in expanded form.
508; 876; 1,090; 2,007

Daily Routines
Students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Talk
How can you utilize base-10 blocks to show 221 in at least three different ways?
What base-10 symbols would you write?

Representing Trades with Base-10 Blocks
Have students share their different representations.
Teachers record several examples, making sure to include the following representations.
2 flats, 2 longs, 1 cube
1 flat, 12 longs, 1 cube

Teachers guide a discussion about how students might translate from one representation to the other. For example, if they started with 2 flats, 2 longs, and 1 cube, they could trade 1 flat for 10 longs.
The students could also start with 12 longs, and 1 cube, and then trade 10 longs for 1 flat.

Ask: Which uses the fewest blocks? How do you know?

Have students model the trades with their base-10 blocks.

How could we use expanded form to show the representation with the smallest number of blocks?

Teachers display 200 + 20 + 1 and point out that each number in the expanded form shows the value of one type of block.
Ask: What number model could we write for the other representation?
Teachers display 100 + 120 + 1 and make the connection between the addends and each type of block. (“We do”, whole class)

Representing Subtraction without Trades
Teachers remind students that although there are many different ways to represent a number using base-10 blocks, they can use the fewest possible blocks by matching the number of each type of block to the digits in the number. Have students use the fewest possible base-10 blocks to represent the number 45. Record 4 longs and 5 cubes in base-10 shorthand for the class.
Ask: Are there enough longs and cubes for me to remove 2 longs and 2 cubes? How do you know?
Then ask students how they would use their blocks to show 45 – 22. As they respond, record these steps on the Class Data Pad.

Repeat this process with other subtraction problems that do not require a trade, such as 65 – 31 and 138 – 17. Discuss students’ representations as a class as you record the steps on the Class Data Pad.

Representing Subtraction with Trades
Teachers tell students they will now use their base-10 blocks to solve 53 – 37. Ask the students to represent 53 with base-10 blocks. When they have finished, record a sketch of 5 longs and 3 cubes.
Ask: Are there enough longs and cubes for me to remove 3 longs and 7 cubes?
How can I get more cubes so that I can remove 7 cubes? Teachers have the students trade with their base-10 blocks. Represent this trade on your sketch by crossing out 1 ling and adding 10 cubes.
Ask: Do our blocks still show the number 53?
Do we have enough blocks so we can remove 3 longs and 7 cubes (37) now? Complete the subtraction of 37 removing 3 longs and 7 cubes.
Count the remaining blocks with students. Record the number sentence 53 – 37 = 16.

Repeat this process with other subtraction problems that require trades, such as 72 – 38 and 114 – 86. Discuss the students’ representations as a class while recording the steps on the Class Data Pad. (“We do”, whole class)

Subtracting with Base-10 Blocks
Teachers have students recall how they can check their answers for reasonableness. Remind them that making ballpark estimates can be helpful when they use any addition or subtraction method. If their estimates are not close to their ballpark estimates, then students know they need to look back at their work and fix something. (“We do”, whole class)

Students complete the problems in journal, p. 232. (“We do”, partner; small groups)

3. Practice
Drawing a Line Plot
Teachers have students turn to journal, p. 193 and record their head-size measurements on a sticky-note. Remind them to write large. Teachers guide students to display the sticky-notes in order from smallest to largest. Tell students they will draw line plots to show class head-size measurements. (“We do”, whole class; partners)

Distribute Math Master, p. TA32 or draw a line plot. Have students suggest a label for the horizontal axis and write it below the line. Then have them suggest a title for the line plot and record it. (“We do”, whole class)
Next discuss the horizontal scale for the line plot. The head-size data include measurements to the nearest centimeter. The scale should start with the smallest head size in the class. Teachers model writing the scale while students do the same. Have students draw Xs to represent the class data on their line plots. (“We do”, whole class)

Math Boxes 9-6
Students complete the mixed practice with Math Boxes 9-6 in journal, p. 233. (“You do”, independent; “We do”, partners)

Science
Objective: Students will learn about the environment and habitats in the grassland and tundra.
Grassland:
Grassland is an open area covered with grass. There are few trees. This makes it difficult for large animals to hide anywhere.
What could be one issue for large animals in the grassland?
Often animals travel in groups to stay more protected from predators.
Read Aloud: What Can Live in a Grassland by Sheila Anderson
Tundra: A cold and snowy environment. The plants grow low to the ground to help protect them from the harsh cold environments. They also grow close together.
Animals in this area have thick fur and fat. Both of these help animals in the frigid tundra stay alive.
How have plants and animals adapted to living in the tundra.
Why do plants on the tundra grow close together?
Complete the fat science exploration.

Place shortening in a Ziploc bag. Have the students put one hand in another Ziploc bag and then put that hand in the shortening bag. Leave the other hand bare. Students will then place their hands in cold water to see how much warmer the bag with shortening (fat) is than the hand without.
Food Chain
Read Aloud:Who Eats What? Food Chains and Food Webs by Patricia Lauber
Objective: Students will be able to describe how a food chain works.
A food chain is the order in which living things eat one another.
Begin by showing a basic food chain.
A human eats a hamburger. The hamburger is a cow. The cow ate grass. We just created a simple food chain.
A food chain transfers energy from living thing to living thing.
The grass has received energy from the sun. The cow then ate that grass so the energy was transferred to the cow. The human then received the energy when he/she ate the cow meat.
In the food chain there are two types of animals; they are either predators or prey.
A predator is an animal that hunts for food. The prey is the animal that is being hunted.
Often an animal can be both a predator and the prey.
A snake can be the predator of mice, but will be the prey for an owl.
Have students go back to their seat. Each cluster will have a set of animals and plants. They will be given time to put themselves in an order they believe to be accurate.
The students will the go to the front of the class and say for example.
I am a snake. I am the predator for the mouse and the prey for an owl.
Guiding Questions:
Describe why an animal can be the predator and the prey.
What is transferred in the food chain?

Students observe and record their mealworms’ activities.

Social Studies
Engage prior knowledge through read aloud: Poem That Kind of Day by Eloise Greenfield
Discuss two more Natural Hazards.
How can the weather affect the moods of people?
Well there are sometimes events in the weather that change the lives of people.
Can someone tell me a natural hazard that would affect humans?
There are many natural hazards that can affect people.
These powerful hazards will change the lives of humans.
Also, humans must adapt to survive the storms, and every storm takes a different way of surviving.
Blizzards: Wind drives stow in a heavy snowstorm called a blizzard.
http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=ACxRt5WhY_c
What safety measures do humans need to take because of a blizzard?
Floods: When snow melts or there is a lot of rain, creeks and rivers may flood or leave their banks.
Continue guided note page
Hurricanes are created in the Ocean. They are high wind and rain storms of the coasts. It creates a circular motion with center called the eye.
Watch: http://www.youtube
.com/watch?v=zP4rgvu4xDE
Describe how a human would have to react to a hurricane to stay safe.
Tornado: A strong, whirling wind that causes great damage to land and buildings.
http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=ad5lj876UP0
How do humans need to react to the natural hazard called a tornado?

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 106 (Tuesday1:40 – 2:25) and room 103 (Friday 1:40 – 2:25)

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of April 19

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We had a good turnout for report card pick-up and parent-teacher conferences. Thank you, parents, guardians, and family members. All of you had to take time out of your busy schedules to come to the conferences, and we sincerely applaud you for your dedication. Without your support for your child’s education, our jobs would not be as exciting and enriching as they are.

Students will take a social studies quiz on Friday, April 24. For this quiz, students will need to be able to identify oceans and continents from a given map. This link may be useful in helping your child review for the quiz: http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/World_Continents.htm .

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 30 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming
– Teacher gives the rime. Students make rhyming words ending with the given rime.
Ex. T: ack S: black, knack, etc.
Onset Fluency
– Teacher says the word pair. Students open their eyes if the word pair begins with the same vowel sound. Students close their eyes if the word pair do not begin with the same vowel sound.
Blending
– Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Ex. T: /b-a-k-e-r/ S: baker
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Ex. T:/yawn/ S: yAWn
Segmenting
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, T: winner S: winner /w-i-n-er/
Substituting
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes
– Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Sing “Icky Insects” by Silly Bus YouTube

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Reading Centers: Reading A to Z Awesome Ants by Rus Buyok
Word Study: Word Sorts: Adding –ing to Words With VC and VCC Patterns
Spelling Words
Math Center: Making Equal Parts
Students use pattern blocks to make equal parts
Technology Center: A.R. on mini- IPads

Day1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, April 20, 2015. We will read and discuss about insects.
Inquiry Question: How are insects important to our environment? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that club members don’t just ‘read’ information to one another. We explain and discuss it. Careful nonfiction readers always try to put what we’ve read into our own words. We might read a bit, then put the text down and say, ‘What the author is saying is that . . .’ or ‘What this means is . . . .’ This will help us prepare to talk in our clubs later.”

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
– Teachers guide students utilizing a KWL chart.
– Teachers chart what the students Know, followed by What the students would like to learn.

Interactive Read-Aloud: Insects National Geographic by Robin Bernard
Questions to guide the read-aloud
– What are the characteristics of an insect?
– What is unique about an insect?
– How do insects travel?
– Are insects important to our environment? Why?
– Teachers present the rubric to explain expectations for the insect All-About Books.

(Discussion points used the following day to model note taking for insect research projects.)
– Students work in pairs to view books on insects.

Day 2
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 21, 2015. We will explore equal shares in Math.
Inquiry Question: How do you share 2 brownies equally with 3 people? Share what you think with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that nonfiction readers have read closely to find the main ideas in the text. We read the first sentence of a paragraph and ask, ‘What is this saying?’ Then we read on, sentence by sentence, asking, ‘How does this fit with what’s been said so far?’ to help us find the main idea. Readers take the sentences we’ve read and say what we learned in one short statement.”
Tip: “Readers of nonfiction can think about the topic of the whole book and the subtopic of the section. Then, as we read the sentences on the page, we can think, ‘What’s the part of the larger topic this section is dealing with? What does the author want me to think, know, or understand about that subtopic?’ ”

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
Interactive Read-Aloud: Bugs Are Insects by Anne Rockwell p.1-15

– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter one, which is what is an insect and its characteristics.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing the characteristics of insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the characteristics of insects, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter One: Characteristics of Insects).
– Students work independently to take notes on the characteristics of insects.

Day 3
Morning Meeting
Morning Message:
Today is Wednesday, April 22 2015. We will read and discuss taking notes about your chosen insect.
Inquiry Question: What are the characteristics of your chosen insect? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Mid-Workshop Teaching Point: “Readers are on the lookout for when our book switches topics. We know that sometimes there isn’t a heading that will alert us to the change, and instead we should think, ‘What part of the main topic is this dealing with? Is it the same or different from the last page?’”
Teaching Share: “Sometimes the author is being clever with the section heading and we need to figure out what the section is really about. We can read each sentence and think, ‘How does this fact fit with the heading?’ Then, at the end of the page or section, we can retitle that section with a heading that makes sense.”

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
– Interactive Read Aloud: Bugs Are Insects by Anne Rockwell p.16-33

– Using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to take notes for chapter one; what are the specific characteristics of each student’s chosen insect.
– Teachers review the rubric to explain expectations for writing the characteristics of insects for their All-About Books.
– Students collaborate in pairs to read and discuss the characteristics of each student’s chosen insect, and to generate ideas for their writing (Chapter One: Characteristics of each student’s chosen insect).
– Students work independently to take notes on the characteristics of their chosen insects.

Day 4
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, April 23, 2015. We will read and discuss the characteristics of fresh water and saltwater environments.
Inquiry Question: What are the similarities of and differences of fresh water and saltwater environments? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that we can come to our clubs with confusions or misunderstandings and talk to the other members of the club to clarify them. We may start by saying what we read in our book and explaining what’s confusing. Then, the other members in the club can talk back to the questioning member to explain or ask further questions to help fix up the confusion.”

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
Interactive Read-Aloud: Bugs and Other Insects by Bobbie Kalman and Tammy Everts p. 4-5

– Teachers model to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.
– Students discuss/practice with a partner how they would elaborate their notes.
– Using their notes, students begin composing a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.

Day 5
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, April 24, 2015. We will clarify our Open Response drawings and words to explain and revise our thinking.
Inquiry Question: How can examining and discussing a student’s Open Response help you clarify your thinking? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
whale, when, where, what, why, which, whistle, whip, whiff, while, whirl, represent, show, display, know, count

The above words will be tested on Friday, May 1.

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part Two: In Nonfiction Clubs We Don’t Only Learn What the Author Says, We Have Our Own Ideas, Too
“Readers can have reactions to the information presented in our books. We can think about how we feel when we read a section or part of our book, and make a statement about what our response is. We can say, ‘That is really important because . . . ’ ‘This part makes me feel . . . ,’ or ‘This seems really surprising because. . . .’”

Writing
Insects Research (All About Book)
Teachers re-demonstrate to students how to elaborate on the notes we have taken to write a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.
– Using their notes, students continue composing a paragraph about their insect’s characteristics.
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Math
Lesson 9-1 Creating and Naming Equal Parts
Students divide shapes and use fraction vocabulary to name the shares.

Vocabulary: equal share, one-half (1-half), two-halves (2-halves), one-fourth (1-fourth), one-quarter (1-quarter), four-fourths (4-fourths), one-third (1-third), three-thirds (3-thirds)

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency/Math talk
Students write numbers in expanded from. They explain their answers.

2. Focus
Math Message
Take 8 squares.
Two students want to share a sandwich equally. Fold a paper square to show how to divide the sandwich into 2 equal shares. Draw a line on the fold. Talk with a partner. Did you both fold the square the same way?

Folding Squares into Equal Shares (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Math Message Follow-Up: Invite students to share the different ways they folded the squares. Expect students to fold a square into 2 equal shares in two ways: from side to side and diagonally.
Ask: How can you show your partner that you have equal shares?
Explain that students will divide squares into different numbers of equal shares and name the shares.

Naming 2, 4 and 3 Equal Shares (Whole Class/Small Group/ Partner)
Begin a 2 Equal Shares poster on the Class Data Pad or chart paper. Have students refer to their paper squares from the previous activity. Ask the following questions. Record students’ answers on the poster.
How can you name one student’s share?
How can you name both shares together?
If students do not mention all of the names shown on the same poster, write one of the missing names and ask students why it should be on the poster. Repeat with any other missing names. As students share the names of one-half and two-halves, point out that these can be written as number-and-word combinations: 1-half and 2-halves.

To complete the poster, attach examples of students’ squares showing equal shares two different ways. As the unit progress, add examples of other shapes partitioned into halves.

Draw a square divided into 2 unequal parts. Tell students it is a piece of toast. Ask: Did I divide the toast into halves?
Why or why not?

Next, have students take another square. Ask: How can 4 students share a sandwich equally? Have partners fold several squares of paper to show as many different ways as possible to divide a sandwich into 4 equal parts. Tell them to draw lines along the folds to show the equal shares.

Observe partners as they work. If they do not suggest all of the solutions, prompt them to look for other solutions.

Ask students how they can show that the shares of each paper square are equal.

Begin a 4 Equal Shares poster on the Class Data Pad. Ask the following questions. Record students’ answer on the poster.
How can you name on student’s share?
How can you name all of the shares together?

If students do not mention all of the names shown on the same poster, write one of the missing names and ask students why this name should be include on the poster. Repeat with any other missing names.

To complete the poster, attach examples of student’s squares showing 4 equal shares three different ways. As the unit progresses, add examples of other shapes partitioned into fourths.

Then discuss the idea of 3 equal shares. Ask: How can 3 students share a sandwich equally? Have partners use paper squares to show as many different ways as possible to divide a sandwich into 3 equal shares. Before they begin, suggest that they think about what the 3 equal parts should look like.

Begin a 3 Equal Shares poster. Ask the following questions and record students’ answer on the poster.
How can you name one student’s share?
How can you name all of the shares together?

If students do not mention all of the names shown on the poster, write one of the missing names and ask students why it should
Be included on the poster. Repeat with any other missing names.

To complete the poster, trace a square and ask a volunteer to draw on it to show 3 equal shares. As the unit progresses, add examples of other shapes partitioned into thirds.

Next, have students sort their squares into piles according to whether they show 2, 3, or 4 equal parts. Ask:
Is the whole the same for all of the squares you folded? How do you know?
Are the shares the same for all of the squares you folded? How do you know?

Partitioning Shapes (Whole Class/ Small Group/ Partner)
Students partition shapes and, for each shape, name a single part and the whole. Some students may benefit from folding 8.5-by-11” sheets of paper to help them partition the shapes.

Assessment Check-In (Math Journal2, pp. 220-221)
Expect most students to be able to show one way to partition the rectangles on journal pages 220-221 into halves, fourths, and thirds and write one name for a part and one name for all of the parts together. Some students may be able to partition the rectangles in multiple ways and write more than one name for a part or for all of the parts together.

Summarize
Refer to the 2 Equal Shares, 4 Equal Shares, and 3 Equal Shares posters. Review the names on each poster for 1 share and for all shares together. Emphasize that these names can be used only for figures divided into parts that are equal. Have volunteers add rectangle drawings with appropriate partitions to each poster.

3. Practice
Playing Array Concentration (partner)
Math Masters, p. G31
Students play Array Concentration to practice finding how many objects are in arrays and writing number models.
Observe
– Do students have efficient strategies for finding the total number of dots in an array? Which students need additional support?
Discuss
– How did you find the total? Is there a faster way?
– How do you know that your number model matches the array?

Students complete Math Boxes 9-1 independently.

Lesson 9-2 Exploring Equal Shares, Pattern-Block Fractions, and Number Lines (2 Days)
Students explore equal shares of different shapes, use pattern blocks to divide shapes, and make a number line.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency/Math talk
Display addition problems with three or four addends. Ask students to look for combinations to make adding easier. Students explain their reasoning.

13 + 17 + 12 + 20 =
14 + 23 + 21 + 27=

2. Focus
Math Message
Solve the problem on journal page 223. Explain your thinking to a partner.

Explaining Equal Shares
(Whole Class/ Small Group/ Partner)
Math Message Follow-Up:
Invite student to share their thinking about whether Juan shared the cracker equally.

Some students may think that Juan didn’t share the cracker equally because the pieces are different shapes. Guide the discussion so that students see that the 3 shares are equal in size. If no one mentions that each piece is composed of 3 smaller squares, display Math Masters, page 248 and use shading to show students the 3 small squares that make up each share.

After explaining the Explorations activities, assign groups to each one. Plan to spend most of your time with students working on

Exploration A: Sharing Crackers
Students divide crackers into equal parts and explain how they know the parts are equal.

Teachers explain that they can draw horizontal or vertical (but not diagonal) line segments to connect the dots on the crackers. (“We do”, whole class)

After students divide the crackers, have them write fraction words to name parts of each cracker. (“We do”, partners)

Exploration B: Making Equal Parts
Students use pattern blocks to divide shapes into equal parts.
Have students cover shapes with pattern blocks on Math Masters, p. 215-252 and use their Pattern Block Template to record their work. (“We do”, partners, small groups)

Exploration C: Making a Number Line
Students make number lines and label their halfway marks.
Students use paper strips to make number lines and label them with whole numbers. They discuss names for the number represented by tick marks between whole numbers. (“We do”, partners, small groups)

Summarize
Invite volunteers to discuss how they know that the crackers from Exploration A were divided into equal shares. (“We do”, whole class)
3. Practice
Practicing with Fact Triangles

Math Boxes 9-2
Students complete Math Boxes 9-2 to reinforce and maintain previously taught concepts.

Lesson 9-3 Sharing Muffins (2 Days)
Day 1: Open Response
Students decide how to share muffins equally and use words to name the shares.

Vocabulary: equal shares, one-half, two-halves, one-fourth, four-fourths, one-quarter

Goals:
– Compare the strategies you and others use.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Mental Math and Fluency
Students solve addition problems with 3 or more addends.
Teachers display addition problems with four addends. Encourage students to look for combinations that make the addition easier.

13 + 17 + 12 + 20 =
14 + 23 + 21 + 27=
13 + 17 + 22 + 18=

2. Focus
Math Talk
Students share their thinking about ways of naming all the shares in a shape partitioned into thirds. Discuss how both Jaylan and Leila had correct ways of naming the partitioned paper.

An Art Project
Students discuss their ideas about ways of naming all the shares of a shape partitioned into thirds. Use this discussion to review the representations and vocabulary on the Class Equal Shares Poster. (“We do”, whole class)

Solving the Open Response Problem
Students show how to divide muffins equally among two and four students, describing each student’s share.

Distribute Math Masters, p. 254-255. Read the problem as a class and ask partners to discuss what the problem asks them to do.
Encourage students to refer to the Equal Shares Posters and use fraction vocabulary like that on the posters as they talk about and write responses to the problem. Review the terms one-half, two-halves, one-fourth, four fourths. Tell students that an important part of the task is to write how much a muffin is in one student’s share.

Circulate as the students work. Ask students to explain their drawings and descriptions of one student’s share, and encourage them to add details to clarify responses.

Assessment Opportunity
Note students’ strategies.

Summarize
Ask: How did you show your work and thinking for this problem? Did you use words, symbols, or anything else?

Collect Students’ work to evaluate and prepare for Day 2

Day 2: Open Response
Review student work, teacher notes, and the rubric on p. 795 to plan ways to help students meet expectations on both the content and practice standards. Look for misconceptions in students’ description so of the as well as different correct ways children choose to share muffins and name the shares

2b. Focus
Display responses to Problem 1 that show different strategies for sharing muffins and describing one child’s share.
Ask:
How do you think student A shared the muffins?
Does student B have the same strategy for sharing the muffins?
How does the drawing for student A show how many show how much muffin Anna or Sammy get?
How does the drawing for student B show how many show how much muffin Anna or Sammy get?
Do student A and student B agree or disagree about how much muffin goes to Anna or Sammy?
For student A, do the words about a child’s share match the drawing?
For student B, do the words about a child’s share match the drawing?

Display responses to Problem 2. Discuss the strategies students use to share muffins and how they describe one child’s share. Have students interpret and compare the strategies.
What do you think this student is trying to show with this drawing?
Do you have suggestions for how the drawing can be improved?
What do you think this student is trying to say with the words?
Do you have suggestions for how the words can be improved?
Have students improve the clarity and completeness of their drawings and descriptions of each child’s share.

3. Practice
Math Boxes 9-3
Students practice and maintain skills.

Science
Objective: Students will be able to describe the characteristics of a freshwater habitat.
A pond, lake, river, creek are often freshwater.
Describe to me what a pond is.
A pond is a small freshwater environment.
Many animals and plants call ponds and other freshwater environments their habitats.
Show pictures of some of these animals including fish, beaver, water lilies, and the water strider.
Fish have gills to breathe underwater.
The beaver has webbed feet so it can swim more easily through water. The beaver also has extremely sharp teeth to cut down trees and build homes.
The water lilies grow on the top of the water to get the needed sunlight for survival.
The water strider’s legs help it walk on water without ever sinking.
What do we notice about the legs of the water strider?
Pretend you are a fresh water animal or plant. Draw yourself with the adaptations that would help you survive. Or write about the adaptations you would have and why. Be sure to label your adaptations.
Objective: Students will be able to describe the environments of both the desert and rainforest. They will describe one similarity and one difference of these environments.
Rainforest: A wet environment that gets rain nearly every day.
Often there is less growth near the bottom of the rain forest.
Infer why there is less growth near the bottom of the rainforest.
The rainforest had very tall trees that reach for the sunlight. Therefore other plants have adapted to grow near the top of these trees.
Desert: A dry environment that gets little rain. Few plants and animals can survive in this environment.
Plants that do survive have adapted in order to survive.
A cactus stores water to use when needed.
Other animals have adapted the way they find food.
On a Chicago summer is it cooler or hotter at night?
It is also cooler in the desert. Therefore, many animals, like the lizard, hide in the shade all day and search for food at night when it is much cooler.
Read Aloud: What Can Live in a Desert? by Sheila Anderson
Students will be able to describe the life in an ocean and the differences between salt water and fresh water.

The students view short videos, which introduce oceans. One of the videos is an introduction to the types of animals in the ocean environment.
Students will also watch Why the oceans are salty from


25 Most Terrifying Sea Creatures

Social Studies
Read Aloud: Ox Cart Man by Donald Hall
This book is about the past and farming in the past.
Before reading:
What is the past?
This book is about how farming was in the past.
Can anyone predict what may be the same and what may be different than the read-aloud that was on Friday?
What may be different?
After Reading:
Chart Ox Cart Man on the Venn diagram.

Oceans and Continents Quiz

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 106 Tuesday (1:40 – 2:25)

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 103 Friday (1:40 – 2:25)

Thank you for your support,

Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of April 12

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

We hope you and your family had a good spring break.

As part of the FOSS science program, second grade students are observing and feeding mealworms (beetle larvae stage), Painted Lady butterflies (pupae stage), and crickets (nymph stage). These experiences are providing a path to develop scientific thinking, including formulating inquiry questions essential for the insect research project.
Therefore, students will be writing insect-themed research papers as well as designing and creating an insect habitat. Please provide your child with a cardboard shoebox. If your child did not bring Crayola Model Magic last fall, please submit one package this week.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 29
Rhyming (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the nonsense word. Students produce real rhyming words.
Onset Fluency (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and then isolate the onset from the rime, as written. Ex: T: pouch, S: pouch /p-ouch/
Blending (Words change daily)
– Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and they say the whole word.
Identify Final and Medial Sounds (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word in regular voice. Students repeat the word and “punCH ouT the sOUnd!”
Segmenting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the whole word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Example, Teacher: found, Students: found; /f-ou-n-d/
Substituting (Words change daily)
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ to /*/ and the word is? *Use sounds
Adding Phonemes (Words change daily)
– Teacher says word or word part. Students repeat the word or word part. Teacher says and the word is? *Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes
– Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left? *Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Sharing: Students share their friendly letters about characters in stories read or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Sing “A Hole in the Bottom of the Sea” (food chain) from YouTube, Barefoot Books

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Word Study: Word Sorts: Adding –ing to Words With VC and VCC Patterns
Spelling Words
Math Center: Building pyramids.
Students build pyramids from straws and twist ties.
Technology Center:
A.R. on mini- IPads

Day1
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, April 13, 2015. We will read and discuss about wind power during social studies.
Inquiry Question: How can we utilize wind as a power source? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Interactive Read-Aloud: Dear Mrs. LaRue Letters from Obedience School by Mark Teague

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Launching The Unit
This part is all about reminding children that they already know a lot about how to read nonfiction and that it’s time to switch from thinking about characters to reactivating that nonfiction mindset. Bring out your old nonfiction charts. Remind children of all they know.
Explain to students about book clubs:
– A reading club is formed around a basket of books that has been collected because the books relate to one another in some way.
– A reading club doesn’t involve a particular task, other than reading and talking about books.
– Reading clubs aren’t a permanent daily structure of every reading workshop period all year, but instead are used a couple times a year for two to four weeks at a time.
– In a reading club, readers partner with other children who are reading at about the same reading level and have the same or similar interests.
– Partners read and talk about texts in their reading clubs, and then they ponder questions, develop ideas, develop theories, celebrate discoveries, and so on.
– The work that students do in reading clubs allows them to become experts on their topics and increases their comfort and familiarity with different kinds of texts and reading strategies.
– Club and partnership work are teacher-supported as the teacher confers with individuals, partners, and club members.
– Reading clubs are in addition to, not instead of, daily independent reading.
Assign students into clubs.
During conversations, mentor children in the kind of independent talk they will initiate in their club. When mentoring students’ conversations, exemplify the kind of independent thinking that students are expected to do as they read.
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session13 Prove it! Adding Quotes to support Opinions
Minilesson
Connection: Share your observations about the impressive work students have been doing in this unit. Recall prior learning about quotation marks and hint at the new work they can do. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate how you use direct quotes from the touchtone text to support your opinion. Reread your writing, thinking about your opinion. Then go back to the text to find evidence to support your opinion. Finally, add in the direct quote, using revision strips and quotation marks. Restate the entire teaching point, recapping your process, to reinforce the demonstration.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to plan for their independent work. Ask students to recall their writing and make a plan for how to make it stronger by quoting the books they are writing about.
Link: Remind students to call upon all they know to make their writing strong and powerful. Give them an opportunity to get started on their revision work, right in the meeting area, before sending them off to work independently.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, April 14, 2015. We will continue to write letters of nominations of favorite books.
Inquiry Question: How can you persuade readers to read your nominated book? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Reading
– Interactive Read Aloud: Insects What Does It Take To Be An Insect? P. 4-5 by Molly Marr

Using the read aloud to review with students that when we read nonfiction texts independently, we don’t just roar on, tearing through the text at the speed of a Ferrari. We pause quickly and often to collect our understanding. We think, “What have we learned so far?” or “What was this part about?” and hold this information in our mind as we move forward in the book. Of course, when readers stop to recollect what we’ve just read, we are likely to be more mindful, also, of what ought to come next. Tell students they need to learn to categorize text into sections to make sense of the sections, and teach them how to make mental containers as they read and drop the information they learn into the various categories.
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
– Interactive Read Aloud: LaRue Across America Postcards From America by Mark Teague
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 14 Good. Better. Best.

Have a student share his or her writing with the whole class.
Students also share their writing with a partner.
Review vocabulary words by having students get up to stretch and say out loud what the words mean: introduction, opinion, persuade, conclusion, evidence

Minilesson
Connection: Tell students a story about watching movies and then comparing them in a discussion with friends. Relate this to the kind of thinking and writing they can do across books. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Show students how you compare similar books. Model your thinking closely about what aspects of the book you are comparing, and then include this thinking in your writing. Debrief, reviewing the steps you went through to compare books and think closely about the comparison.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to practice this work using books from your collection.
Link: Remind students how making comparisons between books is another kind of evidence that can support their opinion. Give them an opportunity to come up with some possible books to compare.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 3
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, April 15, 2015. We will read and discuss environmental factors which require animals and plants to adapt in order to survive.
Inquiry Question: What are some ways animals and plants adapt? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Interactive Read Aloud: Detective LaRue Letters from the Investigation by Mark Teague

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
This part is all about reminding children that they already know a lot about how to read nonfiction and that it’s time to switch from thinking about characters to reactivating that nonfiction mindset. Bring out your old nonfiction charts. Remind children of all they know.
“Today I want to teach you that we need to come to our clubs prepared to talk about our topics. One way we can do this is to really listen to the text. We don’t just read with explaining voices; nonfiction readers, in fact, actually explain the text to ourselves as we go along—we pause after a few words and explain whatever we’ve read to ourselves, using our own words if we can. It’s almost like the explaining voice in our head is a real teacher who makes sure we understand each section before moving on. Then we will be ready to explain and talk in our clubs about our topic.”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session15 Giving Readers Signposts and Rest Stops
Minilesson
Connection: Gather your writers and explain how longer sentences need some rest stops. Name the teaching point.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Invite your writers to notice some rest stop punctuation in a few well-written sentences. Guide them through the steps of first noticing the punctuation and then asking themselves what the purpose of the punctuation is. Record punctuation observations in a class chart.
Link: Before sending students off, give them a chance to try rest-stop punctuation in their own fabulous writing. Remind the class that punctuation is one way of taking care of your readers.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4
Parent/Teacher Conferences
No Class for Students

Day 5
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, April 17, 2015. We will write about the lab observations from the Duck Feather experiments.
Inquiry Question: What additional animal can you identify that has a similar characteristic like the duck’s feather? Share your thinking with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
bolt, jolt, colt, felt, belt, welt, built, stilt, wilt, melt, salt, face, edge, vertices, set, tally

The above words will be tested on Friday, April 24.

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Reading
Unit 6 Nonfiction Reading Clubs
Part One: We Know How to Be Strong Nonfiction Readers, and Now We Can Do That with Our Club
“Today I want to teach you that we need to come to our club ready to talk about the main ideas about our topic. We can figure out the main idea by noticing the who and what of the page or part. This helps us name the subject and the action as we read. To find the main idea, we can think, ‘What’s the relationship between the who and the what?’ and ‘How can I say this main idea as a sentence?’ ”
– Students read independently or with a partner.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 16 Writing Introductions and Conclusions to Captivate
Minilesson
Connection: Tell students that you are impressed with their nomination writing and all of the strategies that they are using to make their pieces powerful and persuasive. Explain that opinion writers have the challenge of catching the attention of their audience and communicating their claims, before releasing them. Name the inquiry question.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Set writers up to investigate a mentor text by guiding then through a series of steps that help students discover answers to the overarching question. Then listen in and coach, to elicit and collect their comments. Coach students to study structure, voice, word choice, and craft as they work in pairs. Listen in and highlight observations that students make. Reconvene the group to elicit students’ observations. Repeat their observations using more precise language, and record these on sticky notes to add to a Venn diagram chart.
Link: Send writers off to work independently, reminding them to call on prior knowledge as well as what they have learned today about writing introductions and conclusions.
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Review/Games
(Day 1)
Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

Exploring Arrays
What You Need
Exploring Arrays Record Sheet, page 112
cubes
paper clip

What to Do
Work with a partner
1. Spin the paper clip. Take the number of cubes that matches the number on which the paper clip lands.
2. Build an array using your cubes. The array should have the same number of cubes in each row. No cubes should be left over.
3. Record the number and draw the array on Exploring Arrays Record Sheet, page 112.
4. Build a different array with your cubes and record your work. The array should have the same number of cubes in each row with no cubes left over.
5. Repeat Step 1-4.

Talk About It
Describe your arrays to your partner.
My array has ___ rows. There are ___ cubes in each row.
My array has ___ columns. There are ___ cubes in each column.

(Day 2)
Goals:
– Solve your problems in more than one way.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

Adding Four 2-Digit Numbers

What You Need
spinner
paper clip
paper
pencil

What to Do
Work with a partner or by yourself.
1. Spin the spinner 4 times.
2. Write an addition problem using the numbers from the spinner.
3. Solve your addition problem.
4. Repeat 3 more times.

Talk About It
Tell someone which numbers you added first and why.

Unit 8 Assessment (Wednesday, April 15)
Skills:
– Draw a 3 or 4-sided shape with or without a right angle.
– Name and explain polygons (triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons).
– Recognize parallel sides in a polygon.
– Name attributes of 3-dimensonal shapes, such as cube, rectangular prism, pyramid, cylinder, cone, etc.) For example, a rectangular prism has 6 faces, the faces are rectangles, a rectangular prism has 12 sides and 8 vertices.
– Partition a rectangle into same-size squares.
– Draw an array with given rows and columns. Write a number model for the array.

Cumulative Assessment (Friday, April 17)
Skills:
– Tell time to the nearest 5 minutes.
– Estimate and measure lengths to the nearest inch and centimeter.
– Make friendly numbers to add four 2-digit numbers (e.g.13 + 12 + 17 + 28 = ? Add 13 and 17 first. Then add 12 and 28, etc.)
– Solve comparison number stories (e.g. Taylor is 54 inches tall. Gracie is 48 inches tall. How much taller is Taylor?)
– Read and interpret a bar graph.
– Use given data to create a bar graph.

Science
Switch the students thinking about the use of natural resources from the perspective of a human to a prospective of a living item in that environment.
Yesterday we talked about how humans use the natural resources.
How do other living species use the same natural resources?
What happens when there are no natural resources for these animals and plants to use?
Often because of humans or other environmental factors animals are forced to adapt in order to survive.
Some of these adaptations include extra blubber on ocean animals or how ducks have oily skin. These small adaptations happen over time. Often animals slowly change with the environment. The environment is constantly changing and animals and plants are a part of the environment.
Duck feather experiment:
Students will have two duck feathers, one they will cover in grease and the other they will not. The students will then dip each feather into water and notice the differences. The plain feather is before an animal like a duck adapted.
Vocabulary quiz (Friday, April 17) on the following words: habitat, adapt, rain forest, grassland, desert, ocean, pond, food chain, food web, and environment

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 103 (Friday 1:40 – 2:25)

Social Studies
Natural Resources continued:
Students will begin discussing the use of air and soil.
Read Aloud: Wind Power by David Neufeld
Who here has ever seen a windmill before?
Can some describe to me how these windmills look?
What does the environment where these windmills are located look like? Can someone infer why it is such barren land?
Can anyone infer how the windmill helps make energy?
How does soil help meet our need for food?
Have a discussion about some of the pros and cons of using natural resources to help humans.

Introduce the multi- level independent read aloud to support students of all reading levels.

Students will compare the tools people used in the past to the tools used today.
Discuss how technology has adapted in just the students’ lives.
Read-Aloud: Heartland by Diane Siebert
Teacher questions throughout reading.
Predict which tools we believe the characters in Heartland had that people from long ago also had.
Teacher and students will fill in a time line on the Smart Board. The time line will be focused on the time period of Heartland in comparison to the students’ birthdate, and approximate birth of parents, and grandparents
On Monday we will be reading Ox Cart Man by Donald Hall, which is a similar story, but from long, long ago.

Drama @ Murray program through the Ingenuity Creative Schools grant by Mr. Duone Brown:
Lookingglass Residency at Murray for room 106 (Tuesday 1:40 – 2:25)

Thank you for your support,

Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of March 29

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Beginning on April 20, students will be writing a research paper in class about insects. The teachers will meet with your child prior to this to select an insect of choice. Once the decision is made, please help your child select informational texts from home, school and community libraries to use in class. Students are required to bring three sources to class by Monday, April 13 in order to have sufficient information for the research. The three options are:

Option 1: one book, one magazine article, and one child-friendly internet article
Option 2: two books, and one child-friendly internet article
Option 3: three grade level books

Friday, April 3 is a school improvement day for staff. It is a non-attendance day for students.

Spring break begins Monday, April 6, for students and staff members. Classes resume Monday, April 13.

Upon return from spring break, students will take the math Unit 8 Assessment on Tuesday, April 14 and the Cumulative Assessment on Wednesday, April 15. The study guide for the Unit 8 Assessment will be sent home next week. Please refer to the study guide as well as graded homework to support your child.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 28 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming: Teacher says a real word. Students make nonsense rhyming words from it.
Onset Fluency: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word, and then isolate the beginning onset.
Ex: T: kite S: /k/
Blending: Basic sight word review
Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher reads the word series. Students say the requested sound (varies by day).
Tues & Wed: Final Sound, Thurs & Fri: Medial Sound
Segmenting: Basic sight word review
Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: too, S: too; t-oo
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ (underlined word) to /*/ and the word is?
Ex. T: waterfall, S: waterfall, T: change the/fall/ to /melon/ and the word is? S: watermelon
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Listening Centers: Mentor Texts Chickens by Gail Gibbons; Mercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo
Word Study: Word Sorts: Adding -ing to Words With VC and VCC Patterns
Word Study: Beginning-Middle-End, Finding Phonemes in Sound Boxes
Word Building with Fry Spelling Words
Math Center: Finding Differences
Students work in pairs to find the difference between a 2-digit number and a multiple of 10.
Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading levels two-five sight words
c. A.R. on Mini-iPads
d. Kindle books related to the Guided Reading Themes and Stories embedded sight words.

Day 1:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, March 30, 2015. We will build equal groups and arrays and write number models for them.
Inquiry Question: How does making equal groups or arrays help you write addition models?
Share your thinking with a classmate!

Interactive Read-Aloud: Cowgirl Kate and Cocoa by Erica Silverman
Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“There are lots of ways that a reading club can tackle comparing and contrasting series books. Today, you will have a few options for how your club will do this work. You could get lots of ideas going by having two members read a couple books in one series while the other members read two books in another series, or you could focus on character similarities and differences across series. Other book clubs may prefer to focus on the big ideas. Maybe you might even think about how certain types of books (funny, detective, etc.) are similar and different.”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing Workshop
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 11 Publishing Our Opinions for All to Read
Mini-lesson
Connection: Drumroll the upcoming writing celebration. Remind students that writers fancy up their writing before publishing, and ask them to recall which tools located in the classroom they can use as resources to do this. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Start a quick study of one of the book you have written about. Think out loud about what you see, noting not just the feature but why you think the author or illustrator included it. Start a quick chart to list different extras writers might include.
Active Engagement: Invite students to find the extras in their books, asking why the author may have chosen to include them.
Link: Remind students of their ongoing work and invite them to add the work of including extras to their plans for the day.
Students publish one of their letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, March 31, 2015. We will complete our personal maps and present the maps with the class
Inquiry Question: What are important features to focus on when you listen to the map presentations? Share what you know with a classmate!

Interactive Read-Aloud: Cowgirl Kate and Cocoa: School Days by Erica Silverman
Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“We know that, just like real people, characters can act differently depending on who they are with or who they are around. Today I want to teach you that, as readers, we can come up with possible reasons this is so. We can closely study the patterns around our characters’ interactions and then make theories about these patterns. We can try to figure out why they’re acting or reacting in certain ways. Are they trying to impress or embarrass or annoy the other character they’re with? Why?”
“Readers can even come up with new theories as we study characters’ reactions and interactions. We can look from book to book to book within a series to see if and when these patterns tend to repeat.”
– Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 11 Publishing Our Opinions for All to Read
Students continue to publish one of their letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: When is Handwriting a Priority?

Day 3:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, April 1, 2015. We will read and discus natural resources. Inquiry Question: How have you used natural resources today? Share what you know with a classmate!

Interactive Read-Aloud: Cowgirl Kate and Cocoa: Rain or Shine by Erica Silverman
Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“Whether we’re reading alone or talking in our clubs, readers come up with theories about why characters do certain things or say certain things. We also read to find out what the author is trying to teach us. Today I want to teach you that we can think about how these theories and ideas matter to the real world. For example, after reading Chester’s Way, we may ask, ‘What does this make me think about copycats now?’ or ‘Does this book or this series help me to think differently about best friends now?’ ”
– Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session12 And the Nominees Are…
Mini-lesson
Connection: Tells students a story about visiting a bookstore and noticing all of the award-winning books. Explain that this is the work they will be undertaking: writing nominations for their own favorite books. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Walk students through the steps you take: first, choosing a book to nominate, then thinking about what makes your chosen book so special and the reasons why it is deserving of an award. Debrief.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to practice, first by choosing a book to nominate, and then by planning the reasons why their books deserve an award. Ask students to rehearse their writing with their partners.
Link: Send students off to write, reiterating the procedure you introduced during the mini-lesson.
Students begin writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, April 2, 2015. We will perform an experiment to learn about adaptation.
Inquiry Question: Why is it necessary for living things to change? Share what you know with a classmate!

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
soft, lift, shift, drift, gift, left, raft, craft, loft, swift, sift, apart, form, congruent, arrange, geometric

The above words will be tested on Thursday, April 17.

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Interactive Read-Aloud: Cowgirl Kate and Cocoa: Partners by Erica Silverman
Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Four: Readers Let a Series Book Lead Us into Learning about a Topic
“Readers, sometimes reading one book can lead us to wonder about new topics. Today I want to teach you that when you find yourself wondering about something as you read your series book, you can stop and say, ‘I want to learn more about that!’ ”
Tip: “While reading and talking about our series books, we may wonder things like, ‘What kind of place is this?’ or ‘Who are/were these people?’ or ‘What is life like for ____________?’ This can help us find topics we may want to learn more about.”
Tip: “We can look over the books we have read so far and come up with some possible topics to learn about. Today I want to teach you that this can be done in different ways, on our own or in our clubs. We can work together to find out more about one thing we wonder about, or we can each investigate a different topic and then bring back what we each find to share with our clubs.”
– Students read independently and/or discuss with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 3 Writing Nominations and Awarding Favorite Books
Session 12 And the Nominees Are…
Students continue writing nominations for their favorite books, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Getting Mileage Out of Any Learning Tools You Have at Hand

Day 5:
School Improvement Day

Math
Lesson 8-9 More Equal Groups and Arrays
Students build equal groups and arrays and write number models for them.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Pose subtraction problems. Students explain how they use ballpark estimates to help them find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Complete Problem 1 on journal page 212. Share your number story with a partner.

Sharing Number Stories (Whole Class/Small Group)
Math Message Follow-Up: Invite students to share their number stories and drawings. Some students may have written equal-groups stories and others may have written arrays stories. For example:
– Amy has 3 bags of apples. There are 4 apples in each bag. How many apples does Amy have in all? She has 12 apples.
Make sure a variety of stories and drawings are shared. If no one drew an array to represent their story, choose one story and ask students how they might represent it with an array.

Ask students to compare a drawing showing equal groups that are not represented in an array (such as the drawing for the apple story) with a drawing of an array. Ask: How are these drawings similar? Do both pictures match the number model? How can you tell?

If your class used multiplication number model in Lesson 8-8, ask students to suggest a multiplication number model that matches the drawings. Ask: How can we read the number model in words?

Tell students that solving number stories like these depends on being able to think about equal groups. For more practice with this, they will use counters to build equal groups and arrays and then write number models to represent them.

Building Equal Groups and Arrays (Whole Class/Small Group)
Math Journal 2, p. 212
Distribute 36 counters to each student and one die and one slate to each partnership. Explain the following directions:
1. Partner A rolls the die. This is the number of groups, rows, or columns.
2. Partner B rolls the die. This is the number in each group, row, or column.
3. Partner A uses counters to make equal groups (not arranged in an array) to match the numbers. Partner B uses counters to make an array to match the numbers.
4. Partner A find the total number of counters in the equal groups, and Partner B finds the total number of counters in the array. Partners compare their totals to make sure they are the same.
5. Partner A writes a number model on the slate to match the counters. Partner B reads the number model in words.
6. Partners switch roles and repeat the activity.
Model a sample round for the class.

Sample Round
– Partner A rolls a 2. Partner B rolls a 3.
– Partner A makes 2 groups of 3 counters each. Partner B makes an array with 2 rows of 3 counters each.

Partner A writes 3 + 3 = 6 or 2 x 3 = 6 on the slate. Partner B reads the number model aloud as “2 groups of 3 is 6 all together.” Circulate and observe as students build equal groups and arrays and write and read the number models. As appropriate, guide them to skip count or add to find the total number of counters rather than counting by 1s. Encourage students to read the number models using language about equal groups (or rows or columns). They should say “2 groups of 3 is 6 all together” rather than “3 plus 3 is 6” or “2 times 3 is 6.” Using equal groups language helps students build a conceptual foundation for multiplication.

When students have several chances to practice both roles, tell them to each record their final set of equal groups, their final array, and the matching number model on the bottom of journal page 212. If students write multiplication number models, ask them to also write addition number models and discuss the connections between the two number models with their partners.

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
If students struggle to build the arrays, provide a 6-by-6 grid with rows and columns labeled. After the first roll, students place the first counter in each row. After the second roll, they fill in each row with the correct number of counters.

Assessment Check-In
Expect that most students will be able to use counters to create arrays, draw them on journal page 212, and record addition number models. If students struggle to write addition number models, encourage them to circle each row or each column in their arrays to highlight the idea of equal groups. Then help them connect the groups to the equal addends in their number models.

Summarize
Have students use counters to solve the following problem and share their answers. Ask: Which will have more counters – an array with 3 rows and 5 in each row or an array with 5 rows and 3 in each row?

3. Practice
Playing Basketball Addition (Small Group)
Observe:
– Which students can add the numbers to find the total score?
– Which students need additional support to play the game?
Discuss:
– Which numbers did you choose to add first? Why?
– Can you use another strategy to add the numbers?

Students complete Math Boxes 8-9 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-10 Playing Array Concentration
Students play Array Concentration to practice finding the total number of objects in arrays and writing corresponding number models.

Goals:
– Make connections between representations.
– Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions.
– Think about accuracy and efficiency when you count, measure, and calculate.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Pose addition and subtraction facts one at a time. Students answer orally and explain how they find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Work with a partner. Suppose there are 12 desks in a classroom. Use your counters to find at least two ways to put the desks in rows with the same number of desks in each row. Draw your arrays on journal page 214. Write an addition number model for each array.

Arranging Desks (Whole Class/Small Group)
Math Message Follow-Up: Remind students that when they arrange things in equal rows, they are making arrays. Ask volunteers to share their arrays and number models. If students wrote multiplication number models, ask them to suggest addition models as well.

Record student’s arrays and number models. Ask students to continue sharing answers until no one has a different answer to share. Then have students look at all the number models. Ask: How are these number models alike? Focus the discussion on the idea that there are several different ways to arrange the 12 desks in equal rows.

Have students use their counters to arrange the desks in equal rows of 5. Ask: Can we make equal rows of 5? Why or why not? What would a number model for this arrangement look like? Does this number model have addends that are all equal? Is this arrangement an array? Ask: Did we find all the different ways to arrange 12 desks in equal rows? How could we check? If no one mentions it, suggest the following strategy: check whether we can make rows of 1, then rows of 2, then rows of 3, and so on, until we have all possible arrays for 12.

Work together as a class to find any missing arrays and add them to the class list. Students can record additional arrays on journal page 214. Remind them to check that in each array, all the rows have the same number of desks. They should also check that in each number model, all the addends are equal.

Tell students that they will play a game to practice finding how many objects are in arrays and writing corresponding number models.

Discussing the Array Cards (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Have each partnership cut out one set of Array Connection Number Cards and one set of Array Concentration Array Cards. Tell students to write an N on the back of each number card and an A on the back of each array card to help them keep the two decks separate.

Have students find the array card that says “2 by 3” at the bottom. Ask them what they think “2 by 3” might mean. If no one suggests it, explain that this is a short way to describe and array that has 2 rows and 3 columns.

Academic Language Development: To reinforce students’ understanding and use of the phrase ___ by ___ (for example, 3 by 2) to describe the rows and columns in an array, have them work in pairs to label everyday objects laid out in arrays. For example, give students different-size muffin pans that they might label 3 by 2, 3 by 4, or 4 by 6 (depending on the size.) Provide sentence frames that students can use to describe their arrays: “My ___ has an array of ___ by ___. My ___ has ___ rows and ___ columns.”

Next, have students find the 4-by-5 array card. Ask students to share strategies for finding the total number of dots in the array.
Sample strategies:
– Count all the dots by 1s to get 20.
– Skip count by 5s as you point to each row: 5, 10, 15, 20. Or add 5s as you point to each row: 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 = 20.
– Add 4s as you point to each column: 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = 20.

Ask: Which strategies might help you find the total fastest? Why?

Introducing and Playing Array Concentration (whole Class/Partner)
Playing Array Concentration provides practice finding the total number of objects in arrays and writing corresponding addition number models. Play a few sample rounds to introduce the game. Students play the game in partnerships.

Observe:
– What strategies are students using to find the total number of dots in each array? Which students have efficient strategies?
– Which students need support to understand and play the game?
Discuss:
– How did you find the number of dots? Is there a faster way?
– How do you know your number model matches the array?

Assessment Check-In
Expect that most students correctly match number cards add array cards and write correct addition number models for the arrays on Math Masters, page G13. If students struggle matching the arrays to the number cards or writing number models, have them copy the array onto a sheet of paper and mark rows, columns, or individual dots as they count to help them keep track.

Summarize
Have students share the arrays for which they easily found the total numbers of dots and the arrays for which they had to use strategies to find the totals.

3. Practice
Solving Subtraction Problems (Partner/Independent)
Students complete Math Journal 2, p. 215. Students use strategies to subtract. As needed, encourage them to choose and use tools such as base-10 blocks or the number grids or the number lines on the inside back covers of their journals.
Math Boxes 8-9 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-11 Exploring Mystery Shapes, Polygons, and Equal Parts (2 Days)
Students describe attributes of shapes, build polygons with trapezoids, and show fractions on a geoboard.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Pose facts one at a time. Students give the sum or difference and explain how they find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Draw these shapes on your slate:
– Draw a shape with 3 sides and 3 angles.
– Draw a shape with 1 or 2 pairs of parallel sides.
– Draw a shape with 1 right angle.

Comparing Shapes (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Math Message Follow-Up: Have students share what they notice about the shapes they drew. Ask: How are some of the shapes alike? How are some of the shapes different? Remind students that the number of sides, the number of angles, the number of vertices, the lengths of sides, the number of pairs of parallel sides, and the number of right angles are all different attributes of shapes.

Explain to students that in today’s lesson they will describe shapes in terms of their attributes, build polygons out of trapezoids, and form equal shares on a geoboard.

After explaining the Explorations activities, assign groups to each one. Plan to spend most of your time with students working on Exploration A.

Exploration A: Identifying Mystery Shapes (Small Group)
Activity Card p. 107; Math Journal 2, p. 217
To explore attributes of shapes, partners take turns figuring out mystery shapes based on their attributes. Without looking, one partner reaches inside a bag or a box containing a Shape Card, feels the shape, and describes the shape’s attributes without saying its name. Based on this description the other partner draws the shape on journal page 217. Partners compare the drawing to the shape. As students are engaged in the activity, ask questions such as the following: What geometry words are you using to describe the shapes?

Exploration B: Making Pattern-Block Worktables (Small Group)
Activity Card 108; Math Masters, p. 239

To explore building different polygon shapes from trapezoids, students pretend that trapezoid pattern blocks are small tables and that you, their teacher, want to make larger worktables by fitting the small trapezoid tables together. Students follow the directions on Activity Card 108 to make tables of varying sizes and shapes.

They use a Pattern-Block Template to record their shapes on Math Masters, page 239. Group members compare their results to find as many different worktables sizes and shapes as possible.

Exploration C: Partitioning Shapes into Equal Parts (Small Group)
Activity Card 109; Math Masters, p. TA10
To explore equal parts, partners partition shapes on geoboards into equal parts. One partner forms a shape on a geoboard with one rubber band. The other partner tries to divide the shape into 2 (or 3 more) equal parts using additional rubber bands. Students record their results on the 7 x 7 geoboard dot paper on Math Masters, page TA10.

Summarize
Have students share two attributes they used in describing the shapes in Exploration A.

3. Practice
Playing Array Concentration (Partner)
Math Masters, p. G31
Have partners play Array Concentration to practice finding the total number of objects in arrays and writing corresponding addition number models.
Observe:
– Do students have efficient strategies for finding the total number of dots in an array?
– Which students need additional support to understand and play the game?
Discuss:
– How did you find the number of dots? Is there a faster way?
– How do you know your number model matches the array?

Science
Students will learn about what makes an item a natural resource, and how often they use these natural resources every day.
List natural resources on the board and the uses of that resource.
Students will review a natural resource map to see which areas have which natural resources.
Begin the discussion of water and trees as natural resources.
Discuss how much water the students have used since they woke up that morning.
For exact usage use:
http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/freshwater/water-calculator-methodology/
Then discuss the use of wood. Trees must be removed for lumber, which is used for buildings and furniture.
How do people waste natural resources?
What are some ways in which we as second graders can preserve our natural resources?

Oreo experiment
Students are each given one Oreo. The students must open the cookie and eat the cream out of the middle before they eat the cookie. Then you say that because humans harmed their environment they no longer have arms. They must complete the same task as above without using their hands. They must adapt.
Guiding questions:
How did you feel when you could not use your hands to get the white part out of the cookie?
How did you adapt?
Was your adaption effective?
If you had another cookie how would you adapt you original method?

Social Studies
Students will continue working on and editing their map.
What are some of the key characteristics of a map?
Why do we need all of these parts to make our map effective?
Can anyone predict what might happen if someone did not have all of the parts of a map?
What if it lacked a compass?
A key?
A river, ocean, or, mountain?
Why do people use maps?

I want you to make a map of your new state.
Map must have a title
Map must have a map key
Map must have a compass rose
Map must have various landforms labeled on the key

Allow students to volunteer to present what they have already created on their map, and then discuss what that particular student is doing well, and what he/she should add.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Week of March 22

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

This is a reminder that the third-quarter-parent/teacher conferences will take place on Thursday, April 16. If you haven’t signed up for the third quarter parent/teacher conferences, please do so. The sign-up schedules are posted outside the front door of rooms 103 and 106. Parents, who do not sign up by April 2, will be assigned the time slots available! We will be sending home the finalized schedule on April 2.

The second grade classes will be visiting the Peggy Notebeart Museum as part of the FOSS Insect Unit on May 8. We will send home permission slips as soon as we receive the approval from CPS.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 27 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming: Teacher says a real word. Students make nonsense rhyming words from it.
Onset Fluency: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word, and then isolate the beginning onset.
Ex: T: kite S: /k/
Blending: Basic sight word review
Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher reads the word series. Students say the requested sound (varies by day).
Tues & Wed: Final Sound, Thurs & Fri: Medial Sound
Segmenting: Basic sight word review
Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: too, S: too; t-oo
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ (underlined word) to /*/ and the word is?
Ex. T: waterfall, S: waterfall, T: change the/fall/ to /melon/ and the word is? S: watermelon
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: “Over In The Meadow” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p.209-210 and You Tube, Barefoot Books

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Listening Centers: Mentor Texts Chickens by Gail Gibbons; Mercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo
Word Study: Word Sorts: Adding -ing to Words With VC and VCC Patterns
Word Study: Beginning-Middle-End, Finding Phonemes in Sound Boxes
Word Building with Fry Spelling Words
Math Center: Finding Differences
Students work in pairs to find the difference between a 2-digit number and a multiple of 10.
Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading levels two-five sight words
c. A.R. on Mini-iPads
d. Kindle books related to the Guided Reading Themes and Stories embedded sight words.

Day 1:
Morning meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, March 23, 2015. We will begin creating our own maps of our new chosen town.
Inquiry Question: Why do we need map keys to make our maps effective? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Two: Even When Readers Think We Know How a Series Will Go, We Are Ready to Be Surprised
“Readers, we know that characters, like people, aren’t always one way—even if they are often predictable. This is because characters are complex. Today I want to teach you that as we talk and learn about characters, we can use this knowledge to challenge and revise our all-or-nothing thinking. Instead of saying, ‘Pinky always,’ we might say, ‘Sometimes he ____________.’
Tip: “When we notice our character acting in a way we don’t agree with or are confused by, we can sort out our thinking in a partnership conversation. We might say things like, ‘I disagree with what Jamaica did,’ or ‘I don’t know what Maria means by ____________,’ or ‘Why does Harry think that is important?’ ”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud
George and Martha: Split Pea Soup by James Marshall
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 8: Reading Closely to Generate More Writing
Minilesson
Connection: Use an example to illustrate the importance of close reading. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate by looking back at an important part of the touchtone text. Highlight the fact that you pause to attend closely to what’s in the text, saying or writing what you notice. Make it clear that noticing is not enough. Instead, writers need to ask, “What new ideas does this give me?” Debrief by explaining to students how you notice new details and incorporated them into your planning.
Active Engagement: Give students an opportunity to try the same work using the touchstone text.
Link: Remind students that they should be working toward the goal of writing more about their opinions, and that close reading of their books can give them more ideas to write about. Prompt them to think back to all the strategies they’ve learned to make their writing powerful.
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, March 24, 2015. We will continue to explore 3D shapes?
Inquiry Question: What are the characteristics of 3D shapes? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Two: Even When Readers Think We Know How a Series Will Go, We Are Ready to Be Surprised
“Since we know characters don’t always act predictably, we can expect to be surprised now and then by things they do and say. Today I want to teach you that we can read our series on the lookout for those surprising moments—when a character acts out of character. When we see a character acting in a surprising way, we can pause and do some big thinking, jotting on a Post-it what we notice that is different and why we think that this is so.”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud
George and Martha: The Flying Machine by James Marshall

Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 8: Reading Closely to Generate More Writing
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Linking Details and Ideas

Day 3:
Morning Message
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, March 25, 2015. We will learn how rectangles can be partitioned into equal squares.
Inquiry Question: Why is it important to divide a rectangle into square? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Two: Even When Readers Think We Know How a Series Will Go, We Are Ready to Be Surprised
“Readers, you know how when we come to the end of a book, we know some of our work is just beginning? Well, today I want to teach you that when we end a book, we can reflect, asking, ‘What was the whole book about?’ and ‘Was the author trying to teach us something?’ Then we might go back and find evidence in the book that the author really was trying to teach that lesson.”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud
George and Martha: The Tub by James Marshall

Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 9: Gathering More Evidence to support Each of Our Opinions
Mini-lesson
Connection: Congratulate students on the close reading work they did yesterday. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Let students know that you are aware that they are noticing details and using them to come up with an opinion. But now, they need to take it to the next level and search for even more details to support each of their opinions. Demonstrate taking an idea or opinion from a section of a letter and returning to a book to collect related details and evidence. Debrief, describing the process you followed to gather more details and evidence from the text.
Active Engagement: Ask students to join you in supporting a new opinion.
Link: Add on to the anchor chart and remind students of the importance of using strategies outlined on it.
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, March 26, 2015. We will begin reading and discussing living things and their environment.
Inquiry Question: How do living things benefit from their environment? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Three: Readers Grow Smart Ideas by Looking Across Different Series, and We Use the Smart Work of Club Members to Push Our Thinking
“Today I want to remind you that when we meet with club members, we don’t only think about our current series, we think about all the series books we have read, and we think about the patterns in those books. We can think about the types of characters, the types of problems, even the messages the different authors might be teaching. We can talk with our club, thinking ‘What is the same in these series?’ and ‘What is different?’ ”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Interactive Read-Aloud
George and Martha: The Mirror by James Marshall

Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 9: Gathering More Evidence to support Each of Our Opinions
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Using the Classroom Environment to Teach

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, March 27, 2015. We will read and discuss the impact that people have on the environment.
Inquiry Question: How can people have an effect on the environment? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
drink, think, sink, stink, wink, thank, bank, drank, honk, blank, shrink, sphere, cube, pyramid, prism, rectangular

The above words will be tested on Thursday, April 2.

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 10: Why is the Author Using a Capital Here?
Mini-lesson
Connection: Let writers know that as their writing becomes more complex, so too does their use of capitals.
Teaching and Active Engagement: Provide questions to guide the class inquiry. In this case, “Why is the author using a capital letter here?”
Guided Inquiry: Set writers up to read apart of a letter about a book, letting them know that they should listen and read along, thinking about the inquiry question. Read through the mentor text a second time, reminding students of the guiding question and pushing them toward closer examination. Pull the students back together and challenge them to think about the difference uses of capitals across the writing. Remind them of the inquiry question and get them working to answer it with a partner. Add the students’ observations to the class chart.
Link: Send students off to revise, edit, and work on their letters, keeping in mind all the strategies they have learned so far.
Students continue to write more letters, applying what they’ve learned from the writing workshop.

Math
Lesson 8-5 Attributes of 3-Dimensional Shapes (2Days)
Students sort and compare 3-dimensional shapes according to their attributes.

Goals:
– Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gesture, tables, graphs, and concrete objects.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Pose facts one at a time. Students explain how they find the sum or difference.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Turn to journal page 193. Record the measurement of your wrist size in centimeters on a stick-on note. Then look at the base-10 thousand cube. Find examples of other cubes around the room.

Describing Cubes (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Math Message Follow-Up: On the Class Data Pad, list examples of cubes that students found.
Distribute a centimeter cube to each partnership. Have students share with their partners what they notice about the cube. After a few minutes, bring the class together to discuss students’ observations. Expect them to note the following:
– There are six flat surfaces, or faces.
– All the faces are the same size.
– Each face is a square.
Ask students to point to each of the six faces on their cubes. Revisit the examples of cubes listed on the Class Data Pad, asking volunteers to confirm that each item fits description of a cube.

Discussing Attributes of 3-dimensional Shapes (Whole Class/Small Group)
Use your models of 3-dimensional shapes to point out the following attributes:
– Cylinders, cones, and spheres all have curve surfaces.
– Rectangular prisms, cubes, pyramids, cylinders, and cones all have flat surfaces called faces.
– An edge of a cube, a prism, or a pyramid is a line segment where two faces meet.
– An edge of a cone or a cylinder is a curve where a flat face meets a curved surface.
– A vertex on a 3-dimensional shape such as a cube, a prism, or a pyramid is a point at which at least 3 edges meet. (The plural of vertex is vertices.)
– The apex of a cone is the point that is opposite the flat face.
Draw students attention to the faces, edges, and vertices on the base-10 thousand cube. Have partners take turns running their fingers along the edges of their centimeter cubes and pointing out the faces and the vertices.

Comparing 3-dimensional Shapes (Whole Class/Small Group)
Explain to students that they are going to make a Shape Museum so they can examine different kinds of shapes. Help them set up the museum by placing the items they brought from home near the corresponding name cards. Shapes that do not fit into any of the six categories are placed near the “other” card. Add some of your own items to the museum.

Display models of pairs of shapes as specified below. As you display each pair, ask: How are these alike? How are they different? Samples observations that students might have include the following:
Cube and Rectangular Prism
– They have the same number of faces, vertices, and edges.
– Each face on both shapes has 4 sides and 4 angles.
– All of the faces of the cube are squares.
– The faces of the rectangular prism can be squares or rectangles.
– Rectangular prisms that have all square faces are called cubes. A cube is a special kind of rectangular prism.
Cube and Cylinder
– The cylinder can roll when push. The cube can’t.
– The cylinder has a curved surface. The cube doesn’t.
– The cylinder has 2 flat faces. The cube has 6 flat faces.
– The cube’s faces are squares. The flat faces on the cylinder are circles.
Cube and Pyramid
– Most of the faces of a pyramid are triangles. (Sometimes one of the faces is not a triangle.) All of the faces of a cube are square.
– A cube and pyramid both have vertices where edges come together. A pyramid has a special vertex called an apex where the triangle faces come together.
Cube and Cone
– The cone can roll when pushed. The cube can’t.
– The cone has a curved surface and 1 flat face in the shape of a circle. The cube has 6 flat faces that are all squares.
– The cone has a point, or apex, opposite the circular face. The cube has 8 vertices.
As time allows, compare and contrast other pairs of shapes.

Differentiate: Adjust the Activity
To help students describe the faces of 3-dimensional shapes, have them select a 3-dimensional shape and trace all of its flat faces on paper. They identify the shapes of the faces, record the names on the paper, and then use that information to describe the 3-dimensional shape. For example, a cube has 6 faces that are all squares.
Over the next several days, allow small groups of students to visit the Shapes Museum. Have them examine the shapes and describe them in terms of their attributes.

Assessment Check-In
Expect most students to be able to describe a cube as having 6 equal-size square faces. If students struggle describing a cube by its attributes, have them trace the faces of a cube on paper as suggested in the Adjusting the Activity note.

Summarize
Have students share one or two things they learned about 3-dimensional shapes.

3. Practice
Drawing a Line Plot (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
With the class, organize and display the stick-on notes wrist measurements in order from smallest to largest. Explain that students will draw line plots to show all the wrist measurements for the class.
Distribute copies of Math Masters, page TA32 to students. Discuss the horizontal scale. The wrist-size data are measurements to the nearest centimeter. The scale should begin with the smallest wrist size in the class, increase in 1-centimeter increments, and end with the measurement of the largest wrist size in the class.
Ask students to suggest a label for the horizontal axis and write it on the same line. Then ask the students to suggest a title for the line plot.
Have students draw Xs on their line plots to represent the class data. Remind them that each X represents one child. Model how to draw Xs one above the other for stick-on notes with the same measurements.

Students complete Math Boxes 8-5, Math Journal 2, p. 201 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-6 Partitioning Rectangles, Part 1
Students use manipulatives to partition rectangles into same-size squares.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking.
– Use tools effectively and make sense of your results.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Display place value exercises. Have students explain how they found the answers.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Take 20 centimeter cubes. Complete Problem 1 on journal page 202.

Introducing Partitioning (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Math Message Follow-Up: Display Math Masters, page 225 and have a volunteer cover Rectangle A with centimeter cubes. Ask students to share what they notice about the cubes covering the rectangle.
They may observe that it took 15 cubes to completely cover the rectangle and that the cubes are arranged in rows and columns. Remind students that a rectangle is a 2-dimensional (flat) shape and a cube is a 3-dimensional shape. Ask: What part of each cube actually covers the rectangle? What shape is the face?
Tell students to complete Problem 2 on journal page 202 by drawing squares on Rectangle B to show how they covered Rectangle A with centimeter cubes. Explain that when students draw same-size shapes to cover a shape, they are partitioning, or dividing, the shape into smaller shapes. Have volunteers share their drawings. Identify a drawing that has 3 rows with 5 close-to-same-size squares in each row and ask students what they notice. Guide students to connect the equal rows of squares on Rectangle B to the equal rows of centimeter cubes that covered rectangle A. Have students check that the squares they drew on Rectangle B match the arrangement of centimeter cubes that covered Rectangle A.
Discuss the challenges students faced in Problem 2. Ask: How could you tell if you made a mistake? How did you fix your mistake?

Academic Language Development: Have students activate prior knowledge of the word part to help them understand the terms partition and partitioning. Point out that when they partition a figure, they are dividing it into equal-size parts. This is also called partitioning.

Partitioning Rectangles (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Display a 1-inch square pattern block and Math Masters, page 226. Point to Problem 3. Ask students to think about how they might use a single square pattern block to find the total number of square pattern blocks needed to completely cover Rectangle C. Invite students to share their ideas with a partner and encourage them to make sense of their partner’s ideas.
Distribute a square pattern block to each child. Have them place the pattern block flat on the rectangle. Ask: What part of the pattern block is actually on the rectangle? Tell students to partition the rectangle, they need to draw squares to show where all of the square faces of the blocks would be if they covered the rectangle completely. Explain that their drawings should show where they put their square each time they move it. Demonstrate drawing two or three squares on the display of Math Masters, page 226. Have partners use a single square pattern block to partition Rectangle C into same-size squares.
When they are finished, tell them to count the squares and answer the questions below Rectangle C. Bring the class together. Ask: Into how many squares did you partition Rectangle C? How did you use the square block to help partition the rectangle? Expect strategies to include the following:
– I traced the pattern block multiple times to cover the rectangle.
– I traced a complete row or column of square pattern blocks and then filled in the other rows and columns.
– I traced the square pattern block to fill the space along all four edges of the rectangle and then filled in the middle.
Explain that one way to make partitioning easier is to first draw one row and one column of squares. Demonstrate by placing a square pattern block in the upper-left corner of Rectangle C and tracing a mark along its right edge. Then move the block to align its left with your mark. Continue making marks and moving the block to complete the row, pointing out that there are no gaps or overlaps between the squares. Ask: How many squares will be in each row? Count the spaces to verify that 7 blocks will fit in a row.
Repeat the process for a column, staring in the upper-left corner and tracing marks along the bottom edge of the block. Ask: How many rows will there be? Extend the lines for each row and column until the rectangle is completely partitioned into squares. Ask: How many rows are there? How many squares are in each row? Point out that the number of squares per row is the same as the number of columns. Ask: How many same-sized squares cover the rectangle?

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
For students who struggle with partitioning, provide enough square pattern blocks to completely cover the rectangle in Problem 1 on journal page 204. Students count and record the number of pattern blocks they used and then remove the blocks. They then use their recorded numbers as a guideline to partition the rectangle.

Assessment Check-In
Because this is their first exposure to partitioning, do not expect students to accurately partition the rectangles on journal page 204 into same-size squares. Expect their attempts to show evidence of a strategy, such as tracing the pattern block multiple times, drawing rows or columns of squares, or drawing squares along the edges of rectangles. The “squares” each student draws may vary in size and shape. Some students will have a harder time drawing squares in the middle of the rectangle than on the edges.

Summarize
Have students share their strategies for partitioning the rectangles in Problem 1 and 2 into same-size squares.

3. Practice
Playing the Number-Grid Difference Game (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Observe:
– How are students using the number grid to calculate differences?
– Which students are using the calculators to add their five scores?
Discuss:
– How did you decide on the order of the digits in your 2-digit numbers?
– What did you find easy about this game? Challenging?
Students complete Math Boxes 8-6, Math Journal 2, p. 205 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-7 Partitioning Rectangles, Part 2
Students partition rectangles into same-size squares.

Goals:
– Reflect on your thinking as you solve your problem.
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Pose one fact at a time. Students explain how they find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Take one square pattern block. Complete Problem 1 on journal page 206.

Partitioning Strategies (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner/Independent)
Math Message Follow-Up: Have students share their strategies for partitioning the rectangle in problem 1 on journal page 206 into same-sized squares. Display a drawing that shows equal rows with equal numbers of close-to-same-size squares in each row.
Have students run a finger along each row on their rectangles. Ask:
– How many rows does your drawing have?
– How many squares are in each row? Have students check that they have the same number of squares in each row.
– Where are the columns? Point to them.
– How many columns are there?
– Why does this rectangle have 2 columns? Count the squares in the first row aloud while pointing to each square: 1, 2. Point out that each square in the first row is at the top of a new column. Count the columns aloud as you run your finger down the columns from top to bottom: 1, 2.
– How many squares are in each column?
– Why does this rectangle have 3 squares in each column? Count the squares in the first column. Point out that each square is at the beginning of a row.

Draw students’ attention to the picture of the square to the right of the rectangle in Problem 2 on journal page 206. Explain that they will use the picture to help them figure out how many squares of that size are needed to cover the rectangle. Have students imagine that they are picking up the square and using it to partition the rectangle the same way they used the square block to partition the rectangle in Problem 1. As students work, check to make sure that they are drawing the same number of squares in each row and that the squares are about the same size.

Ask students to share their strategies for determining how many squares are needed to cover the rectangle. Some students may have visually estimated how many squares will fit in one row and one column, while others may have used their fingers or marks on paper to help them estimate. Ask: How were you able to make sure that your squares were the same size?
Invite volunteers who drew equal rows of close-to-same-size squares to demonstrate how they drew their size squares.
Have students complete Problem 3. Bring the class together to share their strategies.

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
If students struggle drawing the same number of squares in each row in Problem 3, suggest that they draw one row of squares at the top of the rectangle and then the first square on the left in each of the other rows. Then have them place their fingers on the first square in each row and run their fingers across the rectangle to help visualize each row. Ask: How many rows are there? How many squares should there be in each row?

Partitioning into Same-Size Squares (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner/Independent)
Draw students’ attention to journal page 207. Point out that there are no pictures to show the size of the squares that are supposed to cover each rectangle. Instead, students are given the number of rows and the number of squares in each row.

Display a rectangle and say: I have to partition this rectangle into 2 rows with the same-size squares in each row. Suppose I make each row this tall. (Make a mark too low.) Will two rows fill up the rectangle? What about here? (Make a mark too high.) Where should the mark be? Make a mark halfway between the top and bottom edges of the rectangle and draw a line to partition it into 2 equal rows. Say: Now I have to draw 3 squares in each row. Invite a volunteer to make marks for the squares in the top row. Ask: How can we check to make sure that these squares are the same size?
Before students begin work on journal page 207, ask them what they should think about as they partition the rectangles. Expect responses to include the following ideas:
– All the squares should be the same size.
– There should be the same number of squares in each row.
– There should be the same number of squares in each column.
Circulate as students complete journal page and check that they are drawing the correct number of rows with the same number of squares in each row. Encourage them to help each other check whether their squares are the same size.

Differentiate: Common Misconception
Watch for students who partition their rectangles into too many rows or one too many columns. Suggest that they run their fingers along each row or column as they count. As they adjust their drawings, have them check that the squares are the same size.

Assessment Check-In
Expect that most students will be able to partition the square in Problem 1 into two rows with two same-sized squares in each row and count the total number of squares. If students struggle making the same-size squares, suggest that they use a square pattern block as a reference.

Summarize
Have students discuss their strategies for partitioning the rectangles in on journal page 207 into same-size squares.

3. Practice
Solving Addition Problems (Partner/Independent)
Math Journal 2, p. 208
Students add 2-and 3-digit numbers. As needed, encourage them to draw open number lines, use base-10 blocks, or use the number grids or number lines on the inside back covers of their journals.
Students complete Math Boxes 8-7 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-8 Equal-Groups and Array Number Stories
Students solve number stories about equal groups and arrays.

Goals:
– Make sense of the representations you and others use.
– Make connections between representations.
– Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Pose one fact at a time. Students explain how they find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Jermaine bought 3 packs of gum. There are 5 sticks of gum in each pack. How many sticks of gum did he buy? Draw pictures to help find the answer.

Discussing Equal Groups and Arrays (Whole Class/Small Group)
Math Message Follow-Up: Ask students to share their drawings and solution strategies. Expect a variety of representations, including drawings of groups, arrays, or tallies. Strategies may include counting the objects in the picture by 1s, counting by 5s, adding 5s, or doubling 5 and then adding 5 more.
Ask: What do these drawings have in common? Tell student that groups with the same number of objects in them are called equal groups. Stories that involve finding the total number of objects in sets of equal groups are called equal-groups number stories. Ask volunteers to explain how their drawings show the equal groups from the story.

Ask students to suggest number models for the Math Message problem. Some students may suggest 5 + 5 + 5 = 15. Ask: How does this number model show what is happening in our drawings?
Some students may suggest the number model 3 x 5 = 15 to represent the story. If so, explain that this is a multiplication number model and that multiplication as an operation involves finding the number of objects in equal groups or rows. Explain that when students solve equal-groups number stories, they are doing multiplication.

Write 5 + 5 + 5 = 15 and, if someone suggest it, 3 x 5 = 15. Have students practice reading the number models as “3 groups of 5 each is 15 in all.”

Look for students who drew arrays to represent the Math Message problem. Ask them to share their drawings, or, if no one drew and array, sketch one yourself. Remind the class that a rectangular array is an arrangement of objects or symbols in rows and columns. Point out that an array is one way to represent equal groups because all of the rows have the same number of objects and all of the columns have the same number of objects. Ask: How are the equal groups from the gum problem represented in this array? The equal groups in this problem could be represented by either the rows or the columns n an array, depending on whether students drew 3 rows of 5 or 3 columns of 5. But students should recognize that the number story calls for 3 groups of 5 each, not 5 groups of 3 each. The number model 5 + 5+ 5= 15 is more appropriate for this problem than 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 =15.
Explain that many real-life objects are arranged in arrays. Pose the following number story: There are 2 rows of eggs in a carton. There are 6 eggs in each row. How many eggs are there in all? Ask student to draw a picture and solve.

Ask volunteers to share their drawings and answers. Expect most students to draw an array like the one shown in the margin. Ask: What number model could we write for this story and drawing? How could we read this number model?

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
Have students sketch the array, circle each row, and write 6 at the end of each row. This may help students see how 6 + 6 = 12 represents the array.

Tell students that the egg problem is an example of an array number story, which is one kind of equal-groups number story. In an array story the equal groups can be either the rows or the columns.

Tell students that they will solve and write number models for more equal-groups and array number stories. Although it is not important for students to be able to distinguish between equal-groups and array number stories, it is important that they have experience with both.

Solving Equal-Groups and Array Number Stories (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Pose number stories involving equal groups or arrays of objects. Tell students to work with their partners and use drawings to model and solve each problem. After each number story, have volunteers share their strategies. Then work as a class to write an addition (and, if appropriate, a multiplication) number model to represent the number story. As students share number models, guide them to practice reading the number models aloud. They should use language such as the following:
– 3 equal groups of 2 is 6.
– 2 columns of 4 each is 8 all together.
– 3 rows of 7 each makes 21 in all.
Suggested number stories:
– Your family has 3 bicycles. Each bicycle has 2 wheels. How many wheels are there in all?
Sample Strategies:
– Make or draw 3 groups of 2 and count the objects by 1s.
– Skip count by 2s, moving from group to group: 2, 4, 6.
Provide additional samples. After the class has solved them, have students work in partnerships or small groups to complete journal page 210. Students should draw a picture or an array to model each number story. Encourage them to make quick, simple sketches using dots or Xs. Then find the total number of objects and write a number model.

Assessment Check-In
Expect that most students will be able to correctly solve the number stories on journal page 210 using drawings and be able to write addition number models. If students struggle finding the totals, suggest that they use counters to model number stories before drawing their pictures.

Summarize
Have students share with a partner one strategy they can use to find the total number of objects in equal groups or arrays.

3. Practice
Playing Beat the Calculator (Small Group)
Observe:
– Which facts do students know from memory?
– Which students need additional support to play the game?
Discuss:
– What strategies did you use to solve the facts you did not know?
– Why is it helpful to know addition facts?

Students complete Math Boxes 8-8 (Independent/Partner)

Science
Pre-assessment for the science unit focused on the environment
Introduction to the unit
Vocabulary Introduction
Environment, habitat, adapt, desert, rain forest, grassland, tundra, ocean, pond, food chain, and food web
Not discussing the vocabulary today, but letting the students hear the words they will hear the rest of the unit.
Guiding questions to informally gage schema?
What is a habitat? Ocean? Grassland? Etc.
What types of animals would we experience in each?
Can anyone describe the difference between a food chain and a food web?
Are humans in a food chain or food web?

Students will describe a variety of landscapes using colorful word choices.
Do a photo walk using the smart board and PowerPoint. Show a variety of pictures and have student describe what they are seeing.

Read aloud: “Living Things and Their Environments” Harcourt Science Book
Students will be able to describe the effects people have on the environment.
Intro: Brainstorm the variety of ways in which people have an effect on the environment.
Recognize the effects on people today and predict the effects in the future. People have an effect on the environment.
Read The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
This is a fiction book with non-fiction messages and implications.
As I read discuss the implications of mistreatment of natural resources.
What did we learn about what could happen when natural resources are mistreated?
How can we as a second grade class help reduce how much we waste natural resources?

Social Studies
Students will begin creating their own maps of their new town.
Read Aloud: Me on the Map by Joan Sweeney
The scenario: The students have just bought empty land in which they can do anything they want. They must make a map of their new state/city.

What are some of the key characteristics of a map?
Why do we need all of these parts to make our map effective?
Can anyone predict what might happen if someone did not have all of the parts of a map?
What if it lacked a compass?
A key?
A river, ocean, or, mountain?
Why do people use maps?

I want you to make a map of your new state.
Map must have title
Map must have a map key
Map must have a compass rose
Map must have various landforms labeled on the key

Allow students to volunteer to present what they have already created on their map, and then discuss what that particular student is doing well, and what he/she should add.

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Dear Parents and Caregivers,

Students will take the Balancing Science Unit Test on Friday, March 20. The study guide will be sent home on Monday, March 16. Please refer to it to help your child prepare for the test.

The third-quarter-parent/teacher conferences will take place on Thursday, April 16. If you haven’t signed up for the third quarter parent/teacher conferences, please do so. The sign-up schedules are posted outside the front door of rooms 103 and 106. Parents, who do not sign up by April 2, will be assigned the time slots available! We will be sending home the finalized schedule on April 3.

The second grade classes will be visiting the Peggy Notebeart Museum as part of the FOSS Insect Unit on May 8th. The permission slips and fees are due April 1st. We are required to pay the museum costs 30 days in advance. The permission slips will be sent home Friday, March 20th.

Balanced Literacy
Independent Reading (30-35 minutes at the beginning of each day). Differentiated instruction is provided at this time as well as throughout the lessons.

Word Knowledge: Phonemic Awareness: The Skills That They Need To Help Them Succeed! by Michael Heggerty, Ed.D.
Week 26 (Different words will be given each day.)
Rhyming: Teacher says a real word. Students make nonsense rhyming words from it.
Onset Fluency: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word, and then isolate the beginning onset.
Ex: T: kite S: /k/
Blending: Basic sight word review
Teacher says individual phonemes. Students listen and then say the whole word.
Identifying Final and Medial Sounds: Teacher reads the word series. Students say the requested sound (varies by day).
Tues & Wed: Final Sound, Thurs & Fri: Medial Sound
Segmenting: Basic sight word review
Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word and chop it into phonemes. Ex. T: too, S: too; t-oo
Substituting: Teachers says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says change the /*/ (underlined word) to /*/ and the word is?
Ex. T: waterfall, S: waterfall, T: change the/fall/ to /melon/ and the word is? S: watermelon
* Use sounds
Adding Phonemes: Teacher says the rime. Students repeat the rime. Teacher says add /*/ at the beginning and the word is?
* Use sounds
Deleting Phonemes: Teacher says the word. Students repeat the word. Teacher says without the /*/ and what is left?
* Use sounds

Building Classroom Community based on CHAMPS A Proactive & Positive Approach to Classroom Management by Randy Sprick, Ph.D. and The Morning Meeting Book by Roxann Kriete
Reading and Writing Workshops: Based on Common Core Reading & Writing Workshop, A Curriculum Plan for The Reading Workshop and Units of Study in Opinion, Information, and Narrative Writing by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project
Morning meeting (daily):
– Sharing: Students share their journal writing entries or something that is meaningful to them.
– Group Activity: Read the poem “The Brook” from Sing a Song of Poetry by Fountas and Pinnell p.54

Differentiated Instruction:
– TRC Progress Monitoring
– Guided writing: teachers circulate the room to assist students
– Guided Reading: Students work in small groups under the scaffolding of the teacher or an NSP student from the University of Chicago (Close Reading is included)
– Writing conferences
– Working in pairs
– Allowing extended time
– Using graphic organizers
– Drawing pictures to support writing
Listening Centers: Mentor Texts Chickens by Gail Gibbons; Mercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo
Word Study: Word Sorts: Adding -ing to Words With VC and VCC Patterns
Word Study: Beginning-Middle-End, Finding Phonemes in Sound Boxes
Word Building with Fry Spelling Words
Math Center: Finding Differences
Students work in pairs to find the difference between a 2-digit number and a multiple of 10.
Technology Center:
a. Students practice reading levels two-five sight words
c. A.R. on Mini-iPads
d. Kindle books related to the Guided Reading Themes and Stories embedded sight words.

Day 1:
Morning meeting
Morning Message: Today is Monday, March 16, 2015. We will discuss earth’s most valuable resource—water.
Inquiry Question: How and why is water important for all living things? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Inter Active Read Aloud: Mercy Watson Goes for a Ride by Kate DiCamillo Chapter 1-6
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part One: Readers Figure Out How a Series Goes, Noticing Patterns and Predicting What Will Happen
“Readers, we already know that series are full of patterns. Today I want to teach you that when we pay close attention to those patterns, we can use them to predict what will happen next in the story. We can say, ‘I bet this means that ____________ will ____________.’ ”

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 3: Writers Generate More Letters (Developing New Opinions by Looking at Pictures)
Mini Lesson
Connection: Gather students and recall an image from your shared story. Choose a scene that is portrayed in a picture rather than in the words of text. Go back to the text to show that the scene you recall wasn’t created through the printed words. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Go back to the picture in the text and study it closely. Debrief, highlight your use of the pictures to help you develop and support a new opinion.
Active Engagement: Give students a chance to try this work in their own books.
Link: Reiterate that this strategy is one of several they have learned for generating ideas about books.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Assessing and Teaching Your Writers Using the Opinion Writing Checklist.
Students continue to write letters to offer their opinions about characters, favorite parts, pictures, titles, and covers from books they’ve read.

Day 2:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Tuesday, March 17, 2015. We will continue to explore maps and globes to identify landforms and water sources.
Inquiry Question: How are maps and globes useful in your daily lives? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Inter Active Read Aloud: Mercy Watson Goes for a Ride by Kate DiCamillo Chapter 6-10
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part One: Readers Figure Out How a Series Goes, Noticing Patterns and Predicting What Will Happen
“Today I want to teach you that when we are preparing to work with our club mates, one thing we can do is look over our Post-its and ask ourselves, ‘Will this help me talk well about the book?’ or ‘Is this Post-it important to understand the book?’ Then we collect the Post-its that will help us talk long and strong about the book.”

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 4: Writers Make Their Letters about Books Even Better by Retelling Important Parts
Mini Lesson
Connection: Gather some intriguing sentences, ones that are sort of cliffhangers, and then read them aloud to your writers. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Demonstrate how to explain more to your reader by retelling important parts that are connected to your opinion. Return to one of the sentences you just read as an example. Slow down your demonstration, really showing what it looks like to recall important parts and retell them.
Active Engagement: Invite your writers to do this work by first planning the opinion they’ll write about today. Next, prompt writers to rehearse that part of the story they will retell, with a partner.
Link: Reiterate that explaining information to readers is always one way to write better, and remind students that talking and listening to a writing partner really helps with this work. Then send them off to write.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Continuing to Teach from Information Gathered and Further Helping Writers with Retelling
Students continue to write letters to offer their opinions about characters, favorite parts, pictures, titles, and covers from books they’ve read.

Day 3:
Morning Message
Morning Message: Today is Wednesday, March 18, 2015. We will apply a strategy to discover which of five sealed canisters contains six marbles.
Inquiry Question: What strategy can you employ to identify a canister with the greatest amount of marbles? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Inter Active Read Aloud: Mercy Watson Goes for a Ride by Kate DiCamillo Chapter 10-14
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part One: Readers Figure Out How a Series Goes, Noticing Patterns and Predicting What Will Happen
“Today I want to teach you that when we read on our own or work with a partner, we think about how different books in the series go together. We can ask, ‘Did one happen first?’ ‘Did the character learn something in one book that he or she uses in the next?’ ‘Do other characters come back?’ We can talk about the things that are the same and different or how parts in the different books fit together.”
Tip: “Just like in everyday conversations, we work hard to make sure we understand what our partner is saying. As he or she talks we listen actively, and if we don’t understand something, we ask, ‘What do you mean?’ Or if we want to understand our partner’s thinking more deeply, we might say, ‘Why do you think that is important?’ ”

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 5: Keeping Audience in Mind
Minilesson
Connection: Engage students in a quick shared inquiry about where their letters should live. Reiterate what has been said so far, and transition from the idea of where letter lives to the idea of a specific audience. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Using your read-aloud text, engage students in thinking about what a letter might sound like to someone who has already read the book. Emphasize how you think about what you would probably talk about if you were together. Reinforce the work you just did by saying it again as a series of steps.
Active Engagement: Give students a chance to try this work, setting them up with a letter to someone who hasn’t read the book.
Link: Prepare students for independent work by giving them a few moments to decide on the specific audience they’ll be addressing, considering how that choice will affect the content of their letter.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Drawing on Three Teaching Resources for Strong Writers
Students continue to write letters to offer their opinions about characters, favorite parts, pictures, titles, and covers from books they’ve read.

Day 4:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Thursday, March 19, 2015. We will identify and discuss attributes of quadrilaterals.
Inquiry Question: What are parallel sides of quadrilaterals? Share what you know with a classmate!

Reading
Interactive Read-Aloud: The Day The Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt p. 1 – 15
Unit 5–Series Reading and Cross-Genre Reading Clubs
Part Two: Even When Readers Think We Know How a Series Will Go, We Are Ready to Be Surprised
“Today I want to teach you that when we finish a chapter or a chunk of text, we can stop and make sure we are accumulating the story. One way we can do this is to ask ourselves, ‘What is going on with my character so far?’ or ‘What do I know about my character so far?’ ”
Tip: “We can keep track of our thoughts by jotting them on a Post-it or using a graphic organizer, such as a T-chart.”
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 1 Letter Writing: A Glorious Tradition
Session 6: Using a Checklist to set Goals for Ourselves as Writers
Minilesson
Remind students the importance of the work of final revisions and edits. “Today I want to teach you that when writers are ready to share their writing, they give it one last read, looking for ways to make it even better. They use all they have learned ever to make their writing the best it can be!”
– Begin with a shared reading of the Opinion Writing Checklist, giving students opportunity to turn, talk, and process the various criteria they’ll be self-assessing. Demonstrate to students how to read through their writing, looking for places where they have, or have not, done various things on the checklist. Have students work with a partner to offer feedback and suggestions for revision.
– Confer with students in small groups or one-on-one to provide support for their revisions.
Students continue to write letters to offer their opinions about characters, favorite parts, pictures, titles, and covers from books they’ve read.

Day 5:
Morning Meeting
Morning Message: Today is Friday, March 20, 2015. We will edit and revise the Open Response project during math.
Inquiry Question: What are the advantages of revising an Open Response problem? Share what you know with a classmate!

Parent Read Aloud

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Spelling Test

Word Study
Spelling Words:
back, stack, pack, dock, lock, quack, sack, snack, quick, neck, check, circle, square, rectangle, triangle, plane

The above words will be tested on March 27.

Teacher displays the 16 Fry words, pointing out patterns and strategies from Fountas and Pinnell such as read, copy, cover, write, and check.

Independent Reading
– Students read independently and/or with a partner using strategies they’ve learned.

Writing
Unit 3 Opinion
Bend 2 Raising the Level of Our Letter Writing
Session 7: Writing about More than One Part of a Book
Minilesson
Connection: Welcome students to the new bend by praising the work they’ve already done. Invite students to recall what they already know about getting started with writing, and encourage them to think about what it looks like when they do their best. Gather students’ ideas on a chart and then share them, capturing the major lessons you hope they took from Bend 1. Name the teaching point.
Teaching: Invite students to recall some of the ways they developed opinions about books from Bend 1. Explain that they have graduated to a point where they can write about more than one opinion in a single letter. Debrief by walking students through the steps you took to plan your new letter.
Active Engagement: Invite writers to keep going with the work you started together, coming up with more opinions they might write about. Call the students back together, sharing some of what you heard.
Link: Ask students to plan for the sections of their own letters before heading off to work independently.
Conferring and Small-Group Work: Supporting Writers in Paragraphing
Students continue to write letters to offer their opinions about characters, favorite parts, pictures, titles, and covers from books they’ve read.

Math
Lesson 8-1 Attributes of 2-Dimensional Shapes
Students describe the attributes of 2-demensional shapes.

Goals:
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Post facts one at a time. Students explain how they find sum or difference.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Look at your Shape Cards. Pick one shape with 3 sides and another shape with 4 sides. Be prepared to describe the shapes.

Describing Shapes (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: First discuss the 3-sided shapes. Ask:
– Which Shape Cards have 3 sides?
– Describe a 3-sided shape.
Display Shape A and point to the sides and the angles.
– What do we call 3-sided shapes?
Next discuss the 4-sided shapes. Ask:
– Which Shape Cards have 4 sides?
– Describe a 4-sided shape.

Have students look at the Two-Dimensional Shapes poster and locate the 4-sided shapes. Explain that all 4-sided shapes belong to a family of shapes called quadrilaterals.
Have students find the Shape Cards that have 5 sides. Have students describe a 5-sided shape. Have students look at the Two-Dimensional Shapes poster and locate the 5-sided shapes. Explain that all 5-sided shapes are called pentagons. Repeat with the 6-sided shapes. Have students locate the 6-sided shapes and explain that they are called hexagons. Tell students that they will explore other shape attributes.

Discussing Attributes (Whole Class)
Ask students to examine their Shape Cards to find things that are the same about all the shapes. Expect answers such as:
– All the shapes are made up of straight sides (line segments).
– Any two sides that meet form an angle. All the shapes have angles.
– The point at which two sides of a shape meet is called the vertex.

Explain that another attribute some shapes have is parallel sides. Have students place a ruler on blank paper and draw lines along its top edge and its bottom edge. Explain that the two line segments are parallel because they are the same distance apart.
Tell students to place a pencil on the top line segment. Have them slowly slide it down toward the bottom line segment without turning or angling it at all. Have them repeat the action starting at the bottom segment and sliding the pencil to the top segment. Explain that because the pencil can be slid from one segment to the other without any turning or angling, they are parallel.
Display Shape G and have students practice to see if the sides are parallel.
Discuss real-world examples of parallel line segments, such as railroad tracks, shelves on bookcases, and so on. Ask students to identify examples of parallel lines or parallel line segments from the classroom or the hallway.
Display shape K. Ask volunteers to point the sides that are parallel. Have students work as partners to examine all of the 4-sided shapes and sort the shapes into two piles: shapes that have parallel sides and shapes that do not have parallel sides. Students share their results.
Display Shape K. Ask students to look at all of the angles and point out the angles that form a square corner. Explain that the name for this type of angles is a right angle.

Working in partnerships, students find and then sort all of the 3- and 4-sided shapes into two piles: shapes with right angles and shapes that have no right angles. Students share their results. Have students point to all of the right angles on each shape.

Assessment Check-In
Observe as students sort shapes according to whether or not they have parallel sides and whether or not they have right angles. Expect that most students will be able to sort the shapes according to whether or not they have right angles. Some may need to use an index card.

3. Practice
Playing Subtraction Top-It (Small Group)
Math Reference Book, pp. 170-172
Differentiated: Make counters or a number line available for students as needed.

Observe
– Which students automatically know the differences?
– What strategies are the remaining students using to determine the differences?
Discuss
– How did you figure out the differences?
– How did you know which comparison symbol to write on the record sheet?

Students complete Math Boxes 8-1, Math Journal 2, p. 195 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-2 Playing Shape Capture
Students identify shapes that have certain attributes while playing the game Shape Capture.

Goals:
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Post facts one at a time. Students explain how they find sum or difference.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Display Shape Cards A and K
In your journal, describe the shapes using the following words: side, angle, vertex, parallel, and right angle.

Identifying Attributes (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: Ask students to share their descriptions of Shape A, making sure they use the words side, vertex, angle, parallel, and right angle as suggested in the Math Message.
If no students mention the lengths of Shape A’s side, ask: What do you notice about the lengths of the sides? You or a volunteer can measure the lengths of the sides to show that they are the same length. Ask: What is the name of the shape?

Have students share their descriptions of Shape K. Ask: What is the name of the shape?
Explain that today students will identify shapes that have specified attributes.

Academic Language Development
Provide sentence frames for students to use to describe shapes:
– This is a ______.
– It has ___ sides.
– It has ___ vertices.
– It has ___ angles.
– It has ___ pair(s) of parallel sides.
– It has ___ right angle(s)

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
To support students who struggle to identify shapes with specified attributes, provide cards that illustrate each attribute.

Demonstrating and Playing Shape Capture (Whole Class/Small Group/Partner)
Math Journal 2, Activity Sheet 13

Have students carefully cut apart the Attribute Cards from Activity Sheet 13 in their journals. Students will identify attributes of shapes as they play Shape Capture. The game is played with two players or two teams of two players each. Each partnership or group will use one set of Shape Cards and one set of Attribute Cards.
Play several rounds of Shape Capture with the class to help students learn the rules. Consider displaying a set of Shape Cards while the students arrange their shapes on their desks.

Observe
– Which students can correctly find the shapes with specified attributes?
– Which students are checking the other team or player’s selections?

Discuss
– How did you check to be sure the other team or player was capturing shapes that matched the Attribute Cards?
– Which shapes were easier to capture? Why? Which shapes were harder to capture? Why?

Summarize
Using their Shape Capture record sheet for reference, have students choose one Attribute Card and name the shape(s) they captured.

Assessment Check-In
Have students draw three shapes on an Exit Slip – one with 3 sides, 3 vertices, and 3 angles; one with at least 1 right angle; and one with at least 1 pair of parallel sides.

3. Practice
Practicing with Fact Triangles (Small Group/Partner)
Math Journal 2, pp. 250-253

Students complete Math Boxes 8-2, Math Journal 2, p. 196 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-3 Comparing Triangles, Pentagons, and Hexagons
Students build and compare various polygons.

Goals:
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.
– Use structures to solve problems and answer questions.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Students make a ballpark estimate for each sum and explain how they find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Using your straws and twist ties, make at least two different 3-sided shapes.

Comparing Triangles (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: Display some examples of students’ triangles. Ask: What do these shapes have in common? What name describes all of these shapes?

Compare some of the different triangles, focusing on the sides and the angles. Be sure to display one triangle with a right angle and one with all equal-length sides and discuss these attributes Have students describe each triangle’s attributes and then discuss the differences between the triangles.

Explain to students that another attribute all the triangles share is that they are all polygons. As you discuss these traits of polygons, point them out on one or more straw triangles:
– Polygons are made up of all straight sides (line segments).
– The sides of the polygon do not cross.
– Polygons are “closed” figures: you can trace their sides and come back to where you started without retracing or crossing any part.

Ask students to trace their straw-and-twist-tie triangles and confirm that they meet all the criteria to be polygons. Display some examples of nonpolygons and discuss why these shapes are not polygons.

Students should be able to determine why these shapes are not polygons. Have a volunteer trace some of the shapes with a finger. For shapes made up of two polygons, ask: Can you return to the starting point without retracing or crossing any part of the shape? Is this a polygon?

Comparing Pentagons and Hexagons (Whole Class/Small Group)
Math Journal 2, p. 197
Students work with partners to use their straws and twist ties to build 5- and 6-sided polygons as directed on journal page 197. Then each student draws his/her polygons on the page.
When students have finished drawing the polygon, ask: What is the name for any 5-sided polygon? What is the name for any 6-sided polygon? Which of the shapes you drew are polygons? How do you know? Have students trace the sides of each shape on their journal page with their fingers to be sure that all their polygons are closed, have straight sides, and have sides that do not cross.
Display two different straw-and-twist-tie pentagons made by students, making sure to choose examples that have different attributes. As a class, compare and contrast the shapes based on their attributes. Encourage students to examine the number of angles, the number of vertices, the number of sides, side lengths, the number of right angles, and the number of parallel sides.
Guide students to notice the attributes by asking the following questions:
– How are these two pentagons alike?
– How are they different?
Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
If students struggle comparing and contrasting polygons, provide them with sentence frames in which they fill in the attributes that the shapes do or do not share:
– These two shapes are alike because they both have ___.
– They are different because ___.
Allow students to practice in small groups before the large-group discussion.

Assessment Check-In
Expect that students can build 5- and 6-sided polygons and draw them on journal p. 197. Some students may be able to compare and contrast the polygons. If students struggle building or drawing pentagons and hexagons, refer them to My Reference Book, page 123.

Summarize
Students describe the attributes of various polygons.

3. Practice
Playing Target to 200 (Small Group)
Math Masters, pp. G19-G20
Have students play Target to 200 to apply their understanding of place value.

Observe
– Which students are correctly representing their numbers with base-10 blocks?
– Which students seem to have a strategy for deciding whether to make 1 1- or 2-digit number? To add or subtract their numbers?
Discuss
– How did you decide what number to make? Whether to add or subtract?
– How did you know when to make an exchange?

Students complete Math Boxes 8-3, Math Journal 2, p. 198 (Independent/Partner)

Lesson 8-4 Drawing and Reasoning About Quadrilaterals (2 Days)
Day 1: Students draw quadrilaterals with given attributes.
Day 2: The class discusses solutions, and students revise their work.
Goals:
– Keep trying when your problem is hard.
– Make mathematical conjectures and arguments.
– Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties.

1. Warm Up
Math Talk: Mental Math and Fluency
Students make a ballpark estimate for each sum and explain how they find the answer.

Daily Routines
Have students complete daily routines.

2. Focus
Math Message: Look at journal page 199. Discuss the questions with a partner.

What Is a Quadrilateral? (Whole Class)
Math Message Follow-Up: As partners discuss their ideas about the shapes, suggest they look for attributes that are common to all of the quadrilaterals. Have students share their ideas about/check for attributes of quadrilaterals (four sides, four angles, and four corners, etc.)
Have students examine the shapes to identify more attributes of quadrilaterals such as four straight sides, figures must be closed. Add these attributes to chart.
When you are satisfied with your list of attributes, help students see that all the quadrilaterals have all (and not just some) of the attributes. Review each of the shapes in the second group and ask students to explain why each of these shapes is not a quadrilateral.
Give each partnership a square pattern block. Ask: What is the name of the angles in this shape? Review how to use the square pattern block or the corner of a sheet of paper to decide whether and angle is a right angle.
Tell students that they are going to draw their own quadrilaterals and write about their attributes.

Academic Language Development
As you use the vocabulary, regularly use gestures and point to diagrams, objects, and written words that are connected with the vocabulary.

Solving the Open Response Problem (Independent)
Distribute the problem and a sheet of dot paper. Read Problem 1 as a class. Tell students to make drawings for Juan’s garden on the dot paper. Remind students to use their square pattern block or the corner of a piece of paper to check their drawings for the number of right angles.
When most students have created drawings for Juan’s garden, hand out a second copy of dot paper. Read Problem 2 as a class. Have students make drawings for Linda’s garden on the second page of dot paper. Tell students that they should expect to make several drawings before they find one that may work for Linda. Provide extra dot paper to students who need it. Read Problem 3 as a class. Tell students that they should move on to Problem 3 only after they have created one or more successful drawings for Linda. Remind students that they may use the list of quadrilateral attributes from the Math Message as they write their explanations for Problem 3.
Observe students as they work. Encourage them to create multiple drawings that fit Juan’s or Linda’s plan. Expect on Day 1 that only some students will successfully create shapes that satisfy Problem 2. During the reengagement discussion on Day 2, students will discuss successful examples and have time to complete a drawing and write an argument for Problem 3.

Differentiate: Adjusting the Activity
Students who have difficulties writing their explanations may need more structure. Consider using one or more of these sentence frames: “My shape is right for Linda because it is a ___.” “It is a ___ because it has ___ sides” “It has ___ vertices.” “It has ___ right angles.”
Partners can work together to examine each other’s shapes and share ideas, but students should complete their own drawings and arguments.

Summarize
Ask: Why do you think it is important to keep trying and not give up when your problem is hard?

Getting Ready for Day 2
Planning a Follow-Up Discussion
1. Review Problem 1 and display a child’s drawings for Juan’s plan. Select work that has shapes that do and do not work for Juan’s plan. Ask:
– What needs to be true about drawings that fit Juan’s plan?
– How can we check to see whether a shape has four angles?
– Which of these drawings do you think will work for Juan’s plan? Explain why you think they work.
– Which of these drawings do you think will not work for Juan’s plan? Explain why you think they won’t work.
Display examples of successful, unsuccessful, and incomplete drawings. Ask:
– What needs to be true about drawings that fit Linda’s plan?
– It looks like this student decided that several of these shapes don’t work. Do you agree? Why or why not?
– How could we change one of the drawings that doesn’t work to make it work?
– This student didn’t cross out two of the shapes. Do you think one or both of these drawings work for Linda’s garden? Why or why not?
Display a student’s successful shape for Problem 2 and response to Problem 3. Consider using a response that is incomplete to generate more discussion. Ask:
– What do you think about this student’s explanation?

Day 2: Reengagement

2b. Focus
Setting Expectations (Whole Class)
Review the open response problem from Day 1. Ask: What do you think a complete answer to this problem needs to include?
Tell students that they are going to look at others’ work, decide if the shapes work for Juan’s and Linda’s gardens, and think about the explanations. Point out that shapes and explanations will be different. Some explanations will be correct and complete, and others will need more work. Remind students that they should help each other draw shapes that work and write explanations. That shape works because ___. I would add ___.

Reengaging in the Problem (Whole Class/Partner)
Students reengage in the problem by analyzing and critiquing other students’ work in pairs and in whole group discussion. Have students discuss with partners before sharing with the whole group. Guide this discussion based on the decisions you made in Getting Ready for Day 2.

Revising Work (Partner/Independent)
Pass back students’ work from Day 1. Before students revise anything, ask them to examine their drawings and arguments and decide how to improve them. Ask the following questions one at a time. Have partners discuss their responses and give a thumbs-up or thumbs-down based on their own work.
– Did you try to draw several shapes that will work for Juan’s plan?
– Did you circle one shape that worked for Juan’s garden?
– Did you try to draw several shapes that will work for Linda’s plan?
– Did you circle one shape that worked for Linda’s garden?
– Did you write how you know your circled shape for Problem 2 works for Linda’s plan?
– Is your explanation clear enough that your partner can understand it?

Tell students they now have a chance to revise their work. Tell them to add to their earlier work using colored pencils or make additional drawings on a new sheet of dot paper, instead of erasing their original work.

Assessment Check-In
Collect and review students’ revised work. Expect students to improve their drawings and explanations based on the class discussion.

Summarize: Ask students to reflect on their work and revisions. Ask: What did you do to improve your work?

3. Practice

Students complete Math Boxes 8-4, Math Journal 2, p. 200 (Independent/Partner)

Science
Where Are the Six Marbles?
– Students apply a strategy to discover which of five sealed canisters contains six marbles.
– Students discuss the importance of the weight of the empty canister in solving this problem.
Ask:
– What could you find out about the six marbles that would give you information to help you solve the problem?
– How could you compare the canisters to find out the one that has six marbles?
– How could you use the Unifix Cubes to find the canister that has six marbles.

Ask students to share which canister they think has the six marbles. Ask them to describe the reason for their decisions. What did they learn about the canisters and the marbles that led them to conclude that a specific canister contain the six marbles?
Ask students to discuss how the weight of the canister affected both their strategies and their results.
Challenge: How could you find out how many marbles are in each canister?

Review for the Balancing and Weighing Unit Test
– Students utilize the beam balance and the equal arm balance to complete the study guide to prepare for the unit test.
Students utilize the beam balance and the equal arm balance to review the following concepts for the Balancing and Weighing Unit Test.
– On a beam balance, balance is dependent on the amount of mass of an object, the relative lengths of the arms of the beam, and the location of the fulcrum.
– Weighing is the process of balancing an object against a certain number of standard units.
– The weight of an object is not determined by its size.
– Equal volumes of different foods will not all have equal weights; equal weights of different foods will not all have equal volumes.

Balancing Unit Test

Social Studies
Shared Reading The Force of Water by Lacy Finn Borgo
Book Summary
The Force of Water teaches the reader about earth’s most valuable resource—water. The book explains how water changes our planet’s surface, how it changes form as it moves through the water cycle, and how and why it is important to living things. Photos and other visual aids support the text.
Targeted Reading Strategy
– Ask and answer questions
Objectives
– Use the reading strategy of asking and answering questions
– Identify main ideas and details
– Recognize and understand the use of bold print
– Arrange words in alphabetical order
Vocabulary
– Content words: deltas, floodplain, groundwater, irrigate, pollute, nutrients, recedes, sediment,
tributaries, watershed, water vapor, massive, transport
Before Reading
Build Background
– Ask students to tell what they already know about water. Ask them if they have ever heard the term “water cycle” and, if so, to explain how it works.
– Create a KWL chart on the board and give students the KWL worksheet. Work together to fill in the first column (K) with things students know about water. As a group, brainstorm some things students would like to know about the topic and have students fill in the second column (W) of their worksheets. Write some shared ideas on the class chart, as an example.
Introduce the Reading Strategy: Ask and answer questions
– Model asking questions while looking at the table of contents.
– Think-aloud: When I’d like to know more about a topic, I can use the section titles in the table of contents to think of questions I’d like to have answered. For example, the section after the introduction is titled “Water on the Move.” This makes me wonder what happens to water once it has soaked into the ground. (Write your question in the (W) column of the KWL chart and invite students to add it to their worksheets.)
– Have students share any questions they have based on the table of contents or the covers of the book and add these to the second column (W).
– Have students preview the rest of the book. Show students the title page, photos, diagram, map, graphs, and captions. Draw students’ attention to the map on page 7. Encourage students to use all of these resources to think of questions to add to their KWL chart.
– Show students the glossary. Review or explain that a glossary is an alphabetized list of words from the text with their definitions. Some glossaries, such as this one, also contain page numbers that tell where the reader can find each word in the book. Tell students that they can use the glossary to find the answers to some of their questions. For example, they can look at the glossary to find where in the book they should go to learn more about sediment. Ask students to tell which page mentions sediment (8).
– As students read, encourage them to use other reading strategies in addition to the targeted strategy presented in this section.
Introduce the Vocabulary
– Model how to apply word-attack strategies. Have students find the word tributaries on page 6. Tell students that they can look at the letter the word begins with and then use what they know about syllables and vowels (one vowel sound per syllable) to sound out the rest of the word. Remind students to look for clues to the word’s meaning in the sentence that contains the unfamiliar word, as well as in sentences before and after. Point out that in this book, they may also look to the photos for clues to find meaning.
– Remind students of the other strategies they can use to work out words they don’t know. For example, they can use what they know about letter and sound correspondence to figure out the word. They can look for base words, prefixes and suffixes, and other word endings. They can use the context to work out meanings of unfamiliar words.
– Remind students that they should check whether unfamiliar words make sense by rereading the sentence.
Set the Purpose
– Read the story together on the Smart Board to find answers to their questions about water.

Lesson 3: Maps and Globes
Objectives:
– Identify major landforms and bodies of water, including continents and oceans, on maps and globes.
– Compare maps and globes.
– Use a globe to find the poles, the cardinal directions, and the equator.
Vocabulary: continents, cardinal directions, equator, globe
Geography: Have students take turns locating Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America on the map. Ask them to identify the continent in which we live. Point out islands that are near the continents. Explain that islands are usually considered to be part of the continent they are closest to. Provide examples such as Great Britain and Europe and Japan and Asia. Ask “Which is the largest continent? Which is the smallest?’
Help students locate the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, and Arctic Oceans on the map. Explain that almost three-fourths of Earth’s surface is covered with water and that most of that water is salt water. Help students determine that the Pacific Ocean is the largest of the four oceans and the Arctic is the smallest. Explain that the Pacific Ocean is also the deepest ocean in the world. Ask “Why is a map such as this one so useful?”
Display a globe and a world map. Ask students to compare and contrast the images of the continents and oceans shown on the globe and a map. Have them compare the colors used on the globe and map. Invite students to name the continents and oceans shown on the globe.

Next, help students locate the North Pole and the South Pole on the globe. Remind them that east is the direction where the sun appears every morning, and west is where the sun sets each evening. Invite students to use their fingers to trace the symbol for the equator around the globe. Emphasize that this line only appears on maps and globes. Have students put a finger on any area north of the equator. Explain that most of the world’s dry land and most of its people are in this part of the world. Then have them put a finger on any area south of the equator. Explain that only two continents, Australia and Antarctica, lie completely within this area. Ask “What are the two things you can learn about Earth from looking at a globe?”

Thank you for your support.
Anh Tuan Hoang and LuAnn Lawson

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment